21 Burst results for "Acute Infection"

"acute infection" Discussed on Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

05:15 min | 1 d ago

"acute infection" Discussed on Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

"When our bloodstream or when our body senses that we have higher amounts of microbes, whether it's live bacteria, live, fungus, live, parasites, or fragments of them. We call those endotoxins, or in a sense, poop from these microbes, which again, we label into this category of endotoxins. When that's elevated, when it goes beyond a certain threshold in our bloodstream, our body starts to panic. It says, oh my gosh, we could be at risk of dying from an acute infection dying quickly dying tonight from this infection, so we need to drive up defenses. We need to get our military ready. I know you were a marine, right? It's like, hey, now we're activating the National Guard here, right? We need all defenses on guard. And we drive up this inflammatory process. And the goal there is to get whatever the pathogen that we're facing under control so we can survive. The issue is, as long as we're eating and we've got this kind of tear in our gut, we call this leaky gut or intestinal permeability. We've got this damage in our gut. We're constantly pouring out more and more of these endotoxins, bacterial debris, undigested food particles into the bloodstream and we're constantly turning up inflammation. And then we get it into this state of chronic systemic inflammation. And over time, that wears down all the different tissues and organ systems in our body and creates major problems. And so leaky gut is a major factor. There are other components too, having too much fat tissue, for example, fat tissue itself, particularly a type of fat called visceral fat. Release, this is the type of fat that actually surrounds our organs, not the type of fat that kind of provides more cushioning and thermal support, right? So we have that that's kind of right under our skin. We call it subcutaneous fat. The visceral fats, what surrounds our organs. This is the really unhealthy fat. That actually releases inflammatory compounds. Cytokines. So we're actually pouring out more inflammatory producing molecules when we have this extra fat. Of course, trauma or any sort of injuries that we have, our body says, okay, if there's trauma more than likely, we may be at risk here for some sort of pathogen getting in, so we need to drive up this inflammatory process. In fact, there's basically there are compounds that are released whenever a tissue is damaged, that trigger an inflammatory inflammatory process. And again, that's the body saying, okay, we need to break down and repair this, but also we want to make sure that this region, which is now more susceptible to infection because it's damaged, we need to make sure that no infection gets in and further causes further damage to this particular region of our body. And how is somebody going to know that they're actually they actually have inflammation taking place in their body right now? What are the signs of symptoms and then are there blood tests or other types of tests that we can objectively look at and say, okay, inflammation is present, we need to address it. Yeah, absolutely. So whenever somebody is inflamed, okay, we typically think, and it can impact people in different ways, but the way that most people in a sense feel inflammation will be heat in certain areas, pain, so painful, joints, that could be an issue, or just areas that are not functioning properly, like in your skin, if you have skin inflammation, you may not feel pain, you may, but you may not feel pain, but you might have eczema. You might have, you know, dry, scaly skin. You might have acne.

acute infection chronic systemic inflammation National Guard eczema
"acute infection" Discussed on THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

07:26 min | 3 months ago

"acute infection" Discussed on THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

"This episode is brought to you by California almonds, almonds are a great addition to any wellness routine. They're the perfect on the go snack and only a handful of almonds is all you need to get the benefits, like 50% of your recommended daily value of vitamin E, a powerful antioxidant that helps protect and keep your skin healthy. So no matter what wellness looks like to you, yoga, massages, listening to your favorite podcast, almonds are easy to bring along. Eat omens live well, repeat. Coming up, on 5 minute news. Iranian made suicide drones strike Ukraine's capital. 8 million people apply for Biden's student loan forgiveness. And Doctor Fauci says long COVID is an insidious public health emergency. It's Tuesday. October 18th. I'm Anthony Davis. Dozens of suicide drones struck Ukraine's capital yesterday, setting buildings ablaze, tearing a hole in one of them and sending people scurrying for cover to try to shoot them down in what the president said was Russia's attempt to terrorize civilians. The concentrated use of the kamikaze drones was the second barrage in as many weeks after months in which air attacks had become a rarity in central Kyiv. The assault sowed fear and freight nerves as blasts rocked the city. Energy facilities were struck and one drone largely collapsed a residential building, killing four people. Intense bursts of gunfire rang out as the Iran supply shahid drones buzzed overhead, apparently a soldiers tried to destroy them. Previous Russian air strikes on Kyiv were mostly with missiles, analysts believe the slower moving shahid drones can be programmed to accurately hit certain targets using GPS unless the system fails. Also on Monday, a Russian SU 34 warplane crashed in a residential area in the Russian port of yikes on the sea of azov, after an engine failure, killing at least 13 people on the ground, injuring 25 others and starting a fire that engulfed several floors of a 9 story apartment building. Vice governor of the region Anna menkov said three of the victims died when they jumped from the buildings up a floor to escape the flames, both crew members on a training mission bailed out safely. President Joe Biden on Monday officially kicked off the application process for his student debt cancellation program and announced that 8 million borrowers had already applied for loan relief during the federal government's soft launch period over the weekend. He encouraged the tens of millions eligible for potential relief to visit student aid dot gov and touted the application form that the president said would take less than 5 minutes to complete an early beta launch version of the online form released late Friday handled the early stream of applications without a glitch or any difficulty Biden said. The president called his program a game changer for millions of Americans saddled with student loan debt. The number of borrowers who applied during the testing period already amounts to more than one fourth of the total number of applicants the administration had projected with submit forms under scoring the popularity of the program and the eagerness of borrowers to receive the debt relief, some 8 million borrowers who have income information already on file with the education department would see their debt canceled without applying. Biden's plan calls for $10,000 in federal student debt cancellation for those with incomes below a $125,000 a year or households that make less than $250,000 a year. Those who received federal pell grants to attend college are eligible for an additional $10,000. The plan makes 20 million eligible to get their federal student debt erased entirely. America's top infectious disease expert, doctor Anthony Fauci, has warned against prematurely declaring victory over the pandemic, not only due to short term needs, but because long COVID represents an insidious public health emergency for millions of people. In an interview with The Guardian, Fauci urged U.S. Congress to avoid complacency and resume funding to combat the virus as well as long COVID, a chronic and prolonged illness that continues to elude scientists and healthcare providers. It's a very insidious beneath the radar screen public health emergency Fauci said. It isn't that you have people who are hospitalized or dying, but their function is being considerably impaired. For reasons that are obvious that doesn't attract as much attention as a death rate. The cold fact that COVID-19 still kills 400 people a day in the U.S. catches public attention more acutely than estimates of the millions suffering from long COVID Fauci added. The World Health Organization believes that between ten and 20% of COVID-19 survivors have been left with lasting symptoms, including breathlessness, fatigue, and cognitive dysfunction that can persist long after the acute infection has resolved. Between 7.5 and 23 million Americans are estimated to have developed long COVID, more than a million people could be out of the workforce at any given time, resulting in a loss of more than $50 billion in income. There is no test for long COVID, its precise causes remain mysterious and little is known about how it interacts with other medical and physical conditions. Less predictably, several studies indicate that long COVID is more common among women than men. Noting that diseases such as lupus have a similar gender bias, Fauci speculates that some aspect of dysregulation of the immune system is more common in women than in men. You can subscribe to 5 minute news on YouTube with your preferred podcast app, ask your smart speaker or enable 5 minute news as your Amazon Alexa flash briefing skill. Subscribe, rate, and review online at 5 minute dot news. 5 minute news is an evergreen podcast covering politics, inequality, health and climate delivering independent, unbiased and essential world news. Daily. If you enjoy 5 minute news, join me for the weekend show podcast. Big picture conversations with expert guests about the state of America available every Sunday with Midas touch and 5 minute news. Search and subscribe to the weekend show.

COVID Fauci Biden Kyiv Ukraine Anna menkov President Joe Biden Anthony Davis shahid Russia California Iran Anthony Fauci education department federal government
"acute infection" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

02:24 min | 4 months ago

"acute infection" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"So not being fully expressed also seems to be a risk, and there's obviously many ways to work through that through therapy or coaching or even novel therapies that are now being used to deal with trauma such as psilocybin MDMA. I think sumo be legalized. So that's sort of a big overarching view of taking the vitamins B 6 folate B 12. In treatment of vitamin D, all these are really important in terms of reduction of cancer risk. So that's sort of high level. There's a mammogram or thermography. I think they both have their role. But I think it's important to get checked regularly. That's the main take home. Great. Thank you so much. Thanks for that detailed information. And that was really interesting information about the supplement from John Hopkins. We'll make sure we that as well. So thank you. Darcy, over to you for the next one. Yeah, for sure. Thank you for all that. So kind of switching gears a little. The next question has to do with food sensitivities. So it would be helpful to kind of give an introduction into what a food sensitivity is versus like an allergy. But the question is, also, what food sensitivity test would you recommend and of the ones that just like, how do you decide which one is the best for you? Oh, this is a wormhole rabbit hole. First of all, let's just sort of distinguish two things. One is the fact that there are food sensitivities and they're real and they exist. And then the testing for them. They're two really two separate questions. So I'm going to address them separately. The first thing is that we're all familiar with food allergy. That's a pen analogy, shellfish allergy. That is when you get anaphylaxis hives, tongue swells up and you can't breathe. Life threatening and dangerous. Those people know they have it. It happens immediately. It's called an IgE. Reaction, which is one type of antibody called IgE that your body makes. And you have different antibodies for different things. So you have antibodies to deal with acute infection, you have antibodies deal with chronic immunity. In a long-term immunity, like IgG, you have IgE, which is actually for allergy or dealing with parasites and stuff in the gut. IGM, which is more acute infection, IgA, which lines the epithelial lining of your respiratory tract, your digestive tract kind of first line of defense. So there are all these different divisions of your immune system. Most doctors when they think of

allergy John Hopkins Darcy cancer acute infection
"acute infection" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

06:56 min | 6 months ago

"acute infection" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"Welcome to another episode of ask, Mark, anything. My name is Herschel Perez and I'm the doctor Hyman plus me manager. I'm joined by darcey gross, hi Darcy. And she's one of the producers of the longevity road map docu series, and we're here, of course, with our expert doctor Mark Hyman. Hi doctor Hyman. Guys. Thanks for joining us today, everyone. So let's go ahead and get started and ask Mark anything. So we'll start with our first question. So doctor Hyman, our first question is, what is Lyme disease and how do you treat it? Well, that reminds me of a quote from Mark Twain who said, if you want me to speak for a day, give me an hour's notice. If you want me to speak for an hour, give me a week's notice. If you want me to speak for ten minutes, give me a year's notice. I literally, I literally could speak about this for an entire day. And try to distill it into ten minutes. But this is one of the most horrible conditions known to humankind. If I could, as a doctor, weigh my wand and create a magic trick and eliminate one condition from humanity, it would be chronic Lyme disease. And what I mean by that is all tick-borne illicit, but BCR. Bartonella line, all the various strains of lime, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, all the fruits and babies. I mean, there's just so many of these tick-borne illnesses that are causing so many people to suffer. And they're hard to treat the heart diagnose and I personally am an expert in it unfortunately because I've had a busia and I've had lime and I've been very sick from that. And I've had to figure it out for myself. So I'm going to share with you one. How do we know you have it? How do we diagnose it? What are the treatment options? What have I found works best? And help you sort of create a road map for thinking about how to navigate this. The first is how do you diagnose it? Not everybody gets a rash, not everybody gets a bull's eye rash, which is classic for line. Most people don't know they're bit by tick, most people have no symptoms initially. They just feel chronically ill. And they can cause all sorts of different symptoms from chronic fatigue, syndrome, to cognitive dysfunction to quote Alzheimer's, which is often misdiagnosed. And it can cause Parkinson's cause depression as autoimmune disease, arthritis, heart failure. I mean, the list goes on and on. Gut issues. It's the great masquerader. We should call syphilis the great masquerader will take more illnesses our today's great vascular. And how do diagnose it? Well, the first thing I would do is take a free test. It's called M Sid's questionnaire. And it's developed by Richard Horowitz. It's a quiz, actually, to look at your symptoms to score them to look at your exposure and your risks. And you get a score. And it doesn't definitively tell you, but it says gee, you know, if I have a high score, the likelihood that something's going on is high. And it gives you different ranges of scores. And so that's the first place I would start. You can Google it online. You can link to a link to it in the show notes. And it's free. The second is, how do you diagnose Lyme? How do doctors agnostic? So the average doctor will do an antibody test. Like coronavirus, right? Coronavirus, you get an antibody test, the same thing. It's a record of whether your body's been exposed to the infection, but not whether it's active or still going on. So for example, if you got coronavirus or COVID-19, you will have positive antibodies even after you're better in the virus out of your system because it's your body's memory of the infection. It doesn't tell you whether you have it or not. Now, some of the tests to help IGM levels and so forth. But they're really not very sensitive. So you can miss a lot of people in these infections. And by the way, most doctors will just check for lying. They won't check all of the strains of wine. They won't check all of the other co infections. So you really have to cast a wide net because these are showing up at all sorts of different symptoms and they're often missed. The second kind of test is called a PCR test. We're familiar with that with COVID because of COVID. We use PCR testing to check for COVID-19. And so people are familiar with that test. And it looks for the DNA or the RNA of the material and actually can tell you that there's some particles of this bug floating around in your system. Now, most of the time it's negative because these tie behind in your cells, they had any organs and tissues, and they don't come out. So they're hard to detect. But if you have a PCR positive, which I did, it means you have this problem. Next you can do is, how does your immune system respond to this? So there's a test called CD 57. It's one of the natural killer cells. And it's very depressed with lying. Now, I think Lyman. And I say lime. I'm referring to all of these tick infections, okay? I think this chronic wine is like a way. It's suppresses your immune system. It makes you sick in general, and it's this chronic thing that is hard to get rid of. So you often have to look at the immune cells. And so I often will do something called an LE spot test, which looks at your Olympus site, your white blood cell responses, not through antibodies, but through urinate immune system in other ways, that actually shows that you have an active infection. And I find these most helpful that first test was developed in Germany called Harmon labs, the one in the United States was called infector labs. And we use those in my clinical practice to help determine whether or not someone's exposed. So it's still not perfect. Okay, so it's a big advance. And then you have to go on your clinical picture, your history, symptoms, and so forth. So that's sort of the diagnosis. In terms of the treatment, I would sort of break it up into four buckets. The first bucket is conventional medicine says, three weeks antibiotics provide you're done. If you're not better, it's not lying. That's just nonsense. If you have an acute infection and you take doxycycline for three weeks, yes, most of the time it would clear it. But again, most people don't know they've had to fight that they're infected and are kind of just hit by this later on because they have chronic fatigue or autoimmune disease or they have something else going on. So I'm not a big fan of that unless you have an acute infection. And then often you might have co infections for which doxycycline doesn't really work. So you might need to take other drugs. The next group is what we call the I labs community. And they've done a lot of great work to advance our understanding of lime and lime related conditions. And they often use heavy doses of long-term antibiotics and multiple antibodies. They might treat you for a year or two years or three years. And often people will improve, but it doesn't really fix the problem. Because most of these drugs are not by a cyborg or germicidal, meaning sidle means to kill suicide homicide means to kill. They might be suppressing it and you'll feel a

Hyman Herschel Perez darcey gross Lyme disease Alzheimer's Parkinson's cause depression Mark Hyman Richard Horowitz Mark BCR Darcy Mark Twain autoimmune disease Rocky Mountain chronic fatigue syphilis fever heart failure Sid arthritis
"acute infection" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

07:04 min | 8 months ago

"acute infection" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"Like growth hormone. These are just naturally occurring hormones. Why? It's a growth food for cats. It helps them grow. So it's got a lot of factors that are hormonally active that drive growth. Yes. And we know that those growth factors can stimulate acne in some people. You know, not everybody, but for some people, they're more sensitive to them and they definitely will cause more acne. Actually. I'm one of the people. I'm one of them. I get pimples. Yeah. So if I know I'm going on a TV, I can't eat dairy. I don't usually eat dairy, but I have sheep or goat, it's a little different. It's not as inflammatory for some reason. But if I regular dairy, you can count on me getting pimples. Yeah. And I'm like 60 years old to get pitbulls from dairy. Absolutely. And I think it depends the question of sheep or goat. I think it depends on the person. There's some people that it really, all types of dairy bother their skin and for other people, there's some that is better than others. And what we know is sometimes the testing, like the food allergy testing or food sensitivity testing doesn't always pick it up. I mean, we do it often, but there are times when we get a negative test result, but even if we still pull it away and people's skin improves. So this isn't like an allergy necessarily. Like you said, all the hormones in dairy too. But there's another category of things which are food sensitivities that do drive inflammation and drive leaky gut and can drive acne that are independent. So we've got sugar, we've got dairy, and we've got this other category, which is sort of more sort of amorphous, but it is a factor in a lot of people. Absolutely. Absolutely. So there's so many ways. And I always say this. There's so many ways that somebody can react to food, right? You can have. And people get confused all the time, 'cause they get one negative report and they say, oh, then I must be fine to eat that food, right? You can get an immediate reaction to food or an IgE. You can get a delayed reaction to food or an IgG, but you can also have a food intolerance. There's just so many ways you can react to food. So just because you have one negative food test result, doesn't necessarily mean that food is not causing you problems. That's a whole other topic, which is how, what are the many ways that we react to food? There are 50 ways I love you. It's like, what are the 50 ways you react to food? And it's all kinds of stuff from tartrazine and which is a die that causes asthma, it's an additive or whether it's MSG that can cause an amino acid related cognitive effect or whether it's food. Or whether it's something like high fructose corn syrup, which people can have fructose intolerance. How food changes your microbiome. And then that changes the inflammation. And by the way, in this age of COVID and coronavirus, it's really clear that the more sugar we eat, it affects our immune system, but it also affects our microbiome, and our gut health turns out is incredibly important for us to be resistant to the flu, through many, many research studies, and likely to coronavirus as well. Absolutely. Absolutely. And you know, I think that this first case that we were going to talk about this 22 year old who came to see me, you know, she, it really kind of pulls in the importance of the microbiome in terms of your immune system, but also in terms of your skin, right? She was a 22 year old and she had she started to develop acne when she was around 12. When we got more history from her, I realized she had had multiple antibiotics as a kid. She had chronic ear infections. And especially when she was getting those ear infections, they were treating most of them with antibiotics. And I think we've kind of calmed down a lot on treating every ear infection with antibiotics, but she got a lot of antibiotics because of her ear infections. Yeah, I was a family doctor. Remember, it's like, oh, give me a like candy, a little moxa salad. Nothing. Right, right. And I'm like horrified by what I did. 30 years ago. So she's she came in to see us because she and she was using a lot of different topical treatments. She was also taking a low dose antibiotic and her skin was better, but she didn't want to stay on these antibiotics and she wanted to really look at it a different way. And when she stopped taking the oral antibiotic, which she realized she didn't want to be on forever, her acne started to get worse again. So she said, okay, I really want to figure out. Which is not uncommon, and then doctors say, oh, you need more antibiotics. Right. It's like, that's the vicious cycle. It becomes a vicious cycle. We see these vicious cycles all the time with medications. Because they're shifting because this antibiotics, as we've mentioned, are shifting the microbiome, the shifting the microbiome in your gut, they're shifting it on your skin. They're getting rid of that first line of defense, and then they're allowing more common to get the acne again when you stop them. And so just because of her history of all of those antibiotics as a kid and being on the antibiotics and because she we got more information, she was having a lot of digestive issues. She was having some bloating, some diarrhea, constipation, her digestion was off. And her dermatologist never was like, what's going on with your gut, right? No, right? Right, no, he didn't ask that. So because of that, I said, you know what? I really need to focus on the microbiome here for this woman to help improve her acne. And so we did a stool test, which is kind of a neat, it's a neat way to get a sense of what's going on in the microbiome. It looks for real. How is this different than what a traditional doctor would do with a regular stool test? You know, it looks at a lot of different biomarkers. So it's looking at all of your levels of commensal bacteria. Though the good bacteria and is there an imbalance in the good and bad bacteria. So it does look for acute infections for real infections as well, but it also is really paying attention to something we call dysbiosis, which is an imbalance in the good and bad bacteria. And trying to get a sense of, is there an overgrowth of not good bacteria or not good yeast, or it also looks at parasites. It looks at digestion and absorption and inflammatory markers. So if you look at your enzymes are working, are you digesting your food or absorbing your food? Inflammation in there. It's like a window into a dark world. And we can learn so much from that through these tests, which are really not available through traditional doctors. I mean, they could order them if they wanted to, but they just, it's just not something we're trained in, which is, how do we take a deep look in the gutter? Are we talking about the microbiome microbiome? But you know, some future state of medicine will somehow figure out what to do with it. Well, we've been doing this for 30 years in functional medicine. Right. And now that we understand even more than we ever did, and we're learning better and better how to actually optimize the microbiome and fix the problems of leaky gut and all these things that happen as a result of your patient who had all these antibiotics and this crappy diet and developed overgrowth of bacteria that you found and yeast. So when the stool test came back, we found that there was this overgrowth of unwanted bacteria. And there was an overgrowth of unwanted yeast. And yeah, and so we can do tests like you said on, is there increased intestinal permeability or leaky gut. And she, of course, had that because of these imbalances and the inflammation going on in her digestive system..

chronic ear infections acne allergy asthma flu diarrhea
"acute infection" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

08:10 min | 8 months ago

"acute infection" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"This is the science podcast for June 17th, 2022. I'm Sarah presti. Each week we talk about the most interesting news and research from science and the sister journals. First up, staff writer, Jennifer peasant frankel. She shares a snapshot of the current state of long COVID research. We're going to hear about what scientists think might be causing this lingering illness and some potential ways to treat it. Also this week, researcher Deborah Matthews tackles the use of DNA testing kits designed for law enforcement, but also being used on biomaterials for research. In her policy forum, she talks about why this is a bad idea and what should be done instead. And in a sponsored segment from our custom publishing office, director of custom publishing, Sean Sanders, asks Bobby Sony from VII. For his advice for scientists wishing to commercialize their research. Long COVID is like this rising shadow behind the pandemic. We don't know how big it will be or the impact it will have on the world. We don't even know why it's happening. Now we have staff writer Jennifer cousin frankel. She wrote this week. She took a stab at trying to figure out the state of long COVID research who has it, what might be causing it, and how we might either treat it or even one day prevent it. Hi, Jennifer. Hi. Thanks for having me. Oh, sure. Yeah, I'm really excited to talk about this. I think it's not a lot of people's minds these days. And I just, it's good to get a view of what is happening this month at least. Yes. This month. I hate to throw what might be the hardest question at you right up front, but what is long COVID? So long COVID and it goes by a couple different names is basically the persistence worsening or sometimes onset of new symptoms after an acute infection with SARS CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. I would say most doctors tend to define it as symptoms that persist for at least 90 days. People who are still struggling three months, four months, 5 months, and many would say that they do have long COVID. Right. Brain fog, fatigue, breathlessness. What are their kind of common symptoms are associated with long COVID? Probably one of the most common is fatigue. And when we say fatigue, it was more than just, oh, I feel tired this morning. It's a really crushing, disabling fatigue, brain fog, real difficulty thinking, difficulty with cognition is also really common. Joint pain, abdominal pain, headaches, heart palpitations, or sort of a rapid heartbeat, often breathlessness when exercising and by exercising that could just be walking down the block. How common are researchers thinking long COVID is after infection? The numbers ranged anywhere from like 10% to upwards of 30%. Many of the studies that have been done so far were done prior to vaccination or are done in mainly people who are unvaccinated and there is a lot of uncertainty about whether and to what degree vaccination might change that frequency. And that's certainly being studied as well. One of the big questions here, besides what is log COVID, how long does it last, and is it going to stick around forever? Is what exactly is causing it after acute infection? So what are people doing to try to figure out the cause? To answer what is causing long COVID, there are a few steps. So first of all, we have to show that some trait is unique or far more common in people who have long COVID than in other people. Now the challenge is that even when you figure that out, that doesn't mean that what you're finding is causing the symptoms. So then you have to do a lot more research and basic biology and other studies to determine that what you found is actually fueling specific symptoms or all the symptoms or something. Another way to test that and to understand it is via treatments. So if you give somebody a treatment that eliminates like a biological abnormality they have and then they're symptoms get better that can help you deduce that that problem is causing the symptoms because getting rid of it made them feel better. You have to almost think like really step by step in how to prove this. One of the main focuses of your piece here is looking at these potential causes that people are starting to investigate. Let's take those one at a time here. The first one I want to talk about is micro cloths. Yeah, so micro clots are a potential cause that are getting a lot of attention right now to take a step back. We know that acute COVID, people who are really sick, particularly hospitalized with COVID, can have blood clots. And the virus can attack the cells that line our blood vessels and cause big clots and small clocks and strokes and heart attacks and all sorts of other things. What scientists are starting to see or deduce is that some patients who have long COVID also appear to have blood clots. Now these are not the big blood clots that you would see on like a cat scan. These are teeny tiny clots that are thought to be gumming up the circulation and then causing problems. They're also maybe kind of a propensity for the blood vessels in general to be chronically damaged and that can be affecting circulation and other things as well. If you have this damage to your circulatory system ongoing, what does that look like for symptoms? If you can imagine, if you're circulation, let's say, in your brain, isn't running the way it should, you could have difficulty thinking. For example, if it's affecting your lungs, you might have breathlessness. So you can imagine if this was happening all over your body that it could cause a number of different symptoms. Again, we haven't quite made that link between clots and symptoms. But there's certainly a very reasonable argument. The tricky thing here seems to be that you can't see micro clots exactly. You can't find them in the body and pick them out. Yeah, so there are a couple different ways that people are starting to look for them. One is with a very sophisticated kind of imaging study called a SPECT CT scan and essentially what it shows you is blood flow in the lungs. There have been several cases now with long COVID patients who've had these scans where we see that often it's one long basically has very limited blood flow. And the presumption is that may very well be caused by these teeny tiny cloths or also possibly by other problems with the blood vessels in the lungs. This whole web of tiny blood vessels that run through our lungs are somehow disrupted in these patients. That's one way to look for this. Another way is to look in the blood. Right now it's a pretty kind of laborious research method to take blood and analyze it in certain ways and you can in that setting kind of figure out if there's a high burden of micro clots. And so there have been studies that were started by a researcher in South Africa who began looking at this and she has since teamed up with a number of other researchers around the world to study this, but she has found these signs of excessive clotting in long COVID patients as well. Looking at the treatment side of this, this is obviously way too early to be treating people at mass in this way. But individual cases have been treated with things that prevent clots or remove class and there has been some alleviation of symptoms from that. Doctors get a little nervous about this because anticoagulants as a class of drug are pretty heavy duty drugs. They have side effects, and they can also cause severe bleeding in somebody. So you have to be careful, you know, you really want patients doing that under a doctor's supervision. But there have been some people who have been prescribed anticoagulants who have evidence of this abnormal clotting and those people in some cases have experienced improved symptoms over time. So that is very interesting. And I think there is interest in running trials to study this more rigorously to really see is this fixing.

Sarah presti Jennifer peasant frankel Deborah Matthews Sean Sanders Bobby Sony Jennifer cousin frankel acute infection COVID heart palpitations SARS Jennifer headaches heart attacks South Africa
"acute infection" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:04 min | 8 months ago

"acute infection" Discussed on WTOP

"Problems at least 6 weeks after their acute infections Coming up for you in money news The market has taken other downturn A lot of electric vehicle startups now wanting D.C. I'm Jeff Cleveland Ten 48 We have traffic and weather every ten minutes on the 8s married to papa in the WTO traffic center All righty thanks Mark we're going to start out working on three 95 our accident as northbound after The Pentagon and working toward the 14th street bridge before you get to the George Washington Parkway Crash is blocking the left lane You can make the exit for X at ten past the accident and response but that is your delay Now heading in the other direction south belt 95 slows out of lorton getting across the Purple Heart bridge at the aqua Quan the crash just passed one 23 exit one 60 last reported blocking a right lane right around the curve where we can't see it but that does become the breakaway point Traveling between Virginia and Maryland three O one nice Mac Middleton bridge you may be held in both directions There was a southbound disabled vehicle police were rolling it off of the bridge bottom line here following police direction 66 expecting work even in the weather but they say they're going to be eastbound working toward the beltway they would be in the left lane that is the schedule And if you're the interlude to exit to 66 might have that right lane block working in The Rain as well D.C. two 95 in both directions slogan to get south of Pennsylvania avenue northbound out the 11th street bridge to go northbound where the right side is blocked This is the new work zone that will be with us through the end of the week Rhode Island avenue northeast Washington street or Washington place northeast watch for response to the accident And summer's almost here and the YMCA offers a wide variety of fun and exciting summer camp options Spots are filling fast visit YMCA D.C. dot org slash summer camp to browse camps and register today Mary de pompa WTO traffic Okay Mary return to storm team forest chuck bell All right yeah we may have had to turn the air conditioners off after the heat wave over the weekend but now we need the dehumidifiers It's cloudy and.

Jeff Cleveland D.C. lorton WTO George Washington Pentagon Mark Maryland Virginia Washington Pennsylvania Mary de pompa YMCA
"acute infection" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:23 min | 9 months ago

"acute infection" Discussed on KOMO

"Chris flexen takes the mound at T mobile park tonight asked to pitch Seattle past the Phillies the Mariners right at their ship Sunday afternoon snapping a 6 game losing streak with a two one ten inning victory over Tampa Bay Today the M's option relief pitcher Nick marges to Tacoma and former Washington husky star Kelsey plum ignited a fourth quarter rally leading Las Vegas past the Seattle storm 85 to 74 The storm play at Phoenix Wednesday Sports was Schwartz at ten and 40 after the hour northwest news radio Northwest news time now is 60 11 Many people who have recovered from COVID-19 are still dealing with long-term complications from the virus We have a closer look at that now from como fours Molly Shen Their symptoms are wide ranging but one of the more common issues reported involves difficulties with sleep These sores are one of the commonest symptoms that nowadays our patients who suffer from acute infection are having these days So mainly what we are finding is that they complain of insomnia fatigue also brain fog a lot of them complain about these and also we see sometimes to give them rhythm disorders Doctor Cynthia Pena says circadian rhythm disorders occur when a person's internal clock is out of sync with their environment As a result they might suffer from insomnia daytime sleepiness difficulty waking up depression and stress in relationships Doctor Pena says they don't know why some COVID long haulers are experiencing these sleep related issues That is something researchers are still trying to understand They're also not sure how long those symptoms could last However the good news is they are treatable Well have you heard of zombies Of course we have They're not real but so called zombie cells actually are Zombie cells can actually cause aging to happen a little bit early can also increase your risk of age related diseases as you get older Now they're not really called zombie cells in the medical community They're actually called sentient cells They're cells that become damaged yet refuse to die And zombies just the nickname for them because they act just like zombies They change their shape and they change what they do They secrete all these nasty chemicals in a time that affects all the cells around them they can just really impact on our health Researchers at the university of Minnesota medical school have found that these damaged cells can accumulate in the body causing issues that promote aging and diseases related to it like Alzheimer's disease Those zombie cells also associated with osteoporosis diabetes and muscle weakness Biotechnology is Greg McPherson tells me one way to combat zombie cells is to eat from the rainbow getting plenty of brightly colored fruits and vegetables and he says exercise is also another great way to shed those cells That report from como forest Denise Whitaker A Florida mom is giving her children the gift of health after donating her own stem cells to help cure their disease Maryland's elgato's donated her own bone marrow to treat the sickle cell disease her twin sons were battling The 70 year olds received the bone marrow transplants in March and April and are now cured so godo says that she's grateful and now her boys can live a regular life 6 14 she's got an update on.

Chris flexen T mobile park Nick marges Kelsey plum Molly Shen acute infection insomnia fatigue Seattle Cynthia Pena Mariners Phillies Tacoma Tampa Bay Schwartz Phoenix Las Vegas Pena Washington insomnia Alzheimer's disease
"acute infection" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:47 min | 1 year ago

"acute infection" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Even a year later after the initial infection All Ali and his co authors at Washington University combed through VA medical records They identified more than a 150,000 people infected with coronavirus between March 2020 and January of last year Then they compared those patients to match control groups made up of millions of other VA patients The cardiovascular outcomes included different kinds of clots arrhythmias heart failure inflammation of the heart muscles This is really going to create a generation of people with heart problems For some of the most serious outcomes including heart attack and stroke the rate of those problems was 4% higher among the patients who had COVID Even though to some people 4% as a single digit number it may seem small to some people You have to multiply that by the huge number of people in the U.S. and many many more around the world who experience COVID-19 infection What was also striking was this increased risk turned out even among the people who were not hospitalized and Ali says it wasn't just happening to people who were already at high risk of heart disease Even young people people who were previously athletic people were never smoked who are not obese people who never had diabetes or any problems with diabetes Cardiologists are taking notice One of them is doctor Harlan krumholz at Yale who's been researching long COVID I think that this is a wake-up call to us Crumbled says this new study is strong and comprehensive but he also worries that it could create unnecessary anxiety In the end you know a small number of people end up getting cardiovascular disease It's not like oh my gosh everyone got COVID And then the next thing you know they all had heart attacks That's not it Others have pointed out the studies limits Doctor Betty raman a cardiologist at the University of Oxford notes as the authors do the VA population studied was majority white and male and it only reveals a correlation It can't prove cause and effect because of COVID Finally the study only covered the first year of the pandemic And since the vaccines have come into the picture things are dramatically different just in terms of the way the body is handling the infection She's hopeful vaccinated patients will have fewer cardiovascular problems Doctor Peter Libby of Harvard says the findings do help get at the scale of the problem He says inflammation that comes with the acute infection could be causing problems in the heart and blood vessels and imaging studies have also revealed signs of scarring in the heart after COVID which can then lead to arrhythmias It doesn't take very big scar to predispose you to have arrhythmias So fortunately we have ways of dealing with that these days but they're invasive They have complications Some of this post infection damage it might turn out that other viruses can cause that too But with so many people infected by the coronavirus the hard problems could be with us for a long time.

arrhythmias heart failure infl Ali Harlan krumholz VA Washington University heart disease diabetes Betty raman heart attack Yale Peter Libby University of Oxford U.S. Harvard
"acute infection" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:38 min | 1 year ago

"acute infection" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"150,000 people infected with coronavirus between March 2020 and January of last year Then they compared those patients to match control groups made up of millions of other VA patients The cardiovascular outcomes included different kinds of clots arrhythmias heart failure inflammation of the heart muscles This is really going to create a generation of people with heart problems For some of the most serious outcomes including heart attack and stroke the rate of those problems was 4% higher among the patients who had COVID Even though to some people 4% as a single digit number it may seem small to some people You have to multiply that by the huge number of people in the U.S. and many many more around the world who experience COVID-19 infection What was also striking was this increased risk turned up even among the people who were not hospitalized and Ali says it wasn't just happening to people who were already at high risk of heart disease Even young people people who were previously athletic people were never smoked We were not obese people who never had diabetes or any problems with diabetes Cardiologists are taking notice One of them is doctor Harlan krumholz at Yale who's been researching long COVID I think that this is a wake-up call to us Krumholtz says this new study is strong and comprehensive but he also worries that it could create unnecessary anxiety In the end you know a small number of people end up getting cardiovascular disease It's not like oh my gosh everyone got COVID And then the next thing you know they all had heart attacks That's not it Others have pointed out the studies limits Doctor Betty ramen a cardiologist at the University of Oxford notes as the authors do the VA population studied was majority white and male and it only reveals a correlation It can't prove cause and effect because of COVID Finally the study only covered the first year of the pandemic And since the vaccines have come into the picture things are dramatically different just in terms of the way the body is handling the infection She's hopeful vaccinated patients will have fewer cardiovascular problems Doctor Peter Libby of Harvard says the findings do help get at the scale of the problem He says inflammation that comes with the acute infection could be causing problems in the heart and blood vessels and imaging studies have also revealed signs of scarring in the heart after COVID which can then lead to arrhythmias It doesn't take very big scar to predispose you to have arrhythmias So fortunately we have ways of dealing with that these days but they're invasive They have complications Some of this post infection damage it might turn out that other viruses can cause that too But with so many people infected by the coronavirus the heart problems could be with us for a long time.

arrhythmias heart failure infl Harlan krumholz heart attack Krumholtz heart disease diabetes Betty ramen Ali Yale Peter Libby University of Oxford U.S. VA Harvard
"acute infection" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

08:19 min | 1 year ago

"acute infection" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"It's Kate with a C and Twitter handle is at DR doctor Kate Shanahan SHA and Kate welcome the program. Thanks so much for having me back on Dr. Drew and happy 2022. Happy 22. I've noticed you've been a little quite lively on Twitter lately. Tell me what lit you up. Well, I just needed to get away from talking about COVID. I manage about a lot of people with COVID. We've had a hundred cases in the past, probably ten days. And it's just insane. But you know what? I'm one doctor. I've seen I was adding it up this morning. I probably got 50. And it's 90 9% over crime. Yes, thank goodness. Because we're not allowed to say, but it's different. It's so we're not allowed to say, seriously, we can't describe our observations of what omelet has been clinically. Are you freaking kidding me? Well, we get dinged, don't we? Yes. This is someone this is someone who's let me guess. You live a lot in the YouTube world? Yeah, YouTube. Well, this is not YouTube, right? We're not going to get dinged here. We can do whatever he wants. So here's what I'm observing. I'm observing. I've seen 50 cases, my whole household has had it. I've had it. It's been all over the place. And what I'm observing is, if you are a triple vax, it is incredibly mild. It is quite mild. Not nothing. I mean, it's like my wife whose triple vaccine was down, didn't want to go to bed for a couple of days, but it was nothing like alpha and delta, nothing like I had last year. I had it. I didn't know I had it. I was coughing a bit and horse and it wasn't until the whole household came down that I started thinking because I tested negative the whole way, although now I'm having weird, familiar, long haul symptoms, isn't that crazy? So you can get long haul even after mild COVID. That's an interesting thing, right? I've heard a couple of people say that, yes. But that's about the worst that it does. It's kind of, you know, you maybe have two or three days of if you haven't been vaccinated. I haven't had COVID before. You maybe have two or three days of high fever, really bad body aches, often a terrible headache. But it's like, that's like a flu. Like a float, right. So an unvaccinated is like a bad flu. Vaccinated two vaccines are when J&J little more is constitutional. A lot of cough, a lot of upper respiratory, some fever, some aches. My son is in that category, and he developed incredible body exit scared him. And I was like, oh, here it comes. And then he was just kind of in bed for a few days. And it's still kind of lingering, whatever. But all the triple vaccinated, it's much more like a cold. Right? Is that about fit? Absolutely. I mean, so mild that some people just completely deny it could possibly be even anything. That was me. That was me. I didn't really work. I still never tested positive, but my whole house got sick. So I know I did it. And my son came from New York after he was exposed. He was sick for a couple days. I think he brought it in. I got it. There was another category we have talked about, which is natural immunity, plus single vax. Which is me and my son. And it was vastly different than what we had in the alpha at last year. Persistent cough, here we are, and a little long hauler, and that's that. I'm wondering, as I started thinking about this thing, I'm wondering if this is just something we're going to kind of have every year or so either a vaccine or a little illness or and I thought, you know, if more for this little long haul or stuff, and by the way, I'm probably going to go back on fluvoxamine to see if it resolves it the way it did the first time. You know, I have to deal with this every year. Oh well, I mean, even the flu had a post flu syndrome that lost post flu fatigue that never really got that much press, but it could cause fatigue for 6 to 12 weeks, sometimes longer. So really, any virus can do that. I think COVID probably has a higher chance of doing that. But this acronym, you know, if you had it before that, if you had a very natural immunity for some people, doesn't seem to help very much. I've had two people that actually had COVID before and had a really nasty case of it. Oh, really? And they were outpatient, but they were in bed for like ten, 14 days with a fever. And not natural muni, but Novak's. That so they had the infection back before they were vaccines. And now they're getting this. And it's kind of bringing back some of the worst of the chest pain. I think there's a sort of a pleurisy, which is the length of the lungs, gets inflamed, or you know what? I'm going to argue because I've now had it and there's a lot of sore throat with this. Sore throat is a prominent symptom and it's persistent and it's nasty. I know what I know this pain you're talking about and I had it and it felt more like tracheal or large bronchus something because it had a pleuritic piece 'cause it got worse when you took a deep breath, but it stayed inside. It didn't go to the chest wall. You know what I mean? Yeah. Who knows, you know? Yeah. That actually makes sense because they say this new one is really reproducing more in the upper areas, which is the large, the large stuff and not even getting to the lower airways, so that makes a lot of sense. And that's actually good to know, because then you don't really have to worry really anything about pneumothorax. It also makes me wonder and I've been obsessing about this whether inhaled corticosteroids is the way to go or would that make it worse? Because you know it might impair the local immunity. I reach for albuterol and I thought, maybe I should go for some steroids and I don't know. But I didn't do it. Have you used any health steroids? I've used inhaled steroids in the past with really bad laryngitis when people won't stop coffee. But if it's not that bad that they're able to control their cough, I haven't. Yeah. Pulmonary pull my friend of mine said he's beaten the residents these days that if you use the corticosteroids during acute infection, you can make things worse. And you gotta be really careful with that. So that's in my head. Now, Gary had a question. I was just wondering what you guys thought of the new marketing scheme that's going around LA this week of fluid. Oh my God, I want to punch people in the face when I saw that. It made me angry. So I'll let Kate talk first. I don't even know what that is, 'cause I've been married and COVID and Twitter. Yeah, yeah. So there was like a half a dozen cases. One, one prominently of an immune compromise meaning pregnant woman who got both flu and COVID. And I was like, it's fluid. There's fluid. Oh my God, flume is coming. It's such insanity that I want to punch people in the face when I see it. But good luck press with panicking everybody this time. You did it for two years. Good luck trying to do it again. What are you saying? Yes, I know it's like, come on. You know, they're trying to punch through the COVID fatigue, I guess, and they keep trying to do it by Gary people. It's just not very nice. I think it's like a media bullying. At this point. But I have seen a couple of cases where people have had both. And those actually have been some of the worst cases. Were they immune compromised, but there's something they're normal people. All right. So you tested are you routinely testing for both? No, I can't, because I do mostly telehealth. So I have to get folks to do their own tests for COVID at home. And if I'm really worried about the flu, then I have to tell them to go to an urgent care. And so you've had two that did that and turned out positive for both. Yeah, two or three. How did you what made you worry that there was another illness aboard? The fever was lasting longer than like two days, right? Because the, I'm calling over on baby COVID understanding man on Twitter. You.

flu Kate Shanahan YouTube Kate fever Twitter cough Dr. Drew headache acute infection Novak COVID New York Gary LA
"acute infection" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:47 min | 1 year ago

"acute infection" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's morning edition from NPR news I mean Martinez and Culver City California And I'm Melissa block in Washington D.C. The FDA has given doctors a new tool to use in treating patients with COVID-19 The regulatory agency granted emergency use authorizations to drug maker Pfizer for the antiviral therapy the company has developed Now that would be good news all by itself but even better it appears the new drug will work to treat COVID cases caused by the omicron variant And joining us to talk about this new therapy and how it can be used as empires Joe Parker Joe tell us about it What is it and how does it work Well it's called pax levied or pax lovid if you prefer It works by messing with a key enzyme in the coronavirus called a protease And if you inhibit the protease the virus can't grow and spread You take it with another drug called ritonavir twice a day for 5 days The company conducted a study in some 2200 volunteers that showed that it could reduce the risk of hospitalization and death by close to 90% in people at high risk for the disease Susannah Maggie is an associate Professor of infectious diseases at duke university medical center It does appear to be a highly efficacious oral pill which we've been waiting on for quite some time That seems like great news for a lot of people who is it for specifically Joe Well it's for people 12 and older who weigh more than 88 pounds and who have mild to moderate symptoms but are at high risk of developing severe disease Now the best results are if you take the drug within three days of the symptoms appearing Chris white is an assistant Professor of medicine at the icahn school of medicine at Mount Sinai hospital in New York where he's been working with paxil And he says what's really impressive is the drug appears to prevent hospitalizations even if you wait 5 days after the symptoms first appear And that is critical for these acute infections to have as big a window as possible Because you know you have people that get sick they start to feel bad They say let me wait let me not do anything I don't want to go to the doctor And before you know it two three days pass is very quickly So if the window is 5 days that means people still get a chance to benefit from the drug Right Now we mentioned that the drug does appear to work against the omicron variant but if vaccines are less effective against oma crown why isn't this drug facing the same problems Well good question Vaccines are designed based on the spike protein which is a different part of a different protein in the virus The spike protein in a Macron has a lot of mutations but they don't seem to be many mutations in the genes for the protease And remember this is a protease inhibitor So in theory that shouldn't be a problem And there are lab tests that suggest the drug will work But of course to be certain it would be necessary to test the drug in patients infected with autocrat and those tests haven't been done yet Right Now there was another drug that a lot of people were expecting would get an emergency use authorization That's one name by Merck What happened to that one Well that drug is called monopoly and it received an endorsement from an FDA advisory committee last month And it's not entirely clear why it didn't get an EUA A lot of people were expecting that it would It's also an antiviral It works by causing errors in the RNA when the virus tries to make copies of itself And it was also tested in a large clinical trial And the drug did reduce hospitalizations and deaths not quite not nearly as well as packed with it There's also a question of whether the mal new pair of air can cause DNA damage So it's not the ideal drug but Susanna nagy says there's still reason to think it would be helpful in treating people with COVID especially because at least initially that drug will be more available than pax levied For the right person where there risk benefit favors taking it I still think it's probably going to be a drug that we see used at least for now particularly given the numbers that we're seeing with spreading in various parts of the country So there's a chance that the FDA will still grant an EUA from all new pair and it probably would be helpful to have as just an alternative to pax levy if doctors turned out to need it Okay Joe Parker and pierce Joe Parker thanks so much You're right You're welcome The House select committee investigating the January 6th insurrection at the capitol wants to talk to representative Jim Jordan The Ohio Republican is a strong ally of former president Trump Jordan is also the second sitting member of Congress that the panel has asked a question representative Scott Perry of Pennsylvania declined the panel's request earlier this week And piers deirdre wall shoe covers Congress joins us now to try to explain all of this for us and your first why does the committee want to speak with Jim Jordan Good morning Will Jordan has already publicly said that he spoke to president Trump on January 6th and in the letter that the commerce committee chairman the select committee chairman Benny Thompson sent to Jordan yesterday he mentions that the two could have had multiple conversations If that's the case the committee wants to talk to him about each one in detail They also want to talk to him about any meetings he was in in the days leading up to the insurrection with White House officials or outside activists who were planning efforts to overturn the 2020 election results They also specifically asked if he was in any discussions about presidential pardons Wyoming congresswoman Liz Cheney she's a member of the select committee She's called him quote a material witness Okay so that's the request What has Jim Jordan said about it Well he said last night on Fox News that he just got the letter and he's reviewing it but he also said he has concerns about the way the committee operates But back in October when he was asked about his own actions on January 6th he did indicate a possible willingness to cooperate and Benny Thompson actually noted that in his letter to Jordan here's an exchange that Jordan had in October with democratic congressman Jim mcgovern I guess are you willing to tell the select.

NPR news Culver City California Melissa block Washington D.C. COVID Joe Parker Joe Susannah Maggie Joe Well severe disease icahn school of medicine FDA duke university medical center Chris white Mount Sinai hospital Martinez Pfizer Susanna nagy Jim Jordan
"acute infection" Discussed on Health Babes Podcast

Health Babes Podcast

03:12 min | 1 year ago

"acute infection" Discussed on Health Babes Podcast

"And in my private practice working when people have had cancer treatment oftentimes they have lymph nodes removed to make sure the cancer spreads with a system. But that can put somebody at risk for they can get lymph adina which is humilate swelling in a limb. They had lymph nodes removed under the armpit. There mr lymph edina the arm. So lymphatic drainage is actually covered by insurance in this country if you have a note from the physician prescription from them and you work with a certified. Lymph edina therapist. They can really help you manage lymph edina but it also runs the gamut too aesthetic reasons people wanna get glowing skin be red carpet ready lose a few pounds around the waistline help reduce appearance of cellulite. I've worked with people. Who have extra. I've worked with auto immune issues people with the mta of our. Jeanne have issue fee toxin lupus in line as well as young people who want to avoid some of the chronic conditions. Their parents face. They come in early because they know it's proactive healthy beneficial type of such gas for sure. So who should not be getting lymphatic. Massage is such a great question. So i have a whole list in my book. The vote us. But if you have chronic heart conditions if you have on chronic cardiac edina if you're at whisper of blood clot if you recently had surgery if you have acted on cancer treatment. Dbt there are. There's a list that i have in my book. You know if you have an active infection. Don't work though if you have covert wait until you. Are you know really over that. Active acute infection cellulitis. No working that. Dvd just see his nose deep-vein thrombosis right. So that's basically where you get a blood clot usually in your calf that can be released into your lungs and become a pulmonary. Embolism so you could see why massaging that area would be a problem. So you know if you're walking with calf pain You know a good. I think a someone who does what you release that would know you know that is not the type of person you probably wouldn't take if there's any risk of that when in doubt ask your doctor your doctor. What are the symptoms. You can experience after working on the lamps is such a great question again. It's sort of a rainbow of possibilities. A lot of my clients feel lighter and writer afterwards with more energy but oftentimes people can also feel really drowsy and tired. Some people can get headache. If they're not drinking enough water you are accelerating the natural detoxification pathways of your body. That your lymph system works with so just like you might feel on day. Three of the cleanse. If you've got a lot of toxins you're getting rid of. It might not be so comfortable. That can be normal. So i always tell people. Try not to schedule anything that you have to rush off to. After you get lymphatic massage. Give yourself time to rest and drink plenty of water and.

mr lymph cancer Active acute infection celluli Jeanne headache
"acute infection" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

06:19 min | 1 year ago

"acute infection" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Often it so i think what was most people's idea of what happens. Is he hospital. You get quite sick. You get better and leave the front door of the hospital. Thank goodness i made it three. That was a great. But there's been a lot less mckeag ignition about the fact that the end of the story. I'm by some whether had been in hospital. Oh you hadn't those increasing commission if the thing that's been termed long david and it covers a range of different things that long cave patient grapes suggested up to two hundred symptoms that people experience in the months after they've had their primary infection but what we noticed from data that came from the office for national statistics and from the united states towards the end of last year was that actually people were saying and ending up coming back into hospital insecure numbers as you outlined. I felt that somebody needs to be done about that. Do we know is. Is there a link between a join us. Is there any way that you can work out. Which groups are more vulnerable. Who to this this readmission to hospital so obviously as we get older all risk of dying increases at worrying the looking at the data from the oh. Ns it suggests that your risk is greater. If you're below the age of seventy compared to the background late you would normally have of death. I'm competitive to those avis. Seventy so younger working age. People are increased risk compared to their usual risk of almost mood and seven times greater the major risk of dying in the months after david whereas people over seventy the risk is destroyed three times. The usual rate now said said in the introduction. You're one of the lead researchers on this new clinical trial. It's called he'll keva just explained to us. What you doing so he will keep. It is helping alleviate the longer term consequences of caveat nineteen so said national platform can trial. So what we're trying to do is to recruit people the point that well enough to leave hospital and say if we give you a drug therapy at this point does it make the chances of you being alive and out of hospital over the next one year better. Anti the trial is made up with a fabulous team of people. And as you highlighted. It's got a really strong female leadership team. So allen has davies is the chief executive of apparatus the digital clinical trials company. What grave carroll campbell. He's the by statistics at liverpool. He runs the liverpool clinical trials center. We've got some fantastic. Clinical trial man manages. Emma bentson probably donahue at a really really brilliant data linkage researcher could anne-marie docherty's university of edinburgh and patient reported outcomes specialists from birmingham similarly calvert as well as really brilliant maiocco investigators kites printout pge team from across the country and talk about the drugs. You're traveling because these drugs are drugs. Already used but in different ways only exactly so we've gone with the option of repacking therapy so taking drugs that we know all honesty cheap that safe and widely available and saying okay if we give these two people and they work. We know that they would be rapidly. Stay lockable across the world like mattison has been since the recovery. Trial shape worked. So what were you using is a band which is an oral blood. Thinning drugs to try and see whether addressing blood clots makes a difference to outcomes using stacked in which is a lipid lowering drug people. Use it but fast athlete is working on it later. Affects blood vessel. Inflammation is to get anti inflammatory for that and we knew. The blood vessels very inflamed after credit acute infection. How difficult is it to trial treatments. When we still don't fully understand the condition difficult. I think is the honest answer. We went very lucky in the k. Has i think the kelly covet thirty two advisory panel. There's an expert panel that convenience people you know who's lots of different aspects of the disease to decide what therapies we should be testing myspace and say the talks that have gone into our trial ones. That were recommended by the experts that processed but the option is that we don't do anything we keep fina siping people trying to understand what the natural history next like was more people are being essentially harmed or we can say we know enough. We will try the things that we think irrational and safe and see if we can save lives and tell us briefly. How do people get involved if they fall into this category. What can they do if you or your loved. One happen to be in host. Blue with a caveat impaction and sadly there's likely to be far more effective for the coming weeks. Please do ask your hospital. Doctors taking part and he'll cave it and if not why not and whether you eligible to be recruited into the trial we are open at hospitals across the nhs in all devolve nations. Say please do seek out charlotte psomas. Thank you so much for speaking to us this morning. In sharing with us your achievements over the age of fifty. Sally says after three disastrous attempts to pass my. Csc maths in the fifth year lower and upper sixth of feeling through life. I was mathematically steep. Did i passed my. Gcc maths in two thousand seventeen. When content and grading was reformed. I passed. I was fifty two with a five strong pass. She says as he says. I'm enjoying the program very much at. Thank you for all of your masters this morning. So many inspiring stories of what you have achieved in your fifties. It's been delightful company throughout the week hair on women's out. Of course we back again tomorrow. At ten o'clock that's all from today's women's. I hope you can join us again next time. What would you do if your house just disappeared down are staring you causing a see through viking. I can't find a new five part mystery from bbc radio for. Never be better if you didn't ask questions all but he's seen not it was a warwick took yours. It just cleans sucked it up. One man's fight for answers. Bermuda triangle on tori identifies. Just got the house. That vanished available now on bbc sounds..

carroll campbell liverpool clinical trials cent Emma bentson marie docherty office for national statistics david acute infection avis university of edinburgh donahue mattison calvert davies united states liverpool allen birmingham anne kelly myspace
"acute infection" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

06:25 min | 1 year ago

"acute infection" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"Pandemic bring you up to speed on the science behind the most urgent questions about the virus and the disease we this defy research and you understand what it really means. I'm tanya lewis. I'm josh fishman. And where scientific. American senior health editors. Today we'll talk about clinics for long-haul cova patients the rise of the delta vary. And what you knew about it and using barbershops to get vaccines to communities. That need them most early. In the pandemic there were some reports of people with odd symptoms such as fatigue and memory issues that continued long after their acute infection. Now these long haulers are getting some specialized help more and more. Data's coming out about long cohen. That's serious physical and mental effects that can last half the year after people. I get infected. The latest study came out last week in the journal. Nature medicine researchers looked at health records for a few hundred people in bergen norway. That was almost everyone in the city. Diagnosed with cohen. During several months in twenty twenty overall sixty one percent of the group had symptoms six months after they were first infected. Their most common problem was fatigue followed by difficulty concentrating. Disturb smell or taste memory trouble and a hard time breathing to striking things about these patients. One was that many had just a mild or moderate case of kobe at the star. The other was that a were young age. Sixteen to thirty other. Studies have reported similar symptom cluster. Such as one by university washington. Researchers that found about thirty percent of people was covered. Had these lingering troubles to doctors know what's causing these problems. That still a mystery. Tanya some people have organ damage related to the virus infection but some do not doctors are trying to figure out how best to treat them. Siam contributor melville newsome wrote this week about new covered recovery clinics that treat the whole patient rather than making people run from a lung doctor to a neurologist to an immunologist patients say the coordinated care helps and they feel more hopeful since they're being taken seriously and not dismissed as crank cases the nih is also taking it seriously spending about a billion dollars to study the disease. It now has an official job breaker of name post acute so calais of sars kobe to infection melba notes. However there's racial imbalance showing up at these clinics overwhelmingly. The people referred there are white but people of color are more likely to get cove it so access barriers. Such as lack of health insurance are likely keeping care away from many people who need it. It's yet another burden added to the healthy body. that's already hurting people. In the pandemic. Let's talk about the delta variant. It's red for more than seventy countries and it's now the dominant variant in the us. How worried should we be. The delta variant is definitely concerning particularly for unvaccinated people. It's already causing another surge in the uk where it makes up the vast majority of cases and a company that's been tracking virus sequences in the us estimates this variant now counts for about forty percent of cases. Here making it more than twice as prevalent as the alpha variant. That was previously the most common. As you've noted before josh research from the uk suggests delta is at least forty percent more transmissible than alpha and almost twice as likely to result in hospitalization. The data are a bit murky on whether it actually causes more severe disease or not though so far it hasn't actually caused a huge uptick in hospitalizations or deaths in the uk. Still it's spreading widely in the us. Where only about half. The population is fully vaccinated far less in some areas experts. Say it's not likely to cause another devastating nationwide surge like the one. We had last winter but it will probably lead to flare ups in some states. Where fewer people have been vaccinated such as alabama or mississippi and the risk could increase in places where hotter temperatures or more people to spend time in air conditioned indoor settings where the corona virus can easily spread. The sounds pretty grim. What can we do about it. The good news is that the vaccines work. More data from the uk show that two doses of the pfizer vaccine were ninety six percent effective at preventing hospitalization and two doses of the astrazeneca vaccine were ninety two percent effective but need both shots. A single dose of astrazeneca was only seventy one percent effective at preventing hospitalization and one dose of both vaccines was only around thirty four percent effective at preventing infection. We don't know yet how. Well the johnson and johnson vaccine works against the delta variant but it's likely to provide some protection meanwhile the world health organization is urging even vaccinated people to keep wearing masks and practicing social distancing just to be on the safe side given how much viruses still circulating. Cdc has not changed. Its guidance. Though it's still says vaccinated people don't need a mask unless they want to but with the delta being so transmissible it couldn't hurt to err on the side of caution. There are still plenty of people who are skeptical about getting vaccinated sometimes for valid reasons. Now some efforts are trying to build trust by reaching people in their neighbourhoods. The rate of cova. Vaccinations among people of color. Lags behind that of white people access barriers are one reason for this and so are negative experiences with the medical profession that we distrust lack run. Barber shops and hair salons may be able to counter. Some of this says stephen. Thomas who directs the university of maryland center for health equity for the last fifteen years hamas has been researching the trust placed in barbers and stylus by their communities. And he says it's a powerful thing he's been training these people to help educate their clients about ways to prevent diseases such as diabetes. Now this expertise is helping with co vaccines thomas's group is part of a white house shots at the shop campaign. Barbers and stylus are getting trained to talk to people about the benefits of vaccines versus the risks building on long relationships these conversations which can happen while snipping and combing are not lectures. And they're not magic and they don't convince all downers but they do have an effect on many people. Some shops have become up vaccination sites staffed by local health clinics solving access problems by bringing free vaccines into the neighborhood. Thomas's project is called the health advocates in reach and research and that rebates naturally to pay..

tanya lewis josh fishman acute infection cohen melville newsome uk Pandemic bergen Siam fatigue astrazeneca Tanya norway nih
COVID-19 Long Haulers Get Specialized Help

60-Second Science

02:13 min | 1 year ago

COVID-19 Long Haulers Get Specialized Help

"Early. In the pandemic there were some reports of people with odd symptoms such as fatigue and memory issues that continued long after their acute infection. Now these long haulers are getting some specialized help more and more. Data's coming out about long cohen. That's serious physical and mental effects that can last half the year after people. I get infected. The latest study came out last week in the journal. Nature medicine researchers looked at health records for a few hundred people in bergen norway. That was almost everyone in the city. Diagnosed with cohen. During several months in twenty twenty overall sixty one percent of the group had symptoms six months after they were first infected. Their most common problem was fatigue followed by difficulty concentrating. Disturb smell or taste memory trouble and a hard time breathing to striking things about these patients. One was that many had just a mild or moderate case of kobe at the star. The other was that a were young age. Sixteen to thirty other. Studies have reported similar symptom cluster. Such as one by university washington. Researchers that found about thirty percent of people was covered. Had these lingering troubles to doctors know what's causing these problems. That still a mystery. Tanya some people have organ damage related to the virus infection but some do not doctors are trying to figure out how best to treat them. Siam contributor melville newsome wrote this week about new covered recovery clinics that treat the whole patient rather than making people run from a lung doctor to a neurologist to an immunologist patients say the coordinated care helps and they feel more hopeful since they're being taken seriously and not dismissed as crank cases the nih is also taking it seriously spending about a billion dollars to study the disease. It now has an official job breaker of name post acute so calais of sars kobe to infection melba notes. However there's racial imbalance showing up at these clinics overwhelmingly. The people referred there are white but people of color are more likely to get cove it so access barriers. Such as lack of health insurance are likely keeping care away from many people who need it. It's yet another burden added to the healthy body. that's already hurting people. In the

Acute Infection Cohen Fatigue Bergen Melville Newsome Norway Tanya Siam Washington NIH
"acute infection" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"acute infection" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"Early. In the pandemic there were some reports of people with odd symptoms such as fatigue and memory issues that continued long after their acute infection. Now these long haulers are getting some specialized help more and more. Data's coming out about long cohen. That's serious physical and mental effects that can last half the year after people. I get infected. The latest study came out last week in the journal. Nature medicine researchers looked at health records for a few hundred people in bergen norway. That was almost everyone in the city. Diagnosed with cohen. During several months in twenty twenty overall sixty one percent of the group had symptoms six months after they were first infected. Their most common problem was fatigue followed by difficulty concentrating. Disturb smell or taste memory trouble and a hard time breathing to striking things about these patients. One was that many had just a mild or moderate case of kobe at the star. The other was that a were young age. Sixteen to thirty other. Studies have reported similar symptom cluster. Such as one by university washington. Researchers that found about thirty percent of people was covered. Had these lingering troubles to doctors know what's causing these problems. That still a mystery. Tanya some people have organ damage related to the virus infection but some do not doctors are trying to figure out how best to treat them. Siam contributor melville newsome wrote this week about new covered recovery clinics that treat the whole patient rather than making people run from a lung doctor to a neurologist to an immunologist patients say the coordinated care helps and they feel more hopeful since they're being taken seriously and not dismissed as crank cases the nih is also taking it seriously spending about a billion dollars to study the disease. It now has an official job breaker of name post acute so calais of sars kobe to infection melba notes. However there's racial imbalance showing up at these clinics overwhelmingly. The people referred there are white but people of color are more likely to get cove it so access barriers. Such as lack of health insurance are likely keeping care away from many people who need it.

tanya lewis josh fishman acute infection cohen melville newsome uk Pandemic bergen Siam fatigue astrazeneca Tanya norway nih
New Data Released on Long Covid

60-Second Science

02:08 min | 1 year ago

New Data Released on Long Covid

"Early. In the pandemic there were some reports of people with odd symptoms such as fatigue and memory issues that continued long after their acute infection. Now these long haulers are getting some specialized help more and more. Data's coming out about long cohen. That's serious physical and mental effects that can last half the year after people. I get infected. The latest study came out last week in the journal. Nature medicine researchers looked at health records for a few hundred people in bergen norway. That was almost everyone in the city. Diagnosed with cohen. During several months in twenty twenty overall sixty one percent of the group had symptoms six months after they were first infected. Their most common problem was fatigue followed by difficulty concentrating. Disturb smell or taste memory trouble and a hard time breathing to striking things about these patients. One was that many had just a mild or moderate case of kobe at the star. The other was that a were young age. Sixteen to thirty other. Studies have reported similar symptom cluster. Such as one by university washington. Researchers that found about thirty percent of people was covered. Had these lingering troubles to doctors know what's causing these problems. That still a mystery. Tanya some people have organ damage related to the virus infection but some do not doctors are trying to figure out how best to treat them. Siam contributor melville newsome wrote this week about new covered recovery clinics that treat the whole patient rather than making people run from a lung doctor to a neurologist to an immunologist patients say the coordinated care helps and they feel more hopeful since they're being taken seriously and not dismissed as crank cases the nih is also taking it seriously spending about a billion dollars to study the disease. It now has an official job breaker of name post acute so calais of sars kobe to infection melba notes. However there's racial imbalance showing up at these clinics overwhelmingly. The people referred there are white but people of color are more likely to get cove it so access barriers. Such as lack of health insurance are likely keeping care away from many people who need it.

Acute Infection Cohen Fatigue Bergen Melville Newsome Norway Tanya Siam Washington NIH
"acute infection" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

07:18 min | 2 years ago

"acute infection" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"Getting away from reactivity or inertia as powerful for relationships almost everyone moves from one relationship to the next right the rebound but sitting in space post. A relationship is is really powerful. Post a love relationship or posts friendship that falls apart. I just think that we have the impulse to fill space the moment that empties but sitting emptiness can be really powerful. Thank you for that. So i'm going to take a stab at your question. I will say as a preface. That i don't know if i've ever mentioned this to the piece of writing that i somehow lost. That made me sad. I was a piece of fiction. And i never read fiction but it was a story i wrote. I think it was on a ride. And i was and i asked myself. This question sometimes goes. I wouldn't wouldn't older version of me. Say to me now. This is a long time ago. Ten years ago. Something like that. So i wrote the story of a fiction story going skiing taking a break going to see lots sitting by the fire having some wine and having this older gentlemen sit down next to me and this is before i read any his because this is like straight bore his and struck up a conversation about ten twenty minutes into a realized that it was an older version of myself and so we had this conversation about what he'd learned what advice he would give me and it was ten twelve page document and it was it was just an incredible exercise and then i somehow lost it. Go figure if you're reading that story today around this story. Today i think the the core piece that comes to mind. If i'm not over thinking it and just whatever pops into my head which i'm trying to pay a lot more attention to that first flash. It's very different from the number crunched analytical flash doesn't really flash it's more of like a squeezing out of the sponge but that first flash is that he would say focus on enjoyment and fun and pleasure like the things that give you those feelings and the justification. Not that there's one needed. I mean i think those those are all very good things by large assuming the no there's no collateral damage. I just have so much more energy. When i feel one of those things and my lifelong battle since my teens has been with chronic fatigue and that led to abusing ephedrine caffeine aspirin in high school which was introduced to me by upperclassmen for wrestling. And then oh now. I'm using it to three times a day. That was a mess for decades. Plus and i'd lie severe lime disease a few years ago. This happens all the time on long island. Having to the extent that in the er and the summers have a. It's like do you have lime disease like hey fill out the survey and get a free amazon gift cards. It's everywhere so severe lion in the blood test came back and the doctor said well. You are positive you have an acute infection. But you're aware you've already been infected. And i as more and more people now would recognize. What the serologic testing steig might be getting that wrong. I think it's g instead of gm long-term antibodies for lima president and have just had this incredible fatigue. Since i was in my teens so in that that persist to this day on some level. And so i think that deepening my relationships thinking about family i think moving from a deep feeling of obligation and responsibility which i think is driven a lot of my behavior. There's the competitive drive then. There's also a feeling especially after almost committing suicide in college that i'm just operating on borrowed time and like i owe a lot and then i have a moral obligation to do a. b. c. d. e. all the way to see and i not not to say that's run its course entirely and maybe there is a place for that and i think. I don't think i'm at risk of becoming totally irresponsible. I just don't think that it's likely that the pendulum would swing back. That far. And i think if i have a family and i haven't embraced fun. Enjoy and taking time and taking a tension for the pleasures. That will really like mike. Kid will receive or kids will absorb that type of orientation to the world where it is responsibility where it is obligation and it will have a very sterilizing effect and muting effect on them and so right. Now i've found myself say years ago thinking when i have kids i'll change a kid's i'll change when i have kids all change e and f and i've i've come to the conclusion that i think is very naive. You better start becoming the parent. You wanna be now before gametime right like you're not going to step in the ring me like okay. Now that i'm here with mike tyson. I'm gonna learn how to box. That's terrible and the beautiful thing is all the head preparation you'll do. Then you have a kid and the kid is kicks your ass anyway. Yeah teaches you how to parrot back right now just to be clear. It's not so much learning how to be a parent. It's becoming the person you want to be trying to train yourself and instill the habits and the changes in perspective that you want to have when your parent. So it's purely is within your locus of control. Yeah and then you get kicked in the nuts and like okay now you gotta nigga change your strategy but but it's not a. it's not a parenting strategies. More a way of thinking about the person. I want to be when i'm holding a child in my arms for the first time versus who i am now and working on that now. That's beautiful woman. I think you're going to be a hell of a dad. Wait thanks brother so fun to have a little ones little rugrats duke and i love it yeah okay. Let's we have about eleven minutes. Let's pick up the pace. I wanna hit you with. Let's be a little more tactical about these taxes. So this one is practical. This is not such tactical question but it's slightly relatively tactical. So i personally have this feeling that i observed so many people yearning for return to normal right. I don't personally think that normal is necessarily returning so quickly. And i feel that we're entering an age in human history where core theme will be radically accelerating pace of change to destabilizing events. Have different forms will become the new normal versus the return to normal. That's when people are craving and so really suggesting we debate that idea but just roll with me on that. And if you were to play with that framing how do you think that people would best prepare for the world that we might be entering over the next five ten fifteen.

mike tyson Today ten twelve page today Ten years ago first flash first time about eleven minutes three times a day mike few years ago amazon fifteen about ten twenty minutes one relationship lima gift cards years one many
Sick of COVID: The Long Haulers

The Naked Scientists

03:22 min | 2 years ago

Sick of COVID: The Long Haulers

"Miss, we will learning about long covert the condition where corona virus sufferers recover from the acute infection. But thank God wants to develop a teague another very bizarre symptoms. The Ken lost months and hints are starting to emerge about the damage or complications that are going on in multiple different or in these patients and a group of medical scientists in Germany have recently discovered ongoing heart issues in a significant proportion of people that only ever had this mild covert cardiologists. Valentina Portman explains we investigated patients that recently recovered from covid nineteen illness. So we have the very, very deep look at their hearts. And in these patients, we found that many many of them even if they didn't really have a rough course of the original illness, they still had persist and ongoing cardiac inflammation a little bit like a flu of the heart. How many of them had this kind of inflammation? We scan total of hundred patients seventy eight off. Those have had some findings in the heart. Of these sixty had very active inflammation. Inflammation within the heart muscle something that we call myocarditis as well as inflammation of the lining of the heart pericarditis. How long is this after they were originally sick? The average time from their original causative task was seventy one days. Wow that's a long time since they had this, you know positive test what's going on? This is the question that obviously I can only speculate on and it is not due to an ongoing infection of the heart muscle. So it is not the virus remains within a heart cells. The body itself is understanding the inflammation of the heart is something that it has to fight against or tries to control it but this is obviously at this present point hypotheses. Juno whether this kind of heart inflammation might linked to any specific symptoms that people are feeling months after they were supposed to go better from covert. That is very difficult to say because Hark inflammation does not present with specific symptoms being knocked feet especially young patients. This is one of those symptoms definitely can make aware of it. However inflammation takes a long time to present itself with what we call text book symptoms, chest pain shortness of breath swelling of the legs. But in general, then this might be kind of a hint as to why these people are still unwell. Absolutely this is definitely one of the things that we should look for very early and very fast if possible. In konic inflammation trying to be very sporty very fast is probably not the right thing and I think if any message can be given the present point is that we just need to give the heart as well as the rest of the body time to heal. Balancing appointment from the University of Frankfurt explaining her study from the Journal of Cardiology.

Valentina Portman University Of Frankfurt Pericarditis Journal Of Cardiology KEN Germany
Gout associated with doubled risk of death from heart failure

Dr. Daliah

04:53 min | 4 years ago

Gout associated with doubled risk of death from heart failure

"How many have. You guys have gout I would not wish gout. On my worst enemy gout is, rough, well we've been talking for, years about how those people with gout may be at higher risk for heart disease Well another study has come out saying yeah It can increase your risk. Of, heart attack and stroke by fifteen, percent Apparently the American, Heart Association has revealed the research they clarified a bunch of older studies confirming that there is a link between, the inflammatory condition of gout and heart health Dr ni ha package potty and our colleagues from university looked at seventy thousand patients and found that those who had gals were at higher risk of dying from their ca-. Combat cardiovascular disease and, twice as likely to die from their heart failure if they had it She states. Among patients went out as beginning of the study or who developed, during follow up their risk of either dying of cardiovascular disease or having a heart attack. Or, stroke was fifty percent higher than patients have. Never developed scout right so what is, out and a lot of people say yeah my dad had dugouts we don't really call. A thug out you, know like the diabetes we just say we just call out we just got diabetes gout is an inflammatory condition that even though it primarily affects joints it can affect a lot of parts of the body and how. We break it down Is, a gal we'll have. Higher levels of uric. Acid now where does your acid come from well uric acid comes, from the breakdown appearance now hearings are the building blocks to all living cells and DNA So our body. Makes Purina's or we get from outside sources like food especially meat And so, if your, body is healthy you. Will excrete the excess. Uric acid so let's say you know you're gonna outback steakhouse that's I love steak let's say. You take it a whole bunch of things you normally healthy body will, excrete it But if you overproduce uric acid or if you under excrete. It You may have been too, much circulating uric. Acid if you. Have, too much circulated uric acid. You make these you're a crystals now these uric crystals are exquisite I have, a picture on. My website or on my Facebook and Twitter adopter. Dia dot com but these uric crystals will once they supersaturated, crystallize Then they precipitate making huge crystals And they precipitate in joints especially large joints. Like the big, toe and knee when. This happens it comes on immediately Dowdy joint won't, take weeks flare up It will happen overnight It is so painful that somebody will not want to put on their sock or put on their pants or have anything near, the the joint del even ask you to not for far next to the joint, it is that tender Because you have these crystals your body swells and it it just gets red swollen and you, know sometimes these gout attacks make us as doctors concerns you have an acute infection Like a staff because it. Happened so rapidly, so painful so red there were like oh my. Gosh you have an infection But that history of. Gal and yeah we I. Had a lot of meat I had a lot of shrimp I had, a lot of alcohol we know it's probably out, so one way to tell is we take fluid out of the. Joint and then we look at the. Crystals the microscope or we, do, a, Graham Staines. To, see if there's. Any bacteria we could also do a, blood account now some people will. Say oh well that's easy just oh blood test and if the uric acid is high you know their outpatient not. Entirely this is where it gets tricky if you have a gout attack and, your uric acid has made your eight crystals, and they. Crystallize many times during the, attack your uric, acid levels baby normal So, a, doctor, does not. Where, worry really well. Versed in this which should be rare, because most of us are can't. Just do a blood test to go out it's not gal because you're against it is normal now no not that. Because again you're you're a gas it may the busy making that joint attack Now some people will. Say well wait a second I don't get out attacks. But, I have a dramatic, hyper, which is elevated, announced say that three times fast say that Elevated uric acid, levels that just circulating the body if that's the case, I think those calls some. Baseline inflammation

Gout Heart Disease Heart Association Graham Staines Purina CA United States Sleep Apnea Outback Steakhouse Facebook Hydrochlorothiazide Dodgers Twitter Fifty Percent