25 Burst results for "Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome"

"acute respiratory distress syndrome" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:12 min | 2 d ago

"acute respiratory distress syndrome" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Rachel mentioned that she was previously working multiple jobs working sometimes 70 hours per week. She's now unable to work at all. And the outlook for her working isn't good. And this is a woman who is in her early 50s, she didn't expect to have to retire so young. It's just the isolation. It's not even the financial, you know, 'cause we do all right, so that's fine, but it's like, I would go to work every day and see my Friends and enjoy them and to chat and talk to people and do my work or whatever. I don't have that anymore. I don't go out, really. I mean, I'll go out to see my kids, my grandkids, whatever. Run errands, but since I don't drive, I've got to wait for a ride. So it's had a profound effect on her professionally, but even, you know, socially and economically and not just not just Kelly, but the rest of the family. It has affected me. I still get choked up, but what I find is I can be driving along in the car and just listening to music that has nothing to do with anything. And all of a sudden, it will hit me, and I will feel very sad. Only for a moment, but there's still those little flashes. And I suspect those will go on for a while. I don't know how long, but it says to me that if something like that is affecting me, I can't even begin to imagine how it must be for the child, the woman who went through all of this first person. That's Kelly McCarthy's mother, Brenda Reed. And I think it's important to note that when a patient does spend a lot of time in the ICU, the former effects across families is quite profound. A study from France showed that about a third of relatives of ICU COVID patients suffered PTSD as a result. And in the case of Kelly McCarthy, the woman you write about in your story, she was thought to be dying and the medical team called her family to say it may be time to say goodbye. And in fact, her life was saved simply by reducing the amount of sedation she was on. Yeah, so initially, Kelly McCarthy was traded in a county hospital, essentially, and her acute respiratory distress syndrome just got worse and worse to the point where it looked like her respiratory failure would become fatal. And so her family was called in to say goodbye. We did go and see her. We did say our goodbyes, but I told her to hang on because we were working on something that would be beneficial to her, and she couldn't she couldn't hear us, so we didn't know if she could hear us as I say she was unconscious. Around the same time, Brenda Kelly's mother learned that double long transplants were occurring in May offer some lifesaving benefit for Kelly and so calls were made to the Brigham and women's hospital in Boston to have Kelly transferred. I had seen a story where at Brigham and women's they had along center and there was a man. I believe he was from Nebraska, had come in both lungs were gone because of COVID that he had transplants. He survived, he was home in Nebraska, doing quite well and recovering, and so we said to the doctor, we want to transfer. I spoke to daniella llamas, an intensive care Doctor Who took over Kelly's care and she realized that Kelly's lungs weren't the main problem. She just, as daniela llamas said, needed to have her sedation turned off, or turned down slowly. And over the course of the next week or two, they did titrate down all her sedation and opioids and things. And eventually she was able to come off the mechanical ventilator. What do you take away from all this about the lessons that have been learned from this and how in the future the harm that can come from this sort of treatment, though well intended can cause? So talking to a lot of folks working in ICUs in different capacities, it seems as though we can never not allow family caregivers back into the ICU is that we need to figure out a way of keeping that very important component of intensive care back in the ICU. So that is something that we've really learned from this pandemic that it's so important to keep family members there in the room with patients. She's just a funny person, but a sensitive person and a kind person, and I watch her now, and I always know she was strong and brave. But I watch her now as recovery continues, but at a snail's pace, unfortunately, and the recovery in the end may not be exactly what she had hoped for, but she's doing better now than she was in the beginning. And her sense of humor does bring her through, but it's funny because there'll be days when I'll be talking to her and she's very bubbly and upbeat and I'll say, okay, you're having a bad day, aren't you? And she'd say, why? Why do you think that? I said, I'm your mother, and when you're upset, you're extremely bubbly and outgoing. And she went, yes, I guess I'm having a bad day. So they are in there, but she's her coping mechanism is positively amazing. You can read Jason Gale's story about COVID and sedation at Bloomberg dot

Kelly McCarthy Kelly Brenda Reed ICU Brenda Kelly Brigham and women's hospital Brigham and women acute respiratory distress syn Rachel daniella llamas daniela llamas Nebraska PTSD France Boston Jason Gale Bloomberg
"acute respiratory distress syndrome" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

06:43 min | Last month

"acute respiratory distress syndrome" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"So really trying to feel a little more prescriptive for people as opposed to just don't do this. Right. Well, let's talk about fever and heat, because this is another thing. It's like, oh, I have an ache, I'll take I'll take an advil. Oh, you know, I'm feeling phlegmy. I'll take a cough. These are all very knee jerk, common reactions to ailments that we've all experienced. And on that note, the idea that when you have a fever, oh, we need to bring the fever down, like this is not good, right? So walk us through the protective mechanism of the fever and what it's doing to us and when it is appropriate to try to lower it and when we should just let it run its course. And I'll tell you, fever is one of those things that was good than bad and maybe getting good again. So this idea of, you know, you think about different cultures and things like sweat lodges and saunas, et cetera. That's all thermal therapy. That's all heat therapy. And hippocrates. I mean, everybody's familiar with the all disease begins in the gut, but hippocrates also famously said, give me a fever, and I can cure any illness. And I think it was in 1927 an Austrian physician won the Nobel Prize for heat therapy that was being used to treat neurosyphilis. So successfully, I mean, of course we have drugs now that are more effective, but so heat therapy and this idea of fever as being therapeutic is not something new we're seeing now thermotherapy and cancer finding that using heat to treat cancer cells to kill them is effective polio virus replicates 250 times faster at normal body temperature compared to with a fever. So fever is a really important defense your body has of slowing down, if not halting viral replication. And what's the first thing we do when we have a virus? And a fever as we reach for an antipyretic, something to stop the fever. So understanding that fever is our body's sign that there's something going on and also our body's therapeutic response to try and handle that thing, whatever it is that's going on. So just a replication rates. And so in the book, I do talk about when it's okay to take an antipyretic or maybe if you can even wait a little bit and then take it, allow your body time to try and get its antiviral fever virus slowing down replication processes going. But there's really interesting data to there's some mice studies. If we look particulate elderly people, a lot of the morbidity and mortality around COVID with elderly people is this condition ARDS, acute respiratory distress syndrome, which is essentially lung failure. And studies in mice show that at high heat for a few hours, we don't see the respiratory cells dying. The same way, and then when you think about the fact that elderly people often are not able to mount a high febrile response, right? Kids can get their temperature up to one O 5 one O 6, but older people not so much. And so they're looking experimentally now at whether thermal therapy might be a treatment for ARDS. I mean, this hasn't gone into the human stage yet, but they've seen it in mice for slowing down the death of the respiratory cells. And then again, we've seen similar thermotherapy happening in the cancer world. So again, we have to be thoughtful about this and we have to understand the process. What is our body trying to do and make sure that we're not sabotaging that process in our efforts to feel better and there are plenty of things you can do to feel better when you have a fever that can do that and make you more comfortable without sabotaging that process. And also understanding for our kids, it's not just a temperature. It's what else is happening with your kid is your kid lists less, not eating, not making eye contact, especially with babies. That's a more worrisome sign. The kid might have a fever of a 104, but it's running around eating, playing, laughing, that's a whole different matter. So what else do you look at and how do you how do you make the evaluation obviously? This should be done in concert with people's healthcare practitioner, but giving people some basic information about that and some questions to ask. Yeah, well, obviously, if you have an elevated body temperature and that's slowing replication rates of the acute viral infection that you're trying to combat, you want to allow that to take place, but I would presume that there are other physiological systems that get disrupted by an elevated body temperature and at some point when that threshold that temperature threshold exceeds a certain set level, it becomes problematic and you do want to bring it down. That's right. And again, it's not just the number. It's what else is going on. But I'll tell you, and that's why it's important to have that done in a natural medical setting and not just rely on what I am putting out in my book. A couple of other things in terms of the gut fever connection. So when you have a fever, slows down viral replication, it also recruits additional immune cells for the immune response and can enhance production of certain antiviral cytokines and interestingly in the gut, it helps to tighten up those junctions. So those connections between cells. We talked about intestinal permeability, the tight junctions, when you have a fever, the tight junctions realize, oh, we're battling something here. We need to tighten up our battalions. Our forces here and the junctions become tighter and the gut membrane becomes less permeable to whatever virus bacterial et cetera, your fighting. So it's just fascinating how your immune system, your God, all the different things that are going on when you have a fever. Super interesting. Did you look at any of the research or science that's coming out on sauna therapy, not in the context of combating an infection, but just as a daily practice in terms of what it's doing to us? Benefits, negatives. I haven't rich, but I'm a huge sauna fan. Anything hot. Heated vinyasa flow yoga. I love saunas. I feel like heat and you could hearken back to ayurved and talk about pita wata and maybe do some analysis there, but it certainly feels good in my body. What give me a little update? Well, I mean, I'm certainly no expert on this, but I know there's some indications that perhaps might be a longevity extender and certainly as an athlete in terms of recovery and all these other kind of things.

fever ARDS fever virus cancer lung failure hippocrates cough Nobel Prize polio fever connection
"acute respiratory distress syndrome" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

08:27 min | Last month

"acute respiratory distress syndrome" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"It's hyperactive, and then you see all of these autoimmune diseases or allergies to foods and such. The cytokine storm that comes with certain people who succumb to COVID, et cetera, or the underperforming immune system that you mentioned where you're not producing the interferons in the cytokines necessary to combat the disease on the front lines, the virus on the front lines. Yeah, that's a beautiful summary. And I think even dividing it further into internal threats and external threats can help to clarify even more, but you gave a beautiful summary of what it is. So if we think about an overactive immune system, on the one hand, I want people to think about internal threats. And that would manifest as autoimmune disease. So that's basically when your body is reacting to your own body's normal tissue. It's recognizing your own joints, skin, et cetera, as foreign and mounting an immune response. And so we see that with autoimmune disease, affect one in four Americans, there are over a hundred different autoimmune diseases now, and this is a list that's growing, unfortunately. We can talk about why that's happening later. When we look still in the category of an overactive immune system, we look at external threats. And so that would be people having allergies, peanut allergies, severe allergies to bee stings. I was exploring the Martian buford, South Carolina, and my husband's hometown back in May, and we had the we had the unfortunate privilege of being bitten up by chiggers, these insects. And his healed in about two or three weeks, and mine are still active four months later, I've had this sort of unknown delayed hypersensitivity reaction to it. And maybe because he grew up in South Carolina and he's been bitten by chiggers before as a kid and I never have, but that's an example of an exaggerated response to this external threat. So that's all overactive immune system. Under active immune system if we again look at the two categories of internal threat and external threat, the internal threat would be people developing cancer because your immune system doesn't just protect you from infection, it also helps with cancer surveillance. So as our cells start dividing, sometimes they start to divide a little precariously. And that reproduction leads to errors in the genetic material of the cell and over time that can transform to cancer. And so the internal cancer surveillance system is also something that our immune system does, and it would weed out those cells so that they die off and they're not continuing to proliferate and form cancer. So with an underactive immune system, you can't just surveillance is off and you're at increased risk of cancer on the internal side. And on the external side, that would be infection. Viral bacterial fungal, et cetera. So should all be aiming for is this concept of a Goldilocks immune system, right? An immune system that is active enough to clarify virus, but not so active that we end up with a cytokine storm you mentioned this overblown immune response and the really fascinating thing when we look at this pandemic is that a lot of the deaths and the illness have been due primarily to the immune response, not so much a virus itself, but it's our bodies on regulated or dysregulated response to that virus that's causing the acute respiratory distress syndrome or other severe illnesses and sometimes even death. Yeah, sure. So there's so much in what he just said to unpack, but to kind of pull some threads on this. I mean, first of all, yes, like in this era of COVID, I think we can all agree that we've been on the receiving end of a lot of conflicting information and social vitriol that kind of swirled around what is fact, what is fiction. Certainly, one truth that was kind of underrepresented was that there was not enough messaging about the personal responsibility that we have for our own health. And much of what you talk about and is in your book is the malleability, the adaptability of the gut microbiome and in turn our immune system when we sort of get rid of certain things or stop certain habits and adapt new habits like it really is resilient in that regard and we're all capable of creating a Goldilocks immune system. I mean, most of it, most of the language is around boosting our immune system. Obviously that's problematic for the reasons that you just said. It is this Goldilocks immune system that we're all striving for. But to kind of begin to understand this, I think we have to talk about it seems to me that the first place that we want to kind of enter into here is the difference between germ theory and terrain theory, which you know beautifully articulate in the book. So let's start with that. Okay. And I can talk about that one for hours. It's a great one to talk about, but I just want to circle back to something you said, which I think is so important, which is this perceived duality that if you're saying host health matters and that we have some control over outcome, that means that somehow you're not saying that vaccines and monoclonal antibodies and so on are important. And I just want to emphasize that both of these things are important. Of course. And it's common sense. And not just for COVID. I mean, if you're an 85 year old with heart disease, who's a smoker and sedentary and overweight and diabetic and hypertensive, and you have a heart attack, you're going to do worse than somebody who's 35 and an ultra runner who eats really healthily, et cetera. So host health matters for cancer and infection and viral illnesses and everything else, right? And that's the goal to be the healthiest host we can. So to get back to my two favorite topics of germ theory and terrain theory, germ theory was really popularized by Louis Pasteur and drum therapy basically says that a bad bug gets into your body and it makes you sick. And that's absolutely true. And we see evidence of that all the time. We are seeing evidence of it now with SARS CoV-2. But terrain theory says that a healthy host can manage illness and recover, and that's also true. So we wash our hands if you look at medical practices. We wash our hands and we sanitize things because a germ theory. But we also eat a healthy diet and exercise and do all of those things because a terrain theory, because we want to be healthy hosts. And so the two things are really, you know, again, they're hand in glove. They're not contrary to each other. And in the scientific community, there's all this back and forth, but apparently bechamp Antoine deschamps who popularized terrain theory, who's also a French man like Louis Pasteur, folks in the bechamp camp, and I don't think there are two distinct camps and they shouldn't be, but they sort of are apparently Louis Pasteur reportedly on his deathbed said, bechamp was right, terrain theory and I don't know if that might be a little dramatized, but clearly both things are really important, right? There are germs that get into our body that can do us harm, but our health as hosts matters greatly in this equation. And it's also important to realize that not all terms are bad and a scorched earth approach where we go out and basically try and seek and destroy mission for all bacteria or viruses can lead us to some bad places. Right, once again, it's not a binary dualistic thing. It's not one or the other. These are both important. It does feel like in the messaging or conversation around COVID. It was pretty much all about germ theory. And maybe not enough about terrain theory. We can quibble about that. But it is interesting to kind of consider the interplay between these two theories that are at play in terms of our susceptibility to a viral infection and disease. And what was amazing in the book was the statistics around people who were not healthy hosts or who had dysbiosis or some kind of dysregulated gut microbiome and how they ended up faring when they came into contact with the virus. Yeah, it's an incredibly predictive marker, the health of the microbiome. So one of the studies that I talk about in the book is a study that looked at what's going on in your microbiome as a predictor of acute respiratory illness and even death.

cancer autoimmune disease form cancer Viral bacterial fungal South Carolina Louis Pasteur acute respiratory distress syn Antoine deschamps bechamp diabetic heart attack heart disease SARS
"acute respiratory distress syndrome" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:28 min | 11 months ago

"acute respiratory distress syndrome" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Flash All right Charlie thank you so much Carl master Tim steno back here on Bloomberg business week We talked about some of the big headlines And certainly one of the big ones is the hospital admission in the U.S. for COVID-19 We are seeing them receding about 34 states in the nation's capital So that's a good sign to him Yeah and closer to home Terrell here in New York City or in New York State I should say cases have dropped 92% from their peak Like I said gotten busier Have you noticed Yeah streets have gotten busier and I'm riding the subway again So you feel better Yeah it's the paranoid person metric you know you can just follow me If I'm riding the subway things are okay The dims den of egg metrics Hey let's bring in our next guest with our daily check on the pandemic Doctor Kevin I'm just his director of medical affairs at the BioTech company along jevon He is on the phone for Miami Doctor am does it's nice to have you here with us How are you Good good Good afternoon Thanks Thanks for walking on the program Yeah you bet It's good to have you here Tell us a little about your company in terms of what you guys do Because you're involved big time when it comes to stem cell research Yes absolutely Absolutely Okay so for context I'm not a director of medical fears a long job and we're kind of staged BioTech company in my Florida publicly traded on the NASDAQ We specialize in cellular therapies for life threatening chronic conditions We recently work granted by the FDA orphan drug and where PDFs disease designations for our efforts in treating infant heart defects affecting babies with HLHS which is hypoplastic left heart failure But aligned with what you were just talking about omicron and COVID-19 one of the therapies we actually have a phase one clinical trial for in the U.S. is for COVID-19 ARDS which is acute respiratory distress syndrome Our lead product launch will be works in dampening the cytokine storm that's seen in ARDS And that's kind of a severe form of COVID-19 Once you get it and the body doesn't react as well and it really gets uptake in the lungs and you develop ARDS that's when we hope that our products will have really good effects and clearing out that cytokine storm allowing the lungs to heal and the body to repair itself Doctor Rhodes this condition that you're speaking about and your company is working on treating does that happen Do we know from a that something that is a consequence of other variants including delta and alpha Yes So all variants all variants are produced respiratory diseases and respiratory disease could be upper respiratory tract or in the lungs And they do have the potential to be dangerous We have seen a dip in the more severe cases but it absolutely has been present during odd ways the current almost on wave So and with this treatment a lot of the treatments that we see right now are very variant dependent And this treatment is more independent It's all patients and regardless of the variant that get pneumonia and have this severe syndrome You are working on various treatments and they're all in various stages A lot of them do involve research in a lot of it for chronic disease A lot of it dealing with diseases of aging Alzheimer's aging frailty What's the biggest potential and soon as potential for your company specifically when it comes to top and bottom lines Yeah that is a question we get asked a lot So our company was founded on aging related diseases Like you mentioned frailty and cognitive disorders like dementia and Alzheimer's We recently completed our phase one Alzheimer's in the U.S. and we just started our phase two trial With frailty we completed our phase two trial and now we are starting a phase two trial in Japan So we believe that we have potential in both physical and cognitive aging processes But is it at least a year or two before you get through these phases Well currently currently the trials that are we were trying to expedite it but there's only so much and then because pandemic we had to kind of limit the way our enrollment would have gone our face one always our we expected the finish much earlier than it would end up happening But we are looking at probably a year to complete enrollment in our phase two Alzheimer's thought and that will definitely give good top line results and we're able to get clear indicate the direction that we're going So and that's going to be complete enrollment by the end of the year Hey doctor Rhonda I want to talk a little bit about the evolution of the virus here just in the last minute that we have with you There's been a lot of discussion about this moving from pandemic to endemic And I'm wondering if somebody who watches the space closely what are the signs that you're looking for to indicate to us that okay we're out of this pandemic And this is endemic now Yeah And that is a great question And with these ways so with these variants with these types of there's mutations constantly And new variants are able to popping up all the time It's very hard to predict But the fact that the results are less severe less patient hospitalized less depth of current those are very positive signs Another big cause of sign is is vaccines being approved for the I believe Pfizer is going up for less than 5 years old These are great signs that we are in the path to the right path for this to become like an influenza endemic where you could go in on annual basis and the results are not as severe and it's not as infectious So the signs the current stats are great right now Well great to check in with you and certainly keep us up to date as you guys move through your trials As doctor Kevin rob does he's director of medical affairs at Ron on the phone for Miami long driver and by the way it's a BioTech.

Alzheimer's Tim steno U.S. Terrell acute respiratory distress syn aging Alzheimer Carl Charlie New York City heart failure respiratory disease Miami Kevin FDA New York Florida chronic disease pneumonia dementia
"acute respiratory distress syndrome" Discussed on Prognosis: Doubt

Prognosis: Doubt

08:36 min | 1 year ago

"acute respiratory distress syndrome" Discussed on Prognosis: Doubt

"There are many theories on why people continue to suffer from a multitude of symptoms long after a coronavirus infection. Some easy to explain, others are a mystery. For example, it's known that if COVID gave you a severe case of pneumonia, your lungs could have scarring, there might reduce lung capacity. That's an unfortunate consequence of acute respiratory distress syndrome. That can also occur with the flu. If you were unlucky enough to need intensive care, that's linked to muscle weakness, memory problems, and a raft of other conditions referred to as post intensive care syndrome. And if you were really unfortunate and needed mechanical ventilation, that's long been associated with post traumatic stress disorder. But these aren't the problems baffling doctors and researchers. The biggest surprise that COVID is that people who are not in the intensive care unit people actually were never needed to be hospitalized, I still haven't consistent symptoms. This is doctor Walter car sheds who we heard from an elastic. He heads the National Institute of neurological disorders and stroke in Bethesda. Otis says it's this group of patients, the ones with unexplained fatigue, brain fog, weird, heart palpitations and body aches and pains, who also represent the largest pool of patients who are persistently unwell as a result of the pandemic. These long COVID have fatigue, that's the primary complaining factor. That's true about the post ICU cases as well. The is the major problem. But the long COVID symptom complex of fatigue, trouble with memory, trouble with thinking quickly, executive function, trouble with sleep, pain syndromes, sometimes and exercise and tolerance. Those are the features of this syndrome that we don't have good explanations for at this point. In some ways, the disease patent many long COVID sufferers experience resembles mono or infectious mononucleosis. It's called glandular fever where I am in Australia. And some people refer to it as the kissing disease, possibly because it spread through saliva and often occurs in teenagers. The culprit is usually the Epstein Barr virus. It can cause fever, swollen glands in the neck and armpits and a sore throat. Most cases of mono a mild and resolve in their own and one to two months, but water says that's not always the case. With infectious mononucleosis, there is another syndrome which you probably heard about, well, myalgic encephalomyelitis chronic fatigue syndrome and symptoms are very overlapping between what long COVID folks are complaining of and what happens in MA CFS. It's just that ME CFS has a 6 month period. You have to add those symptoms for 6 months. And it looks like people are moving into that space. Otis has researchers have been trying for years to figure out the causative driver of that longer term illness after infectious Mona. Now with the 34 million people with COVID, it's a tremendous challenge now that we have to take up to try to figure that out. There is a greater chance that we're going to figure it out now because we have this opportunity to study so many people and to try and understand what differentiates those who get better quickly versus those who have these persistent symptoms. So the hope is that we can get some answers with allow us to try different treatments to see what helps and then potentially also learn something about what causes ME CFS as well. Congress is giving the national Institutes of health $1.15 billion over four years to find answers. Alter along with doctor Anthony Fauci from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and doctor Gary gibbons from the national heart institute, are co directing the research. There's a clinical team with an autopsy team, there's electronic health record team. I know there's a big data team in this probably a couple of others. So I think the estimate wears this 300 people have been working on this project since November. The amount of money Congress has set aside to study long COVID seems a lot, but it piles compared with the trillions of dollars, the pandemic has cost already and the economic toilet will have decades into the future. Some estimates suggest that more than 1 billion people around the world have been infected with the coronavirus. We don't know yet what proportion of them will develop long COVID or the duration of their symptoms. My gut feeling is that you're probably close to a 10% figure at about 6 months out. This is doctor Avi nath. He's the clinical director at the National Institute of neurological disorders and strike. The one Walter heads. People do recover over a period of time or spontaneously too. But most often if you're not better by 6 months than the chances of getting better, I've become really less. Obviously, the impact on individuals, families, and societies will be used, but nobody can do the calculations for you, you know? But it's a dream on society at every single level. I mean, it affects women more than men. It affects people and their average age is 40. That's the most productive years of your life. And so you can see that the impact worldwide impact of this is unbelievable. You couldn't translate it to money. Economical psychological, every aspect of society is kind of touch. It's why figuring out the cause and why is to treat and prevent long COVID are so critically important. Obviously, there could be two main driving forces behind the clinical manifestations. One is that the coronavirus manages to persist in the body somewhere somehow and that it's lingering presence is damaging the body directly. Or it's triggering an immune response that's causing the damage. Another hypothesis is that the coronavirus has sent the immune system haywire, and it's this dysregulated immune response. That's driving long COVID. All reasonable hypotheses. But they're not exclusive. They could be interrelated. Avi has been researching chronic fatigue for years, and now he's also trying to understand it, as well as other elements in long COVID patients. One of the interesting features about this illness is that if you look at it, the people who develop these long haul symptoms are often not the individuals who are hospitalized and were sick and on a ventilator and stuff like that. These are individuals who are actually most often they never went to the hospital. And they were at home. And during that time, they had relatively mild illness and the acute phase. And they recovered from it, Avi says that the people who were sick enough to require hospitalization probably mounted a strong immune response that helped them to eventually recover and importantly get rid of the virus. But if you had a mild illness, perhaps you never mounted a strong enough immune response. You thought, oh, you know, I escaped this, but in reality, you never got another life. Hi, everyone. Thanks for tuning in today. If you haven't heard there's been an interesting development in healthcare. A company called premier has launched a new initiative to help make healthcare better for everyone. It's called pink AI and it can help provide faster better and smarter care for patients. Pink AI is an intelligence engine that can leverage artificial intelligence and machine learning to put providers in their patients at the center of care, using a massive dataset from actual patient encounters, pink AI has already delivered over 5.4 billion clinical decision support alerts to help physicians determine the best treatment options for their patients. Pink AI is revolutionizing the paper based invoice processing system in most hospitals, saving an average of $1.8 million per hospital, with over 75% of hospitals already partnering with premiere, it's easy to see how pink AI will positively impact our healthcare system for decades to come, visit pink AI dot com backslash smarter for the full story. AI.

coronavirus infection traumatic stress disorder Walter car Otis Epstein Barr encephalomyelitis chronic fati acute respiratory distress syn COVID National Institute of neurolog Gary gibbons national heart institute infectious mononucleosis heart palpitations pneumonia Avi nath National Institute of neurolog Bethesda Anthony Fauci
"acute respiratory distress syndrome" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

FoundMyFitness

03:31 min | 1 year ago

"acute respiratory distress syndrome" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

"On the cdc website and they say here that quotes the number of deaths that mentioned one or more of the conditions indicated is shown all deaths involving cove in nineteen and by age groups for over five percent of these deaths. Cove in nineteen was the only 'cause mentioned on the death certificate so people have taken that to mean that really cova one thousand nine hundred only caused five percent of the six hundred plus one hundred thousand People that have died in this country and all the other things were just co morbidity but if you actually look at the cdc's website you'll see what some of these quote co morbidity is our and as we just discussed the actual way that cova nineteen kills people so for instance that the number one co morbidity was pneumonia influenza. Pneumonia group together well. The pneumonia was caused by cova nineteen. It wasn't a co morbidity another one that's very common as respiratory failure. Yeah it's not like people are coming with respiratory failure and they also happen to have cova nineteen no cova thousand nine causes respiratory failure and another one of these ones that was on there was adult respiratory distress syndrome. That's actually what they mean to say. There's acute respiratory distress syndrome again. Another thing that's caused by cova nineteen and so what's happening here. Is that you know these physicians are very busy. They're being handed death certificates. They've need to fill these things out. They think oh. Yeah that guy. He died of covert nineteen. That's right and they just right cove in one thousand nine at the top. That's the incorrect way of filling those out and that's the reason why fortunately only five percent of those death certificates are being incorrectly filled out with just kobe. One thousand nine just to clarify using that data to make a case that really cova nineteen is only killing people with multiple coburn. Biddies is not not accurate. Not at all. We'll dr patrick this next question's for you and it's about spike protein and we know that the spike protein can be dangerous and caused a significant immune response and there's this idea floating around that because spike protein is dangerous from the sars koby to virus therefore the tobin nineteen. Vaccines must be as dangerous as well. What are your thoughts on that. Well i have a lot of thoughts on that kyle i. I've thought long and hard about it. But before i get into some some of the details i think spike protein israeli. Become a common household name at this point. Most people around the world know what the spike protein is mostly. Because it's it's the entry point for these harsh. Coaching virus to get into our cells there about twenty six different spike proteins. I shouldn't say different there about twenty six spike proteins that line the surface of a sars cope to viral particle and these spike proteins will bind to a receptor on many different cell types. We have in in our body that have receptor called ace to and when the spike protein then binds to the ace two receptor it undergoes. A confirmation will change that essentially refers to the structure of it of it changes so at binds onto this receptor and it then along gates and sort of twists and turns around and then it fuses with the cell membrane in is engulfed inside of the cell..

acute respiratory distress syn cdc pneumonia influenza dr patrick cova Pneumonia pneumonia coburn koby kyle gates
"acute respiratory distress syndrome" Discussed on Fear And Greed

Fear And Greed

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"acute respiratory distress syndrome" Discussed on Fear And Greed

"Including europe and in for mantle in perth and adelaide city. That's because house. Prices have risen at a slower right but in areas in sydney particularly around the northern beaches and borkum hills is deteriorated. according to core logic i- deterioration in affordability is one of the mine reasons why house prices mice stop rising as fast as they have been for most of this year. Stralia post is taking drastic measures to get on top of the crown of ours juiced backlog of postles letters and distribution centers along the east coast. It won't click the mile in the ict new south. Wales victoria from this saturday morning. Until tuesday evening. Ozzy post apologized for the decision but said the safety of its people was its highest priority and it needed to ensure volumes with kicked the saif in manageable level as he post has hundreds of employees currently in isolation commonwealth bank shareholder is taking the bank to court to gain access to documents detailing decision to finance oil and gas projects. Despite the potential to breach the paris agreement goals according to the financial review. The case could trigger a new wave of climate change litigation as share held a seek to hold companies to account for their environmental commitments. We gained he much more about shareholders wanting companies to be environmentally responsible in the run up to the annual general making season mid cash reported solid siles in the six weeks to the middle of last month in a sign that people continue to shop locally mckay supplies independent retailers such as i j stores sales were higher than pre pandemic. They're not quite at the level of my august last year. When shutdowns hit the nation and most of his shopped local makasi share price fell two and a half percent yesterday the worst performer. On the i. Six top two hundred yesterday was vitamins group blackmore's which fell nearly seven percent after a strong run following. Its result last week. Part of the reason was because it's magic competed us. Swiss think ricky ponting and nicole kidman said online siles during lockdowns increased. But it wasn't enough to make up for lost store sales and there's been a shift for people to buy more vitamins from sube markets rather than chemists by take group. May i blast clarified comments from the us. Food and drug administration after its share. Price tumbled more than five percent yesterday. Following the fifteen percent drop on tuesday. Mesa blast said the fda had not put on hold its clinical development program of its flagship drug to treat acute respiratory distress syndrome in adults with kevin nineteen and payments group. I signed this which is suing the ice. Ix suspending trading back in late twenty nineteen will split its business into two with one pow likely to try and list on a european boss the company and its chief executive john currencies are being sued by esotique of allegations. Mr cranston failed to disclose revenues that resulted in hundreds of millions of bonus. Shares issued to human case. Staff were.

borkum hills Stralia post adelaide city northern beaches siles perth Ozzy east coast sydney Wales europe victoria mckay paris blackmore ricky ponting nicole kidman Food and drug administration
"acute respiratory distress syndrome" Discussed on Fear And Greed

Fear And Greed

03:12 min | 1 year ago

"acute respiratory distress syndrome" Discussed on Fear And Greed

"Welcome to the fear and greed afternoon market report for wednesday the first of september twenty twenty one. The first i have spring. We're just in a few minutes. I tell you everything you need to know about. What's happened in financial markets in the world of economics. Today i'm sure alma. This is six. Two hundred fell slightly today to close at seven thousand five hundred twenty seven points consumer staples and discretionary stocks which is pretty much much of the retailers were among the worst performers while energy companies with some of the best given the small drop in the overall index. There was some pretty big foles. Among large companies wisdom was off three point. Three percent or four to skew was three point. Two percent lower rio. Tinto was off two point. Four percent woolworths fell by one point six percent. They edged pay dropped. One point three percent and say l. was down zero point nine percent making up for the leg odds with the banks and telstra national australia. Bank was up more than is hedge or westpac and come away with both around one percent. Higher toll stroke was one point three percent higher the best performance on the day when newey which was up more than five percent. It's been beaten around in the last couple of sessions and shareholders appreciated. the reprieve. next faced was alumina up. Four point eight percent. The worst performers with autumn is group blackmore's which is run hard since it strong result last week it was down six point seven percent today and not hoping was the fact that its biggest rival. Swiss reported tough trading conditions during july and august and biotech group. As i blast into down five point four percent following yesterday's fifteen percent drop the full kind. Despite the company clarifying comments from the us food and drug administration may blasted the fda had not put on hold its clinical development program of its flagship drug to treat acute respiratory distress syndrome in adults with kevin nineteen mid cash reported solid siles in the sixteen wastes to the middle of last month in a sign that people continue to shop locally. Mid cashed applies to independent retailers such as iga stores sales were higher than pre pandemic. They're not quite. The level of might august lash g. When shutdowns had hit the nation it share prostate. I fell and a half percent in economic news. June quarter growth figures from the bureau. Statistics show zero point seven percent expansion during the months. The result was much better than most market economists expected and it triggered a rise in these trillion dollars seventy three point one. Us since on yields also rose slightly the steps of of the economy shares of the head of the lockdowns and restrictions along the east coast consumers spending and businesses were investing author means. The strategy will avoid a double dip. Recession given the current quarter is almost certain to show a contraction in economic christ just recapping wall street major indices finished lower with the s and p five hundred dow jones industrial average and take. Heavy nasdaq off zero point one percent. That's it for the afternoon. Market report for wednesday the first of september. Twenty twenty one. Join me tomorrow. Morning for the thursday edition of fear and greed and then for my chat to shine all of the chief economist impede capital that. Today's gdp figures. I'm sean alma joe your evening..

foles telstra national australia newey woolworths Tinto kevin nineteen us food and drug administratio blackmore
"acute respiratory distress syndrome" Discussed on The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

07:42 min | 1 year ago

"acute respiratory distress syndrome" Discussed on The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

"Great to have all of you here. So dr gupta the post story of the washington post also reports tonight about the cdc document. They obtained quoting here. The document strikes urgent note revealing the agency knows it must revamp its public messaging to emphasize vaccination as the best defense against variant so contagious that it acts almost like a different novel virus leaping from target to target more swiftly than a bola or the common cold that got my attention. Dr gupta what do you make this new information. How does it change things. Good evening. Chris you know. Frankly i don't think the war has changed at all and this is an indictment of ineffective confusing messaging from the very top. Let's let's call it what it is. And i think your team actually has an image that shared many months ago. That my pulmonary colleagues and i have been trying to share and disseminate out. This is on the left for all your viewers out there. Those are healthy lungs on the right. Those are longs ravaged by cova. That my colleagues and i care for in the icu. That's acute respiratory distress syndrome. That's what the vaccine prevents. That message was never clearly communicated through images through authentic messengers from the very beginning so now people are saying well. what's changed. Frankly if you actually look at the cdc data that was presented in slide format. It's pretty darn clear that the vaccines and they were looking at two. Five stor chris. Judo's pfizer was protective against Hospitalization in israel in canada and england even against symptomatic illness. We saw eighty eight percent protection but against hospitalization. Seeing somebody like me you are nearly one hundred percent protected. So i don't think anything has changed what we are doing what we are now dealing with this in indictment of ineffective confusing messaging making people. Think that now we're doing. I wanna make sure i understand because my takeaway from this washington post article was that even though i'm fully vaccinated i think everybody on this panel is fully vaccinated. We can still be carrying the very end and it is so much easier for it to transfer to transmit and even though again and we've talked about this and i think the messaging has been clear if you're vaccinated and you do get this delta variant. You're going to have a much more mild case the idea of transmission and getting it at all sound scary so it is this information though not new. So that information is new so this notion of But we have to think about this in context. I think chris we have to take a step back and say the. Cdc is likening this to chicken hawks. for example. we'll turns out. Even if fully vaccinate against chicken pox you can transmit the virus vaccines perfect against transmission. So what does this mean this. Just basically means yes. There's a potential for transmission of the delta during to others. We think that's different from the alpha burien looks at the delta bearings may be fifty percent more transmissible even if you're fully vaccinated but chris ultimately this adds a greater urgency to getting vaccinated the delta variant itself to those were fully vaccinated is not harmful so immediate fda approval and really brought consideration of a mandate that. Those are the things we need to be talking about. In addition to better messaging and president biden shannon has been talking about this. But i thought today was marked by an even more urgent tone is concerned. The white house rising day by day over this new variant. And and how do folks feel about their messaging on the virus. Will there urgency as certainly ticked up. I will say last week in maybe a little bit into the week. Prior i talk to people within the administration people were close to the administration advised the administration and they raised a lot of these issues like requiring masks for certain groups that scene mandates for some federal employees. But i would say about a week ago. Ten days ago. This time nobody was. It was going to happen as quickly as it did. And as widespread as it has there was talk about vaccine mandates for va employees for members of the military. Maybe tsa screeners. Not for the entire. Federal workforce have to either be vaccinated or submit to really regular testing. If there was talk about requiring masks maybe for certain groups maybe increasing. The urge a to nudge people to wear mass more. Not this sort of about face on mass recommendations in saying that people who live in large swaths of this country even if they're vaccinated to be putting their masks back on so i've noticed internally in an people closed as white has a real shift in jane over the past few weeks which i think speaks to the growing urgency as far as the effectiveness of that messaging. So much of this is being driven by the cdc end. Not necessarily by the white house. And that's where we have seen a bit of Fumbling of the hand off the baton in the messaging. We have the cdc hallway a teleconference to announce this really big change in masks of the white house within itself was trying to figure out how to adapt this policy within their own walls as to whether or not people needed to wear masks at a vp event. Whether the president was going to wear one at his event the next week us. Ill so certainly. They're still trying to get their foot around the messaging of but when i talked to people in the white house they said you know part of that is just because of how quickly evolving this virus is in how rapidly changing the scenario on the ground has been lately clearly. Julius hard to get vaccinated. I mean again. Besides the urgency. The other thing i took away from this press conference today was okay. They've decided they need to pull out all the tools in their arsenal that they possibly can. I think that's right. I mean they have been trying for weeks to find messages to find gimmicks in some cases to find celebrities who can go out there and convince this group of people who are stubbornly unvaccinated to start to moveon really. None of those numbers have budged in a significant way. So now the white house is taking this step that i think in some ways they had hoped to avoid the biden. White house is very conscious of not wanting to be seen as pushing it. A definitive mandate. So they're not even trying to use that word they're calling. They're calling these. You know these programs other. Things have attest that you're vaccinated. They're trying to avoid the idea of a mandate though. Essentially that is what it is. It's a mandate for a vaccine in if you're not vaccinated than you have to take other steps. They are just trying to pull every lever because ultimately as biden said but as Health officials have said there is only one way out of this pandemic in that. Increase the vaccination Until this happens we're going to be bouncing back and forth between new mask guidance. A new guidance on how close we can interact with each other so biden mistress trying to make that hard the message. Vaccinations are the only way out. Really the center piece. I think of what you heard to hear from him for weeks to come and he does make this clear separation dr gupta which is we've got the vaccinated and we've got the unvaccinated and among the unvaccinated and you know this well a lotta healthcare workers and so our gutierrez sat down with four of them and it was eye opening. Maybe something shocking. To hear what they had to say. Take a listen. We don't know what the long term side effects are also hasn't been proven to be effective. The cdc in many public health experts say that it's more than ninety percent effective. They do say that..

cdc dr gupta Dr gupta washington post chris acute respiratory distress syn biden shannon white house cova icu Judo pfizer Chris israel england canada fda
"acute respiratory distress syndrome" Discussed on Horizon Talk Radio's podcast

Horizon Talk Radio's podcast

07:07 min | 1 year ago

"acute respiratory distress syndrome" Discussed on Horizon Talk Radio's podcast

"Yeah i believe from a normal passengers been watching. A lot of professional people do the job. I actually believe that some about all these people dying in in the first couple of months. March april may maximum yards for that too. It's von surely and so this is a difficult question was i doing. Something am vong based on. They didn't know what to do. A coach saban deliberately. We know that. But that's my opinion anyway and maybe some you know. They done the research quick for that area the ventilation part because he did it for the vaccines got so quickly sorted out. They started to put its worth at the moment. But i always felt though that they did the initial stuff in the beginning. I mean 'cause like you said disease of injections or tablets that could take that was helping to stop the death right. I mean i'm not qualified. It's just an orchid question for man. I listen to you being the listening today. Yeah no. I think that's what this physician i talked to from. San diego was telling me is that by sharing data around the world About how patients were being treated and the mortality rates. The evidence showed that they were doing something wrong. In the confusing part about it was when patients that have covid present their oxygen saturation our beloved in there a little bit short of breath but they kinda present like a patient that has acute respiratory distress syndrome in the current protocol for that type of patient is to innovate them and put them on a on a ventilator and so as time went along three or four months into this It became obvious to a lot of the world's leading global pulmonary physicians that they needed to take a different approach. And that's when you started seeing the combination of prednisone shown and different types of drugs in high high flow. Oxygen therapy become more The norm in moving away from mechanical ventilation and innovation which resulted in a reduction in In mortality so yeah the first three or four months it was it was pretty I call it dismal when you start seeing mortality rates In the high seventy low eighty percent for these patients you have to scratch your head and go. what are we doing. Wrong here You know we thought we were doing the right thing but luckily you know they. A lot of the the global leaders and being able to share information as we do today in the healthcare space I think you know. Alternately saved a lot of lives so In moving forward it's definitely a different Different horizon and like you know we could take care of things best. We can if the plane crash a train crash the bus crash. This question that grabs but you know some of the blue. I mean for instance if if one of the satellites earth from space some the crash than the major ten building you know. I'm not sure if that would have happened but if it did with after them works out why that happened in out to prevent future you so this was a now the blue thing but at the same time you know. The second difficult question is I think those always going to be possible of a pandemic coming up. We didn't have one since spanish flu. I believe i'm without of types of size that badgley a math disease is in the uk. I think you know eight look good. Scientists offense. I should've known How to treat people in the pandemic over the you know and that p p writing. But that's just me and At health minister matt. Hancock is what he said We had we had enough peop- even though the people in the industry the doctors nurses the cavs on. We didn't have enough peppy. And and now he's fight himself. The ads in the got never health minister this weekend. So it's a crazy world we're living on Yeah the stockpiling of ventilators and all the medical equipment and p. p. e. and everything here in the united states that it just kind of went overboard and now it's it's kinda normalized itself. I think people now understand that we may may have needed to re Stock of the the The stockpiling of certain pieces of equipment in the case of the pandemic in a kind of exposed in some ways. We weren't really prepared for what was what was happening in terms of the number of patients coming into the system so it's made people in the healthcare industry. I think take a harder. Look at where we have weaknesses and where we can improve so the thing was Kind of embarrassing in a way when you start looking at running out of masks and gowns and gloves and things like that that are you know pretty much. Standard daily use but The ventilators were really concerning. Because a lot of states here in the us they had stockpiles for for years and it seems like they became complacent and either sold off or didn't take care of the equipment and it broke down her. It was no longer functional in. They ran into this situation and had to quickly ramp up and they were making ventilators that General motors and manufacturing plants like tesla. We're trying to step in Because the medical companies just couldn't keep up with all the orders so they had to get creative and it was interesting to see. You know people did step up in the manufacturing side of things and were able to meet the demands of supplying more ventilators. It was amazing. I mean you mentioned car. Companies is one example but the p. poem and industries..

March april earth today eighty percent three uk Hancock seventy first three four months united one matt spanish one example tesla second difficult first couple of months eight ten
"acute respiratory distress syndrome" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

02:50 min | 2 years ago

"acute respiratory distress syndrome" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Someone wins $50,000 every sport changed during Super Bowl 55 touchdown field goals. Extra points. $50,000 plus two grand prize winners will win a half a million dollars they could use toward their dream home. Hurry up and enter for free and rocket mortgage squares dot com. No purchase necessary legal resident of the 50 U. S and D C of age of majority ends everywhere for licensed in all 50 states and the last number 30 30. The NFL is not sponsor promotion in any way. Your Security Council has held an emergency meeting on the M R. The British text raft is among the consideration, while China and Russia asked for more time to discuss the unfolding coup. This statement drafted by the UK would have condemned the coup called on the military to respect the rule of law and human rights and immediately released those unlawfully detained. A senior Security Council officials said Negotiations will continue in an effort to reach consensus on a statement. In particular, according to the official. China, Myanmar's largest trading partner, repeated its view that the council must not do anything to inflame the situation there, which it views as an internal issue. BBC is not a topic. The country's civil civilian leader, Aung San Souci. Find yourself right back where she was just over a decade ago under house arrest, But this timer stead off of the military comes after she is sorely disappointed. Many One time supporters. This town hall dot com. Most Boeing employees will get a bonus next month. That's despite the company losing 12 billion over the last year during the pandemic. Most employees did not receive annual bonuses last year after the company lost 636 million in 2019 because of the grounding of the 7 37 Max by the FAA. In response, the company in February change the structure of its incentive plan, tying its financial goals to the timing of the first delivery of a 7 37 Max after its own grounding the companies Bonuses were previously based on profits. John Scott, reporting brother to Tokyo Olympic organizing Committee has a several message for fellow members of Japan's ruling liver Democratic Party. Games will happen. Go. Shiro Mori, who is also former Japanese prime minister, told lawmakers Tuesday that no matter what situation Would be with coronavirus. We will hold the games. Or the story's a town hall dot com on Patrick Pause. This is life issues with Brad Mattis, President of Life Issues Institute. Ah, promising study with dramatic results was done on covert patients suffering with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome, the most serious cases doctors in few stem cells derived from umbilical cords into the patients. Not the umbilical blood but from the court itself..

"acute respiratory distress syndrome" Discussed on Acupuncture is my Life

Acupuncture is my Life

20:24 min | 2 years ago

"acute respiratory distress syndrome" Discussed on Acupuncture is my Life

"I've had some that. Said they use it to commoners because they stressed. And i can understand that especially at a time such as the timing which were faced with. Now it's not just in new york city thing. It's not just the united states thing it's a global and what happens here in the situation such as is at we have to persevere mentally we have to get past you know what facial with for out own personal health and wellness now with those that outside of saying it's relaxed in nerves. Those at that said you know. I really need to stop and bingo. I was really feeling i was. I was really feeling that response. Just the simple fact that they will wear that they do need to start being faced with the covid nineteen pandemic. This is the best opportunity for people who smoke to recognize the serious health risks that are associated with the addiction the addiction and they should consider it's common knowledge that smoking is bad for your health and when it comes to nineteen pandemic the side effects of smoking and behaviors of people who do could create a one two punch because smoking engines. Let's say within the body. I wanna get into anatomy and physiology not to to stay basic intuition. Smoking inge's local defenses in the longs by increasing lucas production and information which is back which is bad and that's why people who smoke more likely to have serious respiratory infections and illnesses such as like the flu monja covert nineteen. This is a better time ever to consider quitting smoke because people smoke bid generally and more wish for more serious coordinating infection in. They're more likely to get even critical disease and half to be hospital and most times. Why won't say mistake. There were cases of those that have been hospitalized. Have been put on ventilators cain to kobe. I mean you have to think tepe law heart smoking worth it when you know. The realities of smoking is really nothing good about smoking. It's not beneficial to you anyway. Shape of the social behavior. Smoking it generally can increase the risk of spreading the writers and a lot of people on because people smoke oftentimes they they smoke in groups. Virus easily can be transmitted as a person picks up an object and puts it near and unmask space such as a cigarette. Barring someone else's cigarette lighter you see smoking hand to mouth social behavior most cases when you're smoking not socially distanced you're on mass and you're exhaling inhaling deeply thinking about creating an aerosol droplets and those are all the ways that we know this virus spreads so it's very likely that people who are engaging in these behaviors are more likely to get the faction and split it to authors. So these are things you know that we have to think about you know but when you look at it from a chinese medicine perspective. Smoke is basically a poisonous substance and long. Smoking may lead to an imbalance in young and human by and disturbances. Basically in and i'll repeat. Smoke is a poisonous substance and long smoking. It can lead to imbalance between young human body and disturbances in ascending and decent of and blood. Which can lead to. Let's say like a series of pathological changes. So you know. Acupuncture does help with smoking in the amount of signatures to eventually. You can stop smoking. They're they're different treatment. Modalities under chinese medicine. That can assist person and quitting schmuck. She smoking when it comes to chinese medicine. Impairs long cheese like after entering the body in speaking of smoke by way of the mouth and nose the smoke i it invades. The lungs causes and accumulation pathogenic factors in oregon and a myriad of function students. That's why most smokers suffer from cough. Expect ration- gasping now also engines medicine. Smoking caused lung deficiency. Which would involve the kidneys. Now if if any of this. Sounds like mueller. Strange to you you can go to the acupunctures. My life from youtube channel and on that channel league get into the basic functions the visual organs the meridians and thousands of watch didn't have come to understand and get a clear on this day medicine and how it's awesome and acupuncture. Everyone's bodies different. Everyone's constitutions difference not a one-size-fits-all civil you only get one particular treatment protocol for this so on another that disorder one herbal formula for this disorder or another for now the disor. It doesn't work like that. Chinese medicine and acupuncture actual technique under the umbrella chinese medicine. Everyone's constitution is different seasonable. Near the the time of day you know is all factored it when putting together treatment in conducting thorough diagnosis of a patient. Now when it comes to let's say long deficiency involving the kids you see the long's are in charge expiration of g while the kidneys control the inspiration. She both of these organs. They work together to complete process of respiration comes to chinese medicine so therefore like a failure of the longs to perform its function can also lead to weakness of the kings and a series of syndromes characterized by deficiency kicking in kim. Yong kim develop you can also suffer from hyperactivity of gin and hyper activity. Yang where liver and kidney. They basically originated from the same the same resource they both found in the lower jiao. The body has three chows bridge. Our heart and the lungs the middle jiao riches predominantly controlled by stomach and spleen and. That's pulse naidu chicoms room and the lower which consists of your liver and your kidneys so you know when you have deficiency kitten again it may also resulted deficiency of livery so case yin deficiency both living a kidney the deficiency young will become hyperactive because you see yin and yang have to be bounced that represents stations so when yang fall out of balance many disagrees present so so basically again in case of in deficiency of both liver and kidney deficiency young or not the deficiency yoga. But i could say deficient young will become hyperactive. Change into pathogen wind which will lead to like shaking your hands. And that's why excessive. Smoking can cause dizziness vertigo. Have you ever seen someone who sesame smokes like hand shaped. That's an example of long pathogenic wind and chinese medicine. A person can also suffered from. Let's say she'd deficiency of the harden long which represents upper jiao you see the longest the master chee hardest master blood so wherever he goes blood fouls so there's a stagnation plus stasis deficient launchi. It can lead to deficient heart. Cheap and long-term smoking is there for the most risky factor. That leads chess distress shortness of breath palpitation and even mental uneasiness. If you're a smoker you experience in having go back and do. I really need to be looking at a time like this. Another of many. I'll just go with this deficiency spoon stomach which bull you middle jam which is responsible for posting the cheetah's created after birth prenatal gene. To comes from kidneys is before birth pre birth pulse navy. Cheap post is so important that i will do episodes. That'll discuss spleen stomach. And the importance of your diet the time you sleep and so forth stress you stunk. Being you second brain. We're going to get into you for brunch episodes one acupuncture but chee deficiency spleen stomach with deficiency of kidney young that can induce deficiency spleen lean-to weakness the spleen to transport the body fluids lean-to to accumulation of sputum initiative. Where you ever listen to smokers. Talk or they like. Making these hawking sounds as if there's like so much mucus there you have it that's how described whereas in the same way deficiency spleen can causing deficiency of stomach. She see that's why smoking can always cores disorder functions of spleen stomach and it can result in their series of symptoms of the digestive system. Smoking is bad for you so whenever you decide you want to take out a cigarette because you're feeling stressed just thinking like every time you reach for a cigarette nope nope it's not worth you see you have to understand as to how corona buyers moves throughout you see kobe. Nineteen is basically an illness caused and it starts with droplets from any affected persons. Cough sneeze breath from someone talking to you and it could be an air on the surface that you touch before touching his nose mouth. And this is what gives the virus of passage into the nukus membranes in your throat and usually let's say like within two to fourteen days your immune system may respond with symptoms such as fever of cau- shortness of breath or trouble breathing and and that should set off all types of alarms smoking shortness of breath trouble breathing merely want to continue. Put that cigarette in your mouth. But also there's fatigue chills sometimes shaking. His body aches headache and also smoking can dehydrate and wanted to symptoms of deondraye. Andreessen is heading to be accompanied with colbert. Nineteen headache really. Do you really want to continue. Smoking is also saw. Throw congestion runny nose and you and you can even possibly suffer loss of taste as well as loss of smell. They can be nausea. They can be vomiting. It can be died here. She this virus it moves down your respiratory tract. that's the airway that includes mouth nose and your lungs you lower airways have more to receptors and these receptors that this virus binds. You know then you lower airways it has more h two receptors than the rest of your respiratory tract whereby cova nineteen is more likely to go deeper than viruses. Like the common cold your lungs can become inflamed making it tough for you. To breathe to me the fallout negatives. That come with smokey to company and as a result is can lead to pneumonia. Where's an infection of tiny air sense. He's air sets out the old and the alveoli is where blood exchanges oxygen and carbon dioxide. Really want to continue was step. One word i said to us every time. You're looking to pick up a cigarette. Think really think after a few days you can develop like acute respiratory distress syndrome as a result of being infected and this see acute respiratory distress syndrome damages tissues and blood vessels in your album. You remember this is we're gas exchange occurs and it can cause like debris to collect inside of in. This makes it even harder or even impossible. This is where more times than not when you're struggling to breathe dishes you're placed on ventilator in hospital now i have my own personal views of ventilators i mean. Can they save your life. Yes but i'd be super nervous to know that i may have to go on ca- possible gone but when it came to treating patients from the perspective chinese medicine i've had cases where i diagnosed a patient who smoke in six cigarettes a day like as having like deficiency of both heart and lungs and i spoke about a little while which represents the upper chow and in chinese medicine correlated transferred over to westerns deficiency of both chino art. Ci of the long is the equivalent of bronchitis pulmonary emphysema. Coronary heart disease neurasthenia in weston. Where's the main symptoms like things such as cough. Asthma chest distress chest pain. Sloping and schwerin palpitations shortness of breath restlessness. Poor sleep and dreams so if you are a smoker.

six cigarettes Andreessen colbert youtube Nineteen Nineteen headache One word new york united states one both Chinese yoga chinese nineteen one herbal formula weston kim two second brain
"acute respiratory distress syndrome" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

06:03 min | 2 years ago

"acute respiratory distress syndrome" Discussed on KTRH

"Get old if you want to avoid sleeping on the couch. Okay, well, I think that sounds like a good plan. 50 Plus continues. Here's more with Doug. All right, Welcome back to 50. Plus, thank you all for listening. I certainly do appreciate it. Did you know by the way that the number one thing that moms want this Valentine's Day? Is to be left alone Seems maybe we've reached the end of the quality time together thing built up by covert and all our time at home. I actually asked a woman in our office if she could guess. What moms wanted overall across the country for Valentine's Day, she said, the same thing. Right off the top. She nailed it moving forward. We will talk in this segment about something far more serious than that. Which is a condition called a R. D. S, which stands for acute respiratory distress syndrome. We'll talk a rds and its ties to cope. But actually with Doctor hold your Elsie, chair of the department of anesthesiology at McGovern Medical School and UT health and with that push of a button, and as I put my headphones back on because almost knocked him off my head. Will welcome you aboard. Good doctor. How are you, sir? Thank you Duck for for having me. I'm excited to talk with you about a radius and covert. And, um what is our perspective off? How we can help patients were suffering with that wonderful surfers that let's start with the definition of a rds that most of us can understand. So Air DS is sort of a kind of lung inflammation. You know, it's like having a very severe inflammatory disease of your lungs that suddenly offsets the function off the lung, so people with their ideas Will develop water. It's called pulmonary demon, both sides of the chest. They will have trouble breathing and in severe cases they are going to require mechanical intubate. Mechanical ventilation, So they're going to get intubated and they're going to be put on a ventilator until the lung can recover. Hopefully, hopefully, huh? Is this something that patients who wind up hospitalized with covert bring into the hospital with them, or is it something that develops while they're hospitalized? Well, Typically, patients come in to the hospital at earlier stages off from Cupid. 19 s O. Somebody comes in, says Ah, You know, I've got the symptoms, you know. I'm coughing, wheezing. I have, you know, sore throat. That's too a covert test. And then somebody made that measures the oxygen concentration and sees all while the oxygen concentration is not a size, it should be in there being put on supplemental oxygen on then, while they're in the hospital in about 20% of these cases It gets a lot more severe, You know that The covert 19 Wire is the source of two bars targets Al Villa. If you feel yourselves these cells represented in the lining of the lungs. Many of these are Villa If you feel yourself get extremely inflamed when they are, in fact it with The source code to virus and we're calling this L villa inflammation. When this gets more and more patients will progress towards more severe forms of air. The S will require mechanical ventilation, and some of them will even You know, requires sort of a lung replacement therapy. It's called examples where we put them on, sort of like a heart and lung machine where we're kind of taking out over the function of those lungs. Some of these patients or do recover, But it Zahhar journey and some of those patients we know do not recover the you know the the type of lung disease areas. Is the predominant form that kills patients who have covert 19. So it's the biggest threat to the space population. Good heavens, you mentioned the more drastic measures. Is there anything? Can you catch this early and say, Okay, we'll just we'll treat it with this real quickly to see if that stops it, or is it just Something that by the time it gets to that, and you can acknowledge it, it's already pretty far gone. So that's a very good question on guy think, you know. One of the things that everybody's talking about nowadays is vaccine. So if we're vaccinating patients, and they're not really getting the sauce cooked to infection, they're not going to go on to have aired. Yes, so there's a lot of effort. I put on to, you know, preventing task of to infections with vaccinations. Also, there's this monoclonal antibody therapy that Even if you have covert who can help clear the virus, particularly if it give it very early on. But right now our hands are still somewhat tied. And we don't have a lot of options when patients come in with source called called too early on, and they're progressing towards air DS, and that's a very important area of research. And a need for a patient's. We believe to find novel approaches that can help prevent this form of al Villa information that can turn the source code to infection in tow deadly areas. My goodness. So back to it seems to be more common than say, Rds seems to be more common in military veterans and other groups. Is there any idea why yet? Yeah, well, I think the lessons we've learned over the over the Last 12 months of the ongoing pandemic is kind of the older you you are in the more comb abilities. You have. The higher your risk is that you're going to end up with these kind of complications so particularly elderly patients with a lot of additional diseases. Are more prone to developing areas and having a better outcome, and unfortunately, many off all veterans are older patients..

Rds al Villa Al Villa respiratory distress inflammatory disease Doug Valentine Duck Elsie UT McGovern Medical School
"acute respiratory distress syndrome" Discussed on Medicine, We're Still Practicing

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

05:07 min | 2 years ago

"acute respiratory distress syndrome" Discussed on Medicine, We're Still Practicing

"Ready for full physical activity and i hope one thing that will help is the study of ours that have mentioned. It's called apex or addressing post intensive care syndrome. So it's a federally funded study to actually measure. Empirically measure about these discharged needs and the implications of patients. Having unmet healthcare discharged needs and readmission to appear clearly. Show that there's a link between these two things and we hope that that's a first step towards influencing discharge process on the outpatient delivery of healthcare services if a person becomes confined in an icu. What advice do you have to that patient to the our listeners. In case they someday find themselves in an icu. What should they be doing as patients while they're lying in bed that can help their own recovery. So interestingly as we said at our johns hopkins critical care conference every year. We start out with a patient family interview and we learn so much by talking to our patients so interestingly if some patients know that they're going to have an intensive care unit stay because they're having a major surgery were in intensive care unit. Stays is normal. There can even be preparations before this so somebody's having natured cardiac surgery lung surgery where it's known that they're going to go to an intensive carrying talking through say you may have confused thinking in other words delirium and giving some anticipation for this patients have told us that having knowledge beforehand about delivering may help them feel less anxious. I think engaging family members is going to be so important beginning to help educate patients and family members at being awaken. Moving really is the secret to getting better as quickly as possible. I think that's also very helpful as well. Dale what if one of our listeners feels that they're experiencing the symptoms you've described long after they have left the icu. What would you suggest they do. Head of the handle it. So that's not an unusual situation in that sometimes patients suffering silence and thinks that they're the only one that's having these problems and sometimes some of the clinicians that they go to see aren't aware of post intensive care syndrome and aren't aware that these are real consequences of them having been critically ill so the society of critical care medicine has web pages specifically for patients that explain this an easy to understand terms and are things that patients can bring to their primary care teens to say. Hey is this. What's happening for me. And they're also our virtual online support groups for example many people who are very seriously ill in the ice who have something called air yes acute respiratory distress syndrome so the aired yes foundation has a very popular facebook page and people can interact and get support so there are many many things that are out there to help through this particular through things like the society of critical care medicine. The foundation surviving sepsis campaign. Many many things interesting last quick question there seems to be a bit of a trend where virtual reality is being used in patient care especially wants to patients go home. Can you talk about that just a bit sure. So there is interest even in the intensive care unit so before i get into the virtual reality part of our rehabilitation for some of our patients. Physical rehabilitation may involve interactive video games. So for some of our higher functioning patients that need a challenge. They may use a balance or they do boxing to work on their arm strengthened and coordination. They may do bowling green and it also provides some sort of engagement and fun elements as well so interactive video games may be used for patients that are on life support machines when they're awake alert and and can move around in terms of virtual reality. There are people who are interested about yes. Could we change the perception of the ice you environment to make it less scary for patients. That's something that's not sort of within my area of expertise but it's something that i've heard a little bit about and i think people are interested even in the ice you environments and thinking about it but certainly of course there's going to need to be a lot of investigation to look and see what the patient's perception of that is and is the safe is this feasible. Is it an official. These are interesting ideas that many people are thinking about. That's it steve. I think you need bowling without a doubt. Dr dale needham and dr steven tailback. Thank you again for joining and thanks to our producer and editor. Aj moseley audio. Mastering is by steve. Ricky berg and the music for we're still practicing composed and performed by celeste and eric. Dick please take a minute to hit the subscribe button. All that does let you know when our next episode is posted. So you don't miss it. We'll see you next time. Stay healthy by by room. Kirk oh media media for your mind..

Aj moseley Ricky berg eric Kirk Dale dale needham johns hopkins celeste facebook two things first step steve steven one one thing dr critical care Dick intensive
"acute respiratory distress syndrome" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

05:39 min | 2 years ago

"acute respiratory distress syndrome" Discussed on WTOP

"They confined who is involved in this criminal activity, and we had DHS or assisting them in that. And there's no restraint on that. We are fully across the administration pursuing every avenue of justice available. There have been dozens of arrests. The FBI is offering a $50,000 reward for information on the person seen on video placing a pipe bomb that political party offices covert deaths in the U. S topped 4000 yesterday. New pandemic record in California One Corona virus patient is dying every eight minutes. Dr. Mara Carla, head of palliative care at Holy Cross Hospital in Mission Hills, says some seemed to be dying of broken hearts. It's so lonely, only thing that they have is the TV on US. Doctors in South Florida are reporting a new way to treat severe cases with stem cells from baby's umbilical cords. The study from the cell transplant Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine involved coronavirus patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. This could be a turning point, doctor. He is the director. He says the treatment reduces the risk of death has made recovery time faster and is less invasive. Lisa Matteo CBS News the Pandemic is taking a toll on jobs. The U. S lost 140,000 positions in December. Bank rates Mark Hamrick says Covert restrictions are taking a toll. There was a stunning loss in the leisure and hospitality realm. Most of those were lost in bars and restaurants, leisure and hospitality. Seen the loss of nearly four million jobs from last five war Now up 23. This is CBS News. If you need to hire you need indeed, indeed immediately delivers quality candidates from our resume database when you upgrade your job post get started at indeed dot com slash credit. He needs to know. Three we welcome you into Friday, January 8th 2021. Partly cloudy now 32 degrees in Washington and good morning to you. I'm Deborah Feinstein and I'm Mark Lewis with the top stories we're following at this hour, the chief of the U. S. Capitol police stepping down after all the chaos this week at the Capitol. We have details from W. C o ps Mitchell Miller on Capitol Hill. Capitol Police chief Stephen Sund announced he'll resign on January 16th just four days ahead of the presidential inauguration. His resignation came soon after House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said she felt it was time for him to step down. But it goes beyond the Capitol police. It goes to the FBI. What was the short coming in their intelligence that they provided? It goes to the Department of Defense? How long did it take for them to respond or anticipate the need for the national guards? And in a statement had defended his department's response, But many lawmakers are critical of how quickly mobs were able to storm the capital. The House sergeant at arms has also resigned in the wake of what happened on Capitol Hill. Mitchell Miller W T. O P. News, the Capitol police officer who was hurt as rioters stormed the capital, has now died of his injuries. Capitol police released a statement saying 42 year old Brian Sick, Nick was injured while physically engaging with protesters After returning to his office Wednesday. He called Lapsed sick. Nick had been with the Capitol police for 12 years. He died last night at a local hospital, D C Mayor Muriel Bowser, expressing her condolences to sick Nick's family, friends and colleagues a strong condemnation this morning from the leader of the D. C. Police union. About the way Capitol Police leadership handled Wednesday's riot, the chairman of the D. C police union says By all appearances, the leadership of the U. S Capitol police was ill prepared for what happened both in terms of manpower in the resource is that were needed. The statement also notes the Capitol building was secured in less than two hours. One support from other agencies arrived to help it concludes by asking the public to reconsider the way police reform has talked about, especially as it pertains to deep Funding in disarming the union says this is why supporting professional and responsible policing is also important. John Doman w T o P News $50,000 reward is being offered this morning for information connected to two pipe bombs that were planted during the riot. This week. The FBI looking for any information on who might have planted those one was found at the headquarters of the Republican National Committee, the other at the Democratic National Committee headquarters. The devices were called in to police within 15 minutes of each other early Wednesday afternoon, both similar and description a pipe bomb with wires attached. Anyone with information is being asked to call the FBI's toll free tip line at 800 Call FBI. Dozens have been charged so far for their roles in the attack on the capital this week, but many rioters were allowed to leave. BC's Acting U. S Attorney Michael Sherwin says the fact that hundreds of people who were inside the Capitol Warren ZIP tied and we're allowed to leave the building will make prosecutor's job harder. Sherwin says he doesn't want a Monday morning quarterback about why people weren't detained. But the fact that they weren't means that prosecutors have had two and we'll keep going through video footage. Identify suspect bring charges, then try to find them to arrest them. In comparing the capital riot prosecution with 174 arrests from this summer's racial justice protest, Sherwin says they've started by bringing 55 cases and 36 hours, with many more to come. The Lord constrained. W T o p knows well coming up here on w. T. O p on a much lighter note. It is.

Capitol police FBI U. S Capitol police Capitol Warren ZIP Attorney Michael Sherwin DHS D. C. Police union D. C police union California Mitchell Miller CBS Nick respiratory distress US Mayor Muriel Bowser Mark Hamrick Mitchell Miller W T. O House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Department of Defense
"acute respiratory distress syndrome" Discussed on Self Love Revolution Podcast

Self Love Revolution Podcast

05:36 min | 2 years ago

"acute respiratory distress syndrome" Discussed on Self Love Revolution Podcast

"In our local hospital didn't have one so in order to actually keep me alive. During the transport they had to put me into a medically induced. Coma could have a tube in me and paralyzed my body. So i wouldn't move on the transport and apparently i have no recollection of of the days before being transported because my oxygen so i couldn't create memories and but apparently this is what they told me that when the doctor said look. We're going to have to transport you to a hospital with an icu. That i was so exhausted. I decided oh sleep with be great. Yes i can see myself saying that. But i have no memory of it and But yeah power role. I think i learned that for my mom. You know things happen in light and just use it and you move on. And but i was supposed to be in the coma for only a couple of days while they transported me to the icu which luckily was just an hour away from our family because it could have been anywhere in the province of ontario in canada. So luckily it was close in the for my family to come and see me but i developed a rds which is acute respiratory distress syndrome. Which just really means my lungs gave at my lungs. No longer worked on their own and i was not going to survive unless i had somebody else breathing for me and So i actually ended up staying in the coma for three weeks. You can probably hear it on my voice. I am now. I disabled lung patient and it affects my life. Obviously your you'll see me moving a lot I have to keep moving to keep the blood flowing back out of my extremities and as i get tired it does get more difficult for me to think so. Have patients with me but It was honestly the most amazing tweets my life..

canada three weeks ontario one days an
Coronavirus: Ibuprofen tested as treatment to reduce COVID-19 symptoms

BBC Newshour

03:59 min | 2 years ago

Coronavirus: Ibuprofen tested as treatment to reduce COVID-19 symptoms

"Now we know there are many scientists all around the world working on a vaccine for corona virus and we also know there is no single proven treatment for it so there will be a loss of interest in news that a U. K. clinical trial is looking at whether ibuprofen could work the anti inflammatory drug which has shown great promise in initial tests on animals will be administered to those with breathing difficulties that speak to professor metalsmith who is director of king's college London center for invasive therapeutics that's one of the bodies working on the trial welcome to the program I'm sorry but just getting you to outline for us whiny should be there were fears that ibuprofen could actually be detrimental in the treatment for corona virus hi good afternoon yes there were some initial concerns raised we have concerns rise from from the French health ministry and there was an article published as well which which really laid out the theoretical concerns and you know it it is important to consider however what happens afterwards was that there was a review of the evidence including a review of studies that looked at earlier infectious diseases like birds I'm the first Sauls was what is the current head that make and they concluded there was no evidence that this drug could increase the chance of an infection taking hold was sind symptoms and this yeah there are statements released from the World Health Organization the European medicines agency and also the U. K. commercial medicines also released a statement saying that there's no evidence of of home here okay so tell us then walked there is that suggests that type of pricing could reduce inflammation and in the lungs trolls so well there's no there's no evidence of home in order to demonstrate benefit we have to do a trial so why do we think that this trial is important well I'll be pricing has been suggested as a treatment for the respiratory distress that you can get with carpet nineteen disease for a long time in fact prescription dress distress in general but can come from other infections and other lung diseases as well coming all the way back to the nineteen eighties and this is mostly in animal models now they're all concerns with all of your preference side effects you know it's not super tolerated drug if for example you have ulcers we don't risk of gastric bleeding so this particular formulation on record from where you sit is a lot safer and you also have a better buyer distribution in the body so it can enter the immune system S. as well and in the animal models which of my struggles of acute respiratory distress syndrome the survival in the months goes up dramatically when a given this unique formulation of ibuprofen okay I'm what I'm what that will do it would be a formulation be given once it's established that you have covert nineteen Sir do you know this is this is very important so this is not something that's going to prevent you from getting the disease a toll and in fact this is specifically targeted at certain symptoms which we think are in the mid disease stage so we're really looking at patients who are hospitalized and the way they would receive the drug is actually very simple to just be in capsules is warm truck so we're all used to argue pricing is not like that but it's toward drug okay well we wish you all the best with the at the trial professor Mifsud messa a director of king's college London center for innovative therapeutics one of the bodies working on that U. K. trial to see if I'd be profane can be amongst the treatments being given for patients

Coronavirus: Ibuprofen tested as a treatment

BBC Newshour

03:52 min | 2 years ago

Coronavirus: Ibuprofen tested as a treatment

"Now we know there are many scientists all around the world working on a vaccine for corona virus and we also know there is no single proven treatment for it so there will be a loss of interest in news that a U. K. clinical trial is looking at whether ibuprofen could work the anti inflammatory drug which has shown great promise in initial tests on animals will be administered to those with breathing difficulties that speak to professor metalsmith who is director of king's college London center for invasive therapeutics that's one of the bodies working on the trial welcome to the program I'm sorry but just getting you to outline for us whiny should be there were fears that ibuprofen could actually be detrimental in the treatment for corona virus hi good afternoon yes there were some initial concerns raised we have concerns rise from from the French health ministry and there was an article published as well which which really laid out the theoretical concerns and you know it it is important to consider however what happens afterwards was that there was a review of the evidence including a review of studies that looked at earlier infectious diseases like birds I'm the first Sauls was what is the current head that make and they concluded there was no evidence that this drug could increase the chance of an infection taking hold was sind symptoms and this yeah there are statements released from the World Health Organization the European medicines agency and also the U. K. commercial medicines also released a statement saying that there's no evidence of of home here okay so tell us then walked there is that suggests that type of pricing could reduce inflammation and in the lungs trolls so well there's no there's no evidence of home in order to demonstrate benefit we have to do a trial so why do we think that this trial is important well I'll be pricing has been suggested as a treatment for the respiratory distress that you can get with carpet nineteen disease for a long time in fact prescription dress distress in general but can come from other infections and other lung diseases as well coming all the way back to the nineteen eighties and this is mostly in animal models now they're all concerns with all of your preference side effects you know it's not super tolerated drug if for example you have ulcers we don't risk of gastric bleeding so this particular formulation on record from where you sit is a lot safer and you also have a better buyer distribution in the body so it can enter the immune system S. as well and in the animal models which of my struggles of acute respiratory distress syndrome the survival in the months goes up dramatically when a given this unique formulation of ibuprofen okay I'm what I'm what that will do it would be a formulation be given once it's established that you have covert nineteen Sir do you know this is this is very important so this is not something that's going to prevent you from getting the disease a toll and in fact this is specifically targeted at certain symptoms which we think are in the mid disease stage so we're really looking at patients who are hospitalized and the way they would receive the drug is actually very simple to just be in capsules is warm truck so we're all used to argue pricing is not like that but it's toward drug okay well we wish you all the best with the at the trial professor Mifsud messa a director of king's college London center for innovative therapeutics one of the bodies working on that U. K. trial

Why An Experimental Therapy for Inflammatory Disorders Could Help the Fight Against COVID-19

The Bio Report

04:46 min | 2 years ago

Why An Experimental Therapy for Inflammatory Disorders Could Help the Fight Against COVID-19

"As a researcher Joe Garcia Applied Functional Genomics to understanding genes that contribute to inflammatory disorders such as acute respiratory distress syndrome or arts as founder and CEO of the Biotech Company. Akwa Lung Therapeutics. He's working to advanced therapies to hit these novel targets to treat unchecked inflammation with the company's lead experimental therapeutic candidate targeting arts. We spoke to Garcia about the company's arts. Therapy how it works. And why it's time we focus given the cove nineteen pandemic Joe. Thanks for joining us. To be here thing we're going to talk about Aqua Lung Therapeutics Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome or arts and your efforts to develop a treatment for this condition. Let's start with ours though. What is it and how big a health challenge? Does it represent about half a million people. Every year get air F- Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in the United States alone. And you know close to two million. Maybe globally so it's it's not a uncommon Disorder But it is a extremely challenging to treat disorder because mortality of this. Anyone that had gets a yard is Thirty to forty percents In the US and it's probably higher Outside the US what makes it so challenging to treat? Well it's It's sort of the ultimate in inch in the stress to To a human being in that They have multiple attacks on a variety of Oregon starting with the lung though the the most common causes of ARD s are sepsis which is infection in the bloodstream and trauma and Smoking elation will do it and that Curiel and viral pneumonias and so as a result the starts off with inflammation in the lung from those particular Causes the inflammation becomes waves waves of amplify inflammation that starts to affect other organs. Like your kidneys and heart and ultimately patients with AIDS wind up. They don't survive. They die from that multi organ failure and that he's organs weren't able to sustain the inflammatory injury we've heard a lot about the respiratory challenges that can occur to people infected with the covid nineteen virus are the ones who end up on respirators suffering from arts and what role does arts play in the mortality of patients with Covid nineteen arches probably the primary cause of death in most of the cove in nineteen patients. At least that's what the the reports from China and elsewhere suggesting Covid NINETEEN INDUCE. Cards has a lot of similarities to garden variety area but it also has some unique changes that that may not be typical. Air S. as well and The ventilator Think this is an important part of the story. That patients with With Kobe nineteen viral infection or other causes of Respiratory distress like I mentioned substance or bacterial pneumonia trauma and you have Increasing respiratory distress your lungs. Start to fill with Lewis and the work of breathing when your lungs are. Our full of fluid is very very rate. So these patients generally run out of Energy the fatigue and they need then later to help with their respiration and so the the the the irony of of this is that the ventilator while saving your life because your new patients for an out of energy agreed on their own then later also the major cause for information as well. That's been known for now sometime and so strategies to address a yes whether it's cove nineteen induced or otherwise need to take into account the fact that then later contributes to that inflammatory burden patients with they as an academic. You've done functional

Respiratory Distress Aqua Lung Therapeutics Acute Akwa Lung Therapeutics Joe Garcia Biotech Company United States Curiel Covid Founder And Ceo Researcher Oregon Bacterial Pneumonia China Lewis Kobe
COVID-19: What the Autopsies Reveal

Science Talk

11:43 min | 2 years ago

COVID-19: What the Autopsies Reveal

"Gibbs reports on how pathologists are starting to get a much closer look at the damage that covert nineteen does to the body by carefully examining the lungs hearts kidneys and other organs of people who have died while infected with the novel Corona Virus. Wait spoke with experts at the Cleveland Clinic. And the University of Washington who have performed these high risk autopsies very few of which have been done so far in the United States. Covert nineteen is a new disease and doctors have been struggling to figure out how best to treat it putting people on ventilators as always a last resort for other diseases typically about half the patients who go onto a ventilator do not survive but Kobe nineteen patients seemed to do even worse on mechanical ventilation a study in the UK found that only about a third of corona virus patients survived that experience and in a report published on April Twenty second in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Researchers found even more alarming outcomes recently in New York City analyzing data from twelve large New York hospitals during March. They found that out of three hundred twenty patients on ventilators. Two hundred and eighty two died so only about one in nine survived mechanical ventilation. We know this. New Corona virus damages the lungs. But how exactly does it differ in important ways from influenza and other VIRAL INFECTIONS? Some experts have suggested that the virus can infect and damage the heart as well and maybe the kidneys or even the brain when people are seriously ill with Cova nineteen. They seem to be at higher. Risk of blood clots. But it's really hard to determine from lab tests and fuzzy medical images whether it's the virus damaging these other organs or whether the body's own immune system fouling up the works as it generates massive inflammatory response to combat the corona virus. Any kind of lung injury can result in acute respiratory distress syndromes. This is a disease process that we've known about for a long. It's a very typical pattern of injury that we see in the lungs when they're injured for many many different kinds of reasons. That's disarray Marshall. A pathologist at the University of Washington. She says that it's often the cascading organ failure triggered by acute respiratory distress syndrome or A. Rds The causes elderly people to die from influenza and firefighters to die from smoke inhalation and cancer patients to die from reactions to chemotherapy. The pressing question. We need to answer for Kobe. Nineteen is whether it's just a rds that makes the disease deadly or whether this new diseases different and even more complicated to treat them what doctors have seen before well if you watch TV you know what medical examiners do when they want to figure out what killed somebody. There's just no substitute for a thorough and detailed autopsy earlier this month researchers published the first English language autopsy results on people who died after becoming infected with the novel Corona Virus. The paper appeared in the American Journal of Clinical Pathology on April tenth. It describes to interesting cases both from Oklahoma case one was seventy seven year old man who had cycled between fever and chills for six days before finally calling for an ambulance on March twentieth. He had high blood pressure and some other health issues but no cough on the trip to the hospital. He was gasping for air and his heart stopped by the time they arrived at the emergency room. It was too late. The gentleman had not seen a doctor for his fever. He had not been tested for Kobe. Nineteen so it wasn't clear what had caused the heart attack taking his life. The Medical Examiner's team in Oklahoma City decided that it was important to find out they swabbed the man's nasal passages and also his lungs both swabs tested positive for the SARS. Kobe virus and chest xrays showed what they described as complete white out in. What would normally be dark empty lung? Cavities doing an autopsy on a Kobe. Positive body is risky but they had the special protective equipment and high containment room. They needed to do it and maybe they could learn something that would help save some of the hundreds of thousands of people around the world who will fight cove in nineteen for their lives in the months to come so they laid his body on the dissecting table and they opened them up. The team contacted a well-known lung pathologist at the Cleveland Clinic to help them interpret what they saw especially as they examined tissue samples from bears organs under the microscope. My name is Sanjay Mukhopadhyay. I'm director of pathology at the Cleveland Clinic. Autopsies give you another deeper look into tissue. That is actually several layers of resolution higher than what you can get from a history a physical examination routine laptops even the highest resolution CD. Scans none of them. Even approach the resolution that you can get from an autopsy. The medical examiner had noticed that. This man's lungs were two to three times heavier than usual. A Common Consequence of AIDS pathologist actually referred to that syndrome by a different name. One that describes the end result of the disease lung cells. They call it diffuse. Lv alert damage in that gentleman. We found diffuse Alveoli damage under the microscope. When you take a breath and it goes down your windpipe. The windpipe actually branches and to do and when goes into the left lung and one goes into the right and then those branches of the windpipe branch like the branches of a tree. You know they get smarter than sponsored smaller as you go. Further and further away and the end point of the branch is what we call an Lvn Louis or colloquially you can call it an air sac and what that is just a very tiny balloon. You need a microscope to see it. And they're just cows and thousands of those little balloons in the lung. That's what makes up the lamp so each time. You inhale you inflate thousands of microscopic Vealy as the ED enters into that little balloon with oxygen in it. The point of the balloon is to take that oxygen into the bloodstream. The wall of the balloon has little blood vessels in it so in the normal language. Dicap- breath the oxygen goes from the middle of the balloon into the one of the balloon. And that's where the arteries are and the oxygen goes into your blood cells. Red Blood Cells. We call them. And then that Dixit back to the heart and the heart center the oxygen to the rest of the body for this exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide to work properly. The thin lining of the air SAC has to be very close to the walls of the blood vessels. Now what happens in in actually in any severe viral infection is that the virus starts causing damage reading a digest. I which is the back of the throat and then all the way down so all the way down the windpipe down the branches to the smallest branches and then into the air sex and when it gets into the AIR SACS. Call that a viral pneumonia. What's happening is actually. The virus is damaging the walls of the those little webs of capillaries that surround the walls of the air. Sacs start to leak proteins fluids white blood cells and debris from destroyed lung seep into the air sacs the debris clogs the balloons. But maybe even more important it also thickens the walls of the air sacs. Literally it's making a barrier for the oxygen to go from the middle of the relates to the bloodstream and so this is the reason that oxygen levels are so low in these patients who are very sick from ovid. The researchers concluded that case won the seventy seven year old man had died from Kobe. Nineteen even though he had never been diagnosed with it. Mukhopadhyay said he was struck by similar. The pattern of organ damage was to what he's used to seeing from autopsies on people who died from other viral infections. It's actually very similar to what happens in influenza and at just to mention a few other examples. Sars you know the SARS from two thousand to two thousand three identical merced Middle Eastern disparaties syndrome identical findings. I did autopsies and deported them on H. One and one when that happened the swine flu identical findings and I give you one more example. You know the when the vaping thing happened just recently and many people were getting sick from the most sick patients but actually developing diffuse. Lbj damage case too was different. This man had to the hospital a day earlier on March nineteenth. He was only forty two but had myo tonic. Muscular dystrophy a hereditary disease that causes muscles to weaken or atrophy. Sometimes so much that food can back up from the stomach. Go down the wrong tube into the lungs where causes bacterial pneumonia? He felt sharp abdominal pains and went to the hospital where a cat scan showed fluid in his lungs just hours later his heart gave out any passed away although he was labelled as community acquired pneumonia and died and was found to be covert positive. The microscopic examination. This patient does not support the idea that he died of Gobert so there was no damage instead. They found food particles and bacterial infection in the airway clear signs of aspirational pneumonia. So case to died with cove in nineteen but he did not die of covert nineteen. Which makes it very interesting because it brings up the issue of. How often is this happening? How often are people who are PAS? Different went on a nasal swab dying of things other than Kobe. I put that question to Desert Marshall whom we heard from earlier. I'm the director of autopsy after De Services at the University of Washington Medical Center since early. March Marshall has performed more than a dozen autopsies of people who died after testing positive for corona virus infection. She says the results of those autopsies have been submitted to a Medical Journal for publication but are still undergoing peer review. Marshall says that the risk of infection that this fires poses has changed how they perform all autopsies regardless of whether the person was suspected to have covert nineteen. Or not so. We've actually started to swab all of our students and get those results before will perform an autopsy in our facility. That isn't the negative pressure sweet so his Marshall also found that like case to in Oklahoma some patients are dying of something else but turning out to have corona virus infection as well we have not. We have not had any unexpected positive results yet. It's still a limited number but of the probably fifteen that we've done. We have not had a positive comeback where we weren't expecting it. And what about the finding from case one in Oklahoma here in Washington are most of the Kobe? Nineteen patients dying from more or less standard AIDS or the autopsies revealing evidence of the virus infecting and damaging other organs as well hearing concerns of the clinicians and folks on the front lines there's the virus infecting the heart or is it just kind of secondary affects related to the critical illness. Is there excess? Clotting related to this disease. Different things like that. It looks like it's helping us to see that Cova did is actually causing typical acute respiratory distress syndrome. Initially there were thoughts that it was behaving a bit differently. But I think as we get more numbers of people and there's less of the individual variability the vast majority of these cases are showing the typical pathologic features of acute respiratory distress and Which we call a diffuse Alveoli damage. Pathology it does look like it. Is that phenomenon and there's not something Speaking out pathologically. That's different in a way that will inform them that you know. They should probably continue to use. The evidence based tried and true therapies for areas in particular marshal says. They aren't seeing an unusual number of small blockages and blood vessels. That would require treatment beyond the usual blood thinners such as Heparin nor has her group or other. She has heard from around. The country found the corona virus causing serious heart infections in the autopsies. They

Kobe Respiratory Distress Influenza Oklahoma Marshall Cleveland Clinic University Of Washington Sars Sanjay Mukhopadhyay Aids New York City Director Cova United States Pneumonia Gibbs
Symptoms of Coronavirus: Early Signs, Serious Symptoms

Science Magazine Podcast

12:43 min | 2 years ago

Symptoms of Coronavirus: Early Signs, Serious Symptoms

"What does it mean to be sick with current Oh virus we typically think I probably of shortness of breath symptom that will determine whether you should go to the doctor. You have a fever could lose your sense of smell. Maybe some stomach problems. Who What does this virus actually? Due to the body Meredith Wiedeman team of reporters from science looked at what we know of its effect system by system. It's not a complete picture yet but researchers are starting to pull it together. Okay Meredith how are you? I'm fine how are you Sarah? I'm good. This is a very comprehensive story from nose to Toews. I think they saw in one description of the work. Yes and so what happens? When a person comes in contact with the novel coronavirus. He essentially they inhale it and respiratory droplets. They might also pick it up on fingers that they then placed to their face from an inanimate surface the virus finds a welcoming home in the upper respiratory tract. A back of the throat the nose. Because there there are cells that are rich in what are known as ace two receptors and these are receptors that live on the surface of some cells and that the virus needs in order to get into those cells. We don't know the numbers but some people are just gonNA clear the infection and move on with their lives. Right they are. They're going to either be a symptomatic not even being aware they are infected and they can be very infectious in this stage or they might feel crummy they might have Malays. They might have aches fever. That really within a week or so start to recover ordered. They might go into a more serious phase of the disease. This is when the virus makes its way into the lower respiratory tract. That's right if your immune system can't beat back the virus while except in your nose and throat then the risk goes up of marching down your windpipe and into what we call the respiratory tree. The whole system of Airways that leads to the far reaches of the lung. And that's where the virus again finds a welcoming home because the tiny air sacs called Alveoli where oxygen exchange occurs with the blood also adds an abundance of these ace to receptors on their cell surfaces. And this is a problem because if the immune system goes on the attack these tiny spaces in the lungs you can get really serious problems. Sure it becomes what we know as pneumonia and ammonia simply as lung inflammation. This particular virus can cause a really rip roaring lung inflammation but these patients may have in quotes. Mild the MONJA. Although I don't think anyone has described how they feel as mildly affected or they may turn a severe sharp corner where they begin a rapid downhill. Slide into what we know is acute respiratory distress syndrome where. There's just a raging pneumonia and on their chest xrays or C. T. Scans you're GonNa see white where you should have seen black. Lack representing air in an white. Is this whole inflammatory? Response trying to beat back the virus but doing damage itself. Alveoli walls breakdown either can be clots in the little tiny blood vessels that supply the OBVIO- light nurse. Just a real STU real mess and when people deteriorate very seriously enough deny one thing that researchers are trying to understand is how serious is this immune response and would intervening at that point. Be Helpful for patients. If you have just a regular immune response and you start giving immune suppressing drugs your disarming your your Mahameed in a minority of gravely. Ill patients the immune system goes into this really damaging hyper immune state. Call that a cytokine storm when levels of certain chemical signals and the blood. Go absolutely off the charts and in the end what happens is the immune cells of the body began attacking healthy tissues and you can get widespread kwoh-ting you get the blood. Vessels leaking blood pressure plummeting. It's a catastrophe for the whole body. So in efforts to combat that out of Control Immune response they are deploying drugs that go after specific ones of these chemical signaling molecules known as cytokines and just to be clear here. Most of what we're going to be talking about is for severely affected patients people who are in the ICU people who are coming into the ER. So let's turn to the heart and blood vessels meredith. This is something surprisingly being seen in maybe twenty percent of patients. Yes it's clear that the heart and blood vessels are a target for Kovic and just how unwise still being sorted out. Let one paper in. Jama cardiology found heart damage in nearly twenty percent of more than four hundred patients who were hospitalized for the disease in. Wuhan another found forty four percent of patients in an ICU. There had abnormal heart rhythms. And then there's also an increased tendency to blood clotting that in a Dutch. Icu nearly forty percent of patients had blood. That was clotting abnormally. These are extremely problematic issues and people. That are already very sick from pneumonia. What has been seen happening to people's hearts there seems to be heart inflammation and it's possible because the heart lining and the blood vessel lining just like the cells in the lungs and the nose is rich in these ace two receptors again. They're the viruses port of entry into into cells. So the cells could be. It's possible that they're being in the heart. And the vessels directly inflamed. It's possible there at the lack of oxygen. Getting through because of the problems in the lung is doing additional damage to her vessels could be that a societal kind storm releasing all these inflammatory molecules again and sells remember they attack normal healthy tissue and that can include the linings of blood vessels so there are these multiplex of potential causes that may indeed vary between patients as to what's causing let. But it's clear that there's cardiac and vessel damage in a significant number of severely. Ill patients let's take a turn now to the brain. This is something that we've seen some scary reports on actually of inflammation in the brain and we've also seen law sense of smell in corona virus. Patients is that something that's related to the brain it might be that's not been established but there is a direct connection from so-called olfactory neurons. The ones that light you smell running from the nose up to. It's called the olfactory bulb which connects to the brain as one of our sources. Put It as a nice sounding feary who I have to go and prove that it actually extends to the brain but there are more general brain effects. That don't trace back to loss of sense of smell for one thing. The bloods increased tendency to clot can put patients at risk of having strokes. There's also a problem in that. A lot of these folks developed kidney failure that in itself can cause delirium and problems for the brain in addition there can also be a quote unquote sympathetic storm. It's sort of an overreaction of the nervous system that somewhat analogous to the site of kinds storm and that's common after traumatic brain injury some people with Cova nineteen can lose consciousness. So there's just a whole panoply of potential brain symptoms another symptom that I'd heard of before reading this story and I haven't heard most of this. Was that people can have symptoms in their gut. They can have diarrhea. They can have upset stomach. Does this mean that you know the virus pieces of the virus are surviving digestion? Yes apparently it does. And one of the suggestions is that patients are swallowing their own respiratory secretions and that the virus is carried live and somehow survives the acid environment in the stomach to land in the small intestine which is again replete. With these ace two receptors. An so virus can establish. Wow a robust infection. There that's it's thought what's leading to diarrhea nausea and other problems in perhaps on average about twenty percent of patients across studies. I WANNA take a step back here and just talk about how all these different systems being affected kind of expand the pool of people who have pre existing conditions that would make corona virus infection. Really dangerous for them. Can you talk a little bit about that? Sure so since we were just talking about kidney disease in the kidneys. That's one of the organ systems. Where if you have a pre existing kidney disease that gives you basically a handicap when you start this race with this new virus than we think of something like diabetes harms the kidneys. So if you start with a lower baseline of kidney function these chronic kidney patients with pre existing kidney disease are at seriously greater risk of developing acute kidney injury during the infection in the same way diseases that affect the blood vessels will also put patients at higher risk. High blood pressure diabetes again congestive heart failure all these kinds of pre-existing disease just make patients that much more vulnerable. Should they become infected? So how is research like this? It's so preliminary. Were really just beginning to understand the progression of this infection. How will this help with interventions or treatments? I think it will certainly offer clues and sign posts. There will be new discoveries that hopefully will lead to highly effective drugs but we have already a good deal of information that points the way to either existing drugs or targets for drugs now being developed knowing for instance the outline of a site a kind storm which is something that can be triggered by other viral infections or bacterial infections. We have a starting place with that. We have these drugs already being deployed and other inflammatory states like rheumatoid arthritis that you can then say well. If they're beating back a certain site assign one of these out of Control Chemical Messengers in arthritis may be they will also be back some piece of the cytokine storm. That's going on in these severely ill patients and so you have such drugs being deployed in clinical trials. What we know about the ace two receptor and it's detailed protein. Structure has been defined by a couple of new important papers hopefully will give us new unique targets to actually prevent binding there. Which would be terrific. Yeah so what? Was it like trying to report on this? Big Mix of peer reviewed preprinted small clinical studies firsthand reports. Those kinds of things was very challenging. Every scientist and physician we interviewed really added the caveat. This is science on the fly. Our knowledge today may be completely eclipsed a month from now or what we're thinking about how this diseases is acting may be proven wrong within three weeks. This is obviously an ongoing endeavor to understand how the disease progresses what conditions set you up for getting extra sick and then you know the mechanisms that are happening at the cellular level. Where is the best information going to come from? Do you think. Is this something where people need to set up. These robust studies that you described. Are they doing that now? Yes in fact. They are doing it but hampered by the fact that they're trying to at the same time in many cases take care of desperately ill. Patients cleverly does the analogy goes trying to build the plane. While you're flying at this information is going to be constrained or imperfect because of the situation. It doesn't mean it's not going to be important.

Bloods Pneumonia Meredith Wiedeman Respiratory Distress Upper Respiratory Tract Respiratory Tract Fever Toews Sarah Lung Inflammation Respiratory Tree Obvio ICU Scientist
Gilead's Remdesivir Efficacy Still Uncertain! Is Stemline Therapeutics a Buy?

Breaking Biotech

09:04 min | 2 years ago

Gilead's Remdesivir Efficacy Still Uncertain! Is Stemline Therapeutics a Buy?

"So I'm glad to be back and I have a great show for you all today. We have some real spicy stuff to get into. Some of them have commented on twitter. But yet it's it should be good so I'm GONNA start off today by talking about some biotech news. Some little updates that we got some press releases and then a follow up by talking about Gillian ads at Rim decively data. We're going to touch a little bit. On the New England Journal. Medicine study that they published followed up by a report that was provided by our friends at Stat News. So that's going to be good and then the final topic. I WanNa talk about is stem line. So you know. One benefit of being in this volatile environment is that there are buying opportunities right now and one that I do see is a company called stem line. So we're GONNA talk about them and why think thereby right now so with that? Let's get to some of the news that we saw this week and first thing I wanted to touch on his after sys mostly because I just talked about them in the last video but we saw actually in the last couple of weeks that the FDA has authorized after says to initiate a pivotal clinical evaluating multi stem cell therapy in patients with Cova nineteen with induced acute respiratory distress syndrome. So some of the stuff that I talked about in my previous video was that I wasn't sure if the face to that. They're currently undergoing with their collaborator. In Japan was going to be a pivotal study. And it looks like it will be for the Japanese system and then this study that they're launching that they launched in the last couple of weeks is going to be the pivotal study for them domestically here in the United States so the primary endpoint is ventilator. Free Days Through Day. Twenty eight and they're beginning to open sites this quarter so I'm not sure exactly what that means in terms of when we can expect data. I would think maybe late Q. Three probably in Q. Four we'd see some data for this which could be a big boost for the company. Also what we learned in at the risk of opening another can of a drama this company they announce a public offering a twenty two million shares at two dollars and twenty five cents for about fifty million dollars in proceeds. I did say that I was expecting them to announce another offering and that is what we saw earlier than I expected. I really thought that they were GonNa wait until maybe later in the year to do this but while the songs doing okay I guess it's a it's an opportunity to do so so with another fifteen million dollars in cash. This should give them another six months or so and you know if they do see some good data from this pivotal study it would likely boost the stock quite a bit more before they have to go ahead and raise money again. So that's after says. I'm still saying on the sidelines. I'm still not super confident. In that data we originally with their phase one so I have no real sense on whether or not I think the date is GonNa be positive but I hope it is that this can get rolled out and it can actually start helping patients that have covert nineteen and areas going to move quickly to immunogenetics which is a company that kind of fell off my radar ticker symbol. Is I m you? They have a compound called says a to Mab Guven Akin and yes. I did practice. That's all I can say. A properly for metastatic triple negative breast cancer and I kind of talked about is the potential for this drug. It's it's a unique formulation so that they can really target the cancer cells and hit them with this tailored that is toxic to all sales. But because it's tethered to something that specifically targets cancer cells it would primarily affect them and kill them so the primary indication they're looking for is triple negative breast cancer and they had done in a sense study to confirm their previous face through results and there was some concern with safety but the sense that he was actually stopped for compelling efficacy. So that's great news for them the PDF date is June. Second of this year. And we'll see if the FDA is going to go ahead and approve the drug so that they can search treating metastatic triple negative breast cancer patients. They have a plan readout for your cancer in the second half of twenty twenty and they're also still enrolling patients for positive her two negative medicine breast cancer so I think that that trial read out is going to be particularly important for the company. And I'M GONNA keep them on my radar and pay a little bit better attention because I think that if they do see positive data there. The company has a a much larger patient population. Go after so Yeah so it's good for them and hopefully they'll see a positive result at the PDF eight anime. Keep an eye out for that trial moving on. I WanNa talk a little bit about Amarin. Because they had their earnings report while ago and what we learned is that they're cute. One Twenty twenty revenue beat estimates at one hundred and fifty million dollars and I had said previously that. I thought their estimates were sandbagged in anticipation of better results. And that is what happened but unfortunately none of this matters because they do not have pan protection in the United States given the ruling that we heard a little while ago so regarding to the appeal and the generics the CEO is not expecting at risk launches. But they are willing to file an injunction. I've talked about that in the past. This is not new news but they did also say that. In the event of an appeal loss Amarin would be willing to launch a brand engineering version. So this is an interesting strategy in order to allow them to maintain market share in the space because if they launch a generic version immediately. You know by the time another generic comes to the stage Amazon's already going to generic Kinda solidifies their position in the markets. There's not going to be really an advantage to patients taking a another third party. Generic other than Amazon's now the only issue with this is that the generic price is going to have to be competitive with the other companies. That launched generics as well. So in this way they're gonNA lower the amount of total revenue. Get but there's a lot of uncertainty in the company. I'm still not sure what I'm GonNa do with my shares. The stock has bounced back a little bit. But you know if they don't win appeal I assume they're gonNA see further downside until we actually start to see the kinds of numbers that start coming in given the new pricing of generic version of Amarin. So we'll see we'll keep you posted on what I do. I'm tempted to buy a little bit more and lower my cost basis by I'm I don't feel great about that either. So we'll see all right. Let's talk about Gilead. Everybody so first thing I want to touch on with Gilead is this New England Journal. Medicine studied that they released regarding the compassionate use of Rendez severe for patients with severe cove. In nineteen so Gillian been at the forefront of the media when it comes to this rendez severe drug that they're hoping to get approved and they initially had rendez severe offered only as compassionate use for patients as is still undergoing phase. Three trials right now so some people who are really severe severely affected by cove nineteen could apply to to take severe and what they did is they published a study with fifty three patients who had taken it under this program and really it wasn't a placebo controlled trial so for me. There's no real conclusion to be drawn. They said that a majority of patients were discharged. But because there's nothing to compare it to doesn't really mean much Another thing that's worth complaining about for the studies that they didn't even measuring viral load. So we don't even know if patients that were taking Severe head lowered viral loads in. You know we could figure that out by comparing baseline to treat a data. But they didn't do that so it's Kinda left in the dark here. The company itself has terminated a study in China with severe patients because of low enrollment. And they're awaiting the publication of these data to announce in-depth review the result. So that's one thing that we can also look forward to see is the data that we're getting from this low enrollment patient population in China. And they are doing a mild to moderate disease study in China. So that's still ongoing. Takes been seeing on twitter. Pretty disappointing a lot of people complaining that the New England Journal of Medicine shouldn't publish the study given that it was you know. There's a conflict of interest and there's no placebo and you're not new to academia. You know it's a cartel. The big name journals really only published stuff. That's like really hot off the press type thing. So of course there's huge problems with this study and Gillian's not even shy to mention them in the discussion so they clearly outlined limitations of the study. And everybody that I've seen on twitter isn't really taking that into consideration they think Gilead just willfully blind to the fact that there's no control. Obviously they know that. And if you want to throw the New England Journal Medicine under the bus or publishing this year but throw the entire institution appear review under the bus. It's a horribly flawed system as somebody. Who's coming from academia? I've seen this all the time you know. These journals are a cartel that gate keep science. So that unless you know people or your science is so particularly compelling that they'd be willing to publish it but if you WanNa talk about the academic system and publishing. Let's have that conversation but to call out this study in particular is being. The true hope written the true problem in the world of publishing. This is not the one for you

Gillian Twitter Gilead New England Journal FDA United States China Amarin Amazon New England Journal Of Medicin New England Journal Medicine Stat News Mab Guven Akin Severe Twenty Twenty Rim Decively Japan Respiratory Distress
Chicago researcher says helmet ventilators can ease short supply

WGN Nightside

04:08 min | 2 years ago

Chicago researcher says helmet ventilators can ease short supply

"At first when testing increased the number of positive coping nineteen cases was doubling every other day now the numbers are doubling every four days what does that mean for difference in the number of people impacted by covert nineteen currently we have nearly seven thousand cases if that number doubled the way it had been every two days we would sort of one hundred twelve thousand cases in ten days but at the new rate a doubling every four days would leave us with fifty six thousand cases roughly cutting the spread in half I think really the amazing response or and in collective effort by everyone is going to go a long way as we continue to battle this ventilators are the number one tool for the sickest patients to battle this virus they force air into people's lungs after cover nineteen causes so much damage it's nearly impossible to brief but ventilators are in short supply now one Chicago researcher says he has another idea helmets they not only help patients they cut down the risk of infection for health care workers normally we put a tube in the trachea an endotracheal tube and that process is called endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation it's a highly invasive therapy and one associated with poor outcomes that's why university of Chicago medicine doctor John Kress is hoping to harness helmet for the sickest cobit nineteen patients this does have the potential to make an important Dante inspired by space travel built in Texas Chris Austin showed us the helmet he makes in his garage reflects the both weekend and they are looking for storage or what have you yeah this material the models strong it's very resilient it won't tear it won't leak there are twenty to thirty of the helmets in use right now at university of Chicago medicine you can actually connected to the source of oxygen from the wall right in the hospital and no ventilator at all so it simply pressurized system of oxygen enriched air that inflates the helmet and also inflates your lines in the patient breeze spontaneously begets in red stocks engine so that saves a validator for non people who are sicker and might need it that's particularly important to us we start to worry about I guess what I would call the unthinkable which is we have too many patients and we don't have enough ventilators to take care of all of them the devices can be sterilized and reused they connect to the hospital direct source of oxygen so a steady flow at higher pressure compared to a standard mask fills the helmet and ultimately reaches deep into the lungs no tuber ventilator need higher pressures can be effective in many patients that have called the nineteen because the severity of the injury to the lungs is such that higher pressures are needed and a better seal not the mouth but around the neck protect healthcare workers from infected patients when you have a R. D. S. acute respiratory distress syndrome which is what the copay patients have you have some limits because the amount of pressure that defeat gas source must generate is beyond what the mask can handle so you have leaking around the mask effect across study the helmets back in twenty sixteen he found the device helps sixty percent of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome R. A. R. D. S. avoid intubation that number appears to be lower in Khalid nineteen patients closer to thirty percent still statistically significant as ventilators are in short supply that's clinically relevant because we could save thirty percent of patients from needing to be anticipated not only does that and give the patient a better chance for a good outcome as staying off the ventilator it will translate into you having a better outcome but it also saves thirty percent of the ventilators for somebody else the sky's

Leading lung expert John F. Murray dies of coronavirus-related complications

WBZ Morning News

00:25 sec | 2 years ago

Leading lung expert John F. Murray dies of coronavirus-related complications

"A prominent doctor in California dies and as USA today reports its because of Kobe nineteen Dr John Murray who spent decades studying and treating acute respiratory distress syndrome died at the age of ninety three from that very illness caused by coronavirus this syndrome is often the cause of death among those hospitalized by a crew of a

Dr John Murray California USA Kobe Respiratory Distress
21 Californians hospitalized in ICU after vaping cannabis or CBD oils

Gary and Shannon

00:25 sec | 3 years ago

21 Californians hospitalized in ICU after vaping cannabis or CBD oils

"State health officials have linked a lung disease outbreak to the black market for cannabis at least twenty one people in California been treated this summer for acute respiratory distress syndrome also known as wet long all of them had recently vape marijuana products bought from so called pop up dealers shops often display phony licenses health officials say people should stick to legal pot even though it costs more because it is tested for

Cannabis California Respiratory Distress Marijuana