21 Burst results for "Acute Infection"

"acute infection" Discussed on CrazyFitnessGuy Healthy Living Podcast

CrazyFitnessGuy Healthy Living Podcast

05:21 min | 2 months ago

"acute infection" Discussed on CrazyFitnessGuy Healthy Living Podcast

"Podcast do you. How do you think that that affects you. Do you think it affects you in any way related to autism or not necessarily think. I don't think that i feel like you. I like the way i feel. I write my clothes wear baggy shirts. I in my cousins. Like to joke with me as i woke up and they again as as bounce the masses. If i broke up somewhere. I can't book him From my shoulders Now but absolutely weird so at this say around this that doesn't even My my issue and cry. His is Rink underneath my sense. I is trying to be as day He e- has proven. You don't need muscle in order to take down like twenty times bigger than you. I mean okay may not tons. But i like a lot of we on him. I mean all muscle and by his author down because ear big and bulked up your punches tend to slow and oh i didn't know that muscles getting away. He had to come around deger muscles. Get in the way. What do you say it. It makes sense to me. I always thought like walsall's with better way to issues. I'm sorry powerful but not faster. And when you're running no lean mean kind of machine you kinda faster. You have a time better reflexes ends. Are they gonna take me. Maybe a second q. Seconds joe Out of the way. It's gonna be like than the second. Yeah so so the way that. We chose the jewish school for my girls. One of the things that drew us in is They had posted videos of their teacher. I don't know what to teachers called. I don't think it's unsafe. We just call to teacher. We call it by name. But they had videos of him and his daughter who was about six or seven. She was taking him down. He was like he's not a little guy he and we're they guess. We want that for our daughters and when he met them he said yes. I believe that every girl should know how to choke boys and the girls were like. Yeah let's do that lord. Are you scared of my daughters. Let me run. They're much smaller than you. But the rbm trained by this person so asked me what made you want to become a speech therapist. Can i tell you my mom. My mom pressured me into it. But but eventually i did. I was inspired by. If i say the name anne sullivan do you know who that is before right. She was a teacher for helen. Keller helen keller shoot yes. She was a woman. Helen keller the two of them together were very famous. Probably about one hundred years ago in the earlier. Part of the last century Helen keller was a woman or a little girl. She was born with with site in hearing but because of an acute infection. She lost her sight in hearing I think before she was speaking. Yeah i think she was a baby. She was a baby and her father had been a general but it was like a fairly wealthy southern family and they hired a teacher on any sullivan who herself was blind. But could here or i don't know she was totally blind. I think she could see to a degree but also not to a degree and she had learned sign language and braille and she came to south of remember exactly where to live with the family and to teach helen movies and plays about this and i have a theater background and had been familiar with the movies. In the play of the moment that any have worked with pellett and the family. Sue help Helen be able to communicate and And then helen over together with anti but also on her own over. The course of her life was able to really. Nobody's asked me that question ears.

autism walsall Helen keller Keller helen keller acute infection anne sullivan drew joe helen sullivan Helen
"acute infection" Discussed on Health Babes Podcast

Health Babes Podcast

03:12 min | 4 months ago

"acute infection" Discussed on Health Babes Podcast

"And in my private practice working when people have had cancer treatment oftentimes they have lymph nodes removed to make sure the cancer spreads with a system. But that can put somebody at risk for they can get lymph adina which is humilate swelling in a limb. They had lymph nodes removed under the armpit. There mr lymph edina the arm. So lymphatic drainage is actually covered by insurance in this country if you have a note from the physician prescription from them and you work with a certified. Lymph edina therapist. They can really help you manage lymph edina but it also runs the gamut too aesthetic reasons people wanna get glowing skin be red carpet ready lose a few pounds around the waistline help reduce appearance of cellulite. I've worked with people. Who have extra. I've worked with auto immune issues people with the mta of our. Jeanne have issue fee toxin lupus in line as well as young people who want to avoid some of the chronic conditions. Their parents face. They come in early because they know it's proactive healthy beneficial type of such gas for sure. So who should not be getting lymphatic. Massage is such a great question. So i have a whole list in my book. The vote us. But if you have chronic heart conditions if you have on chronic cardiac edina if you're at whisper of blood clot if you recently had surgery if you have acted on cancer treatment. Dbt there are. There's a list that i have in my book. You know if you have an active infection. Don't work though if you have covert wait until you. Are you know really over that. Active acute infection cellulitis. No working that. Dvd just see his nose deep-vein thrombosis right. So that's basically where you get a blood clot usually in your calf that can be released into your lungs and become a pulmonary. Embolism so you could see why massaging that area would be a problem. So you know if you're walking with calf pain You know a good. I think a someone who does what you release that would know you know that is not the type of person you probably wouldn't take if there's any risk of that when in doubt ask your doctor your doctor. What are the symptoms. You can experience after working on the lamps is such a great question again. It's sort of a rainbow of possibilities. A lot of my clients feel lighter and writer afterwards with more energy but oftentimes people can also feel really drowsy and tired. Some people can get headache. If they're not drinking enough water you are accelerating the natural detoxification pathways of your body. That your lymph system works with so just like you might feel on day. Three of the cleanse. If you've got a lot of toxins you're getting rid of. It might not be so comfortable. That can be normal. So i always tell people. Try not to schedule anything that you have to rush off to. After you get lymphatic massage. Give yourself time to rest and drink plenty of water and.

mr lymph cancer Active acute infection celluli Jeanne headache
"acute infection" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

06:19 min | 4 months ago

"acute infection" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Often it so i think what was most people's idea of what happens. Is he hospital. You get quite sick. You get better and leave the front door of the hospital. Thank goodness i made it three. That was a great. But there's been a lot less mckeag ignition about the fact that the end of the story. I'm by some whether had been in hospital. Oh you hadn't those increasing commission if the thing that's been termed long david and it covers a range of different things that long cave patient grapes suggested up to two hundred symptoms that people experience in the months after they've had their primary infection but what we noticed from data that came from the office for national statistics and from the united states towards the end of last year was that actually people were saying and ending up coming back into hospital insecure numbers as you outlined. I felt that somebody needs to be done about that. Do we know is. Is there a link between a join us. Is there any way that you can work out. Which groups are more vulnerable. Who to this this readmission to hospital so obviously as we get older all risk of dying increases at worrying the looking at the data from the oh. Ns it suggests that your risk is greater. If you're below the age of seventy compared to the background late you would normally have of death. I'm competitive to those avis. Seventy so younger working age. People are increased risk compared to their usual risk of almost mood and seven times greater the major risk of dying in the months after david whereas people over seventy the risk is destroyed three times. The usual rate now said said in the introduction. You're one of the lead researchers on this new clinical trial. It's called he'll keva just explained to us. What you doing so he will keep. It is helping alleviate the longer term consequences of caveat nineteen so said national platform can trial. So what we're trying to do is to recruit people the point that well enough to leave hospital and say if we give you a drug therapy at this point does it make the chances of you being alive and out of hospital over the next one year better. Anti the trial is made up with a fabulous team of people. And as you highlighted. It's got a really strong female leadership team. So allen has davies is the chief executive of apparatus the digital clinical trials company. What grave carroll campbell. He's the by statistics at liverpool. He runs the liverpool clinical trials center. We've got some fantastic. Clinical trial man manages. Emma bentson probably donahue at a really really brilliant data linkage researcher could anne-marie docherty's university of edinburgh and patient reported outcomes specialists from birmingham similarly calvert as well as really brilliant maiocco investigators kites printout pge team from across the country and talk about the drugs. You're traveling because these drugs are drugs. Already used but in different ways only exactly so we've gone with the option of repacking therapy so taking drugs that we know all honesty cheap that safe and widely available and saying okay if we give these two people and they work. We know that they would be rapidly. Stay lockable across the world like mattison has been since the recovery. Trial shape worked. So what were you using is a band which is an oral blood. Thinning drugs to try and see whether addressing blood clots makes a difference to outcomes using stacked in which is a lipid lowering drug people. Use it but fast athlete is working on it later. Affects blood vessel. Inflammation is to get anti inflammatory for that and we knew. The blood vessels very inflamed after credit acute infection. How difficult is it to trial treatments. When we still don't fully understand the condition difficult. I think is the honest answer. We went very lucky in the k. Has i think the kelly covet thirty two advisory panel. There's an expert panel that convenience people you know who's lots of different aspects of the disease to decide what therapies we should be testing myspace and say the talks that have gone into our trial ones. That were recommended by the experts that processed but the option is that we don't do anything we keep fina siping people trying to understand what the natural history next like was more people are being essentially harmed or we can say we know enough. We will try the things that we think irrational and safe and see if we can save lives and tell us briefly. How do people get involved if they fall into this category. What can they do if you or your loved. One happen to be in host. Blue with a caveat impaction and sadly there's likely to be far more effective for the coming weeks. Please do ask your hospital. Doctors taking part and he'll cave it and if not why not and whether you eligible to be recruited into the trial we are open at hospitals across the nhs in all devolve nations. Say please do seek out charlotte psomas. Thank you so much for speaking to us this morning. In sharing with us your achievements over the age of fifty. Sally says after three disastrous attempts to pass my. Csc maths in the fifth year lower and upper sixth of feeling through life. I was mathematically steep. Did i passed my. Gcc maths in two thousand seventeen. When content and grading was reformed. I passed. I was fifty two with a five strong pass. She says as he says. I'm enjoying the program very much at. Thank you for all of your masters this morning. So many inspiring stories of what you have achieved in your fifties. It's been delightful company throughout the week hair on women's out. Of course we back again tomorrow. At ten o'clock that's all from today's women's. I hope you can join us again next time. What would you do if your house just disappeared down are staring you causing a see through viking. I can't find a new five part mystery from bbc radio for. Never be better if you didn't ask questions all but he's seen not it was a warwick took yours. It just cleans sucked it up. One man's fight for answers. Bermuda triangle on tori identifies. Just got the house. That vanished available now on bbc sounds..

carroll campbell liverpool clinical trials cent Emma bentson marie docherty office for national statistics david acute infection avis university of edinburgh donahue mattison calvert davies united states liverpool allen birmingham anne kelly myspace
"acute infection" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

06:25 min | 5 months ago

"acute infection" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"Pandemic bring you up to speed on the science behind the most urgent questions about the virus and the disease we this defy research and you understand what it really means. I'm tanya lewis. I'm josh fishman. And where scientific. American senior health editors. Today we'll talk about clinics for long-haul cova patients the rise of the delta vary. And what you knew about it and using barbershops to get vaccines to communities. That need them most early. In the pandemic there were some reports of people with odd symptoms such as fatigue and memory issues that continued long after their acute infection. Now these long haulers are getting some specialized help more and more. Data's coming out about long cohen. That's serious physical and mental effects that can last half the year after people. I get infected. The latest study came out last week in the journal. Nature medicine researchers looked at health records for a few hundred people in bergen norway. That was almost everyone in the city. Diagnosed with cohen. During several months in twenty twenty overall sixty one percent of the group had symptoms six months after they were first infected. Their most common problem was fatigue followed by difficulty concentrating. Disturb smell or taste memory trouble and a hard time breathing to striking things about these patients. One was that many had just a mild or moderate case of kobe at the star. The other was that a were young age. Sixteen to thirty other. Studies have reported similar symptom cluster. Such as one by university washington. Researchers that found about thirty percent of people was covered. Had these lingering troubles to doctors know what's causing these problems. That still a mystery. Tanya some people have organ damage related to the virus infection but some do not doctors are trying to figure out how best to treat them. Siam contributor melville newsome wrote this week about new covered recovery clinics that treat the whole patient rather than making people run from a lung doctor to a neurologist to an immunologist patients say the coordinated care helps and they feel more hopeful since they're being taken seriously and not dismissed as crank cases the nih is also taking it seriously spending about a billion dollars to study the disease. It now has an official job breaker of name post acute so calais of sars kobe to infection melba notes. However there's racial imbalance showing up at these clinics overwhelmingly. The people referred there are white but people of color are more likely to get cove it so access barriers. Such as lack of health insurance are likely keeping care away from many people who need it. It's yet another burden added to the healthy body. that's already hurting people. In the pandemic. Let's talk about the delta variant. It's red for more than seventy countries and it's now the dominant variant in the us. How worried should we be. The delta variant is definitely concerning particularly for unvaccinated people. It's already causing another surge in the uk where it makes up the vast majority of cases and a company that's been tracking virus sequences in the us estimates this variant now counts for about forty percent of cases. Here making it more than twice as prevalent as the alpha variant. That was previously the most common. As you've noted before josh research from the uk suggests delta is at least forty percent more transmissible than alpha and almost twice as likely to result in hospitalization. The data are a bit murky on whether it actually causes more severe disease or not though so far it hasn't actually caused a huge uptick in hospitalizations or deaths in the uk. Still it's spreading widely in the us. Where only about half. The population is fully vaccinated far less in some areas experts. Say it's not likely to cause another devastating nationwide surge like the one. We had last winter but it will probably lead to flare ups in some states. Where fewer people have been vaccinated such as alabama or mississippi and the risk could increase in places where hotter temperatures or more people to spend time in air conditioned indoor settings where the corona virus can easily spread. The sounds pretty grim. What can we do about it. The good news is that the vaccines work. More data from the uk show that two doses of the pfizer vaccine were ninety six percent effective at preventing hospitalization and two doses of the astrazeneca vaccine were ninety two percent effective but need both shots. A single dose of astrazeneca was only seventy one percent effective at preventing hospitalization and one dose of both vaccines was only around thirty four percent effective at preventing infection. We don't know yet how. Well the johnson and johnson vaccine works against the delta variant but it's likely to provide some protection meanwhile the world health organization is urging even vaccinated people to keep wearing masks and practicing social distancing just to be on the safe side given how much viruses still circulating. Cdc has not changed. Its guidance. Though it's still says vaccinated people don't need a mask unless they want to but with the delta being so transmissible it couldn't hurt to err on the side of caution. There are still plenty of people who are skeptical about getting vaccinated sometimes for valid reasons. Now some efforts are trying to build trust by reaching people in their neighbourhoods. The rate of cova. Vaccinations among people of color. Lags behind that of white people access barriers are one reason for this and so are negative experiences with the medical profession that we distrust lack run. Barber shops and hair salons may be able to counter. Some of this says stephen. Thomas who directs the university of maryland center for health equity for the last fifteen years hamas has been researching the trust placed in barbers and stylus by their communities. And he says it's a powerful thing he's been training these people to help educate their clients about ways to prevent diseases such as diabetes. Now this expertise is helping with co vaccines thomas's group is part of a white house shots at the shop campaign. Barbers and stylus are getting trained to talk to people about the benefits of vaccines versus the risks building on long relationships these conversations which can happen while snipping and combing are not lectures. And they're not magic and they don't convince all downers but they do have an effect on many people. Some shops have become up vaccination sites staffed by local health clinics solving access problems by bringing free vaccines into the neighborhood. Thomas's project is called the health advocates in reach and research and that rebates naturally to pay..

tanya lewis josh fishman acute infection cohen melville newsome uk Pandemic bergen Siam fatigue astrazeneca Tanya norway nih
COVID-19 Long Haulers Get Specialized Help

60-Second Science

02:13 min | 5 months ago

COVID-19 Long Haulers Get Specialized Help

"Early. In the pandemic there were some reports of people with odd symptoms such as fatigue and memory issues that continued long after their acute infection. Now these long haulers are getting some specialized help more and more. Data's coming out about long cohen. That's serious physical and mental effects that can last half the year after people. I get infected. The latest study came out last week in the journal. Nature medicine researchers looked at health records for a few hundred people in bergen norway. That was almost everyone in the city. Diagnosed with cohen. During several months in twenty twenty overall sixty one percent of the group had symptoms six months after they were first infected. Their most common problem was fatigue followed by difficulty concentrating. Disturb smell or taste memory trouble and a hard time breathing to striking things about these patients. One was that many had just a mild or moderate case of kobe at the star. The other was that a were young age. Sixteen to thirty other. Studies have reported similar symptom cluster. Such as one by university washington. Researchers that found about thirty percent of people was covered. Had these lingering troubles to doctors know what's causing these problems. That still a mystery. Tanya some people have organ damage related to the virus infection but some do not doctors are trying to figure out how best to treat them. Siam contributor melville newsome wrote this week about new covered recovery clinics that treat the whole patient rather than making people run from a lung doctor to a neurologist to an immunologist patients say the coordinated care helps and they feel more hopeful since they're being taken seriously and not dismissed as crank cases the nih is also taking it seriously spending about a billion dollars to study the disease. It now has an official job breaker of name post acute so calais of sars kobe to infection melba notes. However there's racial imbalance showing up at these clinics overwhelmingly. The people referred there are white but people of color are more likely to get cove it so access barriers. Such as lack of health insurance are likely keeping care away from many people who need it. It's yet another burden added to the healthy body. that's already hurting people. In the

Acute Infection Cohen Fatigue Bergen Melville Newsome Norway Tanya Siam Washington NIH
"acute infection" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

02:08 min | 5 months ago

"acute infection" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"Early. In the pandemic there were some reports of people with odd symptoms such as fatigue and memory issues that continued long after their acute infection. Now these long haulers are getting some specialized help more and more. Data's coming out about long cohen. That's serious physical and mental effects that can last half the year after people. I get infected. The latest study came out last week in the journal. Nature medicine researchers looked at health records for a few hundred people in bergen norway. That was almost everyone in the city. Diagnosed with cohen. During several months in twenty twenty overall sixty one percent of the group had symptoms six months after they were first infected. Their most common problem was fatigue followed by difficulty concentrating. Disturb smell or taste memory trouble and a hard time breathing to striking things about these patients. One was that many had just a mild or moderate case of kobe at the star. The other was that a were young age. Sixteen to thirty other. Studies have reported similar symptom cluster. Such as one by university washington. Researchers that found about thirty percent of people was covered. Had these lingering troubles to doctors know what's causing these problems. That still a mystery. Tanya some people have organ damage related to the virus infection but some do not doctors are trying to figure out how best to treat them. Siam contributor melville newsome wrote this week about new covered recovery clinics that treat the whole patient rather than making people run from a lung doctor to a neurologist to an immunologist patients say the coordinated care helps and they feel more hopeful since they're being taken seriously and not dismissed as crank cases the nih is also taking it seriously spending about a billion dollars to study the disease. It now has an official job breaker of name post acute so calais of sars kobe to infection melba notes. However there's racial imbalance showing up at these clinics overwhelmingly. The people referred there are white but people of color are more likely to get cove it so access barriers. Such as lack of health insurance are likely keeping care away from many people who need it.

tanya lewis josh fishman acute infection cohen melville newsome uk Pandemic bergen Siam fatigue astrazeneca Tanya norway nih
New Data Released on Long Covid

60-Second Science

02:08 min | 5 months ago

New Data Released on Long Covid

"Early. In the pandemic there were some reports of people with odd symptoms such as fatigue and memory issues that continued long after their acute infection. Now these long haulers are getting some specialized help more and more. Data's coming out about long cohen. That's serious physical and mental effects that can last half the year after people. I get infected. The latest study came out last week in the journal. Nature medicine researchers looked at health records for a few hundred people in bergen norway. That was almost everyone in the city. Diagnosed with cohen. During several months in twenty twenty overall sixty one percent of the group had symptoms six months after they were first infected. Their most common problem was fatigue followed by difficulty concentrating. Disturb smell or taste memory trouble and a hard time breathing to striking things about these patients. One was that many had just a mild or moderate case of kobe at the star. The other was that a were young age. Sixteen to thirty other. Studies have reported similar symptom cluster. Such as one by university washington. Researchers that found about thirty percent of people was covered. Had these lingering troubles to doctors know what's causing these problems. That still a mystery. Tanya some people have organ damage related to the virus infection but some do not doctors are trying to figure out how best to treat them. Siam contributor melville newsome wrote this week about new covered recovery clinics that treat the whole patient rather than making people run from a lung doctor to a neurologist to an immunologist patients say the coordinated care helps and they feel more hopeful since they're being taken seriously and not dismissed as crank cases the nih is also taking it seriously spending about a billion dollars to study the disease. It now has an official job breaker of name post acute so calais of sars kobe to infection melba notes. However there's racial imbalance showing up at these clinics overwhelmingly. The people referred there are white but people of color are more likely to get cove it so access barriers. Such as lack of health insurance are likely keeping care away from many people who need it.

Acute Infection Cohen Fatigue Bergen Melville Newsome Norway Tanya Siam Washington NIH
"acute infection" Discussed on Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

02:15 min | 6 months ago

"acute infection" Discussed on Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

"On why what are some of the causes will is sugar This is a really interesting thing. I discovered when i was working with kids with autism. Because know they might do. Mother may have one child. She's afraid to have another one and done. So you know helping them become pregnant joining choice save. Staying on the diet during the pregnancy was really important to do but window and becomes pregnant. Her estrogen goes up. We'll see what that does and then hurt gesturing goes up and then the yeast become really. It becomes an acute infection. Because she's already glutted in her body in the movie she's got a kind of under control But maybe not in some now it becomes very acute and said that acute infection is actually passed onto the baby. So that's a really important thing to understand. I think all women in part of their preparation for pregnancy must be on any computer diet. They must eliminate sugar and do other things about to explain so they don't pass it onto their child or they will pass it on no matter what even if they are eating because of that progesterone estrogen feeding. But you can throw it off right away. And that's what we've been teaching for years established that microbiome give the baby even juice fermented vegetables Or of the coconut kiefer put a little bit of bacteria gunman fantas ensure that that microbiome is set into place. 'cause that's going to be how you're going to the baby's than a throw off that infection and it's well worth doing that because you're talking about advanced brain development there. The grow prettier a beautiful children in their happy children. One thing on your appearance say that other payments stop them and say he's so focused and they're like qatar class where they call it a little babies. They're all trying to play this little tiny guitar and the one child under buddy country diet is is eating right basically has helped in microbiomes really gonna focused where the rest of them are looking all around the room..

one child One thing qatar one
"acute infection" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

08:05 min | 1 year ago

"acute infection" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"The website, Dr Miller. I want to mention a few times but give give the website if you'll be so kind just so that people can even as we're talking, check out and follow along. Well, I don't have a website, but I have an email address, E mail address and anyone who would like to send questions evidence. It's lime Miami. Diagnosis. Camp. Gmail dot com. Again. I use the wrong phrase when he said a website. The thing that that is amazing about this is that people get in contact with you, and he actually answers your questions. It's is an incredible guy. If someone is diagnosed a cz having lying disease, and there's all sorts of questions about false positives and false negatives with which we can get into. But if someone thinks that they have had that they have contracted Lyme disease. Mom. Water doctors. They're going to put him on a treatment, which you think is inadequate. Why? And tell us what you advocate OK. The most critical factor is the interval between the time of the inoculation between the time of the tick bite. And the time that the actual treatment has begun. Now in terms of making a diagnosis. Of course, If you see the typical skin lesion, it's it's easier to make the diagnosis. And that's that. The so called bullseye, right? Is that exactly Okay. Exactly. Now, the blood tests are typically measuring antibodies the body's production of antibodies against the organism, so Early on, when the right after the inoculation that right after the tick bite you mean system hasn't had has not had an opportunity to produce antibodies, so any testing very early will be invalid. And the The interval. If the inoculation occurs, and the treatment has begun within the first, let's say 60 to 90 days. The organism is readily available and will be susceptible to the antibiotic and it's important to understand the different bacteria consume the antibiotic. At different intervals and and the the end of the bacteria always consumed the antibiotic during the reproductive cycle and reproductive cycle of the spiral. Kaede is typically Every 28 days. So therefore In the acute infection, the patient must be treated long enough. To bracket the entire 28 days. So if the doctor prescribed the medication typically Ah, the current, uh, suggest that treatment is Dr Cycling. 100 milligrams twice a day, and it's been shown in various studies that it requires 400 milligrams a day. That's 200 milligrams twice a day. And the typical treatment duration Now is 14 days. So you go to the doctor, you get your doctor exactly 100 milligrams twice a day for 14 days and the story That's that's not adequate. You haven't covered all of those bacteria because they're not all consuming it during at 14 days, so the minimum would be 200 milligrams twice a day of the doctor's cycling. If the patient can't tolerate doxycycline, there are alternatives. And the duration of the treatment must be a minimum of 28 days. I like to extend it a little bit longer to give the medication adequate time to build up a blood level so you might go up to 40 days, 45 days. After the 1st 3 months of the infection, the organism can become a cyst and that's become sequestered, hiding deep deep into the tissue. And that sister is Impenetrable to an antibiotic. So you Khun treat that patient with antibiotics, And if that says closed, the antibiotics cannot penetrate. In that situation. It's very, very critical that the patient has to be treated with One drug toe, open assists and the second drug to kill the spire. Kaede now if the infection has been of a great, very long duration. That cystic structure is so buried that the immune system is no longer being challenged. And there are no antibodies produced and you mentioned the man from England and this is very important for your audience. To understand man from England contacted me. He has a neurodegenerative disease. I knew From his description that he had to have a positive test, but his initial tests were negative. Why? Because he wasn't producing antibodies, so I asked him to please take Provocative antibiotics for 21 days to bring out that organism and expose it to his immune system, which he did when you say proves exact same tests, Same laboratory and now the test was positive. And when and when you say, provocative treatment? Can you break that down so that I understand that my audit My audience understands that okay, the their two medications. One has to be what I call A cyst buster toe open that, sis. And there. The typical is flat jewel or a derivative of fragile called Tendo, Max. And it's usually 500 milligrams once a day. Providing the patient can tolerate it and with their doctor's approval, so that flatulent the tender Max opens. This is And then the next drug goes in and and actually killed. The Sparky brings it out. And that could be zip through my sin. You know the typical Z Pak 500 milligrams a day. So if you take five milligrams of flag of 500 milligrams, if horizon for 21 days and then get the test, in fact, then I don't even recommended patients be tested. Without pretest, provocative antibiotics. Otherwise, you're going to get a slew of The tests are negative, false name, really? Which is going to give you Ah, false sense of security. And if you can hear, because we only got a couple of minutes before the break. You have have taught me over over time and and have led me to understand and believe that a lot of the neural degenerative diseases that people deal with and develop, including things is a serious and his debilitating is less. Look, Eric disease could be caused by Pick a lime disease, which is not treated. My absolutely correctly. That's very, very, very important depending upon which organ the spire Kaede invades. If it invades the nervous system, you're gonna end up with the neurodegenerative diseases. Ah, Alice is a good example. You know. Lou Gehrig played baseball before he went to the Yankees. He played for the Hartford senators in Hartford, Connecticut, 50 miles from Lyme, Connecticut. And he had a house with a little garden. And that was his relaxation. Well, I feel very confident that that's how he got the sparky infection. But other illnesses, specifically multiple sclerosis, dementia, Parkinson's Any of the motor neuron disease is they can all the result of the infection. Other organs in the body can also be involved. If it involves different parts of the brain. You can have mental illness. Everything from schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression rage, chronic fatigue syndrome. Uh And if it invades the cardiovascular system, you can get a vasculitis. Sometimes the first manifestation of the infection is a stroke. The patient has a stroke or it if invades the heart. They get a heart block. They come in with the hard block. It can invade the nerves in the lower extremities. Patients will have a peripheral neuropathy There goes, the doctor says. Get the diagnosis of prayer from their offices..

neurodegenerative disease Lyme disease England Connecticut Hartford Dr Miller motor neuron disease skin lesion heart block Miami peripheral neuropathy doxycycline Lou Gehrig Khun Yankees schizophrenia Lyme
Sick of COVID: The Long Haulers

The Naked Scientists

03:22 min | 1 year ago

Sick of COVID: The Long Haulers

"Miss, we will learning about long covert the condition where corona virus sufferers recover from the acute infection. But thank God wants to develop a teague another very bizarre symptoms. The Ken lost months and hints are starting to emerge about the damage or complications that are going on in multiple different or in these patients and a group of medical scientists in Germany have recently discovered ongoing heart issues in a significant proportion of people that only ever had this mild covert cardiologists. Valentina Portman explains we investigated patients that recently recovered from covid nineteen illness. So we have the very, very deep look at their hearts. And in these patients, we found that many many of them even if they didn't really have a rough course of the original illness, they still had persist and ongoing cardiac inflammation a little bit like a flu of the heart. How many of them had this kind of inflammation? We scan total of hundred patients seventy eight off. Those have had some findings in the heart. Of these sixty had very active inflammation. Inflammation within the heart muscle something that we call myocarditis as well as inflammation of the lining of the heart pericarditis. How long is this after they were originally sick? The average time from their original causative task was seventy one days. Wow that's a long time since they had this, you know positive test what's going on? This is the question that obviously I can only speculate on and it is not due to an ongoing infection of the heart muscle. So it is not the virus remains within a heart cells. The body itself is understanding the inflammation of the heart is something that it has to fight against or tries to control it but this is obviously at this present point hypotheses. Juno whether this kind of heart inflammation might linked to any specific symptoms that people are feeling months after they were supposed to go better from covert. That is very difficult to say because Hark inflammation does not present with specific symptoms being knocked feet especially young patients. This is one of those symptoms definitely can make aware of it. However inflammation takes a long time to present itself with what we call text book symptoms, chest pain shortness of breath swelling of the legs. But in general, then this might be kind of a hint as to why these people are still unwell. Absolutely this is definitely one of the things that we should look for very early and very fast if possible. In konic inflammation trying to be very sporty very fast is probably not the right thing and I think if any message can be given the present point is that we just need to give the heart as well as the rest of the body time to heal. Balancing appointment from the University of Frankfurt explaining her study from the Journal of Cardiology.

Valentina Portman University Of Frankfurt Pericarditis Journal Of Cardiology KEN Germany
"acute infection" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

04:23 min | 1 year ago

"acute infection" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Right here on 5 70 7 51 And if you look like you want to say something, I'm enjoying the music and enjoy the fact that you're back and able to share this wonderful programmed with information. And other stuff too good to be back. Um, we've heard people getting cove in 19 and then seemingly. They got better. And then they said they came down with it a second time, and that's scaring a lot of people. It's troublesome. It is worrisome. I tend to think maybe, and of course, I don't know. I'm not a not a doctor, but Seems like I know as much about it. It's the doctor Well cases it sounds it sounds to me like what's happening is that their symptoms greatly improve. But the disease is not completely gone. Sweet virologists are saying they suspect then in some of these cases have reported re infections. The person was wrongly declared virus free like it was a false negative, which can happen, especially in the rapid tests. And then the virus was still looking somewhere in their body and reignited. Michael Meena, a Harvard immunologist said while why do we do that? A Harvard immunologist. We don't refer to you as a Syracuse newscaster moment. He works for her. Okay, that would make sense. All right, Michael Meena, a Harvard immunologist says While the reports that the antibodies declined sharply, two or three months after infection have caused alarm, he said, it is completely normal for antibody levels to go very, very high. And then come down after an acute infection. Clinicians he says, are scratching their heads, saying Walton Odd virus. We still don't know how long your immunity last right like, if you you know you get the antibodies, But do they last a month? Two months a year? We don't know. So much We still don't know. Working parents. We're in a tough places, all parents right now in a very tough position. I mean, it's hard enough. Caroline and I are empty nesters. It's hard enough for us to conduct our lives without you know, being careful as we can to not get the disease ourselves or spread it to each other. And then you have kids to deal with. You want to be social? Oh, my gosh. You know, how do you live your life You got jobs to go to if you're lucky. And the kids don't have school, and now you have to teach him on the phone when everything's online. Ah lot of parents are are picking up on a new idea that's actually kind of going like wildfire across the country. Forming private classroom pods of fewer than 10 kids who get to you. We'll get together every day in one home. So you might be the host family and the kids come to school and their private teacher comes in. But this comes with a hefty price tag. Well, it is, but for people who can afford it It seems like a pretty good idea. Former math teacher and tutor Jeffrey Han is advertising his services as a pod teacher. His base rate for Paula teaching is 2 50 a session $250 a session. Times 5 $1250 a week. But then you know if you have 10 kids It's like 1 25 a week for a parent. And there are a lot of people would be willing to pay that we could see it happening there like something like that. I mean, it's kind of like private school, I guess. Yeah, it is. It's it's It's sort of like that. But there are some problems with it. First of all, the obvious one. Not everybody can afford that, right. In fact, a lot of people can't afford. Computers for their kids. How are those kids supposed to go where they don't have Internet do online right now? Online schooling? I mean, I know the Frisco I s D does its best to provide Chromebooks to those who don't have them and they're trying to extend WiFi around schools. But what you're supposed to do sit outside of the school to do their work mean This terrible problem. These pods. Thes podgy, As we said, are getting very, very popular. You can imagine kid people who start to plan their kid's college educations from the time they're born. Want to make sure that they continue to progress through their educational careers. What You know, this is this also affects the school system itself because they're not getting money from those kids who now we're having a private education and is probably well, I don't know. It may not be legal. I guess they have to know. Why wouldn't it be?.

Caroline Michael Meena Syracuse Paula Jeffrey Han Chromebooks
"acute infection" Discussed on Z104

Z104

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"acute infection" Discussed on Z104

"One hundred serologic aphids available for the detection of antibodies against sars Kobe to they come in a wide variety of formats some detect I. G. G. some detect that GM and some detect I. GA they have also been designed to perform in a variety of different settings some can be ran in point of care whereas others are made to be run in very large batches on large and lab analyzers one of the reasons why there's such a wide variety of serologic tests available is the approach the FDA took to the regulation in order to make the testing more available the FDA actually removed requirements for FDA review of sars coronavirus U. S. R. logic **** so this has actually been a double edged sword while serology **** are certainly more available since many of them have not been properly vetted they have quite variable performance some have decent performance whereas some are actually quite inaccurate if these athletes are widely deployed particularly inaccurate ones they can have a very negative consequences for public health one area in which sees the inaccuracies can become downright dangerous actually is when Sir logic at the the relied upon for diagnosis in fact I would argue solely relying on Kobe nineteen serology for diagnosis of acute infection is always a risky proposition even for some of the better athletes one reason for that is that antibody response to sars coronavirus who takes up to two weeks to develop so patients will often have falsely negative results early in infection data from our institution actually shows that I. D. G. testing has a sensitivity of less than ten percent within three days of symptomatology and less than forty four percent at less than fourteen days false positives are also quite a big issue with these assets many of them have cross reactivity to antibodies against common circulating pathogens such as seasonal coronaviruses patients with seasonal corona viruses may present in a similar way to those with sars coronavirus too so this prospect of a false positive result is way more than just a theoretical risk the bottom line here.

GM FDA Kobe
"acute infection" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:04 min | 1 year ago

"acute infection" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Sickened with the rare inflammatory syndrome linked to cover nineteen the cases are rattling early assurances that children were largely unaffected by the virus and now there's a pediatric case out of New York that is raising new questions about how and when this illness impacts the body WNYC's Karen he reports no I'm a cruise is trying to remember what she's been singing with her twelve year old daughter Giselle they made up songs they sing the spice girls the Backstreet boys I want it that way things have been a bit of a blur for them lately and singing was how they got through the last three weeks while Giselle was in the hospital it was scary she nearly died after a blood clot stopped her heart the doctors didn't think it was covert nineteen Giselle tested negative for the virus three times she never had a fever or pneumonia but then she tested positive for the antibodies Dr mark Cohen at Newark Beth Israel hospital helps treat Giselle he says the clothing was probably a delayed reaction to the virus the infection occurred before and you don't face the music until after so that's just another feather in the cap of covert being a horrific nightmare it's not clear whether Giselle fall squarely into the category of multi system inflammatory syndrome in children that's the rare condition that causes inflammation of the blood vessels that health officials think is linked to cove it the doctors say there are some similarities among the small number of affected children the virus is still attacking the body even after the acute infection is gone in mid April Giselle says she woke up with a pain in her left leg a very sharp pain like someone was like I don't punching my lake like stabbing my like the next day her leg swelled up Giselle says she was too scared to go to the hospital because of the covert outbreak so her mom took her to an urgent care clinic where they prescribed antibiotics they didn't work her leg turned purple her toes read I'm not rush to sell to the hospital my mom always calm me down and told me everything is going to be okay at Newark Beth Israel doctors found the veins and just sells like plugged up with clot her leg was two to three times its normal size Dr Cohen says the clock then moved to her lungs and stopped her heart it is never a common for a twelve year old two out of the blue develop a blood clot in the leg just underwent CPR machine took over circulating her blood a ventilator helped her brief doctors fed blood clot in dissolving medicine into her body Giselle says she doesn't remember much of anything when I look up I remember I was trying to move but I couldn't so I got super frustrated answer crying then I got thirsty when I asked my mom but I couldn't drink or eat anything because of the tubes in my mouth what she does remember are the fun parts health care workers Anna and Sarah who played no with her and being able to hang out with her mom all the time being silly when she was discharged the staff tutor off the giver.

inflammatory syndrome
"acute infection" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:04 min | 1 year ago

"acute infection" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"With the rare inflammatory syndrome linked to cove in nineteen the cases are rattling early assurances that children were largely unaffected by the virus and now there's a pediatric case out of New York and is raising new questions about how and when this illness impacts the body WNYC's Karen he reports no I'm not cruise is trying to remember what she's been singing with her twelve year old daughter Giselle they made up songs they sing the spice girls the Backstreet boys I want it that way things have been a bit of a blur for them lately and singing was how they got through the last three weeks well Giselle was in the hospital it was scary she nearly died after a blood clot stopped her heart the doctors didn't think it was covert nineteen Giselle tested negative for the virus three times she never had a fever or pneumonia but then she tested positive for the antibodies Dr mark Cohen at Newark Beth Israel hospital helps treat Giselle he says the clothing was probably a delayed reaction to the virus the infection occurred before and you don't face the music until after so that's just another feather in the cap of covert being a horrific nightmare it's not clear whether Giselle fall squarely into the category of multi system inflammatory syndrome in children that's the rare condition that causes inflammation of the blood vessels that health officials think is linked to cove it the doctors say there are some similarities among the small number of affected children the virus is still attacking the body even after the acute infection is gone in mid April Giselle says she woke up with a pain in her left leg a very sharp pain like someone was like I don't punching my lake like stabbing my like the next day her leg swelled up to sell says she was too scared to go to the hospital because of the covert outbreak so her mom took her to an urgent care clinic where they prescribed antibiotics they didn't work her leg turned purple her toes read I'm not rushes out to the hospital my mom always calm me down and told me everything was going to be okay at Newark Beth Israel doctors found the veins and just sells like plugged up with clot her leg was two to three times its normal size Dr Cohen says the clock then moved to her lungs and stopped her heart it is never a common for a twelve year old two out of the blue develop a blood clot in the leg Giselle underwent CPR machine took over circulating her blood a ventilator helped her brief doctors fed blood clot in dissolving medicine into her body Giselle says she doesn't remember much of anything when I look up I remember I was trying to move but I couldn't so I got super frustrated answer crying then I got thirsty I asked my mom but I couldn't drink or eat anything because of the tubes in my mouth what she does remember are the fun parts health care workers Anna and Sarah who played no with her and being able to hang out with her mom all the time being silly when she was discharged the staff tutor off the giver.

inflammatory syndrome
"acute infection" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:13 min | 1 year ago

"acute infection" Discussed on KCRW

"Least seventeen states are investigating potential cases in about a hundred and fifty children Dr Jackie sh much coverage joins me now she's a pediatric cardiologist and Kawasaki disease specialist at children's hospital here in Los Angeles for patients there have been diagnosed with pediatric inflammatory multi system syndrome or pams welcome to the show thank you so much Madeline and thank you so much for your help in raising awareness in our community yes so Pam's this is what is being called this mysterious illness associated with chronic virus so cans is short for pediatric inflammatory multi system syndrome and this does seem to be a new entity which is potentially associated with cold in nineteen and what are the symptoms and what is the age range so when they're ill appearing children who have high fever that persists it's going on for four or five days or more and they have other symptoms which can include a rash sometimes the lips look very dry and reading crafter the tongue looks rad some people say it strawberry looking tongue the whites of the eyes are red sometimes the hands and feet are swollen or red or there's an enlarged lymph nodes in the neck these are all signs together with fever that we would very much encourage them to contact their pediatrician some children seem to be having more of a picture of a domino pain or diarrhea with fever without another explanation and another group we want to be particularly careful with is little entrance who have fever for seven or more days and there is not another explanation identified the general age range from this so the three patients that had a syndrome that appeared to present more like color sake disease the range of those patients was eight months to two years of age the other part of PM's the other end of the spectrum of cams appears to be more of a shock like syndrome sometimes mimicking toxic shock syndrome those children in the other centers across the world seem to be in a little bit older age range are we have only had one patient at children's hospital Los Angeles that's in their shock arranging those seem to be more school age children but this is all changing very rapidly so I hesitate to generalize right and do these patients also test positive for over nineteen none of these patients tested positive for the acute infection at the time the word made it when we check their antibody testing the positive antibody test leads us to believe that these children had a prior infection with coping nineteen and the cans condition is likely a late inflammatory response to their previous acute infection wow and so do you have any idea when they may have had coronavirus to build up those antibodies of what is the time lag between having corona virus and then having this later center I'm that is something that we're all working on to figure out together and I'm confident that the multi disciplinary team at children's hospital Los Angeles will help to answer your question better in the days that are coming so are you going to go back now and look at the children who are diagnosed with Kawasaki disease because you're saying that it's very similar to then test them for covered nineteen antibodies absolutely our call psyche disease team is now following up with all our patients who are diagnosed with Kawasaki disease beginning January first and will be testing them on for antibodies how many patients did you have with that disease so since March first well we have seen twenty two cases that presented with symptoms that looked like at the time Kawasaki disease to us that we're now going back and looking at in more detail and so if a child does come down with this what is the treatment for that child we're meeting as a multi discipline group every day to discuss each new patient so that we get input from all of our different subspecialists to make an individualized care plan for each child that will fit the picture that we see for each child because this is so rapidly evolving of course ma'am what is the prognosis for children who have this disease is it treatable or fatal in some cases you know we have a lot of experience treating this unfortunately some children with Kawasaki disease can develop aneurysms in the coronary arteries which can be a lifelong problem I think that the other end of the spectrum the shock spectrum we're still learning a tremendous amount about but those children are certainly in that much more L. category often in critical care so a lot of parents might think well first of all they're used to their children having fevers and they know how to treat it with Tylenol at cetera but they also might be afraid of actually going to the hospital where there might be kids sick with co better other people sick with co but that might be an infection point what can you say to them to give them a little more peace of mind if they do consider bringing their kid into the hospital well what I would say is that we screen every person carefully before they enter the hospital every impatient every child who's coming in for any type of procedure is screened for virus and we have a universal masking protocol so I wanna make sure that parents know it's safe to come to children's hospital Los Angeles and a what point should they say you know what this is serious enough I need to take my kid in I would ask them to work closely with their primary care givers and if they feel their child is very ill appearing and has had a high fever that's lasting for four or five days or more and they see some of these other symptoms were describing please don't delay and please bring your child.

Dr Jackie sh
"acute infection" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:12 min | 1 year ago

"acute infection" Discussed on KCRW

"In at least seventeen states are investigating potential cases in about a hundred and fifty children Dr Jackie sh much coverage joins me now she's a pediatric cardiologist and Kawasaki disease specialist at children's hospital here in Los Angeles for patients there have been diagnosed with pediatric inflammatory multi system syndrome or pams welcome to the show thank you so much Madeline and thank you so much for your help in raising awareness in our community yes so Pam's this is what is being called this mysterious illness associated with crime virus so cans is short for pediatric inflammatory multi system syndrome and this does seem to be a new entity which is potentially associated with cold in nineteen and what are the symptoms and what is the age range so when they're ill appearing children who have high fever that persists it's going on for four or five days or more and they have other symptoms which can include a rash sometimes the lips look very dry and reading crafter the tongue looks rad some people say it strawberry looking tongue the whites of the eyes are red sometimes the hands and feet are swollen or red or there's an enlarged lymph nodes in the neck these are all signs together with fever that we would very much encourage them to contact their pediatrician some children seem to be having more of a picture of a domino pain or diarrhea with fever without another explanation and another group we want to be particularly careful with is little entrance who have fever for seven or more days and there is not another explanation identified the general age range from this so the three patients that had a syndrome that appeared to present more like color sake disease the range of those patients was eight months to two years of age the other part of PM's the other end of the spectrum of cams appears to be more of a shock like syndrome sometimes mimicking toxic shock syndrome those children in the other centers across the world seem to be in a little bit older age range are we have only had one patient at children's hospital Los Angeles that's in their shock range in those seem to be more school age children but this is all changing very rapidly so I hesitate to generalize right and do these patients also test positive for over nineteen none of these patients tested positive for the acute infection at the time the word made it when we checked their antibody testing the positive antibody test leads us to believe that these children had a prior infection with coping nineteen and the cans condition is likely a late inflammatory response to their previous acute infection wow and so do you have any idea when they may have had coronavirus to build up those antibodies of what is the time lag between having corona virus and then having this later syndrome that is something that we're all working on to figure out together and I'm confident that the multi disciplinary team at children's hospital Los Angeles will help to answer your question better in the days that are coming so are you going to go back now and look at the children who are diagnosed with Kawasaki disease because you're saying that it's very similar to then test them for cover nineteen antibodies absolutely our color sake disease team is now following up with all our patients who are diagnosed with Kawasaki disease beginning January first and will be testing them on for antibodies how many patients did you have with that disease so since March first well we have seen twenty two cases that presented with symptoms that looked like at the time Kawasaki disease to us that we're now going back and looking at in more detail and so what if a child does come down with this what is the treatment for that child we're meeting as a multi discipline group every day to discuss each new patient so that we get input from all of our different subspecialists to make an individualized care plan for each child that will fit the picture that we see for each child because this is so rapidly evolving of course yeah what is the prognosis for children who have this disease is it treatable or fatal in some cases you know we have a lot of experience treating this unfortunately some children with Kawasaki disease can develop aneurysms in the coronary arteries which can be a lifelong problem I think that the other end of the spectrum the shock spectrum we're still learning a tremendous amount about but those children are certainly in that much more L. category often in critical care so a lot of parents might think well first of all they're used to their children having fevers and they know how to treat it with Tylenol at cetera but they also might be afraid of actually going to the hospital where there might be kids sick with co better other people sick with co but that might be an infection point what can you say to them to give them a little more peace of mind if they do consider bringing their kid into the hospital well what I would say is that we screen every person carefully before they enter the hospital every impatient every child who's coming in for any type of procedure is screened for virus and we have a universal masking protocol so I wanna make sure that parents know it's safe to come to children's hospital Los Angeles and a what point should they say you know what this is serious enough for me to take my kid in I would ask them to work closely with their primary care givers and if they feel their child is very ill appearing and has had a high fever that's lasting for four or five days or more and they see some of these other symptoms were describing please don't delay and please bring your child and.

Dr Jackie sh
"acute infection" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio

Mayo Clinic Radio

12:35 min | 1 year ago

"acute infection" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio

"Renee. I'm Dr Halina. Gazelle Tova. Nineteen was first identified late last year. With a cluster of pneumonia cases caused by new corona virus. We now understand quite a bit more about cove in nineteen and it's a major impacts on the respiratory tract and the lungs here to discuss respiratory management in critical care as well as recovery from Cohen. Nineteen is Dr Dan. Dietrich who is an anesthesiologist in critical care specialist at the Mayo Clinic? Welcome Dr Drip. Good afternoon thanks for inviting me. You know it's especially fun for me to have you here. Dan Because you helped train me when I was a resident. And now they're letting me interview you so that's kind of fun because please thank you for being here so Jan help us to understand what happens when someone comes into the hospital and we hear so much about people being hospitalized but they can't have their family members in what happens to them after they disappear into the hospital or kind of care to people get for Kovac Nineteen and who might provide that to them. These patients will present with a primary respiratory problem so they may be at home for a while and feel at some point. I need to go in. So the emergency department will likely be the first point of contact you know since we don't have a rapid test for this disease like I e e result back in minutes For the virus responsible for covert nineteen really has tall task of sorting out. Who has this disease or who hasn't another disease process? So it's a very mixed picture upfront. Until we get more information in the disease takes a dozen a dozen we can recognize so at that point if a patient needs ice you care. They'll be transferred to the ICU. That best matches their needs. Kind of wood would be our standard procedures now at some point if it is determined that a patient does have a cove nineteen or at some point during their hospitals Does develop a cove in nineteen. Then we would transfer them to a single ICU. where the training and clinical care has been aligned specifically to the treatment up to disease process. When we're listening in the news. We hear so much about the various roles. People who take care of our patients cove in nineteen and it seems that the physicians and the nurses both receive a lot of praise. But I know that in hospital there are so many other groups working with our patients. Tell me a little bit about that. And what is the respiratory therapists as you point out? There's many frontline clinicians involved in the care but I think respiratory therapy of the therapist that do that are are some of the unsung heroes. Unrecognized Heroes and as I mentioned before the Kovic Nineteen Disease Process Heavily impacts the respiratory system and the respiratory therapists. That's their specific Training that they go through for schooling so their expertise Really starts back in the emergency department. They determine the need in level of oxygen support If the patient does deteriorate in the require breathing tube placement they're the ones that are helping other procedural stew that they are the ones who really manage the mechanical ventilator to the goal set out by the providers and they really make sure that That the patient is getting the right level of oxygen. In redoing therapies that are protected to the lungs usually the respiratory therapists of the first ones. Who make the WHO get a sense of this? Patient has recovered in doesn't need mechanical ventilator and and when the patients are long recovery pathway the respiratory therapists are the actual ones. They're doing a lot of the rehabilitation so really the respiratory therapist provides a role from really at the time of presentation. All the way through their discharge no one I was an anesthesia residency at some of the respiratory therapists who worked in the intensive care units We're really amazing and very helpful and teaching me how to manage patients great. Thank you for sharing that. We talked about the changes in the respiratory system. Can you tell us a little bit more about what happens in the lungs respiratory system of a patient with Kobe? Nineteen makes them need to be on a ventilator? Sure you know the the understanding of this process of how this disease is affecting the lungs and the body is is evolving and and every week a it seems that what was stated as a goal. Previous week is now totally the opposite so are as we gain more knowledge of this disease. We're GONNA we'll continue to fine tune our understanding of it. But you know I. I try to simplify things myself. to neither is really kind of two parts to this. There is an acute acute infection stage and this is really where the virus is causing the damage as well as as the damage that the body is doing kind of fighting this disease. There's collateral damage is the the long is certainly that At type of an Oregon you know later on as we get past that acute phase you know the body it gets control of the virus but there can be fibrosis or scarring of the lungs. Which which you know can cripple the lungs long-term and that's you know that's really kind of a scary thing differently. Just the mechanical ventilator itself can cause injury by Hollywood provides air and you know we it male are actually very good at preventing this type and as mentioned before this is where a respiratory therapist had become very good at mitigating this problem. They're you know making sure that the type of mechanical ventilation it's just what we need. No more and were providing very safe levels ventilation bet that many of our listeners and viewers have never heard so much about mechanical ventilators as they have in the news lately with the Concern for shortage that we wouldn't have enough to provide for patients. Who Need Them? Can you tell us a little bit about? How does the mechanical later workout as a patient get hooked up to one? And what is that? What are the most common uses for them? Typically when we're not having ovid nineteen pandemic so there are many types of mechanical ventilators out there in some ways. It's kind of like cars. There's just many different types and largely. These differences are in the software that the machines have there's different modes which again represents kind of different ways of Represent different types of software there but now at the end of the day you know without getting into a lot of the details the mechanical ventilators. Really move air in an article lungs you know they can do this different ways pressures volumes of air but again. It's just air moving in and out of logs and really the longs function from respiratory standpoint. That's for oxygen and carbon. Dioxide are exchanged. That's the lungs. Do again you can think when you move air into the lungs. That's you're introducing oxygen. And when air is removed from the long Removes the carbon dioxide. What these machines do again. There's problems with the lungs. That's what the disease causes these. These misleads machines support the lungs through these processes and really buy them time for the body to heal. We have enough mechanical ventilators at Mayo to take care of the patients that we have that we might see. Andy worry that. We're going to run short. This is a question were asked daily almost and by our staff as well as state officials and and federal officials and with the current models that we're looking at now at the time of this podcast. The answer is yes very easy. Yes don't early on. It was predicted that we would have a lot more patients that needed mechanical ventilation in. We were very actively preparing for this type of scenario. I don't think we work many of us three to four weeks streak preparing for this and a lot of that. Effort was spent planning on using mechanical ventilators. That are not normally used in an issue such as transport ventilators machines that you're acquainted with anesthesia. Machines We spent a lot of time trying to figure out how to make this happen anesthesia machines in particular need different connections than a normal ICU. Ventilator to work in a nice environment but you know our again respiratory therapists and others. You know figured out a way to do this. It goes even beyond that capability you know. Having to monitor are doing. Are we going to have enough oxygen? To run the ventilators it goes into even that our respiratory therapist worth while on top of that and we at one point figured out. You don't in order to to fill an ice with all mechanical ventilators. We have to make sure that there is enough oxygen that could get from the storage takeoff back up to the up to the ICU. So I you know again. This is all the activity was spent a making sure we could deliver care That That we need to and we felt very confident that we could do that. What do you think about when you're planning for this is just amazing Whether or not someone needs assistance with their breathing. What other kinds of care might require in either the hospital or in the intensive care unit of their hospitalized with Cova Mateen so while this disease is primarily directed at the lungs there? There are many other organ systems affected. Simply when you get critically ill are goes outside of even the Cova disease and and really the ice. You team doesn't the clinicians are there again. Nurses Respiratory Therapists. They're trained to anticipate an offer support to all these other bodily systems. So you know we. We have patients sedated to to maintain level of comfort Cova also affects the heart so monitoring hard to make insured continues to function properly. Let vessels dilate so you may have to add a blood pressure medicines. The kidneys may May. I have some dysfunctions again. Making sure that if dialysis all of these things is what the ice. Ut really tried to anticipate and head off if you can and if not please support the patient through this on giving the chance for the body to Directed attention to healing Dan. I'm an extra question here on you but it's just something that people might be curious about. We've heard so much about have been over. One hundred thousand deaths from Kobe. Nineteen when someone does die of the disease what is it that they die of respiratory failure? That's a tricky question. Because every patient is different so in depending on what levels of organ system dysfunction they have that would be what they succumb from so again in this disease primarily would be a respiratory respiratory problems. The function of the long deteriorates. So much that it just can't Exchan- is that carbon dioxide for oxygen and it needs and that has very a Alitalia's effects on the body hall so that's primarily the main problem but if a patient is on the breathing machine for a number of a number of weeks certainly secondary infections could take place that could affect Oregon so so I it. It really is patient specific to the problems off that their body may be facie. Sure that makes sense. All of us are so appreciative of the work. That you and colleagues like you nurses respiratory therapists sets are doing right on the front lines in the intensive care units and it was in the hospital to care for patients. What do we? What are we doing at Mayo? Clinic to protect Our employees and our workers from Being exposed to Cova nineteen or having the potential to.

respiratory tract Nurses Respiratory Therapists Cova Mayo Dr Dan Oregon Mayo Clinic pneumonia Gazelle Tova Dr Drip Kovac Dietrich Cohen Renee. Dr Halina Kobe Cova Mateen Hollywood
"acute infection" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

02:59 min | 2 years ago

"acute infection" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"The Joseph Jay's over school of public health at the university of Wisconsin Milwaukee doctor John is currently conducting an H. funded research at the medical college to increase HIV self testing and other HIV prevention behaviors among young gay and bisexual men nationwide you also joins us right now good afternoon doctor John thanks for having me so based on these findings that you've seen as well what do you find to be the most important result here well I think that the study reported some really important data about how simply giving away free H. every self testing kits with instructions helped increase the number of first time testers I think this is really important because nearly one in six gay bisexual in other men who have sex with men living with HIV are unaware of their HIV status getting tested for the first time is the initial step to getting started with the routine of regular HIV testing every three to six months I'm gonna be honest I do me no you could do an H. I. V. self test so a you can it be how is that different from the HIV testing that one might find a clinic well HIV testing device is approved by the US food and drug administration for self testing is currently limited only to the or quick at home HIV test which anyone over the age of seventeen can by the local pharmacy however one of the concerns about this test is that it cannot detect any newly acquired infections within the past three months so taken HIV self test with will only tell you whether or not you had each every three months ago he went to a clinic to recieve HIV testing though you'd likely be given a tacit greater ability to identify new or acute infections roughly fourteen to thirty days from the time of HIV exposure depending on the specific test thank you Steven Johnson in the college of Wisconsin and his talk living thirty W. I. S. and you're doing very similar research at M. C. W. can you tell us a little bit about how your research is actually building off these recently reported finance thanks for asking Dave will hear and see W. were working on developing an online intervention to support this type of HIV self testing specifically among younger gay and bisexual men as well as encourage up take a pre exposure prophylaxis of prop this highly effective once daily till you can take to prevent HIV I find it to be very similar taking malaria pills for instance before international travel to some parts of the world despite the promise the prop so too few younger game bisexual men are currently taking it it's every testing is a critical point for determining your HIV status so we want to leverage the opportunities to put to promote prep uptake among those who self test HIV negative just as HIV test counselors will talk about proper their patients in the clinical setting we want to help promote proper among those who engage in HIV self testing to what we're working on here is to develop online tools to do exactly that also the scientists and professors at the medical college of Wisconsin we'll be talking more about the topic of HIV on the word on medicine that'll be a four o'clock tomorrow afternoon a new stock eleven thirty W. I. is said that John thank you so much for your time thank you for having me David but the latest word on medicine is now heard every Friday afternoon at two and is made possible by a grant.

Joseph Jay three months eleven thirty W thirty days six months thirty W
"acute infection" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"acute infection" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

"A recent study showed an increase in the risk of myocardial infarction during the week after laboratory confirmed infection with influenza virus respiratory Sincil virus or other respiratory viruses to a risk that was six four and three times higher respectively than the risk during the year before or after the onset of infection the association between acute infections and an increased risk of myocardial infarction persists beyond the short-term post infection period. Among patients with mild respiratory infection. Or urinary tract infection? The risk of myocardial infarction returns to baseline within a few months after resolution of the infection among patients with pneumonia. The risk also decreases with time, but still exceeds the baseline risk up to ten years after the infection the increase in the risk of myocardial infarction both in the short term. And the long term is more pronounced when the infection is more severe the strength and temporal pattern of the association between acute infections, and an increased risk of myocardial infarction suggest a causal relationship the authors review, the evidence that acute bacterial and viral infections are associated with an increased risk of myocardial infarction in the short intermediate and long term. And they then discuss mechanisms that might explain this assoc-. A thirty four year old veteran with multiple somatic symptoms. A case record of the Massachusetts General Hospital by Abigail Donovan and colleagues a thirty four year old male war veteran was evaluated for headaches cognitive changes mood symptoms. Flashbacks? Chest pain, armed tingling and gastrointestinal symptoms..

urinary tract infection infarction Massachusetts General Hospital Abigail Donovan pneumonia thirty four year ten years
"acute infection" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"acute infection" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

"Wim syndrome by David McDermott from the National Institute of allergy and infectious diseases Bethesda, Maryland whim syndrome, warts Hypo, gamma globulin Nimia infections, and my local Texas, a primary immunodeficiency disorder involving pan leucopenia is caused by autosomal dominant gain of function mutations in cehic. See chemokines receptor four exc- are four Milo. Ca- fixes is Neutra PINA caused by Neutra fill retention in bone marrow. Patients with whim syndrome are often treated with granulocytic colony stimulating factor. Jesus f which can increase Neutra fil counts, but does not affect side Pena's other than Neutra PINA in this investigator initiated open label study three severely affected patients. With whim syndrome who could not receive g SF were treated with low dose. Pleurisy for a cehic. See are four antagonised for nineteen to fifty two months, Milo fibrosis pan leucopenia anemia and thrombosis PINA were ameliorated the wart burden and frequency of infection declined human papillomavirus associated oral Feren Joel squamous cell, carcinoma, stabilized and quality of life improved. Markedly adverse events were mainly infections attributable to the underlying immunodeficiency one patient died from complications of elective reconstructive surgery. Acute infection and myocardial.

Neutra PINA whim syndrome immunodeficiency Neutra David McDermott National Institute of allergy Bethesda Maryland Pena Feren Joel investigator Texas fifty two months
Gout associated with doubled risk of death from heart failure

Dr. Daliah

04:53 min | 3 years ago

Gout associated with doubled risk of death from heart failure

"How many have. You guys have gout I would not wish gout. On my worst enemy gout is, rough, well we've been talking for, years about how those people with gout may be at higher risk for heart disease Well another study has come out saying yeah It can increase your risk. Of, heart attack and stroke by fifteen, percent Apparently the American, Heart Association has revealed the research they clarified a bunch of older studies confirming that there is a link between, the inflammatory condition of gout and heart health Dr ni ha package potty and our colleagues from university looked at seventy thousand patients and found that those who had gals were at higher risk of dying from their ca-. Combat cardiovascular disease and, twice as likely to die from their heart failure if they had it She states. Among patients went out as beginning of the study or who developed, during follow up their risk of either dying of cardiovascular disease or having a heart attack. Or, stroke was fifty percent higher than patients have. Never developed scout right so what is, out and a lot of people say yeah my dad had dugouts we don't really call. A thug out you, know like the diabetes we just say we just call out we just got diabetes gout is an inflammatory condition that even though it primarily affects joints it can affect a lot of parts of the body and how. We break it down Is, a gal we'll have. Higher levels of uric. Acid now where does your acid come from well uric acid comes, from the breakdown appearance now hearings are the building blocks to all living cells and DNA So our body. Makes Purina's or we get from outside sources like food especially meat And so, if your, body is healthy you. Will excrete the excess. Uric acid so let's say you know you're gonna outback steakhouse that's I love steak let's say. You take it a whole bunch of things you normally healthy body will, excrete it But if you overproduce uric acid or if you under excrete. It You may have been too, much circulating uric. Acid if you. Have, too much circulated uric acid. You make these you're a crystals now these uric crystals are exquisite I have, a picture on. My website or on my Facebook and Twitter adopter. Dia dot com but these uric crystals will once they supersaturated, crystallize Then they precipitate making huge crystals And they precipitate in joints especially large joints. Like the big, toe and knee when. This happens it comes on immediately Dowdy joint won't, take weeks flare up It will happen overnight It is so painful that somebody will not want to put on their sock or put on their pants or have anything near, the the joint del even ask you to not for far next to the joint, it is that tender Because you have these crystals your body swells and it it just gets red swollen and you, know sometimes these gout attacks make us as doctors concerns you have an acute infection Like a staff because it. Happened so rapidly, so painful so red there were like oh my. Gosh you have an infection But that history of. Gal and yeah we I. Had a lot of meat I had a lot of shrimp I had, a lot of alcohol we know it's probably out, so one way to tell is we take fluid out of the. Joint and then we look at the. Crystals the microscope or we, do, a, Graham Staines. To, see if there's. Any bacteria we could also do a, blood account now some people will. Say oh well that's easy just oh blood test and if the uric acid is high you know their outpatient not. Entirely this is where it gets tricky if you have a gout attack and, your uric acid has made your eight crystals, and they. Crystallize many times during the, attack your uric, acid levels baby normal So, a, doctor, does not. Where, worry really well. Versed in this which should be rare, because most of us are can't. Just do a blood test to go out it's not gal because you're against it is normal now no not that. Because again you're you're a gas it may the busy making that joint attack Now some people will. Say well wait a second I don't get out attacks. But, I have a dramatic, hyper, which is elevated, announced say that three times fast say that Elevated uric acid, levels that just circulating the body if that's the case, I think those calls some. Baseline inflammation

Gout Heart Disease Heart Association Graham Staines Purina CA United States Sleep Apnea Outback Steakhouse Facebook Hydrochlorothiazide Dodgers Twitter Fifty Percent