35 Burst results for "Ad Agency"

Aaron Van Discusses Food Photography and Telling "Craveable" Stories

Photofocus Podcast

01:59 min | 2 weeks ago

Aaron Van Discusses Food Photography and Telling "Craveable" Stories

"Of the things that i noticed when i looked at all your images and shamir made a comment about your portfolio one online and and i mean that's just the tip of the iceberg in terms of everything. You've photographed. What are some of the ingredients that you work with when you've got when you've got some students or just other photographers whose work you're looking at. What are some of the ingredients that photographers tend to miss that. That make that image crave -able well. My background in advertising has definitely helped to form in shape. My my i and my take on food photography Also my background in advertising has helped me to work with my clients and work with ad agencies and understanding what they need what they want. What their deliverables. Far as far as the look and feel of an image and what. I'm you know there are one of the things that i think makes a big difference. Is that You can take a photograph of food with some decent light and be done like you. Can you can put a camera over good-looking dish Some decent light on it and have a good photograph. But i think what makes a great photograph is the details and it's in those details it's in those millimeters of movement sits in making sure that there's no tangents visible in a shot. It's the psychology of how an eye moves through a photograph and the composition that photographers in general really need to know and understand and learn over time. There's a such a psychological element to how the mind moves through an image. And i think that one of the things that makes is the thing that pushes an image to the next level is knowing those things and getting it right in the image to a point where somebody would look at that and not know that it was wrong in the first place it just all works it. Just all comes together And it were an your eye flows through it so effortlessly that that the crave ability of the food that you're photographing comes through effortlessly

Shamir
Changes In The Marketing Media Landscape With Former HAVAS Media CEO Colin Kinsella

MarTech Podcast

02:41 min | 2 weeks ago

Changes In The Marketing Media Landscape With Former HAVAS Media CEO Colin Kinsella

"Before the internet era when you're thinking of media you know you're talking about tv print billboards radio to me. It sounds like there is someone who's creating the content and you're buying advertising that's placed in it or not really because as an ad agency you're creating the content so give me an example of creating the content. You're not creating a tv show as an ad agency out a tv show you're creating a levi's jeans s- and they have incredible story line. They've got richness and dutch and if there's another company trying to go against them say the gap you can see big differences between who's going to buy levi's induced by the captured so understanding which target you're going after and what media you think that target is going to absorb more quickly or more in alignment with that ran all of a sudden you start to make a much tighter connection with that person. So the pre internet era media on the integration of is really an advertising play. Eventually you get into the digital age. Now you mentioned google and yahoo already but it seems like a big portion of media's actually starting to create your own media or at least your own web assets as the rise of the internet happened how does the definition of meta change a gap water for sure. There were more opportunities for you to put an advertisement in front of somebody so instead of just having the four main vehicles you now had another typical digital but it was message and it could be incredibly focused. Also be incredibly broad and that was kind of a rare one two punch. It's kind of the classic problem that we have right now. The internet's so big and even from the early days. It felt like you could reach anyone which is a great way to spend a lot lot of money. Maybe not necessarily a great way to efficiently. Spend something that. Hopefully we've got better at in the early days. You're getting brands to build their own websites. They're also marketing themselves on what used to be called portals. But you had the all yahu. Google came along pre social media. What were the effective digital channels. And when did you start making the shift from relying on television radio print and out of home to digital. It happened relatively quickly. Because for yahoo specially in the early days google there was no kind of advertising play with google but with the author who they weren't to advertising much quicker and it was like a rocket

Levi Google Yahoo
Strategize for Future Work Success

The Tightrope with Dan Smolen

02:00 min | 2 months ago

Strategize for Future Work Success

"Described them in the previous two episodes. My early career dreams and explorations were both vivid and meaningful as a young teen. I got to explore the world of broadcast media and my college scholarship. Amy toward a career in broadcasting as a news reporter and producer during my junior year in college i engaged with a truly amazing professor of advertising. His name was howard cogan and he helped me to completely alter my career path. Besides being much admired associate professor at the college park school of communications howard was the successful advertising executive who wrote voiced and produced most of the commercials. That ran on ithaca new york radio stations. It is without a doubt that howard cogan was the most important mentor of my professional and personal life from our first meeting. He took a deep personal interest in me and my success and he soon convinced me to refocus my career sites away from broadcast news to advertising and media and specifically towards the fast growing channel advertising called direct marketing so with graduation day in my sights. I focused my job. Search on entry level opportunities at an ad agency focused on direct marketing. But the going wasn't easy and the rejection letters arrived by the day problem was i had graduated into one of the most depressed job. Markets for entry level talent and a generation. Howard's advice to me was cheerful but sobering dan. He said you're going to need to get strategic about your career in direct mail and it looks like you may not find your opportunity on the agency side quickly

Howard Cogan College Park School Of Communi AMY Ithaca Howard New York DAN
Personal Branding on Instagram with Jasmine Star

Brands On Brands On Brands

01:32 min | 4 months ago

Personal Branding on Instagram with Jasmine Star

"I'm excited everyone to welcome our guest today. Jasmine star to the show jasmine. Thank you first and foremost for being here. Well thank you for having me. We're talking about things that i absolutely love so it's gonna be a party. We have that in common the reason i'm excited why i want everyone to be listening. Today's we get to talk about my favorite marketing topic right now which is personal branding. And from my perspective. I've worked corporate jobs for eighteen years at ad agencies. So i understand what it means to have a resume not a reputation outside of that i wanna hear from you wait wait. Let's hold on you about to drop that. Mike people have a resume and not a reputation. I think that's the podcast app somewhere in there. Is the podcast episode title. That's a real rich. Okay let's go on ahead pause and just clap that moment up. Well it's it's my reason for this whole show right it's the mission behind it. Let's get more people doing that. But i want to talk to people like you who've done that. let's start like top level. I like before we get into like very specific tactical things. Let's take a step back and say okay like personal branding. it's kind of a buzzword but like what is the value of building the brand of you. What and why does that matter. When people are excited about a business they will buy when they want when people are excited about a person they will buy to support in support is endless. And i that that clear distinction and the best most powerful mechanisms are when people buy a brand business and a personal business as one. Then you are just like a soon

Jasmine Mike
What good soft skills look like with Kristen Palana

CodeNewbie

02:24 min | 4 months ago

What good soft skills look like with Kristen Palana

"Is joining us. Thanks for having us. I think for having us for some added context leon is also my wife and has been with our company almost since the beginning circus and you have a long impressive resume of all the things you do. Tell us a little bit about your background. Sure i'm actually coming to you from malawi in southern africa where have been living since twenty. Nineteen i'm actually Doing are in communication for two. Un organizations unfpa in unison have background is a university professor. And i'm scared to say that. It's been since two thousand but i was in my twenties when it started so i'm not that old i've been working with people on four continents students and other artists and workers. And what have you and soft skills. Actually a huge difference between someone doing really well and sort of fizzling out enough they're quote unquote really talented. Some looking forward to talking about it more. We actually found you through a highly rated you to meet horse titled soft skills clear success how to be excellent at work. How did you start teaching these skills. It's funny because your professors when you're in university probably one of their least favourite things they have to do. but we'll do is be an academic advisor. They tell you what classes you're supposed to take and if you get a good one the lawsuit can help you get into the career that you want and give you advice and i actually. Even though i wasn't looking forward to doing these meetings all day long. I found that i was actually quite good at it. And so alongside teaching our digital media illustration and animation. I found that my students were coming to me quite a lot for advising and i was teaching in new york city in new jersey and then for ten years in rome italy and then three years ago we moved to men mar and they're actually wasn't my field in the universities there so i started teaching for organizations and ad agencies. They're junior staff helping them. Be more confident at work. Be more able to ask questions able to give presentations basically not be so timid. So that's sort of how. I started with the soft skills class i. It was an online resource to a live training. I did in men mar and then once that was over i put it online and opened it up to a more international audience and now i'm helping also students here in malawi with that as well

Unfpa Malawi Southern Africa Leon New York City New Jersey Rome Italy
Interview With Eric Siu

My Worst Investment Ever Podcast

04:55 min | 5 months ago

Interview With Eric Siu

"Fellow. Risk-takers this your worst. Podcast hosts andrew stotz. And i'm here with featured guest. Eric su to rock. I'm ready to rock. Thanks for having me andrew. I'm glad to have you on the show. And in fact i went to cal state long beach so i used to be in the la area for a long time so it's good to reconnect with lovely l. a. What i used to call the center of the universe at that time. So let me introduce you to the audience for those people. That don't know eric. He is the ceo of content intelligence software. click flow. Which helps you grow your traffic while looking like a genius and who doesn't want that also owns an ad agency single grain and work with companies such as amazon airbnb salesforce and uber to acquire more customers. He hosts to podcasts. Marketing school with neil patel and leveling up which combined have over forty eight million downloads to date. He's also frequently around the world of marketing and software as a service and he's recently publishing a book called leveling up. And i happen to tell you. Eric doesn't know this. But i've managed to get an inside person to give me the first copy of the book. Let me find it and there. It is whoa. They sent it to you know. Just kidding i made myself. I made included on a little book that i had. But that's what it's going to look like folks and it's called up and right now you can get chapter number one which i've been through and i'm really excited. So maybe you can just tell the audience a little bit about yourself and what they're gonna get from this book and what they could do now to get some of that in wednesday coming out all. Here's the fiscal copy. Here's what is gonna look like boom. This is what it looks like. It's coming out february. Twenty four th. But my name's eric su. So you know to your point couple of businesses. I kind of my go-to level at the world through marketing. So the business you mentioned but we also have any events business. We have an education business and we also invest other mar related sass and to podcasts. You mentioned i just love learning. I love teaching to articulate my thoughts. And i'm here on this podcast to talk about my worst investment. I think there's a there's a theme here. I'll try to tie everything together without me too. Wordy that's great. You know it's interesting. Because when i read through the first chapter and also i'm a listener of your podcast. Both of them. What i get from us that we come from a slightly different generation. Let's say i graduated from university and cal state long beach in nineteen eighty nine. And i didn't really. I wasn't in the gaming realm at the time and i wasn't when it started really hit. I wasn't that interested in it. So what i notice about about you. And i suspect that this is what people were going to get out of the book instead. You focus on some really short actionable things and it's feel like whether it's your podcasts. Or when i read your book. It is a lot about getting to that next level in little steps. And that's the way i was brought up. I was born with heavy big content redes- whole book and then tell me what you learn. Is that correct to think of it that way. Or how do you think how does your mind. Yeah it's so. I have this turtle in front of me and i got from puerto rico and i visited puerto rico for obvious reasons but it reminds me to slow down and to understand that you leveling up one percent everyday just trying to get a little better every single day. That's what it's all about because if you think of decades that be results in decades you'll be amazed by what you accomplished and you have short term hustle and long-term outlook. It's the same thing as investing at the end of the day. So i think it's You know. I'm glad that you noticed that we'll actually never thought of it that way but yeah that's exactly what it is. Yeah in fact before we get into the question. I just quote one thing out of the book and that is you say just because you have struggled in pass does not mean you're entitled anything to play at the next level you'll have a new set of struggles and that's something that really hit me because first of all at the age of fifty five. Life's supposed to be good and easy and all that no no. There's still struggles that you gotta face. That's the first thing. But the second thing that i took away from that this again this kind of incremental way that you look at things focus on the struggles in that one little level and there's always going to be those new struggles so that's a big thing that i've taken away from it. I'm looking forward to getting to the whole book someday. I'll have it by the way. Like i noticed a little warm buffet character in the back. I think that's what it is and so if you think about it. Eighty four point. So i think he's worth eighty five billion eighty. Four of that didn't come until after his sixty fifth birthday. So you talk about patients there. You go right there. Poster child for not

Andrew Stotz Eric Su Long Beach Neil Patel Salesforce Uber Andrew Eric Amazon Puerto Rico LA
Common Facebook Ad Mistakes: How To Avoid Them & Save Money with Emily Hirsh

Online Marketing Made Easy with Amy Porterfield

09:43 min | 6 months ago

Common Facebook Ad Mistakes: How To Avoid Them & Save Money with Emily Hirsh

"I feel like there are two types of people when it comes to facebook ads those who love them and are excited to learn more and improve how they use them and those who are intimidated by them and would rather go organiz their fridge than learn more about them but then again. I love organizing my fridge. But that's beside the point what i'm trying to get at. Is that whether you're the first type of person or the second type. You're going to want to stay right here. Because i brought on my friend in facebook ad expert. Emily hersh and she's going to talk about the most common mistakes entrepreneurs make when it comes to marketing with facebook ads and how to steer clear of them and avoid losing money now for my friends who are listening. That haven't been using adds a lot. You're going to learn so much from this episode so that when you do really get into using more facebook ads. You're going to know the mistakes to avoid for those of you. Who have been using facebook. Ads may be dabbling or your seriously in the trenches. Still listen in. Because i think you're going to walk away with some insights that emily shares. That can improve in tweak. How you're using ads in order to get your biggest bang for your buck. Emily is going to share. Not only what these top five mistakes are. But she's going to give you step by step tangible strategies for avoiding them or course correcting if you might be making these mistakes. Be sure you stick around until the end. Because emily is going to get into how to make these approaches realistic for wherever you're at in your entrepreneurial journey along with exactly where start infact. We've actually work with emily's company hirsch marketing during some of our past launches to manage our facebook ads and they definitely delivered. Alright so please help me. Welcome my guest emily. Well hey there. Emily welcome to the show. Yea thanks for having me. Oh i'm so happy you're here and before we get started. Why don't you give just a brief introduction to what hersh markings all about. Yeah so hirsch. Marketing is an ad agency. We specialize in facebook and instagram ads. And we specifically help people with courses and coaches people selling online digitally their products or their services. And i've got a team of about twenty two people all over the us than we do. Both running the ads than also teaching how to do it in our in our other product. Twenty two people. Is that what you said. Yeah i've got twenty two employees and then a couple contractors that is impressive. I have about twenty as well and you're a lot younger than me. So i've been in business longer and it took me a long time to build up a team like that. I feel like you have grown so quickly so fast and like the best way possible. Would you agree. Yes and growing team is like and as you know twenty people it really pushes you to grow as an individual i share so yes does it. Humbly oh my goodness like if you wanna know all your fault as a leader in all the areas need to really strengthen go ahead and build the big team that will do it or you know yeah exactly going the teams the hardest thing i've ever done. That could be an imam. Okay hey manchester event. I hear ya okay. So we've got a lot to cover today and you have five of the most common mistakes that you see entrepreneurs make when they're growing their business with facebook ads now facebook. Ads is a hot topic with my audience. Whether it be my newbie students are going at it with their first launch and they might want to dabble with this book ads or those that are in their second third and beyond launch. That wanna go really really deep with ads and do a great job usually on their own to start out with and then they looked to an agency so i would love to dive into all of these mistakes. So why. don't you kick us off with mistake. Number one yeah so the first mistake is before you even get to the ads. Peace that so many people miss over whether you're of beginner and you've never run ads. But i've also talked to seven figure business owners who skip over this and continued to not do it because it's so easy to miss and that's not defining what success means for their marketing. So what that really looks like is. What's your budget and how much you're going to make from that budget and a lot of times people kinda pull out like i think spend thousand dollars in see what happens and what. I encourage in really want people to do it. Encourage you to do to get the most out of what you spend is say over the next. Let's say thirty days. I wanna make this many sales which equals this many dollars and then working backwards and deciding from that what your investment is because if you go into ads in your kind of just like picking a number and then seeing what happens what will happen is you'll start running ads in. You'll say things. Like i have no idea if this is working or not. I have no idea where to put my time in energy to get to work and then end up just turning your ads off in waiting. A few months in china have seen that play out so many times so before you even start ads weather. Like i said you're a beginner. You're intermediate your advanced. You need to go into it knowing this is exactly my budget is exactly my sales goals. So that when you start running ads you're able to kind of pick it apart in. See what isn't isn't working and you defined what that success is for yourself just like you've never tried to do something without maybe setting a goal of what that is like you say i wanna get healthy. What does that mean to you. Same with ads. If you wanna run ads what is a successful ad campaign. Look like for you and then it should be based on numbers. Okay so this is such a great place to start. Because i know what my students and my listeners are thinking right now especially if they've never ran ads they'll say okay me. I know how much money i wanna make with. Let's say my first digital course launch or even my second digital launch but they don't understand or know yet how much they should budget for ads. They're like well. How much is it going to cost me to get lead for my webinar. Like let's focus on that. That's the biggest reason why my students would be running ads. I know you can't get into every single number in detail. But what would you say to somebody. That's struggling with that. Yeah so let's walk through how we would how we would break this down. So i you decide that sales goal. So let's say you wanna make make it easy ten thousand dollars. You've got a thousand dollar course. You need to sell ten. So you have that number of those sales goals. Okay now you have to decide your after come up. With how many leads you need into your web. In our in order to get those ten sales so for simplicity sake the average conversion is like one to five percent of all of your leads in. It's going to depend on your audience and the price of your offer. Let's just say three percent of people that sign up for your webinar. The total registrants are going to buy that course so you need ten sales and three percent are going to buy than what would be that total number of leads and i can't do math really fast but i mean what are you whatever that equals i think it would be like one percent is three hundred leads so we will need hundred leads. I think that's right so there once you have your leads. Then what's your cost per lead and an average cost lead for a webinar is anywhere from like four to ten dollars and again it depends on your industry when you're targeting consumers you usually have a cheaper cost per lead where if you're targeting business owners usually pay a little bit more because it's just a more saturated ad space so let's say five dollars you multi that let's say we need a hundred leads. Okay your ad spends five hundred dollars and that's how you break it down and get there. Okay i'm glad that you walk through this in the way that you did. I think my listeners really wanted some concrete data and like a formula to us. So i think that was really helpful so i appreciate you taking the time to really drill. That went down. Yeah perfect all right so move us on to mistake number two okay. The second mistake that many people make is they. Don't do enough testing especially of your ad creative so your copy your images maybe test video and in my opinion when i see someone saying that their ads aren't working eighty five ninety percent of the time. It's the messaging because it takes a lot of work to really understand who your ideal customer is and how to speak to them and how to stand out in the feed especially this year. It's just gotten even more important to go deeper to take it to the next level with talking to your ideal customers fears and their dreams and where they're struggling right now and so a lot people mostly because ads can be a lot of work. But i encourage you to take the extra week if you need you know as you get ready for adds to have at least three versions of your ad that you're testing. Maybe it's a long form of copy in a short form of copy and then you have a video an image. Because i'll get this question all the time. People's will what works better video or image or what works better long or short and it i there is no concrete answer because it's truly different for every audience. A lotta times. I do see video work better than in some cases i see a static image with no tax work better for somebody so the more testing you can do and the more deep you can go with your messaging to stand out the better. Your results will be and like i said truly eighty five ninety percent of time when your ads are hitting that cost per lead goal or they're too expensive or they're not converting it's because of your messaging because as you know amy like so many years it takes so much time to really truly know your customer but the person who knows them the most and can talk to them. The best in the feed will always

Facebook Emily Emily Hersh Hirsch Marketing Hersh Infact Hirsch Instagram Manchester China United States
WPP is ditching several New York offices as the advertising giant looks to slash its real estate costs by 20% worldwide

Bloomberg Wall Street Week

00:29 sec | 8 months ago

WPP is ditching several New York offices as the advertising giant looks to slash its real estate costs by 20% worldwide

"Radio advertising giant WPP plans to give up as much as 700,000 Square feet in New York City. Ah, third of its office space this as it tries to cut real estate costs by as much as 20% by 2025. Business Insider reports Ad agency, Ogilvy will leave its offices on 11th Avenue and moved to 205th Avenue headquarters of Wpp's Great Group and two other agencies will also move to buildings in use by WPP units. WPP spokesman didn't immediately respond to our

WPP Business Insider New York City Ogilvy Great Group
"ad agency" Discussed on What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

04:13 min | 8 months ago

"ad agency" Discussed on What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

"I think adam smith comes gain. Any of those can austrian school economist like academies is and so forth and the people who crossed the fact that economics was actually should be modeled on physics that it needs it needs systems thinking ecosystem thinking not physics thinking and i think all those people were were getting close to that conclusion towards the end of their lives. Suppose the other thing would have been on a no it one day trip to the manhattan project or something like that. Kinda cool actually does a guy who would be really interesting. Who's a worthwhile hero. Which is not any of the kind of nobel prize winners manhattan project. Leslie groves the guy who i think in general leslie groves ran it. 'cause it's also it's always worth meeting. People who have complementary skills gerard or not as an administrator that guy was clearly something else i mean. He chose oppenheim to run it. When opened on a didn't even never nobel prize. It was bit awkward making all these people who have nobel prizes report to guy who didn't and so. It's really really interesting. Question as to you know just i think it's very very easy for academics to disregard the value of real organizational genius and i did possess it in any measure whatsoever so in some ways. You know some of the people. I'd most like to meet with people who are just entirely complementary to my approach of thinking yet gropes one of those just absolute maestros meeting. Yeah absolutely no i. I love this for the listeners. Know how much a fan i am of you. Your work on the book alchemy was was one of my top reads of all last year when it came out so that will obviously be linked up anywhere else. You want them staying connected with you or with the team. At he's doing yeah. Follow will be consulting adobe consulting on twitter. Follow me on twitter at rory sutherland. And also what else. What else would i. yeah. I think they're about five or six areas of just decent inquiry. I just economics. I think service dominant logic if you've heard the boring. Just move on to another one. But i think there are about six or seven heterodox schools of economics which have a huge amount to contribute in terms of reframing how you look at the world how business works and also brands work as well I persistently maintained that because of this debate the chief value of rams consumers. Is there a reliable signal of non practice. It's not that we think lebron produces the best thing a catchy rate it's the reliably produces something. That's not bad or better. That way is one of my that by the way is one of the ideas or insights. We i'm not sure which it is because there's blurry relationship between them but that's one of my ideas are in such which i think is most important that actually quite often people pretend they're looking for the best of what they're really doing deep down in that brain is trying to minimize the risk of bad to worse. We need to understand that much. Better way roy you ever put pen to paper and and put some of your own thinking behind some of these key concepts absolutely love to see that explore that a little bit further i will. I will eventually get into a book and there's just lost. It'll tip one discovery. I've made during lockdown is. That speaking is a halama faster than typing. Even if you're a good typist okay. Now you speak perfectly and fully formed sentences. I get that but ninety percent of the work is just in the words. It's not the editing and editing is high value creation work whereas typing is low value creation. The best discovery i made other than the videoconferencing works. Overtime at scale is the by little voice dictation device or download the otter dot. Hey app on your mobile phone..

Leslie groves adam smith adobe consulting rory sutherland oppenheim gerard manhattan twitter rams lebron roy
"ad agency" Discussed on What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

05:26 min | 8 months ago

"ad agency" Discussed on What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

"The business worked together in the fall of individual asari a full of possibly unconscious corporation to actually create value together interesting. I'm wondering. Why is this book number. Two all of these tools it could be. I've also wondered about writing a book about. We need metrics for human emotional states that because we what we tend to do. We look at human economic behavior. Do people by okay. Because it's easy to measure because there's a dollar amount attached then we compared to a lotta rational things like time and space and distance weight and processing power battery life. We compared to all the things in the in the objective world we can measure and we try and establish a correlation between those two things. Now the problem is that is often. It's spirits correlation or it's a non linear relationship or actually where actually totally wrong about. What in other words. We're optimizing things that consumers generally that care about about about that as for example uber. Okay the uber. Map doesn't reduce your wait time in terms of generation. It doesn't do anything the time you might feel car. It fundamentally changes the psychological experience waiting because it removes the level of uncertainty understanding that kind of thing which is okay. We have an si unit for times every taxi firm which will look at the data. There's a correlation between wake time passenger satisfaction every company. But then say how can we reduce. Wait time. that actually focused on the wrong thing. That folks on the objective reality which is duration time measured in seconds. They're not focused on the metric. That currently doesn't exist. Which is the degree of pain and uncertainty created by. Not knowing where your job is. And so i think we need. We need better metrics if we're going to actually work out. High marketing creates value. I google the phrase the other day emotional efficiency. it doesn't really pad everybody uses it. No one's understood. The concept of internet is efficient. You make something. It's official generate emotion in some of. They want to buy it. That's what businesses so businesses essentially set out to operationally efficient and then they see marketing as a cost because it lies downstream of manufacturing whereas to quote geico. Roy allison from nine hundred fifty seven..

asari google Roy allison geico
Your TV is spying on you

Clark Howard Show

04:12 min | 8 months ago

Your TV is spying on you

"Want to take you back a little bit in the way back machine when there's a big fuss when physio was the top selling tv brand in the united states and they're still a big seller but they're not the top dog anymore and they got their wrist. Slapped for spying on what television you were watching without disclosing t you that. They were spying like they were and they reached a settlement where they didn't it's one of those idiotic things that the government does where the company didn't have to admit that it was doing anything wrong but said it wasn't going to do the stuff anymore without your permission. so there's a lot of value to ad agencies. Big companies to the tv manufacturers themselves and now with streaming television to people like amazon with their fire sticks and roku and all that To be able to track what you're doing and there's a technology called a cr that allows the tv itself or a third party plug in to know what you're watching and the funny thing is they know what you're watching whether you're streaming it watching it on a satellite watching it on cable watching it over the air however you're watching it can track your viewing patterns and then use that to target you with specific ads. It's very much like what you think about. When you're on wine on your phone or your laptop and you'll go to some store and look at an item and then you'll go to. Let's say a new site or entertainment. Satan sunday an ad pops up for whatever that item was in. So there's a lot of A lot of invasion of privacy involved with this stuff people on the tv business. Say no think how great this is because instead of you having ads for stuff you don't care about you'll only see ads for stuff you do care about and I don't know but here's a wild one. I saw on the wall street journal so since video lost that lawsuit the setting on a video. Tv is automatic. Opt out the you have to voluntarily choose to opt in to share your personal viewing habits. And i haven't seen how video words it because i don't have. I haven't had a video. Tv in recent years. So i don't know what you see on the screen but the wall street journal reports that of sixteen million people who bought video. Tv's since they lost the lawsuit Two and a half years ago. Ninety percent of people have voluntarily chosen to allow what they watch to be tracked. So maybe i'm just much more concerned about this privacy stuff than most people are or it could be that the wording makes it seem like this is just the greatest thing ever for you to let us see what you're watching and what you're up to so know that this is a very active part of the sale of televisions and Various streaming products is the ability to track. What you're doing. And i think that we should have the ability with any of these things. If we don't like being tracked to say leave me alone you do not have my permission to track. And it shouldn't be something that's just a private settlement with physio in the feds. It should be standard operating position. should be standard operating procedure. That you and i get to choose whether we get tracked.

Physio Roku Wall Street Journal United States Amazon
How to Build a Brand with Tim Newton

The EntreLeadership Podcast

04:27 min | 9 months ago

How to Build a Brand with Tim Newton

"Hey if you run a business, you know that your brand matters but what is a brand? We throw that phrase around a lot and the whole idea of branding originated with cattle ranchers. Hot Iron into the side of their cow say visually, this is the sign that says, this is my cow and ever since then branding has often been associated with the logo, the imagery, the visual experience, the guys that's only a small part of the deal. From the Ramsey network this is the entreleadership podcast where we help business leaders grow themselves their teams and the Prophets I'm your host Daniels already and my guest today is ten Newton. Tim Lead all things branding here at Ramsey solutions as our senior creative officer and when you hear him talk about branding, you're gonNA to understand it so much less about the visual experience and so much more about your values, your convictions and the story of Your Company. Now Ramsey solutions we have always had a great strategy for branding. In fact, in the early days, it was all over the place. It was. Whatever came up in anybody's mind when out. So there was no connection. There wasn't really thought about brand, but there wasn't intuitive an intuitive nece about the brand Dave intuitively understands grabbing people's emotions and so like he knew to say statements that represented what mattered to the brand and what mattered to him like that's a part of branding something new and we would take those statements live like no one else he can live like no one else. We would take statements and put them all replace. So there was consistency, but it was it was intuitive. There wasn't tenacity to it and so thankfully it. It was coming together back then but just out of intuitive nece. Yeah, if. There was there was energy. Yeah. Yeah. But I think what? What helped it was natural passion. Like that, that's what it was. We gravitate towards passion when a brand looks like there's passion when people look like there's passion we gravitate towards that. So thankfully, even then since the beginning this whole thing, there was passion and that's one of the strongest things a brain can have. Okay. So that was there. I remember back in that day that you're talking about. We went to a live event and we've got all these tables in the back. That have our financial peace stuff. told him make stuff junior stuff entreleadership stuff because at Ramsey we've got I. don't know fifteen different lines of business and each one is run by a VP who's kind of like a miniature business owner and they were responsible for whatever their stuff looked like like it was on them. There wasn't like a centralized. Branding. Creative team brand standards we didn't have a CMO. Like I said, it's the wild west. And I had a buddy who was a big time AD agency Guy who really understood this branding stuff and this is the first time. Personally. That had thought about light bulb moment of like Oh. There's something going on here. He came to the live event. And I said, Hey, what do you think and he goes? Well, this is awesome. This is awesome. Dave onstage is awesome as what do you think about our you know emerge and all this kind of stuff he goes honestly. It looks like a roadside fireworks. And it's so overwhelming and confusing, and the message is don't go together. The FONZ don't go together. I guess. And I think a lot of business owners can relate to this because you know we're just trying to ship stuff. Get it sold Tim. And taking the time to actually think through how does the customer experience this? How do they feel when they see it and I also my experience? I, guess we live so close to our products. Yeah, and we forget that the design and we just know what they do where we know our products services very intimately. We know websites really well, and we forget what it's like to have fresh eyes experiencing that brand for the first time. Yeah it's totally true. It takes it takes a lot more work in effort to understand the emotional connection with the brand but also you're talking about consistency and fonts working together and the narrative working together. All that stuff is emotional. IMPOSSIBE said earlier we we had. An Entrepreneurial Mindset that's an entrepreneur to just go go go and I totally get that. That's that's where we were back. Then just go go but over the past few years we've gotten really good at taking a step back and saying how do people experience this at every touch point? What are they feeling when they go from this to this doesn't make sense does it make them feel like they're going to have freedom after using this thing like we're we're taking these steps to understand the connection, but there's there's a lot to be said for consistency.

Dave Ramsey Solutions GUY TIM Ramsey Daniels Officer Fonz Impossibe Business Owner VP
How to Build a Brand with Tim Newton

The EntreLeadership Podcast

04:27 min | 9 months ago

How to Build a Brand with Tim Newton

"Hey if you run a business, you know that your brand matters but what is a brand? We throw that phrase around a lot and the whole idea of branding originated with cattle ranchers. Hot Iron into the side of their cow say visually, this is the sign that says, this is my cow and ever since then branding has often been associated with the logo, the imagery, the visual experience, the guys that's only a small part of the deal. From the Ramsey network this is the entreleadership podcast where we help business leaders grow themselves their teams and the Prophets I'm your host Daniels already and my guest today is ten Newton. Tim Lead all things branding here at Ramsey solutions as our senior creative officer and when you hear him talk about branding, you're gonNA to understand it so much less about the visual experience and so much more about your values, your convictions and the story of Your Company. Now Ramsey solutions we have always had a great strategy for branding. In fact, in the early days, it was all over the place. It was. Whatever came up in anybody's mind when out. So there was no connection. There wasn't really thought about brand, but there wasn't intuitive an intuitive nece about the brand Dave intuitively understands grabbing people's emotions and so like he knew to say statements that represented what mattered to the brand and what mattered to him like that's a part of branding something new and we would take those statements live like no one else he can live like no one else. We would take statements and put them all replace. So there was consistency, but it was it was intuitive. There wasn't tenacity to it and so thankfully it. It was coming together back then but just out of intuitive nece. Yeah, if. There was there was energy. Yeah. Yeah. But I think what? What helped it was natural passion. Like that, that's what it was. We gravitate towards passion when a brand looks like there's passion when people look like there's passion we gravitate towards that. So thankfully, even then since the beginning this whole thing, there was passion and that's one of the strongest things a brain can have. Okay. So that was there. I remember back in that day that you're talking about. We went to a live event and we've got all these tables in the back. That have our financial peace stuff. told him make stuff junior stuff entreleadership stuff because at Ramsey we've got I. don't know fifteen different lines of business and each one is run by a VP who's kind of like a miniature business owner and they were responsible for whatever their stuff looked like like it was on them. There wasn't like a centralized. Branding. Creative team brand standards we didn't have a CMO. Like I said, it's the wild west. And I had a buddy who was a big time AD agency Guy who really understood this branding stuff and this is the first time. Personally. That had thought about light bulb moment of like Oh. There's something going on here. He came to the live event. And I said, Hey, what do you think and he goes? Well, this is awesome. This is awesome. Dave onstage is awesome as what do you think about our you know emerge and all this kind of stuff he goes honestly. It looks like a roadside fireworks. And it's so overwhelming and confusing, and the message is don't go together. The FONZ don't go together. I guess. And I think a lot of business owners can relate to this because you know we're just trying to ship stuff. Get it sold Tim. And taking the time to actually think through how does the customer experience this? How do they feel when they see it and I also my experience? I, guess we live so close to our products. Yeah, and we forget that the design and we just know what they do where we know our products services very intimately. We know websites really well, and we forget what it's like to have fresh eyes experiencing that brand for the first time. Yeah it's totally true. It takes it takes a lot more work in effort to understand the emotional connection with the brand but also you're talking about consistency and fonts working together and the narrative working together. All that stuff is emotional. IMPOSSIBE said earlier we we had. An Entrepreneurial Mindset that's an entrepreneur to just go go go and I totally get that. That's that's where we were back. Then just go go but over the past few years we've gotten really good at taking a step back and saying how do people experience this at every touch point? What are they feeling when they go from this to this doesn't make sense does it make them feel like they're going to have freedom after using this thing like we're we're taking these steps to understand the connection, but there's there's a lot to be said for consistency.

Dave Ramsey Solutions GUY TIM Ramsey Daniels Officer Fonz Impossibe Business Owner VP
Do This If Your Facebook Ad Account Gets Banned or Suspended

Marketing School

02:44 min | 10 months ago

Do This If Your Facebook Ad Account Gets Banned or Suspended

"Welcome to another episode of Marketing School I'm Eric Su and I'm Neil Patel and today we're GonNa talk about what you need to do if your facebook ad account gets banned or suspended. So here's the funny thing. are at account but one we were primarily using for consulting school was suspended because they put us into the same category as the same bucket as the make money online people the Internet marketers that are selling scammy stuff. But I, don't even though we have creative ads, we don't really scam. So that's the funny thing and you don't sell make money. No no, ethnically. People. Yeah. You help people grow their business. You don't teach people how to make money from thin air. What did you do? Yeah. So I'm trying to think I'm going to give the practical answer and tell people what I did because I don't think is applicable to everyone. Will I start off with what you did and then give the practical because? You did. So we obviously, because I have single grain, which is an AD agency we have an address because we have an ad rep, we have an in there. So we managed let's call it seven footers plus ads Ben each month and Neil definitely does as well if not eight figures plus so the thing is because you are tied to your facebook ad manager, they have incentive to help you so if You are actively spending than I would just go straight to your ad manager, but the problem with that is it doesn't apply for every single person. So we're force enough to be able to do that, and they're actually moving us. They've actually created a new review process and we pass a first step were onto the second step now, and they've actually started to crack down a lot of accounts, which is why we Got Caught in the I guess glow damage, which is call it but that's the first part. So in terms of what I think people can do to protect against this is whenever you're starting to run accounts. Sam Evans actually has a video on youtube about this on how he has multiple facebook accounts. So if something happens to one, he's got another one ready to go and so when we got suspended we Had, make another account, and so we have another one running right now, which is actually performing better than the old one. So you want to diversify and make sure that you're covered because if your business completely relies on facebook against suspended like that, you are not only putting yourself on the line. You're putting people's jobs like people that work for you online as well. So you don't want to take on that risk. What's funny I usually is attacked hitting set on facebook. This happened to me years and years ago I think like six years ago I had issues have had any issues recently but yeah, the easiest thing to do and I know that most people don't like this is discredit new account new credit card new address you IP's logging with different Ip's and like when you do that you usually a good to go it's a little bit of a pain but it works yeah, I mean, you really have no choice. If you plan these platforms, they get to decide when the BANU or whatever. So you're kind of at their mercy. So know hopefully this is helpful

Facebook Sam Evans Neil Patel Eric Su Youtube
Motel 6, Home Depot drop ad agency over "too Black" comment

The DeMaio Report with Carl DeMaio and Lou Penrose

00:32 sec | 10 months ago

Motel 6, Home Depot drop ad agency over "too Black" comment

"Owned advertising agency, is resigned after saying an ad campaign was to black Stander. Richard's founded his agency in 1976, and he stepped down yesterday after word of his comment when public At age reported that stand. Richards said A proposed campaigns celebrating black artist was to black as he put it, and would turn off motel sixes. White supremacist constituents. Hotel, six at Home Depot have dropped the Richards Group as their ad agency effective today. On Wall Street. The Dow closed up

Black Stander Richards Group Richards Richard Home Depot
Being Customer Driven With Data-Driven Marketing

Marketing Trends

07:32 min | 10 months ago

Being Customer Driven With Data-Driven Marketing

"Welcome to marketing trends I mean phase on host of marketing trends, and today we are joined by special guests Marty. How are you? I'm good I. Doing it is great to have you. I'm really excited to talk to you today. Obviously, we love salesforce and and you're the amazing sponsor the show. But beyond that you've been doing some amazing work. You're writing a book that's going to be out soon, called customer driven, and we're GONNA talk a lot about data, which is at the at the top of mind for every marketer. Before we get into all that, how did you get started marketing? That's a good question. I've had a very strange career in I have a hard time explaining it to my mother. But when I look back realized started wanting to be a journalist New York and ninety s writing for magazines back when there were magazines and it seemed like a viable career and I ended up at MTV networks on a show called video. And wrote the little bubbles blurbs, which is the the peak of my journalists experience, and then after that I went into to business school, I wanted to management consultant probably the only person at the time we want to be one and I thought it would be glamorous and sexy to be a media consultant and then the dot com bomb happened two thousand and one, and so I ended up over. Counter the healthcare over over the counter healthcare consulting, which is just what it sounds like and then I ended up at an AD agency doing direct marketing and measurement, and that was kind of the beginning of my marketing advertising career and it was through consulting. It was sort of it was strategic engagements and the career was actually called measurement. I pick all these glamorous wants the measurement was basically impact. of Ad campaigns and it was dumb you know digital campaigns how did they do look at search and display and so on and I was in that field for about ten years and then I, went to garner as an industry analyst covering advertising technology and marketing technology and measurements. Still now, it will be called data science. By the way, I would get a retroactive promotion and then I joined salesforce. About two years ago. So it's always been on the MARCECA and an analytic side in interestingly enough in the beginning that was not the sexy part of marketing and now it is, of course, if you're the the data scientists on the campaign, you're the coolest person there but it was the exact opposite twenty years ago. So I've I've written the wave up. Yeah. The closest closest person to to proof. Of, being ends up being the most valuable person room I do I'm Gonna I'm GonNa follow up on the pop up video stuff because I'm endlessly fascinated in that but flash forward to today. What does it mean to Espn Strategy for Marketing Cloud salesforce? It's. It's an interesting job at spans product management product marketing, and with the flavor of thought leadership I think when I was hired, which was two years ago it was around a specific problem it was and it was into the product organization. Software companies are structured with pretty defined role. So you're in either in product management, which is sort of halfway between engineering and marketing or your product marketing, which is what it sounds like you're in sales or you're an engineer so there for basic rules and this is close. To, product management and the question was around the customer data platform category CD, which was the hottest and is probably still the hottest category and March tack that's come along in a long time since two thousand and sixteen. It's just been hyped out of out of control kind of like insider hype. If you're in the business, you know what I'm talking about. If you're outside, you'd be like what? What's a CD, but it's it's a big deal and the question at salesforce was do we have one? Should we acquire? It was billed by require that kind of thing, and they needed someone from the outside who wasn't sort of inside the the salesforce system having come as a as an analyst industry analyst who knew the industry and a new kind of outsider perspective to say it what is what I need to Dan I knew coming in that we needed to build queries harder than it looks to build something, and that's what we've done. In fact we're launching that in next month version wants it's a tremendously major effort on. As, part to pivot engineers and to develop this net new product customer three sixty audiences, which is a CPA and in fact, the topic of our book customer driven I, wrote it with my colleague Chris O'hara to give him full credit, the multi-talented era he and I wrote this book about Customer Data Platforms it's not about salesforce, but it is about this category, which is fascinating. Yeah I mean. Will we've seen you name it start-up getting snatched up data startups getting snatched up right and left being acquired. Just recently had some massive. IPO's around data companies. I mean, clearly, data is where it's not the new oil and it's not the new oil because that phrase literally never made sense but. But it is the lifeline of every marketer, and if you don't have an extremely strong philosophy and data, you're probably going to be left really far behind, which is pretty counter to the days of marketers creating you know add copying doing some of the things you were doing earlier in your career specifically around ad agencies and things like that I. mean you know going from that agency or from agency to to analyst to here on curious like what is that evolution been like for you? It's I mean, it's it's Bi modal. It's by modal is even to saying that kind of makes me a nerd, but it's a left brain right brain and and it's definitely I do this presentation sometimes say. How has marketing changed over the past twenty years as as a discipline and I remember when I was in business school as I said is right before the DOT com Bob's of two, thousand, two, thousand and one in Colombia and you could tell the people are interested in marketing back. Then just by looking at them, they were like slightly better looking. You know they dress better and they were you know I wouldn't say the social skills were definitely better. They were less interested in making money march sin hanging around with celebrities and I. I mean I'm being reductive in a way. I was one of them. So I can say this, but it was definitely a kind of a branch of show business. And today it really isn't. I mean that part hasn't gone away obviously of influencers, the celebrities if fonts and all that stuff but it's a lot less around the big campaigns and what we might call the softer side of marketing, and it's a lot more about the the foundational data layer and you have to be able to talk today to scientists give them credible instructions and you have to be able to understand things like statistical significance that marketers didn't have to worry about in the past. So I think it's it's a profession that has really Shifted, but it hasn't really shed what it was the past. So it's it's that it makes it interesting, but it also makes it very difficult to succeed in as a CMO. You see a CMO tenures being very short and it's because they have to be a statistician and an artist, and there aren't that many people could do both. So you know it's the long way round for. Saying that my background is is strangely appropriate because I was like in TV and then I was in business school, and so if you have those two elements I, think you can negotiate this strange new world It's moving more towards the data side than the graveside I would say, but we might we might see swing

Salesforce Analyst Engineer Consultant New York Marty Mtv Networks Marceca Espn Dan I Colombia Chris O'hara Advertising Technology
"ad agency" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:15 min | 10 months ago

"ad agency" Discussed on WTVN

"My work in an ad agency. So I've been advocating for drivers right now, almost 25 years, which which is more than half of my life on DH. You know the fact the matter is that it's something I'm very proud of. I know that I've helped a lot of people and It's something that's very important to me. So I appreciate the opportunity to put consumers back in the driver's seat when it comes to what's rightfully theirs. Let's go phone lines. I'm not sure if this affect you or not. Let's go windy online to Wendy, How can we help you out today? Well, listen on exactly a lemon law. I don't want to be lemon doubt somebody that filly I'm sorry. I can't hear you very well, anyway. Nothing way. Wendy. Wendy, when you start over again because he didn't I didn't hear your phone cut out. Okay. Um, I know somebody that folder Lemon. Because, uh, dealer claimed that there was nothing about what? They're over and over again. Um and somebody else ended up with it. My beautiful And it's going to run a warranty in about 3000 miles, So you have a name of somebody and I need a person, not a place because it's good that ugly in all places. That could do a top to bottom inspection on this vehicle, so that I My family doesn't get a big bed. Wait, Winnie, let me let me let me dissect this little bit. So you bought a someone you know about a new car, and it would had a lot of issues. Then you bought it from him or No, no, I know somebody that sold a lemon because the dealership on thing, there's nothing wrong with it. So, uh, document and nothing wrong with it, So they sold it. Okay, um No, I don't want that to happen to me. I don't want to get 11. I need an expectation of the people that's about my warranty. Um so that, uh, I get okay. Well, I mean from the problem when the you're mentioning the manufacturer's warranty, you want an individual person to come out and inspect it. First of all, that's fine. Sometimes we recommend if you're having a problem, and it cannot be duplicated to go to an outside shot that when I must dress to you is you cannot let anyone touch it or fix it or move anything. The manufacturer will point a finger. But the fact the matter is.

Wendy
The importance of monitor calibration with John Walrath

Photofocus Podcast

05:00 min | 1 year ago

The importance of monitor calibration with John Walrath

"And welcome finale. Now, my guess is lansky photographer. An image and trainer and technical support manager at data color. Please welcome John. Hayden John Goodman Finale. Harry doing today. Oh creep that. Our topic today. Well, you're an expert at. Your. Of Monitor calibration, right? Now. First of August before we even get started I did mention you are a photographer and and that's why I love how data color a lot of companies. Hiring photographers to come in. Right. So we photographers talking to photographers. So you know. So especially where trade shows. I saw the mutual friend Jerry from hunts photo exactly Yep you know. So when somebody comes up to you at a trade show, let's see you with Gerry. And they ask you, why do I need to have my monitor calibrated? Talking to them. As Well just work for the company you're talking to them as a photographer end as an expert that happened works the company right right. Awesome yeah. Yeah. So it's You know. That's a great point. You know data color. We have a very technical people on staff but we also have. People who are very passionate about photography. and. I think I I kinda classify myself as someone who falls into the middle there but but you're right. When you have a question about a technical product, it's It's not a technical pursuit at that point. It's it's a, it's a creative pursuit, your helping. You know I have the opportunity to help people understand about. calibration in Color Management and I begin with it from a photographer's point of view not from pursuit. And I did check out some of your work and that's why I asked to hear you do a lot of. Interior design and you mentioned you were. Those one of the stuff you didn't pass. You did a lot of interior designing stuff. Yep. That's what kind of transferred you order photography. Yes. So my my background in school was a bachelor degree in architecture, which is kind of heavy on space design, interior design layout type of thing, and I've kind of you know my career before data color I owned business for awhile sold that. But before I worked for data color I sold that business with the intent of becoming it fulltime interior architectural photographer. So I did work with you know interior designers, architects AD agencies and builders to help them showcase their their work. Um Great and so just. Most of us as a photographer, you had children. Become the subjects exactly I. I would say. Love landscape photography but you know most of what I do these days is you document the lives of of kids might be. I. Learned the basics of photography from my father and he was very passionate about photography a black and white darker our basement growing up and you know. It wasn't that he taught me how to be creative photography taught me about the importance of of photography in someone's life. Documenting documenting time with your cameras is just an important pursuit and he really that was the example he had for me. So it was really cool to grow up with that type of influence and to have a black and white darker in our basement carrying up. So I saw. You know develop ally. You know the smells of the darker are very. Small. I don't miss you know get my hands wet with chemicals but every now and then it just. I get I get the itch to. go back to the dark room but. Very Very Fond Memories Fisher. Well. That's great. Well, let's talk about Baader calibration who, what is it? What is monitor calibration? Yeah. So you know for transition of thinking back to the to the dark room you know there were very Specific things that you need to do to get your chemicals working right and you had to be in certain conditions to to work properly. In the digital age you know we have we rely on on our monitors. So I mean, we're we're photographers we we need to have We we trust our eyes to perceive the world around us. We trust our is to. take us through. The world and express ourselves creatively with our cameras.

Technical Support Manager Hayden John Goodman Lansky Harry Gerry Jerry
Facebook removes disinformation networks tied to Roger Stone and Jair Bolsonaro

Daily Tech News Show

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

Facebook removes disinformation networks tied to Roger Stone and Jair Bolsonaro

"FACEBOOK announced it has moved to information networks associated accounts and pages. One network had fifty four accounts and fifty pages removed from facebook and four from instagram for posting as fake residents of the State of Florida discussing political consultant, Roger Stone the second network involved thirty five accounts and fourteen pages removed from facebook and thirty eight from instagram for creating fake reporters and news organizations in Brazil linked to the office. Brazil's president facebook also banned a Canadian PR firm for interference in six Latin American countries and linked disinformation campaign to an AD agency in Ukraine.

Facebook Brazil Roger Stone Instagram Consultant Florida Ukraine President Trump
7 Unconventional Ways We Run Our Companies |

Marketing School

07:33 min | 1 year ago

7 Unconventional Ways We Run Our Companies |

"I'm Eric Su and I'm Neil Patel and today we are going to talk about seven confessional ways. We've run our companies all right so I will start with way number one so we have a hybrid remote model so we like remote were remote friendly. I'll say it that way. So on the agency side. Because we can having to serendipity of people getting creative and talking in a room and there's just a lot of ideas that go back and forth and a lot of touch points on that we do a three to model meaning that were in the offices Monday through Wednesday and Thursday Friday. People work from home and they really liked that model because Thursday Friday ticket to just focus on the work and then by the time. Monday rolls around. They're excited to come back into work. And then when did her Wednesday crinkle meetings again and just go back home? So that's worked out really well for us over the years so this would be number two unconventional way that I run my companies is I was put a CEO in place. So I'm a big believer. No matter what I do. You always want someone leading the ship. Whose amazing operations growing recruiting and I believe in folks as well also every time. I'm running a business a technically one. I never run a business but to put a CEO in place who's been successful. And when I heard the usual look for someone who's done it successfully before at least two times because if they've only done it successfully once it could be locked done at twice. The chances are they really are good at it so they should be able to do it a third time. Yup and the other thing. I'll say is probably applies Neil as well but we are generally pretty direct with our feedback. Sometimes there's organizations where they actually all tied in with a couple of things but people will sugarcoat things right. People don't WanNa rock the boat. They don't want to make people feel sad. They don't want people cry generally my personality and Neal's first now is we delivered read feedback if things aren't going well it's like hey we're seeing this with the numbers right now. Does seem like things are going. Well what can I do to help right? We delivered directly back. But it's also comes from a place of continued to help the company before because the company is a high performance sports team so if things aren't going well for someone over time that what will try to do we got this from Bob. Glazer from acceleration. Partners is someone's done well for us over the years and it just doesn't seem to be clicking anymore. We'll offer a mindful transition program. Meaning that you know. We'll help them find something and we'll continue to pay them and then we'll make it a good thing for them where the departure was amicable and it wasn't like someone got fired from that right so there's no surprises on both sides. So that is what number three number four. I love creating ten percent. Profit sharing pool for people who can just crank and generate revenue. And I make a dog eat dog world where it doesn't matter what your title is depending on your performance. That's how much you can end up getting the lowest person on the totem pole. But if you're producing the most impact for the business in theory you can have a bigger stake of a profit-sharing pool. Now I try to do this for all my companies. It doesn't always work out and the reason being is when you first start amount allowed times. You're losing money or breaking even in those cases you can't have a profit sharing will once they grow to be big enough then rolled out that concept and I took a lot of the modeling from profit-sharing pool from Sequoia if you look out partners at sequoia capital when they invest in companies and they have home runs and exits? They don't just split the money evenly? The people who bring the best deals in performed the best tend to make the most money from that will all right number five. We encourage people to have side projects because we think the work that we do requires creative thinking so if you're working on side projects a lot of creative work that you're doing is actually going to carry over into company. Someone has a creative project really takes off good for them. They can start their own thing more power to them but at the same time my company actually got the benefit from the learnings that they put forth and the experiments that they read so better across the board people feel happier. And you don't WanNa limit people saying oh you can have side projects. I'm as long as not competitive to the company that they're part of Dan. There's generally no complaints another unconventional thing that we do in this is number six. We're really big on lunch and learns and I know a lot of companies are rolling that out and they'll disc of like a presentation on a topic are way doesn't work out that way so like for example on my last lunch and learn that I did. I tend to do myself. I'll end up breaking on topic so the topic was content. Marketing and blogging. And I went over with a group of how to write amazing content for blog posts and I didn't care what department they were in. Everyone had to start writing blog posts and on the spot so the lunch last hour. So I'm telling people to come up with the topic of teaching them how to write an introduction having them do it right then and there on the spot and then they got to read it out loud and I'm critiquing them critiquing. Everyone's I'm doing it in a positive proactive way where we can learn from it. When I'm critiquing I'm telling him here's what you can fix and how to make it better so I'll do these types of lunch and learn every other week and the reason being is helps people sharpen up their skills. No matter what position you're in you can always learn more. You can always be sharper. And I don't like just the concept of teaching strategies talking as you want them to do it because the moment they're doing it and implementing it that means are learning it and it works out much better for them versus them just reading about it all right last but not least number seven so we got this from Jeff Bezos. This is how Amazon things so back in the day. Even now they do. Something called memos and this could be basically. Let's Neil comes up with an idea right instead of saying. Hey I'm going to call a meeting because I have a new idea you're required to write a memo and sometimes really good memo takes a week or longer to write and it's basically okay. Here's the new idea but it starts with the press release so everyone is a down in a room and the read. The press release I another read frequently asked questions an overview around the idea. What resources required all this different stuff? So it's basically like a speck of the project with the press. Release in there so people can get a good idea of what they're trying to accomplish but what happens there after everyone had room the read the memo for maybe ten to thirty minutes or so then a debate will happen and then you know the last five minutes of the meeting. Basically there'll be a decision that will be made now what this basically forces is. It will scare people from basically throwing meetings whenever they WANNA throw meetings and forces clarity of thought as well and then also because you know everyone read the document and all the questions are answered from that document because that person all the effort you get a decision much faster and you move a lot faster and when you call a memo meeting like that. You're also very cognizant of all the time that you're going to take from the other people because if you're dragging a bunch of busy executives into a room and you know you clearly didn't think through things and they're not happy at the end of it. You are going to be in trouble at the end so memo expensive too right. You're wasting everyone's time everyone's getting paid. Which is a huge expense company? Neil you and I think about that all the time if people are just sitting in meetings kind of just messing around. We're just thinking about all the money going out the door right. Do we have a rule to in our AD agency. We don't like more than three people in a meeting. And it's not that we don't want meetings. We want people to work on the client work and not just sitting doing meeting. Because if you're sitting in a meeting you're not getting work done for our client. Sure you need meetings here and there to strategize figure out what we're doing how we're getting people better results but is not going to happen unless you go out there and do the work so we don't want people in meetings all day. Yeah Fun thing. I'll say from my side is I was reading hacker news. Basically you can just Google Amazon Hacker News and Jeff Basil's memo something like that right you'll find it and people that used to work for Amazon ended up starting their own companies. They said by far the biggest impact thing they got was learning how to take that memo system into their new company. And so I actually got it after. I was reading the Amazon shareholder letters. There's this book that summarize all the shareholder letters Dow's biggest takeaway. I got from that book so we started doing it and the results have been incredible so far so I'll have to report again on it. Maybe in a year or so but so far so good so I recommend checking that

Neil Patel Amazon CEO Sequoia Capital Eric Su Jeff Bezos BOB Glazer Neal DOW Google DAN Jeff Basil
The Difference Between Optimization Vs. Innovation | Ep.

Marketing School

04:08 min | 1 year ago

The Difference Between Optimization Vs. Innovation | Ep.

"Super committed to your success online. We've worked with them. To a special offer just remarking school listeners. All you have to do is go to dream. Host DOT COM slash marking school to learn more and get your website online today. Welcome to another episode of Marketing School. I'm Eric Su and I'm Neil Patel and today we're GonNa talk about the difference between optimization versus innovation but I I think we should define what optimization is what innovation is all start with optimization and the kick it over to you for innovation and we'll talk about the differences so optimization when you look at it from a marketing perspective authorization could be simple as AB testing headline so. I might have red shoes as one headline and a second headline might be Red Shoes. Top reviewed for this year. And you might argue that the second one might click the right. You might get five percent higher. Click rate or maybe ten percent something like that might change the color of a button on websites. I'm making little tweaks right tweaking this a little bit and tweaking destler. That's what an optimization is in the context of marketing thing with your adds to sometimes you might say hey you know I'm GonNa cut out these keywords from an ad group that I have or I might change the color of my add a little bit. Those are often that you're making and you'll get incremental type of improvements. There sometimes might be pretty good but generally like maybe fifty percent plus what most of the time if you get any type of improvement it's GonNa be very incremental like five ten percent if you're lucky and innovation when you think about innovation. It's doing things that are outside the box that most people aren't doing before so when it comes to marketing most people try to grow through basic things like copying others tweaking things like that and there's nothing wrong with that but Example of innovation is like how dropbox did want more space. You can end up referring friends and getting more space from there or I ended up doing with Uber suggesting which everyone was charging a hundred dollars for Seo tolls and I just created a free one to try to crush. The market was able to grow generate a lot of leads for my ad agency to that process so think about innovation as really disrupting. What's happening right? Think of just throwing a wrench in people's plans at messing it up and trying to disrupt the industry. A good example again is uber. Uber really disrupted. The whole transportation is not just taxi industry but transportation. Is You know how many people I know? That don't even have a car anymore. Just because they use UBER DOUBTS. True innovation thus disrupting a lot of different things. And because of that you can grow quite quickly when you combine optimization with innovation you can really pull fuel to. The fire are growing much faster. Yeah to me I mean innovation at the end of the day. Is your swing for the fences right. You're swinging as hard as you can. And a lot of times you're GONNA mess when you're trying to innovate but when I think about the marketing world a lot of stuff has an especially in the Seo Tool world what. Neil talk about a lot of innovation actually hasn't happened. I mean it's a lot of the same stuff over and over and over and people are charging the same prices their tools look the same as well so using the uber suggests example as okay. I'm just going to go with a different approach. I'm GonNa make tool that is designed to performs really well and you know we might give it away for free and then we might have an element where we charge a little bit. That's different right. Same thing with when you think about salesforce back in the day this an example of innovation. They're a bunch of CRM's already so salesforce before they became a Juggernaut they are today. I remember I think it was mark. Benny off the CEO met with Steve Jobs who was his mentor and she was like. Look whatever you're doing right now like if you don't figure out a new way in the next two years or so you're probably going to be dead right. And this is the time when salesforce was probably doing like fifty million or so in revenue or maybe even two hundred billion but the problem is everyone else has. That's not the differentiator so salesforce Martha feels like you know what we're GonNa make an APP store. That's when they made the the APP exchange ecosystem and from that point on they really took off because they generated something or created something that nobody else hat and that was innovation. And that's how they really grew. And by the way guys I would really recommend reading. There's a blog post from our recent speaker at the growth accelerator. Andy Johns he writes about this innovation versus optimization. And

Salesforce Neil Patel Marketing School Red Shoes Andy Johns Eric Su Martha Steve Jobs Benny CEO
"ad agency" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

02:57 min | 1 year ago

"ad agency" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Just want to stay from politics right. I think so but I it but there's a difference between politics and policy coverage and I think they get it blended together so politics and and I think even when you think about what they wanna stay away from from the politics they want to stay away from the type of incendiary you know salacious salacious reporting that is basically you know looking at Exposes or or something that is You don't necessarily want a be around because it's it's ultimately just driving conversation in a direction that they don't want to associate with but when it comes to policies that's that's absolutely where a lot of them Wanna to be especially in a world where brands are being pushed to stand for something consumers really want to understand What they believe in and so so one of the things that You know we are really focused on helping brands. Understand is how to appear in some of those places that may or may may have have considered as as non safe so if you're going to appear on the front page of The Washington Post or you're going to help support journalism that ultimately intimately drives democracy. Like how do you do that in a way. How do you turn up? So you can't be tone deaf. You can't appear against issue type of of of content with like a totally tone deaf ad. But is there a way that we can help. Our readers understand that these are the brands who are helping to support report the really critical sophisticated consequential journalism that that ultimately matters to to this country although sometimes coverage can elicit emotions both breath negative that might not make them You know amenable to a commercial message but that's like to me and this is what one of the things that we really want to focus on with our user lab like. What are the types of messages that consumers expect to have if they understand if it's accepted that advertising is a critical goal part of the lifeblood of of publishing of of of news right? What is the right way for a brand to turn up like what type of messaging does feel more? Like native or additive or acceptable in in a space could be like impeachment. Twenty nineteen brought to you by not big Lou. Let's make it happen all right. Well thank you so much. Thank you Brian. And thank you all for listening as always I want you to subscribe to digital. Plus if you go to digital dot com slash subscribe. You can sign up there. This gives you unlimited access to all of our content and exclusive research and much much more. You will be getting twenty percent discount if you use podcast at checkout that his podcast at checkout also remember over to rate and review this podcast at Apple stitcher wherever you get your podcast helps. FBI discovered supposedly. And thank you to Pierre. Who is.

FBI The Washington Post Apple Pierre Lou Brian
"ad agency" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

10:39 min | 1 year ago

"ad agency" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Hi Listeners shearing Basheer Managing Director at digitally jumping in to let you know about a new podcast of hours at the modern retail. PODCAST we're talking to entrepreneurs were betting big on products aimed at just about everybody as some of the most interesting retailers. Out there like house co-founder Khaleda Price Hambrecht Hambrecht. Who tells us about the light bulb moment that led her to start mailing aperitifs to customers? Legally of course There's a loophole. If you are primarily made of Grapes in under twenty four percent alcohol you can be classified early as a wine even though you're drank like spirit marketed as the spirit and thank you and that was like Oh my God and Lalas Michael Leader. Who knows that building trust with customers is especially important when you're making products for babies? I mean we know that you're putting your most precious belonging belonging in our products. They have to be safe. They have to look good. They have to be an extension of who you are. And if you don't trust US then why buy us. We'll be in your podcast feed every Thursday until then please do check out. Modern Retail Dot Co digital media newest publication focused on the reinvention happening in retail. That's modern in retail dot com. Next step so how much more complicated as that now being in I mean I the post much larger than courts but at the time you left courts memberships are much bigger part of it right now but it was mostly an advertising. Yes I art This is is a good case in that. There's a bunch of different revenue streams at the post the post is one of the forerunners of embracing subscription. Yeah how does that impact the AD strategy. Yeah I think it strengthens it I think that you know there's always gap this ISM When when you're outside the walls to say come on you guys must some? There has to be a finger on the scale of like reader revenue or advertising because they can't co exist and that it was one of the main messages. That was really important to me going into the post. It's camping or strategy. This has to be end and the reason that I think Actually actually having an exceptionally successful subscription business helps us is that it does create that as I talked about before loyalty at scale which is good for brands. Iran's brands want to understand they want an engaged audience having an engaged audience. Having a log in audience gives you Access to First Party data which we all all know is going to be increasingly important as we hit twenty twenty so I think it gives us so it gives us a lot more conversations around found in shoring reader. Experience is best in class. Explain why because you want to treat your most loyal readers. Here's more respectfully right so you don't want to give them terrible experiences. You want to make sure that you're really carefully thinking through what does A subscriber because our subscribers are generally the same ad experience as non-subscribers there. There are some differences And we're actually looking king at how to continue to evolve that even further and I think the question becomes you know. Do you want to give only your subscribers the best experience or you know your perspective subscribers as well and how do you balance that. Because you don't want to just treat your subscribers With like the most beautiful out experience and then everybody else kind of you know because you you you WANNA be. Obviously you want everyone to be a perspective subscribers so you don't you want to give them a taste of what that Um experience will be but we definitely Think especially the you know while we are not an Amazon company. Jeff obviously His we're using air quotes. I need to tell everyone. So sorry. Thank you So so And what I mean by that is we are not part of the Amazon family are owner. Is Jeff Bezos But you know obviously he the the m the expectation. The Amazon experience is incredibly high and his philosophy. which obviously goes into a US at the post is treat your your subscribers treat treat your customers to the best experience as possible so You know that's something that is really looked at carefully when we're weighing the things like you know how to drive increased revenue per page. I don't know if you have an experience but I mean what is what what has Jeff Bezos said about like the overall ad experience variance. Maybe not on the post but just in general always interested in how people from I mean. Look he's someone that at some point of his career had said advertising is admission of failure of a product since then hunts become a gigantic advertiser. So that's okay. Everyone evolves But what I'm interested in just in an outside perspective of someone. Yeah his breath he really am wall. We have conversations with him Just about every two weeks. Those usually like lie within the Technology product subscriber relationship. We don't talk about out advertising Perhaps either surprisingly unsurprisingly But I think that the philosophy remains like. Don't mess up your can't slow. Yeah and and I think like you can see that through some of the technologies that we've built like we built Through our research engineering and development team red team one of the most performance sites We have a rapper That is a It's called Zeus and it ultimately loads the site and Ads Incredibly fast. Ultimately you know really thinking about that that user experience okay So talk to me a little bit about You mentioned before about subscriptions not working in opposition. How can they work together particularly when it comes to the First Party data so oh I would say perhaps not as specific as like what you'd think of like regular first party data in terms of people you know Allowing us to have have more data on them but I think it comes down to providing value so I mean I think in the best of cases we find places where both driving subscribers plus giving an advertiser opportunity to look at be looked at as kind of providing that experience variance As as the best result possible. So for instance we launched a new vertical actually two verticals over the last over the period of time. I'm that I've been here. The first one was by the way which is travel. Vertical focused on authentic travel. And the second is a vertical launcher which actually focuses. This is on E. Sports And both of those have been incredibly successful when you look at it from a reader respective but we're funded by brands And so we we WANNA continue to find places where We know things about either our current her perspective subscribers in terms of what they want from a product technology standpoint or from a content standpoint and how can we then help find A brand to to help provide that experience So bad as is sort of where I think the two can play together When it comes to thinking about First Party data I mean. When you have reoccurring visitors visitors you start to really understand? What a reader's expectation or what their behavior says about the type of content they they prefer or the type of format format? They prefer and the way that we work with brands and Toward that is if we know the subscribers coming in and they tend to favor video or they tend to favor infographics the way that we present either content or potential Ad Formats or something to get them into the the Content experience happens to be in the format that they would prefer. So when you're when you're too dependent on kind of the the fly by traffic ethic that is just produced from people happening upon your your site instead of people who are coming day in and day out in our loyalists You know it's it's much harder to capture that right but when you when you see these readers And you can anticipate their expectations it. It helps provide that real wealth of insights. We're in the the key cue for for Time period and impeachment is coming It is GonNa it's GonNa Happen Right around the holidays. It looks like This is GONNA lead to to flood of traffic. Are you seeing. Are you seeing advertisers. A gimme away from the impeachment stuff. I mean I think it's it's not only impeachment. I think that there. There is an allergy to politics general in many cases and I think can't be good for business. Well I think it's I think it's a bit I think brand safety right. Which is the thing that we're all talking about right now especially among the news publishers? I think it's been misconstrued in this way from from from what actually actually was meant to be keep brandy wasn't them away from Seattle actors like no beheading videos. Yeah right exactly truly truly truly not suitable for brands or you know thinking about a brand safety in the face of things like Ad Fraud Brennan has become this blanket. Get that basically sits across every single anti keyword targeting list that has become in some cases two to three thousand words long And and I think we've all and I think even advertisers are starting to see how paralyzing this is. You saw bank of America just announced that they are taking steps to Increase their own capabilities. or or you know Position within this brand safety because ultimately all this brand safety or all these keyword block lists are going to do is just end up putting advertisers. Who Want to reach Abebe audience or the sophisticated audiences that are artnews consumers and put them in places that are sports and entertainment? which you know isn't necessarily the type of alignment that they're looking for so instead? Instead of focusing on brand safety. I think the conversation has to so to turn into this idea brand suitability. How can we help brands? Appear in environments armaments that are more closely aligned to their messaging while keeping them away from things that truly are brand safe so we have they.

Jeff Bezos Amazon US Khaleda Price Hambrecht Hambre Lalas Michael Leader Retail Dot Co Seattle Fraud Iran Abebe bank of America Brennan
"ad agency" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

07:57 min | 1 year ago

"ad agency" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Necessitate so in terms of just strictly buying audience based targeting that is best best left up to something automated And it's very much why we are also getting into that game with With Zeus prime and some of the things that You you know can potentially compete again. That's that knows farmers and microscopes yes yup but But I think it also is something where we need to decide. Decide what we're going to spend our time and like attention and talent on and ultimately figuring out how to sell just banners with audience targeting attached to that. That's something that I think if that's all a brand wants and it's transactional that can be left up to the machine but the thing that brands like the Washington Post really have to offer And that are differentiated. Are Our relationships with our users insights. That are coming from those. So how Louis you know. What is the unique insight that we can give to a brand That that helps them understand. You know what audiences care about what they value you how to actually create utility when it comes to that relationship And that's where I think like the bigger partnerships That I'm really excited for our team to focus on can can so. How does that change the type of salesperson that you end up bringing it's going to sound trite but the consultative What does that mean everyone race saying it it it does? It'd probably gets thrown around a lot. It means first of all it means somebody that's passionate and gives a crap about what the other person across the table for them cares about. I mean if it's all all about if your entire reason for being is just to go in and like talk about some of the things that you have to sell and close a deal that is not something. I think that we'll get rewarded by the value exchange. Got Actually know your clients your clients business. You actually have to not only sell a program but then recognize recognize that the real work starts once you know the the program begins because you know. I think one of the things that one of the bumps in the road that publishing hit was everybody was taught that native content was going to save The industry against automation right. Yeah so everybody got really excited when you could sell six. Six seven. Figure deals based on Riemann rooms of just original content but at that transaction. Everyone forgot that they had to perform or or there had to be extremely good customer service and project management or we end up kind of where we are now at. Those deals had been really hard to renew so. Explain that a little bit more because we had a josh a stint combs in here and he's talking about the very same thing. Passers historically are not not really good at then. Yeah Yeah and I will say I think to me and and this comes back from even when when I was At Quartz like performance performance is probably as important as process and process sometimes outweighs performance because if you Sell in a big complex flex program to a client but your project management is crap It ultimately the clients haven't actually grown their capacity or how many people are on their side. Had to help manage these programs right. You have a lot of clients now who are sitting there saying great. We are doing bigger programs than ever before. But it's not like I got more headcount to support that's so multi You know in the best cases they they have ad agencies. who help them manage that? But a lot of it ends up hitting them directly. Because it's so reliant John you know their content or their insights so the ability to just a lot of publishers. I spent a lot of time setting up big great creative teams names for the presale process but really skimped on the project management team. And that's felt and you have conversations with clients all the time talk about just you know having PTSD from the execution of a program and you see it when it you know you can tell that it took fifteen to eighteen. Months wants between like someone announcing a big program and you ever seen that and on the web because it is time intensive and if there isn't a team team that is focused on essentially the success of this program feels like a big waste of time More people yeah and lower your margins. I think that that's where comes down to. Where are you focusing your people because four the things that can become automated and should become come automated? Let that happen and and focus that talent on project management. Okay so gotTA learn. Some agencies indices have been in this business for a while exactly exactly and you also can't rely on it as you're only mechanism for revenue. I think you know the idea of of something like content and I think you saw this happening so for a little while you saw a few publishers talking about how they are not only going to create studios but those studios are going to be ad agencies. They are going it'd be creative agencies and you've seen that get walked back. I think probably because this idea that you know you WANNA create a consultation agency Those agencies don't tend to be the most profitable thing I mean there's people the agency business when I don't know if you remember when when Google Google store hired a couple of people from Ogilvie for like oh no google advocacy business and I remember talking with an attitude. He's like what seriously he goes. They can and have it. I'll take let's take their search engine totally Much better business I mean and that's why I think you know we the post also look at our hard you know. Diversification of revenue to include reader revenue to include advertising and within that custom studio revenue But then also so SAS products like our business or or most recently Zeus. Quick break to hear from our sponsor the quick break now for a sponsor message from facebook. There is a new feature emerging in mobile APP publishing and that's APP bidding. It's not the easiest thing to wrap your head around but with the right partner. It's easy to figure but don't take it from me. Here's what facebook accuweather had to say about it. Waterfalls falls are inherently inefficient. The old waterfall method was kind of antiquated or backwards. At least hi I'm BJ Belen Drexler. Publishers Solutions Lucians and partnerships at facebook high batting trouble Pun. I am the director of operations and accuweather under waterfall mediation. If you if you look at what the process today when an ad impression becomes available the demand source actually willing to pay the most for a particular impression might never get called because it's just further down the chain so this creates a real potential loss of revenue Bidding is a way to offer advertisers an equal opportunity to build simultaneously on every oppression in a publisher's inventory be a single unified auction with the bidding system. You change change the the allocation of resources internally so you know if an OPS team was focused on pulling reports for all your waterfall partners changing priorities and CPM's APM's you can now turn your resources and and Vietnam into more revenue impacting parts of the business other than just managing your waterfall partners. So moving the bidding as a publisher I think is the most responsible thing you can do in regards to your business. Ready to learn more check out digitally dot com slash facebook slash APP bidding.

facebook Google Washington Post accuweather PTSD BJ Belen Drexler Louis josh Publishers Solutions Lucians APM Vietnam John Pun Ogilvie
"ad agency" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

09:12 min | 1 year ago

"ad agency" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Welcome to the digital podcast. I'm Brian Morrissey thank you for joining us. This week I was joined by Joy Robbins. Joy is the Sierra of the Washington. I I we talk about everything. From balancing a subscription business with an AD business to the problems with the F. B. and Y. News publishers. Heat Block List Hopi enjoyed episode joy walking on the PODCAST. Thank you so much for having me so you are eight months in now. It just out. You'd spent six years and quartz. Yeah Yep completely much larger organization yes absolutely absolutely. Explain that transition so I think coming from a place like courts which you know was this Example of a new publication created for the time I am in which it was launched To The post which has the balance of both this incredible rich heritage of brand and an audience but also I think has the spirit of a startup And I think that's why for me thinking about leaving somewhere that I had helped essentially build old the opportunity to go into something like that with loyalty at scale but still this relentless spirit for innovation Felt like an incredible next step. Okay so in the first eight months you reorganize the sales team and this is something we recently talked about. But like WANNA go into some depth about Explain what you did the first six months before an figure out how you want to be organized for success. Yeah So I spent my first six months at it. Sounds sort of cliche. But but just listening I talked a lot with our internal teams but probably more importantly I talked to our customers. are both existing customers and our potential aw customers and really started to understand. Okay the the post has several teams assigned to The market one sits in DC in our our retail and regional market really focused on that local market looking after brands who are just trying to reach Washingtonians but we have a Division that has grown exponentially the as we've become over ninety million unique S- in the US now in twenty five million internationally working with what we call the global brand team And that team had been organized by by Ad Agency so ultimately you're signed an agency and all of the clients that fell underneath agency were essentially your responsibility and You know it was working tremendously. Well I think that you know you've seen that through the growth at the post is experienced however I think we all are starting to see he is that In a lot of ways a the importance of understanding clients business is is is paramount For both our agency partners as well it was our selves. We need to better understand their business. Better understand how they make money And in another agencies off exactly exactly well and and I think that's never a part of the thinking it really has to come down to. How do you actually make the agency your partner In ultimately serving the brand rand on the other side of things you start to see more and more that the agencies represent their own business model they are facing their own challenges they are facing their own method or of of disruption. So how do we stop looking at these ad agencies is essentially you know the purveyors of the RFP which by the way my own I think the RFP processes is has been broken a long time but probably never never ever more than right now. But how do we also then start to think about what I think the platforms have done a really. We really good job at is is thinking about the ad agencies and how we can add value there as well so explain that for for those unfamiliar with how the platforms have organized. is their sales efforts. Sure so I think I mean I. Years and years now a lot of the platforms have had these agency development teams That have been working directly with The higher levels in the teams within the agencies to really understand how to both utilize their platforms best leverage their platforms as well as provide value to those agencies particularly when it comes to some sort of unique capability or partnership that they might have So you know that may seem intuitive live when you think about okay agencies are going to have to buy the platforms ultimately aren't they just helping them figure out how to do that. Most effectively perhaps but but for a brand like the post what I see the opportunity as is we are constantly innovating Both in our product as well as in our editorial we have a user lab down in. DC where we're constantly looking at User behavior reader behavior creating insights and to me that ability to leverage that in a in a in a particular way or or think about You know different ways that the Post and particularly agency group or holding company can actually Add unique value is is an opportunity for the agency so ultimately the way that we have organized since October. First essentially is we've created a group who our client partner teams and our agency partner teams and the client partner teams are responsible for or owning the relationship at the client level. All the way through to the agency team focused on that client. An our agency partners will be tasked with breath Really working with the senior level executives at holding companies and AD agencies to understand you know what are their pain points. What are the things that their clients are tasked talking with And how can we ultimately partnered to create something that adds value to their. So you want to have a relationship with the average at the advertiser level. Whenever absolutely I it's critical? I think as much as you know. It's funny I always thought coming from a brand that was perhaps not as well known like courts and before even the BBC which believe it or not was not as well known in the US I always thought just Visibility and familiarity was something that was really kind of hardest to overcome when it came to the clients directly but even a brand like the Washington Post who you know are is not well known. They're still an importance of educating educating at the brand level as to you know what our capabilities are. What are the audience How can we actually help These marketers uniquely weekly. Reach their Their targets Gimme your beef with the RFP So I think the RFP probably worked when people were just vying holes on pages and you could tell somebody the audience that you're targeting the ultimate sizes of the creatives but as things that people don't know give us an example of what appears is like well could range everything from like eight pages of just trying to say that they want something out of the box and never been done before each at scale scale exactly but but also with never been done before but with a clear Roi Capabilities So so you know it comes down to defining and target audience Stating in objective of the of the brand which you know in three sentences or less and Some of the creative tactics that agency will expect every once in a while even understand how you might be evaluated In terms of your submission and but as the marketing journey and and as what clients really expect has become more sophisticated and complex. The way that you are actually going to be able to our peak or something like content or data or insights is just it requires an in in person conversation And often I think what's most troubling about the R. F. P. is it will ask you for a twenty four or forty eight hour turnaround time. which and new and also your best most ambitious ideas at your most aggressive efficient pricing? And so you are you know adding to the human capital required quired at any media company to really like as those scale as you have four hundred five hundred six hundred eight hundred. RFP's if you're close rate doesn't actually really go up with those are essentially just adding human capital to like a game of like loss. Then he can get ghosted to expel. You never know if you're actually actually just an idea factory right so I mean when you don't get feedback but then you ultimately see your idea pop up in some program another publisher you're like wow coincidence students surely All this move to automation. Should I mean it should change the nature of salesforce explain what automation can instill instill cannot do. Yeah because a lot of advertising is becoming automated to some degree yet at the same time the sort of Doomsday Proclamations the units can eliminate. Doesn't seem like it's happened. No and I think that that's I think one of the things that we're really focused on right now is understanding what is best left if to automation and what does a direct relationship still.

US DC Ad Agency Brian Morrissey Joy Robbins Washington Washington Post F. B. BBC Y. News The market R. F. P.
"ad agency" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"ad agency" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Nothing more than an ad agency for the Democrats every single thing has to be bent and twisted to be in favor of the Democrats. Whether or not it's true, whether or not it's believable, whether or not it's factually, correct, everything that you get from the mainstream media will always come from a democrat perspective. Please believe that it is true the John McCullough show weekday evenings at six on the patriot. This is Darryl. Would join me at six o'clock on the John McCullough show right here on FM one zero one point five and AM fourteen hundred the patriot. Keeping Uncle Sam accountable to you every day Hannity is on. All right. Twenty five now til the top of the hour. We're gonna hit our phones. Ethan wants to weigh in on some of what is on your mind, their Sarah's we March towards socialism was just funny that the Blasios he wants that you make enough money on this show with all due respect that he's one of the people that he wants to take some of your money. Oh, yeah. Elise money and Jason's money indefinitely. Linda, Linda, he can't take my money. You're gonna stop it. I'll stop him. Oh, how are you going to stop him? Well, he Bailey shows up for work. So I'm just going to pretend to be mayor. You'll just pretend to be absolutely oh, the bottom line identify as mayor de Blasio wrong. They if they is he said, the wealth is in the wrong hands. Working people have done their share for decades. Working people have gotten more and more productive at the same time, they've gotten smaller and smaller share of the wealth. They create. Here's the truth. Brothers and sisters. There's plenty of money in the world. There's.

Elise money mayor de Blasio John McCullough Jason Darryl Linda Ethan Hannity Bailey Sarah
"ad agency" Discussed on FunnelHacker Radio

FunnelHacker Radio

03:47 min | 3 years ago

"ad agency" Discussed on FunnelHacker Radio

"Know apples a perfect example. You know if I wanted to switch from, you know, an iphone, Android of all my contacts who so much stuff, you know. So that's really the biggest thing operator and then continually being more valuable to your client man value bombs left and right. I real quick say on reading this book right now, it's called play bigger. You haven't read it. You gotta get this one. It's I have not read out. Get up right now. Honestly, it's far it's all about becoming a category king. Okay. It's been a game changer for me. I honestly, it is the best book I've ever read, especially for where we are right now, who is the author on that play bigger at the book is played bigger and the authors four different authors l. ramp Ramdan Dave Peterson, Christopher Lockhead and Kevin Meaney. Okay, perfect. Going to get it right now and one thing on books just because. We bring that up and you guys saw that. I had two books literally with right now, the more you learn, the more you earn. Okay. Do not use an insistent, not take action, but you must study constantly. One of the biggest things that I feel has been one of the biggest reasons why we've been able to get on the scene is I'm obsessive about getting better. I'm obsessive about learning. I read one hundred hundred bucks a year in lease and listen to ours, and our dozens hundreds of hours of trainings and continuing getting better. And I've spent over a hundred thousand dollars out of my own pocket out of my own pocket and the last eighteen months on mentorship in training and courses. It is so important. The ROI you get on that is indescribable. And so many people think that learning ends once they're done with school or their college or whatever, and no wonder they don't actually have a big victory life, right? They most people stay in the same spot. Go learn something. You can separate yourself from the field because most people are lazy. They really are. I teach my kids. The only thing I ever cared about is that They they. love to learn. I don't care what they do, but you have to love to learn. Yup. Well, Nick, I know you've got a ton of things going on. You've been so valuable to us in having you here. Hardy words from you mile smell that literally unreal. Like I can't wait. Was episode drops like listen to it a couple of times because just filled with now you bombs gold nuggets, and hopefully a lot of people listen to take hard like, you know, net net worth is in the network, got more you learn the morning earn and really immerse yourself into anything that you have a passion for that you want to turn into kind of a career or a lifestyle. So Nick, awesome man. The only thing I wanna leave at one more thing for for anybody listening because I think everybody needs to hear this. This is not an easy journey if we are literally trying to build a life of our own on our own terms, as most of us here in the click funnels community do it takes work. Okay. It's scary. It's scary to reach out to the business owner. It's scary to do certain things, but what scares me the most is working on sixty five years old and you know, maybe having a couple years of my life on my own terms right. That should scare you a hell of a lot more than reaching out to business owner or starting your own business or betting on yourself. Right. So I just want to give everyone a vote of confidence you can do this. Anybody can do it. The people who are doing it or no better than you. They just are taking action to you're not willing to take. So get out there. Take some action bet on yourself, burn the boats and make it happen. That's all I got. Well, one last I know I'm going to get hammered and if I don't tell it right now, people are going to be asking, how do I get a hold on it? So if you want to get a hold of me. The best is going to be at seven figure crusader nation this the Facebook page. So go to Facebook, look up, look up. Seven figure crusaders fell with a k. k. r. u. s. a. d. r. so seven figure crusader nation. You can hook up with all his value bombs. I drop areas during him out there as well..

Facebook Kevin Meaney Nick business owner Dave Peterson k. k. r. u. s. a. d. Christopher Lockhead hundred thousand dollars sixty five years eighteen months
"ad agency" Discussed on FunnelHacker Radio

FunnelHacker Radio

03:24 min | 3 years ago

"ad agency" Discussed on FunnelHacker Radio

"Your son was over here is the coolest thing ever. I wish I could met up with them. I was shown on a head headed time because it's so important because without the right psychology without the right mindset, you can't get anywhere. Of course, you're not going to sell anything. You're not going to be able to grow. So that's that's what I got on that and said that you you'd be w, so I love it. Yeah. So my son Parker or my other son, Chandler, and his wife ran were both there. So anyway, let's come back to where we were, and that is you were talking about here as far as not being the savior for these companies and the situation to where so many people when they think of the agency model. You don't have to go out and I'm to just, I'm sure there's somebody will take take my business and it kind of goes back to what you just said is about mindset. And that is, I think when a lot of people start off in the agency model, they don't understand the true value which they're able to bring. And so they think I just have to get a client and whoever it is. It doesn't matter if you don't mind pick things up there and let's go from there. Yeah, absolutely. So one of my one of my main mentors in life, he has something I love to say. He's like, look, if you're an online market or stop hanging out with their online marketers, you guys, are you guys don't charge up. You know, he's like, go hang out with the big agencies because what we don't understand the value provide, it's so strong, especially in this day in age compared to what the big agencies do. I mean, I was just talking with one of my one of my buddies who met me out here in Chicago and he is bidding for, you know, multimillion dollar yearly deal with a big agency. Big agency is a boost goosing post. There's no director sponsors. No tracking. There is no anything, and that's a big agency. They're doing it because they don't know what to do. So we don't. Understand the value that we provide. And as I was saying earlier, like the biggest nude for small businesses in America is new costumers, and that's what we provide, you know. And so many people are so scared to go, talk to people about that and go do it. So it's important to know your value. And there's a big paradox because a lot of times people are getting started if you more comfortable with small manger fees and small businesses. But what's crazy is those are the hardest ones. Those are the ones that sucked the life at you. Do they suck the life out of you when you work with somebody who's got a big budget and that all they care about his metrics, it's all much easier its own, which easier. So it's like this weird paradox going on because we're nervous or scared, whatever, and end up being the worst. And then they get a bad experience. They might give up too early because you know the the, the other thing I want to mention not giving up, you've got it. If you want to build a life, your own, if you want to build a life for my marketing, build an agency role, things like that. It's good to take some more. It's gonna take some ups and downs, you know. So you've gotta be able to put up with rejection. You got gotta, you know, not give in when you're told no things of that nature and focus on bigger clients, and I'm gonna take it back to what I said. Really Oprah. Some clients that are already spending money. That's what you want to focus on. That is the biggest key in his civically in traditional world because you can out beat radio TV, newspaper all day. Every day are mining. Netflix that good doubt being, you know. So miles. What do you think I've been doing most to talk there? I'm gonna let you die down to this stuff here. Okay. Well, I'm fine. I'm in the last time. I said something was started to sweat talking too much. No, I think Nick, I have a question for you as far as I think a lot of people out there when they get started. They're trying to figure out what they're doing, but then they also want to get that first one. I think that first win bills, momentum. How are you? Said you spent ten had advice for people just starting out..

Netflix Parker director Chicago Chandler America Nick
"ad agency" Discussed on FunnelHacker Radio

FunnelHacker Radio

03:11 min | 3 years ago

"ad agency" Discussed on FunnelHacker Radio

"And I was trying bars at possibly could to save this company and bottom line. I lost a ton of money and they ended up declaring bankruptcy and that was the end of that marketing. And one of the biggest things for anybody who's listening who's worked with be very, very wary of anybody who's not currently spending money on marketing dollars because they still have to be able to close the leads. So week actually qualify the business owners, right? Like we need to make sure they're spending money. We didn't make sure that they're actually have sales process. They know they're close rates, things of that nature because are so many people when they're getting started that, oh, my uncle owns a flower shop down the road, you know, and maybe we can. And it's like you, you never wanna be the savior for the company. You know, as you saw like you don't ever want to save it because then all of a sudden they're going to be a nightmare to you and they're gonna be texting you all hours of the night and it's gonna keep you up at night and it's just it's, it's not worth it for five hundred dollar thousand fifty. You know, go find people that are already spending money and show them how to spend that money better. That's that's what it's all about. And right now it's all about going at traditional advertising, right? I mean, the newspaper TV radio costs are through the roof. I'm not saying you can't get in Ottawa on those. You can, but there through the roof for most people don't do it properly. And I always use the example in in my groups and people I talk to in Oklahoma City for one Sunday run. One one full page insert in the Sunday run. Oklahoma City got fifteen thousand dollars. Imagine what we can do with a fifteen thousand dollar budget on Facebook. We give people like billion lead using losing. Click funnels van so go, ask people spend money. That's one. The biggest things I would tell anybody. Oh, man. I hope you guys were listener taking. If you're driving the car, you need to pull over. Take notes on this one because what you just said, I think is Silkroad two things I've picked up there. One is you have to understand there is a language with every single industry and the better you are at speaking that language, the easier it is free to close that type of a business owner. The other thing, which I think is so bad, but what you just said, Nick net is you know what their cost is for advertisements outside of on my marketing. Because if you know that you know what type of leads how much they already spent their spending. Fifteen grand at fifteen thousand goes a long way to Facebook. Ad campaign. Let alone, you know, what are y is typically there. I mean it's real easy going and say, so you're spent fifteen thousand dollars. How many leads did you get out of that? How many those are you call? It just opens up. It's a totally different conversation. So it's so cool for me to see. I love people have immersed theirselves in their businesses deeply as you have. Congratulations and my absolutely man. It's been a long struggle. You know, it's been a roller coaster to figure this type of stuff out. And I, you know, I do. So these basically sitting in a hotel room in Chicago UP w just finished internet crashes because he's just dropping so many value bombs internet could not keep up with Nick. So you remember where we were, if not, I don't, but I will say something about UT UP w in Chicago, and I will say, I want to say l. listeners focus on your mind oaks on your psychology. It is the most important gift that you could ever give yourself in regards to life man, Air New..

business owner Facebook Nick net Oklahoma City Chicago Nick Ottawa fifteen thousand dollars fifteen thousand dollar five hundred dollar
"ad agency" Discussed on FunnelHacker Radio

FunnelHacker Radio

03:59 min | 3 years ago

"ad agency" Discussed on FunnelHacker Radio

"You pay you money in order, run those ads and get new customers in. But the great thing is we are literally doing what most. So I work with small local local business, right? I work with a lot of small businesses across America. What is the biggest struggle for most all small businesses across America getting more customers? Right. And so it makes it so easy. So we've got some. That's great that we can go sell to people in the fulfillment is so easy you. I can't say enough good things about funnels, Nick nickel, one, two quick questions. The first one is I wanna break down this whole agency model because this is the thing that ever starts. It's becoming pretty rampant as miles is going to test you right now. That is, we have a lot. Say there they've got a digital agency, but there's so many different facets of that agency that you can focus on. Sometimes it's an agency runs, just Facebook others. It's an agency that focuses on creating funnels. Another one is an agency that is based on helping systematising existing product or service. Another one is helping them automate and take things to the next level. So when you talk about a digital agency from what you're doing right now, what what's that mean? Yeah, absolutely. And it's really important question because a lot of people screw up at the beginning when they're trying to start agencies because it helped coach lot agency Air New agency owners, and they try and be everything to everybody. There a Email marketing company, their website, design, their SEO, their Facebook, their everything might advice specialize in specialized so hard core that you only you're speaking to one specific type of client. And I want to give you an example. We made a million dollar company by selling one added and one landing page literally. One image. One ad copy in one landing page, right? And it was for osteoarthritis of the knee using high warning acid injections that. I can't even spell that. But, but it's so important to niche down in special Ed. It's okay to specialized guys. That's what I want to tell everybody. It's like, you don't need to be everything to everybody. You don't be mastered everything. If you're working from her basement here, solo newer, you aren't good at everything like quit acting like you are get good at one thing. Learn how to sell that one thing and go help one specific type of client. And then once you start to grow, you build a team shirt, you can add more services, right? But so many people there, the Jack about traits quote, always comes to my mind, jack-of-all-trades master of nut. You've got to specialize. I'm gonna even though I'm a better marketer than you know, a majority of the roof guys out there. I could probably I could learn roofing industry in about a week. I'm gonna lose nine times out of ten to the roofing consultant or the roofing marketing agency because they're speaking the language, you know, even though I can figure it out because I understand marketing and his point like you've got to, you got to specialize in niche the niche, like not only do you want to niche, you want knits down even. In deeper, right? So if you're working with plastic surgeons, you wanna work with Brian plastic. You know, like it really released the civic and it makes it so much easier to sell those clients from ADA z. it makes it easier to sell. It makes easier prospect and also makes easier to duplicate and scale your advertising in what you're actually creating Ford specific clients on my gosh, I'd love that. I mean for one, it echoes everything taught and expert secrets as far as basically starting off with the three markets and going down to and I didn't. I didn't plan this and I don't know if we're getting. Expert secrets on his trip to Chicago. I love it. There's two bucks, and here's the other one which was also recommended adequate funnels event. So, but I think that's real important, and that is too often even people in the digital marketing agency, they find themselves in a red ocean and they're going, I'm I can't make any money, and maybe that's maybe that's what it was for the first ten months of zeros. If you're fighting their red ocean, there's just no opportunity. That's how in the world did you decide on whatever that long word was that ended in arthritis as your niche? So that's a great question..

Facebook America Nick nickel Email marketing company arthritis Chicago Air New Brian plastic consultant Ford million dollar ten months
"ad agency" Discussed on FunnelHacker Radio

FunnelHacker Radio

02:40 min | 3 years ago

"ad agency" Discussed on FunnelHacker Radio

"Zero. Sales zero sits right before we found our actual agency model in. It wasn't until I got into the click funnels community over, make sure people understand that because we've talked about two, two different ten month categories, one ten months from zero to seven figures. I think the other part is there was ten months prior to that zero of basically ten months of zero. Is that? Absolutely. So before we settled on the agency model that actually. I started making money and where we went, I was a website designer. I was an issue guy, all kinds of stuff. And it wasn't until actually came into Russell Brunson rolling found click on that. I discovered the Facebook ad agency model that we've figured out. And once we actually started working on that, that's when we went to over a million dollars in ten month period, you know, and in his spent ten months of going the wrong types of people, the wrong groups. I didn't know what I was doing and it wasn't like on some of these communities in started mentoring under other people, learning brother, people that know my life was changed in while I appreciate that. I know that miles has. We were just talking about this whole concept as far as agencies and we just rolled out the mother funnel which is taken forever. But when I, if you're trying to identify his is what type of business people are in and miles was talking about this whole concept as far as agencies yet? No, and like its or I don't have product, I don't have. I don't have information to sell any of these any of these things, but with new monitoring, we've ruled out resolve. Templates in there. They're literally plug and play replacing image in a headline in. I think that that's going to benefit a lot of people looking to getting kind of the agency round because. To to start agency. There's a lot that goes into it, but you don't have to have your own product. You can help other people. We had Westview Leon, just a few episodes ago and he was talking about kind of has an agency model going on. He looks for three things and click on. I'm sure you can attest to it. He looks for one that he can build a foul or three hours be or two. You always need to spend a few hours a month on it, and then three is profitable from the get-go. And so I mean with click vinyls and you can attest to it, it can really help someone kind of get an agency up and going off the ground in probably some of the same success. You know that maybe not the same degree that you as far as million ten months, but getting that first length. Yeah, absolutely. Yeah. No, it comes down to a point where the only challenge really is, how do I sell local businesses on this? Because the fulfillment side of things between click finals, the community people willing to help you out Facebook ads, the ease of it. The the only challenge is literally trying to sell clients in get them to join..

miles Facebook Russell Brunson Westview Leon ten months ten month million ten months million dollars one ten months three hours
"ad agency" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"ad agency" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Great factory a great ad agency or great photographer retail store will keep coming back as long as they behave with integrity when i find a brand i like i'll stay with it as long as it gives me what i expected them once again integrity i don't change i stay with them into they forced me to leave if i find a car brand that has had standing style performance and quality they can only forever i'll just keep repeating i will keep coming and i will be a consistent repeat customer which is the best kind of customer any company wants if that car companies designed slips if they lose consistency i'm done i'm out of there i don't know maybe as i get older my hair gets greyer i'd like to think that that brings some wisdom while i feel wiser i also feel i don't have the the same patients once did i just can't suffer fools i don't have the inclination to compromise in situations and stick them out just call it quits i leave i'm out of there as i've said before benjamin franklin had a great quote well done is better than well said i don't wanna hear from people i want to see what they do but shouldn't people shouldn't companies shouldn't products live up to their promises deliver on brand give you what you pay for if not i don't know about you but i'm outta there in tonight i'll show for all the reasons i've just listed our show is entitled i'm outta here or a madda here i must admit it's more difficult to say the proper way but i'll tell you what it's also more difficult to satisfy me now where i am in life maybe it's age maybe success maybe it's raising.

benjamin franklin
"ad agency" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"ad agency" Discussed on WJR 760

"An ad agency for seventeen years on the chrysler business and then win a fiat me on mr murky owning came over to the united states and announce fiat was coming back i joined fc a and for seven years i was the marketing director for the fiat brand and that was an amazing experience has not many times and uh you know someone's career you're able to work on an auto brand launched in the united states and we had a lot of fun bring in that brand back building up the dealer network and this past year i got a phone call asking the come down and you know i had no idea what to expect when the doors opened at quicken loans but it is an amazing amazing place amazing culture you know what's been done in downtown detroit over the last ten years since we move downtown building up to seventeen thousand team members and it's just it's an amazing place to be and i absolutely love and been very blessed to have this opportunity loves vice way to begin with a gang buster awardwinning if you will commercial four rocket mortgage which was first introduced a couple of years ago with the super bowl tell me about your journey tickets along the road to the super bowl yes our journey really started about seven months ago paul we we've decided to go into the super bowl we have an inhouse creative team of which they were pitching ideas and we also went to outside aid agencies that's very common now in the mark getting his at the end the marking world more and more uh we did that quite a bit at fca uh as well so we went out we went out to eleven agencies and had them pitches ideas we looked at over a hundred ideas in one just kept rising to the top and that's what we ultimately took to the super bowl was our translator concept when we decided that was the the right idea we wanted to find the right talent and we did some searching and lo and behold you know we won with keegan michael key whose you know from southfield our backyard in our backyard when to you a d winter penn state and we we took the idea to keegan he absolutely loved that he collaborated with us on asana he wrote some.

united states fiat marketing director detroit southfield chrysler keegan michael keegan seventeen years seven months seven years ten years
"ad agency" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:41 min | 4 years ago

"ad agency" Discussed on KGO 810

"The super outback is like the lesbian car driver i didn't realize that allow i didn't i put jewish subaru's days the subaru and hamas cell come up the deal so come up here that's crazy the lesbian corriere apparently an ad campaign was made toward lesbians i say never it was i was a podcast and they hire to this crew this ad agency in this ad agency they were like you know they came to him and they said you know what we discovered lesbian love this car as they went to subaru and they say they're sitting in the room key maginness pitch and they're all looking around in the president was like jeanmichel with eric killed in but they what they could near the the the i remember the picture the ad when the in the newspaper there to women the other side of the car ripe and and they said at first there would have look at each other thinner they can't look at each other with a license plates had p town at least his province town is which is a real game back out at the end cape cod threats against unsold miss review of information a is rinku it's a lesser inkind that's iin it's a lesbian car you're going around with lesbian cars venture route with all states down everything happens from time transformers going to transform into alleged be akaroa may be lifted being porsche it all depends on few ballymena spaces unless macarthur for i don't know with now i don't know i america doesn't work is this was put it out there lobbying conner will go to the clip but anyhow you gotta trump got a trump impression grow undermine trump right now you know might look like penises geez it's as simple as their rulings judit so mind yes hired you seen it every night on a legal talk shows and stuff so you're gonna let it go for a while it has a best is hamon girl gammon he does.

subaru the deal president porsche macarthur conner hamas eric america
"ad agency" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

02:29 min | 4 years ago

"ad agency" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Of the range of uh ideas that the american people are willing to accept in its best manipulated by what we i would now call the swamp through the biggest ad agency in the world and new york city and so let me expand on unless expand on this instrument to be erupt your but the late joseph overton i've read about this the overton window theory is that this as you said it's the range of short of acceptable political discourse on any topic and the window of acceptable options is defined not by what the port politicians how they define it but rather by what they believed they can support and still win reelection so you know there's there's been a lot said about the overton window with the election of donald trump because of course there the shifting policy and a shifting shed of the guidelines over what is in is acceptable behaviour a discourse uh well in the overturn window the event that was a good triggers the american people to finally sure under the constitution liberties and in particular their firearms was nuclear hall of nuclear blast off in the desert and it was or stall by event but this could be that kind of triggering event that the democrats and the socialists totalitarian you're looking forward to get us ensure under a gun rights and thereby the right to protect the ability to protect the rest of our rates listen when you hear the the the antigun rhetoric that always stems from this kind of an event from jimmy kimmel all too elizabeth warren to hillary clinton all and all the rest of them and you realize for example in this case now they're focusing on the kind of uh what was the term lance that the of the of the adjustment that he supposedly made to this to a semi automatic weapon to they basically or essentially turn it into an automatic weapon there's some term it some device of bump stock all right and so apparently a bump stock is legal so oh you're i guess we're understanding and bear with me because i am not as well versed on guns and weapons as many of you are a bump stock is is a device the turns a semi automatic weapon into essentially a machinegun nerd automatic anna bumps stock is legal so you know folks like jimmy kimmel or a up they're crying and whining and complaining that okay.

donald trump jimmy kimmel elizabeth warren new york joseph overton hillary clinton