35 Burst results for "Ackerman"

A Million Mortgage Borrowers Fall Through Safety Net

WSJ Your Money Briefing

07:33 min | Last week

A Million Mortgage Borrowers Fall Through Safety Net

"Early on in the pandemic Congress set up a program to protect homeowners with mortgages from losing their homes. But about a million borrowers have fallen through the safety net missed payments and late fees or putting them at greater risk, and that's further heightening fears of an eviction and foreclosure crisis with more on why so many borrowers have fallen behind on their mortgages despite this relief program, we're joined by our reporter Andrew Ackerman Andrew. Thanks for joining us. Hi, Charlie. Thanks for having me Andrew. I, tell us how this program known as forbearance works. It's unique to this crisis forbearance in the past has been used very narrowly for hurricanes or very regional Zaslov this time it's being used to keep as many people nationally in their homes as possible who are harmed rather virus and it just means you can skip up to a year of payments on your mortgage. And then make them up later. Somehow there's a little bit of a complication because it it applies to all federally guaranteed loans which are most of the market Fannie Freddie or fha backed loans. There is a market for private loans or loans aren't backed by the federal government, and some of those lenders are offering forbearance and others aren't, but for most of the market people can get this. Okay. So when we talk about one million homeowners falling through the cracks, what exactly does that mean that means is that there are a million people who have for whatever reason stopped paying their mortgage their at least thirty days behind or delinquent, and they are not in a forbearance plan. This includes both borrowers with Fannie and Freddie loan as well as people who have a private loan alone from a portfolio loan with a bank or something you know securitise in the private markets will don't. They know about the forbearance program are they scared to participate what exactly is going on here? That's a good question and I think the data's kind of murky but the from talking to lenders, some consumers, some counselors, the picture that we have is that a lot of people don't understand what forbearance means so they don't. Really know what their options are. The other thing is that early on especially early on and still somewhat today the messaging from the lenders was you can take a forbearance, but you're GONNA have to pay all of your mis- payments in one lump sum at the end of the forbearance, and that's really scared people that the scripts that the mortgage companies go through with people on the phone have changed significantly and there's a lot more outreach and education efforts that some of the lenders are trying the consumer groups in some lenders. Say It doesn't go far enough. They'd like better marketing but those are the two factors. There's uncertainty or it's an unknown thing and there's this fear that people have to pay everything back at once and that's just not feasible for most people. Why don't you describe for us the process of trying to obtain forbearance how hard is it? It shouldn't be that hard. There's no documentation requirements. You Literally Call Your Service and you say you can't pay and you WANNA forbearance and they're supposed to the the law, the a rescue bill from March called Cares Act. It says that people are entitled to up to a year. It's says six months that can be renewed for another six months. You have to ask for it. A lot of the lenders have been offering customers short of six months at a time they've been doing three-month for. That can be extended another three months and then twice more beyond the initial six months. Just kind of depends on the lenders it's supposed to be really easy to get. It's still confusing even the we've talked to people who got the forbearance and they were also getting letters from their lender saying that they were at risk of foreclosure because they've missed all these payments and so you get these contradictory messages from your from your lender those lenders are saying hey. Just ignore these letters these contradictory letters we were required, send them by state or federal law, and just know that you've got a forbearance but we still talk to people who said that kept them up at night. Well, I was wondering, for instance, people were jumping through hoops trying to find information about forbearance on the telephone well that he has also been a significant issue if. You talk to counselors and some of the consumers we talked to they would say that I mean they describe this kind of bureaucratic nightmare to be honest everything has happened kind of quickly if you talk to the lenders, they say they're moving to kind of implement this forbearance plan on a scale that's never been envisioned for forbearance before. So they're hiring people to take calls their. End Result is at least initially, the times were significant. People were waiting a long time to get someone on the phone when they did get people on the phone calls might be dropped or they'd be sent to voicemail at the servicer and then they wouldn't hear back. So you have to kind of call the main number again, unfortunately, a lot of the servicers that the way. They're set up you can't just call one representative at the servicer. So you just of are dealing with somebody different every time they're following a script. So what they can say can be kind of very tightly controlled, and if it's with jargon people who aren't very skater even people who are sophisticated and don't know a lot about the mortgage market, you know it can be. It can be very confusing. These terms are not it's not intuitive. Are there a significant number of borrowers who've been in forbearance but of defaulted? Anyway that's the peculiar thing. There are significant numbers are what I would I think it's fair characterizes significant. There's about two hundred, fifty thousand people who were in forbearance at one point since the pandemic there now, no longer in forbearance and. They. are still past due on their loan and it begs the question. We don't know why that's the case. I haven't been able to find someone situated like that. But that's what the data shows and we we talked to people who had experience during the last crisis in two thousand eight and there were always people who just the lenders couldn't reach out to you know they. Knew, they were behind, they thought they were in trouble, and so they docked there servicer at every turn and it's speculative. But people think that that's that's this population kind of fits into that camp and so there are some efforts to reach out to those people. I would also say that two hundred fifty thousand is relatively small. There's fifty three million mortgages in this country Million people have been on forbearance at some point since the crisis started were down, it's under four million. Now, most of the people who've exited forbearance are either performing on their mortgage or they have paid off their loan. So it's an alarming number. It's relatively small and the whole universe and the whole mortgage universe. But there is also a concern that as people kinda hit the six month period who still need help that the number would increase because they won't know they actually have to request the extension, the additional six months. What are the next steps to watch for in this forbearance program? What's on the horizon forbearance figures overall spiked In April, May I believe June and they've steadily declined since the summer or late summer and what will be interesting to watch whether or not that trend continues or you see more people who need help, and probably if you see that, you'll see more people kind of falling through the cracks here where they don't know how to get help that sort of based on macroeconomic trends. Major companies are laying people off tens of thousands of people, and that's I think the Big Question Mark Wall Street Journal reporter Andrew, Ackerman. Thanks a lot Andrew. Hey. Thanks for your

Andrew Ackerman Andrew Reporter Federal Government Congress Charlie Fannie Freddie Fannie Freddie Representative FHA
What sewage water can tell us about the spread of COVID-19

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

02:56 min | Last month

What sewage water can tell us about the spread of COVID-19

"Testing for the corona virus is still limited and way too slow to keep ahead of the pandemic. So now dozens of cities and countries are turning to the Sioux worse to try to find out if cove nineteen is spreading in their community, a Massachusetts based startup called. Analytics, tests, wastewater, and raw sewage for the presence of the novel coronavirus. It started a free pilot project earlier this summer with hundreds of wastewater treatment facilities, and now some cities are starting to pay bio bought for regular monitoring. It's branch of research called Wastewater Epidemiology Dan Ackerman has been reporting on this for member station W. G., B. H.. He told me the scientists new, but since cities are desperate to get a handle on the virus, it's finding new converts. You know a couple early studies. That are not yet peer reviewed by independent experts. So take all this with a grain of salt, but there are a couple of early studies that show this wastewater data can actually be a leading indicator of reported cases. So if a city is closely monitoring what's going on in their sewage, if they see a spike in cove it in that sewage that could give them a few days to prepare for like maybe surge capacity in the hospitals or maybe institute a lockdown to stop it from spreading. Can you give us some examples of cities that have used this technology so far in Cambridge, Massachusetts? Not far from where bio is headquartered. Their public schools district. Actually recently announced that their planned for the fall is to use bio bots sewage data in kind of monitoring whether or to continue with the in person portion of their classes. So they have named three indicators that they're GONNA follow in. One of those is how much covert is in the sewage, and if that gets above a certain threshold that might help trigger them to close down in person schooling and move to remote only. How accurate can it be in terms of estimating you know from rates in a certain amount of sewage? How do they correlate that to a number of people who might be infected the rate that an infected person excretes covert in their stool is really variable. Researchers are still a long way from getting exact numbers of infected people based on the sewage data. So they're sampling raw sewage and looking for genetic material of the corona virus and to be clear this is quite different from clinical. Testing, that would say whether an individual has covid by about looking at a CD sewage in aggregate. So like everyone's waste mixed together and that's a way to quickly cast a really wide net and find out how much how much the virus is spreading. You can get a sense of the trends of whether an outbreak is getting worse or getting better, but you still can't nailed down in exact caseload. So that is one reason that we really need to continue stepping up clinical testing efforts.

Massachusetts Dan Ackerman W. G. Sioux Cambridge
Power 5 Conferences Are Moving Towards Canceling Fall Sports

John Batchelor

00:36 sec | Last month

Power 5 Conferences Are Moving Towards Canceling Fall Sports

"Two of college football's power. Five conferences have cancelled their fall sports seasons due to concerns about the virus. Click. Nevel tells both the Big 10 and Pac 12 leaving the option open to play football in the spring. But all fall sports are postponed. Dr. Doug Ackerman with Oregon State University, says help risks associated with Kobe, 19 played into the recommendation not to play specifically the cardiac, you know, side effects of Of potential covert infections that we don't know enough about. And so we became more concerned about that. Medical experts were advised by both conferences and university presidents. I'm

Football Dr. Doug Ackerman Oregon State University PAC Kobe Nevel
How to Do #MeToo Without Prison

Unladylike

04:58 min | 2 months ago

How to Do #MeToo Without Prison

"When the METOO movement caught fire in two thousand seventeen. The loudest demands centered on calling out offenders and seeing them prosecuted. But metoo founder Toronto Burke has been clear that mass incarceration is not the solution. Today's guest. Dr. Eliza Ackerman agrees. Prison doesn't work. The fact of the matter is only three percent of people who commit rape will adversity a day behind bars. And, the process of going through the criminal justice system is incredibly incredibly harmful for survivors. They are disbelieved, they are victimized again. Their entire sexual history is put on display in the courts. So knowing all of that we are looking for something that actually decreases harm. decreases, violence increases, empathy decreases recidivism, and that's what we find with restorative justice. Dr Ackermann is a criminal justice professor at California State University at Fullerton where she specializes in research on sexual violence and sex crimes policy. She's also a pioneer in her field of resolving sexual violence through a process called restorative justice. So ordinarily, our legal system response to criminal behavior with three questions. Questions what law was broken, who broke it, and what punishment is warranted. But restorative justice asks who was harmed, what are the needs and responsibilities of everyone affected and how can everyone involved collectively repair the harm that was done. Basically, it's all about healing survivors, communities, and offenders today. Eliza is guiding us through the restorative justice approach to sexual violence. Would it feels like for survivors and why it's a promising path toward preventing sex crimes in the first place all to find out? How can we do me to without prisons? Harvey Weinstein in an orange, jumpsuit has come to symbolize me to era justice, but the movement's original vision resonates far more with transformative and restorative justice approaches. Right. So toward the end of last week's part one. On feminism and mass incarceration prison abolitionist. My Shinwari told us about the transformative justice model that model aims to resolve harm without creating additional harm and without involving the legal system at all restorative justice shares that goal, but it can be put into practice both. And outside the system, what it entails is creating safe spaces. For. Survivors and for people who have caused harm to talk about the impacts that sexual harm has had, and it gives the survivor, a safe space to talk about really the very intimate aspects of sexual violence and the aftermath of that. It allows the survivor to ask questions of people who have caused harm. It also allows those people who have caused harm to ask questions at gives them insight about the behavior Dave engaged in that they would never get. From being processed through the criminal justice system, the term restorative justice was coined in nineteen, seventy, seven by prison psychologist, Albert igla-s, but its core principles come directly from indigenous forms of conflict resolution like sentencing circles and peacemaking courts most. Restorative justice programs focused on youth offenders and family welfare cases. But in recent years, experts like Eliza have started applying it to adult cases involving sexual violence for a number of practical reasons. Yeah. Many survivors don't trust police to properly handle their claims and many know their perpetrators and don't necessarily want to face them in a criminal trial plus evidence suggests that the restorative justice approach is both more empowering for survivors that going through a criminal trial and that it's a more effective method for perpetrators to actually learn their lesson and not re-offend. COMES BECAUSE? People. See as soft. Right they see you've done something wrong. You need to do the time for it. But Harsh Punishment Austin to anything to reduce harm to anybody, and if you ask the men that I have worked with what they would rather do face may or face another survivor, sit in a prison south, they will tell you prison cell every time. So I think once people understand that restorative justice is not soft. And, that it's actually much much more difficult to do. Maybe they'll get on board.

Dr. Eliza Ackerman Dr Ackermann Harvey Weinstein Metoo Founder Toronto Burke Rape Fullerton Shinwari Albert Igla-S Austin Dave Professor California State University
Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson acquires XFL

Rush Limbaugh

00:40 sec | 2 months ago

Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson acquires XFL

"Rock. Johnson is part of a group named Red Bird Capital, No relation of the cardinal's. According to multiple reports. That group has bought the XFL for $15 million. The league ceased operations after the pandemic started and was set to be auctioned off his part of bankruptcy proceedings. Sport AKO reports The rocks group bought the league before the auction. For more on what this could mean for battle. Hawks fans. Man head became Alexe dot com Tom Ackerman

Tom Ackerman Red Bird Capital XFL Johnson Cardinal Hawks
Rockets Win Contrast of Styles Against Giannis Antetokounmpo, Bucks

CBS Sports Radio

01:57 min | 2 months ago

Rockets Win Contrast of Styles Against Giannis Antetokounmpo, Bucks

"Victory over the bucks and the way they played down the stretch. We're about to go inside that game here momentarily. We're live from the rocket mortgage by Quicken Loan studios when you need certainty in the home buying process with a loan that fits her life rocket can 1 50 to go. Middleton doubled to Yonas into the paint your own steps hard stolen from Horn picked this pocket hearted pounds past Westbrook by middle delay a good nine in a row for the Rockets. 1 13 1 12 They regain the lead. Craig Ackerman on the Houston Rockets radio network. Russell Westbrook finished with 31 points, and it was a 90 run that brought the Rockets back when they were trailing by eight. With roughly three minutes to go. We're pleased to welcome Eric. Name to the show. He covers the bucks for the athletic in Wisconsin. Eric, What did you see in those final three minutes from Milwaukee? Yeah, I mean, it was They really had a rough go of it tonight. It's It's something that this team all year has is really blown out a lot of teams so they haven't been forced into a spot where they've had to play a lot of close games and Get it on Friday night against the Celtics. I played opposed close game there. They finished it out. Make a couple plays. Chris Middleton had a couple of shots made a couple of passes and their everyone closed out. But tonight It was really just kind of a comedy of areas from, you know, about three minutes left. They had been posted up Brook Lopez the entire night Chris Middleton tosses them. What looks like a pretty simple past. Brooke Lopez has it bounces. Off his hands go out of bounds in that. From that point, it was turnovers. Sloppy play late, getting into their offensive said like it was just kind of Sloppy basketball that we really haven't seen but from the boxes season and they ended up losing this one and just doing something totally uncharacteristic of what they've done thus far this season. Except that as

Chris Middleton Rockets Celtics Eric Russell Westbrook Quicken Loan Studios Brook Lopez Craig Ackerman Basketball Wisconsin Milwaukee Houston Rockets. Horn Yonas
Actor Jordan Fisher Gets His Dance On In New Netflix Movie

Weekend Edition Saturday

00:45 sec | 2 months ago

Actor Jordan Fisher Gets His Dance On In New Netflix Movie

"New Netflix movie work it. Quinn Ackerman is an overachieving teen with her heart set on attending Duke University. But she knows that perfect grace are not enough. I need you to to help help me. me. Get Get on on the the dance dance team. team. Don't Don't dance dance it it off. off. Working Working competition competition is is in in five five months. months. I I don't don't need need you you stinking stinking up up the the place. place. Start Start my own damn team. Then you probably can guess where this is going. The quintessential dance movie with a teen love story between the straight a student and a choreographer played by Jordan Fisher, whom she begs to coach. Her team of misfits You might know multitalented Jordan Fisher from Broadway. He was in Hamilton and he was in another teen romcom toe. All the boys PS. I still love you. And he joins

Jordan Fisher Quinn Ackerman Duke University Netflix Hamilton
Body acceptance vs. liberation

Real Talk with Dana | Nutrition, Health

05:56 min | 2 months ago

Body acceptance vs. liberation

"So Johnson is the founder of the Intuitive D. and she has an amazing new book about intuitive eating out that we're GONNA get into so last episode that she was on I. Think is episode eighty three a Lincoln in the show, but you should definitely listen to that because we talked about misconceptions about intuitive eating and we talked about health at every size. Like Y. You're saying got into this work so welcome back. Thank you so much Dana I still can't believe that it's been a year since we last talk. That is absolutely nuts but I'm glad were chatting again. Will it's funny because it feels like this spring has felt like four years, but like an actual year ago. Like last summer doesn't feel that long ago. Yeah, it's just like a time warp. I don't even know. I was just GonNa say it does. It definitely does feel like a time work? So one of the things that I wanted to hug today, and we're going to jump right in just so we can get straight to the meat of it. Since you have a new book that's out and we like obviously WanNa talk about that, but the things that you talk about in the book that I think is so so helpful for people to understand whether you're new to this whole body, positivity, Acceptance Movement, or you're like kind of dipping your toes intuitive eating your like, but wait like. Isn't this what it isn't like? Earn people being unhealthy and everything like that. So could you talk about some of the? Biggest myths or misconceptions about like body acceptance in the body positivity movement. I think the first one that comes to mind if it's just like so common when when I'm talking with clients about this is like this perception that you know body acceptance work body, positive works should result in like you feeling really good about your appearance or like loving. No way that your body looks loving your the roles and you know whatever all the stuff. It loving, your solid cellulite, and like while obviously, there's nothing inherently wrong with trying to strive for like having a good relationship to the appearance of your body. I think that like. Really like the meat of what we need to all work on shift towards is. Kind of having a bit more of a neutral relationship to the appearance of her body at really like spending, less time and energy on the appearance of our body are thinking about the appearance of body So that's kind of I think that's like the first thing that I think when I think of the misconception around that work. And can you talk about? Why we're all so obsessed with our appearance, and it's funny, 'cause like. We women men everybody like our whole culture around the world. Really can you can say is to some degree like. With appearance America definitely a lot more right, but that then gets tied into like health and morality and Food and manipulating your appearance, but then it's funny because we see that Barry overtly in like Diet, culture, fitness, culture, and everything like that, but then it even translates into like this bastardisation of body positivity that it's like. Oh, well I have to love myself all the time and I find not loving myself in everything about me all the time. That I must be failing. Right yeah, no, it's! It's so true, and it's like I feel like I mean I I don't have the widest. Lens on this because I've grown up in this culture, but also like it's very clear that like we have like culture going on, and we're constantly exposed to imaging, and like the ideal quote, unquote imaging. Everyone's closing the the best selby. Constantly so and and we're just inundated all day every day from every angle, and not to mention were inundated with. One particular kind of body over and over again, and it's like if you don't once before you realize that that that's what's happening. It's just like okay, so obviously. That's I should look like, and it's just very like subconscious thing that's going on but yeah I think culturally like we're just so fixated on On appearance because of this imaging of or being inundated with all the time and I, also kind of feel like. It's. I don't know it's almost like escaping deeper stockholder like on an individual level, but it's like we're all kind of like running from our we're. We're so disconnected for emotions that like if we just focus on like okay. Well I've heard for perfect. My appearance show up perfectly that I'll be happy. Great the perfect you know. Yeah definitely I, mean 'cause we know as clinicians right like a lot. A lot of people will use dieting or exercise, or this kind of like obsession, or some people call it like drive right to constantly improve themselves, and this goes beyond dieting and bodies to lick. This goes along with perfectionism. It can go into work, and it can go into. You know really every of our lives, but when we're so let's call it a nice word that people say driven right to go in pursuit of any of these things. One of the deeper reasons that people tend to do that is because they are running from something. You're running from emotions that you don't WanNa feel you're running from like maybe past traumas or like, and some people would call that coping mechanism, but then the farther at that goes, it's not necessarily a healthy or helpful coping mechanism anymore because you're just running from those problems right and especially with something like dieting that ends up being this thing where it. Explodes in your face. Right like you're using this coping skills like. GonNa make myself smaller. I'm going to stick to the Diet. I'm going to not take anymore. Whatever and then like you find yourself physiologically, you're driven to eat the cake and like do all the things the opposite about it literally explodes in your face, and you're like. Oh, I just don't have the willpower. Oh, just like suck. I need to try harder, so it's like you end up in like crazy like cycle and thinking that you're the problem in that cycle.

Acceptance Movement Dana Founder Johnson America Barry
1.3 million Americans sought jobless aid last week

Charlie Brennan

00:35 sec | 2 months ago

1.3 million Americans sought jobless aid last week

"About 1.3 million Americans filed first time jobless claims last week on Tom Ackerman. Cable X news time is nine o'clock, CBS news Business analyst Dill Slesinger says a lot of damage has been done. The weekly numbers bring the total number of Americans, who at some point over the past 16 weeks have claimed benefits to nearly 50 million. Many of those 50 million had been called back to work or have found other employment on the bright side. Slesin jer notes. It's the 14th straight week where unemployment claims have declined and feels the labor market is slowly

Dill Slesinger Tom Ackerman Slesin Jer Business Analyst CBS
"ackerman" Discussed on Going Solo with Matthew Mayer

Going Solo with Matthew Mayer

03:42 min | 3 months ago

"ackerman" Discussed on Going Solo with Matthew Mayer

"There was a guy in the English Department at Stanford With My Dad I don't know if he was a full professor that time or not, Willard Wyman And he had this thing that he did in the summers where he was subcontracted by the National Forest Service to do trail building and trail maintenance in Yosemite and in the Stanislas National Forest. And After my mom suicide I was one lost little boy. I worked with Wyman and some other kids all from troubled, but you know I I I'm not quite sure what the criteria was for. You know who was on these things. But to have spent. The summer after my mom suicide. Building trails in Yosemite. absolutely saved my life and this hit me very strongly only a couple of months ago and now. There's a tr- and the guy was asking me. He said were were, did you? Were you involved in the last trail? And that's that's the name that was used only within the forest service, but apparently that come up, and and there was some some. Sense that I had something to do with that well, the the w. a the the was ackerman wyman Ackerman citizen citizens, so it was a little cutoff trail that went past, Rogers Lake that connected Pay Valley to to twelve meadows. And only a couple of weeks ago, I had a photograph of Rogers, Lake and and This is what saved my life. Oh, there, okay, just found not only the map, but the picture of of Rogers Lake. That saved my ass. to be to be in that greatness and in that beauty. I think I'd always loved. You know the outdoors and the rest of it, but. that that shortly interview put me back in touch with. That salvation and that literally talking salvation. This back. Think, this is what. Senator my life around something, great and beautiful. and which is why I need. Why I need to live here as as opposed to you know Moreno Palo Alto I. Mean you know the now Miranda that what they say that Brennan's is now the most expensive county live in the United States and Paolo Alto Course Being Palo Alto. Thank, God I still own the building. That was the office for Windham Hill. That's that's GonNa pay the bills for the rest of my life. Anyway I digress in a big way but I. I'm GonNa. Take some pictures now. I'll show you this, but you know for us to. You know to get into nature and and and surfing. I mean to these day to this day. Being out in the waves is is also salvation. To be in a lineup. He have you served at all. You know on an funny story, so it was my first time in Hawaii this last Where were you? Where were you always in? Nollie! My my younger brother was getting married. and..

Willard Wyman Rogers Lake National Forest Service wyman Ackerman Stanislas National Forest Rogers, Lake Moreno Palo Alto Yosemite professor Palo Alto English Department Stanford Paolo Alto Hawaii Pay Valley Windham Hill Senator United States Yosemite. Brennan
Big East Conference commissioner Val Ackerman: If campuses are closed, there will be no sports

Masters in Business

00:18 sec | 5 months ago

Big East Conference commissioner Val Ackerman: If campuses are closed, there will be no sports

"The big east conference is leaning toward not allowing sports to be played at schools this season unless their campuses are open well no deadlines have been set commissioner Val Ackerman said the presidents of member institutions indicated a late June early July deadline for fall sports and possibly as September first deadline

Val Ackerman Commissioner
Apples MacBooks have finally gotten rid of the butterfly keyboard

The 3:59

02:19 min | 5 months ago

Apples MacBooks have finally gotten rid of the butterfly keyboard

"Apple's butterfly keyboard which endured endless shots from fans and critics like finally gone. Welcome to the age of the magic keyboard. I'm Roger Chang and this is your daily charge with me. Is One of the foremost experts laptops our own. Dan Ackerman welcomed in Roger. Apple just released. Thirteen inch MAC pro which comes with one of its new magic keyboards that essentially wipes out the butterfly keyboard from its lineup right. How are you feeling about that you know? This was the last butterfly keyboard that was left. Was it was one of the reasons why that thirteen inch pro? A little bit outdated compared to the rest of the math book line. They updated the fifteen inch last year. And turn it into a sixteen inch and that was the first time they said all right this keyboard. No more we're going to call it the magic keyboard and it's a little different than it's the same but it's better you like it and we did. Then they finally did the same thing for the macbook air back in March very recently so and they say hey we got some more bad news coming up though. That's got be the thirty. The one laptop left a thirteen inch bro. So that you know there are a couple of things about it that we're feeling a little dated. The keyboard was one of them and now everybody has done magic keyboard. It's interesting they used that branding on the ipad keyboard also and also understand keyboard. You get with your. I'm AC. Let's back things up a little bit and let's talk a bit about the butterfly keyboard. What was so controversial about all the problems? They snuck that butterfly keyboard in with a new product. Five years ago it was the twelve inch Mac but not air not pro just MAC book they had not had a product with just that name at a longtime although they used to and one of the things that made that twelve inch. Mac Book which I loved so small and portable was over putting the super flat keyboard in and it's not going to have a Z shaped scissors switch under the key like so many other laptops it's GonNa have a butterfly which is basically the four corners and the sensor would indicate when a key was depressed so they could make it super slim. Did it in there? The problem was it was so slim. It didn't really feel like you were typing it all. It didn't have that right. Feel at also people immediately started getting the key stuck because there was so little space underneath them any little bit a dust debris would get in there so immediately. There were a lot of problems with it. And what apple did was they said. Oh that's great. We're going to put these in everything.

Apple Roger Chang Dan Ackerman
How Nutrition Improves with Connection & Kindness

Nutrition Matters

07:39 min | 5 months ago

How Nutrition Improves with Connection & Kindness

"Much for listening. Hello and welcome to another episode of nutrition matters. Podcast has always thrilled to be with you today. And so excited to share this podcast episode with you. My name is page and I'm your host and today I'm sharing a conversation that I had with Kirstin Ackerman who is uniquely qualified to talk about this. This really important topic where we're diving deep into this common question. We get as Dietitians where people wonder like often. Get this question where people say. Well I really want to work on intuitive eating but I also have concerns about my cholesterol. Or I'm worried about my diabetes diagnosis. So can you help me? A lot of people really kind of believe or assume that intuitive eating is fundamentally different or in opposition to any particular health concerns or any particular medical nutrition therapy that might be necessary for certain conditions. And I my both feel very strongly that that. That's just not the case and we talk about that today in today's episode. What I love about Curson is. She is a fierce anti advocate. But she also her day job is a is a renal. Dietitian so she works with patients on dialysis and getting treatment for an stage kidney disease or end stage renal failure. I forget what the exact term is there anyway so Kirstin talks about her her work and how she uses intuitive eating at even with her her kidney patients and I just thought that this was really important thing to share. So if you've ever wondered yeah I'm really interested in this intuitive eating stuff but I have all these health concerns and if you felt like you had to pick one or the other. I hope that this conversation will give you a little bit of food for thought because I really truly believe that as we use intuitive eating principles and as we connect to our bodies and discover a more peaceful relationship with food it becomes much easier to figure out how we need to care for it whether that's a particular special diet with a certain disease such as kidney disease or whether that's concerns about

Kirstin Ackerman Diabetes
Bizarre Big East: 1 half of hoops, then tournament canceled

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 7 months ago

Bizarre Big East: 1 half of hoops, then tournament canceled

"The cancellations are now complete the beast was the only major college basketball conference to begin a game on Thursday but at halftime of the Creighton St John's quarterfinal game after hearing from New York City officials and discussions with school president big east commissioner Val Ackerman canceled the torment due to a coronavirus concerns we have to completed games we have half a game and that's all we're going to have in twenty twenty I got tell you breaks my heart Major League Baseball the NHL and MLS follow the NBA by suspending play might make you so New York

Creighton St John President Trump Val Ackerman NHL NBA New York Basketball Commissioner Major League
'Dark Towers' Chases Scandal-Ridden Institution Deutsche Bank

The Book Review

08:10 min | 7 months ago

'Dark Towers' Chases Scandal-Ridden Institution Deutsche Bank

"David ensor joins us now. His new book is called Dark Towers. Deutsche Bank Donald Trump an epic tale of destruction it debuts this week at number two on the New York Times bestseller list and I also have to disclose that. David is my cousin in law and he eats all the pie Thanksgiving about his nonetheless. Welcome here on the PODCAST. Lobo I didn't know what you're going to get that person quickly. Yeah important. Why people to know Dave? Thanks for being here. That's revenue so we're not GonNa talk about that crime. We're GONNA talk about some other ones. This is a book about deutchebanks. Started off with reporting that you did beginning around two thousand fourteen. I was in London working at the time of the Wall Street Journal and I'd already been kind of obsessing about Deutsche Bank. Ps This is you know. One of the biggest banks in the world one of the most troubled institutions and involved is either at or near the center of just about every financial scandal under the Sun and then in January twenty fourteen one of the most senior executives at the bank and kind of the right hand man to the CEO at the time was found hanging in his apartment in lended. Who is he his name is? Bill Broke Smith and he was a guy who had worked at the bank on and off for almost twenty years and he had he was an expert in risk management in an expert in derivatives and he but more important he was the guy who turned to as kind of the ethical compass of the bank he was. He was known informally as the conscience of the place. He was someone who could say no. He was pretty conservative and he was not quite as hungry for short-term profits as most of his colleagues were and it's something that happened at the bank immediately precede his suicide and did he leave a suicide note like do. We know that this was tied to his work. Well I mean it's really hard and I think probably dangerous to try to make in light statement about why someone does something like this but he did leave a bunch of suicide notes including one to with his longtime colleague onto Jane who at the time was the CO CEO of the Bank. And so one thing that became clear over the years a report and I did and working to talk to his many friends and family members and former colleagues as I could was that. There's no doubt that at the time of his death. Deutsche Bank was very much on his mind in someone he knew his on his mind in a not in a good way he was very upset about some of the things that had transpired while he was there are before we get into some of the things that that he personally saw during the I guess the Early Twenty First Century you say that as of two thousand fourteen it was well established that Deutsche Bank was kind of troubled scandal-ridden institution I mean. How far does that date back? Well the bank is one hundred fifty years old this year. Happy Birthday Deutsche Bank and for the first several decades of its existence. This is just a pretty provincial. German and European lender helping big industrial companies like Siemens spread their wings internationally. But when the Nazis came to power in Germany in the thirties Deutsche Bank became a central part of their attempt to take over the world and this is not attempt to take the Nazi attempted takeover. Was that different from what other German banking institutions did. At the time Deutsche Bank was by far the biggest German bank. A lot of German companies to survive did what it took to arrive in that area which was helping the Nazis. But there's been an attempt by the bank and some historians I think in recent decades to kind of sanitize that basic fact by saying well. Everyone was doing it and that was just the way the world works and we can look back at this period now and say that Deutsche Bank was party to genocide. Wow most people who don't work in finance and don't report on finance look at these banks. They all kind of seem interchangeable and interchangeably bad. That every one of them or many of them have had one terrible scandal or another or many in recent years is a bank especially at I mean. Is there something about its culture? There are a lot of things that make it a specially bad. I mean first of all wallets true that just about every bank under the Sun has been attached to one or more financial scandals over the years. Don't you think really has been involved in a disproportionate number and it's faced disproportionate penalties. As a result of that you can look at that in terms of the number of criminal charges. The bank has faced around the world or the amount in fines that it's racked up the to me. The better measure of its destructive capacity is the havoc wreaked around the world. And you can really look in. Probably almost every continent of the world in see some major in pretty pretty bad scandal to the bank was involved with the cause real harm whether it's destroying companies or really messing up economies or being involved in major bribery or corruption scandals laundering money violating sanctions. Deutsche Bank is blamed by the families of some American soldiers for their deaths in Iraq because the bank was illegally funding Iranian terrorists. So you can say that about some things but you can't say about every bank that every single scandal comes right back to their doorstep in that unfortunately is the case. Allow the time with deutchebanks one of the things that differentiates Deutsche Bank for many other banks is that there is no villain at the top. They have no. Ceo Unlike many other banks is that part of the problem that there isn't one person who has held accountable. Well it actually used to be that way these days for the past fifteen years or so they have had a CEO. In fact you can trace the banks last series of problems going back to the mid two thousand to the decision to place increasing power in this unitary see It's gotten worse when they've had someone. Yeah although it got worse under Joe Ackerman who is the longtime CEO from two thousand to two thousand twelve. And he was the one who converted the organizational structure of the bank from being this kind of collaborative committee led approach to being one where there's an American style. Ceo At the top of the bank and Ackerman very shortly upon arriving as CEO of the bank made a very fateful decision which was that he decided that within a very short period of time a couple of years deutchebanks prophets needed to go up about five hundred percent and looking backwards. It doesn't seem that surprise and the consequences that followed that at the time. This marked a really transformational change within the bank. And it went from being an institution that looked around and kind of saw itself as serving multiple constituencies whether shareholders or customers employees or the communities. In which an operator and it went from doing that to having a single minded focus and obsession on maximising short-term profits basically consequences. Be Damned and when you talk about the recent crimes of DEUTCHEBANKS and we're not even getting to Donald Trump who is in your subtitle him later. Did most of those things manipulating markets helping terrorists regimes defrauding regulators. Did most of this take place during that two thousand and two to two thousand twelve period when he was the CEO will the got started. Then and that was Ackerman's decision to prioritize short-term profits above all else was the catalyst for all sorts of bad behavior within the bank and it wasn't just the people were rushing to make money at any cost and although they were doing that it was also that the bank at that moment because it was so obsessed with meeting quarterly profit targets. It stopped investing in things that cost money. For example they stop investing in technology. And so the banks internal computer systems became just this. Archaic jumbled mess and that sounds kind of technical and maybe not that important but the reality is immense that Deutsche Bank. If you if you were asked to say Deutsche Bank what how much money have you lent to say Russia? There's no easy way to answer that you can just type it into a computer. None of these computer systems are talking to each other. And that's a pretty scary thing for bank. And they also completely failed to invest in compliance an anti money laundering staff. And because those are things that cost money they're not going to produce revenue and in fact they they do the opposite prison revenue. They take away revenue as their job. If they're doing it properly is to say no to potentially problematic and potentially very lucrative transactions this focus on quarterly profits and profit above all else. Is that very different from what other banks were doing. During this period Deutsche Bank went from

Deutsche Bank CEO Birthday Deutsche Bank Donald Trump Joe Ackerman Nazis David Ensor Co Ceo Dark Towers Lobo New York Times Dave Siemens London Bill Broke Smith Wall Street Journal Bribery
Céspedes arrives at spring training as silent as his bat

Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

00:22 sec | 8 months ago

Céspedes arrives at spring training as silent as his bat

"Now a check of sports good afternoon rich Ackerman good afternoon Steve Yanis us but this is back on the field the sight for sore eyes and it barely sort or the media the former all star said he won't talk to them this year he's missed the last year and a half first because of double heel surgery and then an ankle injury caused by an incident with the wild boar he also was very impressive though with a bat today in batting practice crushing at least two

Steve Yanis Rich Ackerman
Samsung Galaxy Z Flip: The Flip Phone Is Back and It's Not a Total Flop

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

01:54 min | 8 months ago

Samsung Galaxy Z Flip: The Flip Phone Is Back and It's Not a Total Flop

"CBS news on their Ruben chanting was seen at senior managing editor Dan Ackerman so I understand you're one of the lucky ones and you had the opportunity to play with the Samsung galaxy siii flat so how do you feel about it from getting to play with it for a little while I think it's frankly the most advanced out of all of them the big difference is the screen that flexes when you close the phone it actually made of a kind of flexible glass instead of plastic and that really gives the more upscale feel it's probably more durable some of the other ones like the regional Sampson galaxy fold in the Motorola razr which is kind of a a new take on that for back regional flip phone razr but with a flexible screen vamp plastic screens they feel little creaky when you use them at least using this new one for about an hour or so I I felt more confident in it there was a better engineer now it's also very high end very expensive product but it's certainly an interesting way to get people more excited again about getting a new phone if it looks and feels and acts differently it liberally folds in half and can fit a human size pocket which is and we haven't had in awhile and when people are upgrading their phones every you know two to three to four years instead of every one to two years these phone companies are so invested in finding anything to get you excited about buying the phone again does it do everything a normal phone does these folding phones the functionality is largely the same as standard phones a surf the web to make calls I have ABS on them these all run just standard android the only things they do that are really really different our our physical they fold in half you have a smaller footprint when you haven't filled it up and they have some some apps behave differently in kind of a half folded mode like it'll put your photos on the top half of the screens and controls in the bottom half the screen when you haven't folded almost like it's little tiny laptop there are plenty of reasons for slow internet but how can we

Dan Ackerman Engineer CBS Ruben Managing Editor Samsung Motorola
Brad Miller, Cardinals agree to $2 million, 1-year contract

Total Information AM

00:13 sec | 8 months ago

Brad Miller, Cardinals agree to $2 million, 1-year contract

"With the cardinals in Jupiter Chris ray became more exports cardinal signed an infielder yesterday Brad Miller one year two million dollars had thirteen home runs in only one hundred fifty four at bats last season I'm Tom Ackerman on the voice the cardinals

Cardinals Chris Ray Brad Miller Tom Ackerman
What is the Microbiome?

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

05:37 min | 9 months ago

What is the Microbiome?

"Let's back up a little bit and talk about this whole thing of the microbiome because we we started with functional medicine. There wasn't the word microbiome but we still focus on normalizing the gut function. We talked about the four our program which is a restoration program for the gut and how that can help so many different diseases. But the microbiome is the sum total of all the organisms that we have in care around inside of us in that also can include Viruses can also include fungi. You know the ecosystem of the microbiome inside the body is like a rainforest and at some point. Some people's ecosystems are so disturbed. So messed up. This like napalm is hit your rainforest that's like a corn mono-crop. Yes so you've got this whole ecosystem bacteria it's been disturbed by all these new talked about C.. Sections anybody anybody accused lack of breastfeeding and so on and our diet also Plays a huge role in the growth of good or bad bacteria and you can feed it certain things and it makes it worse than other things and it makes it better so talk about that. Yeah so so. I always tell patients that when you're eating food you WANNA be choosing your food not just for you what you like. Your you know the things that are pleasurable for you but you also want be feeding the good bacteria and we talked earlier about the Ackerman Ms Sinophilia. That's a specific bacteria that is in the body and that you want to have on high levels and when we do the testing we can actually determine. Do you have high levels of it or do you have low levels or we have no levels are very low levels and there are certain foods which you can incorporate into your diet. Things like pomegranate and Baca and A case the case Uvira cranberries and things like that these are foods which are basically pre pre a prebiotics. And when you incorporate them into your diet you it's like praying miracle-gro grow and a garden they start to flourish. They start to take over and they help balance out the whole ecosystem. Yeah I think is one of the biggest advances in our thinking about God. We get probiotics and that'll fix it but you know you're giving like fifty billion is a lot right but you have it hundred trillion bacteria so it's like a drop in the ocean he's athlete and one of the big insights I had was actually from an experience I had last year where I develop colitis so long story but I had been sick for mold and I've told that story and I had had a recurrence of my gut because I had the C. Diff and that was kind of really messed me up and I check my stool and had really low levels of this ackerman SIA which has been linked linked to autoimmune disease linked to poor response to immunotherapy for cancer. It's billing two Cardi metabolic disease and diabetes. And I'm like WHOA. Oh this is not good so I started to research it and created this cocktail of cranberry Pomegranate Green Tea Keisha fiber products other products. And I took it and it literally. Within three weeks I went from full blown clients to completely normal perfect. Yeah and it was sort of a wakeup call for me. In which was you can't just get products you've got to feed the whole inner garden and what it likes is certain foods and likes all the polyphenols yes in the polyphenyls colorful dark rainbow color chemicals that are in plan foods certain plant whose have more of the berries and so forth. Absolutely your microbiome is depending on what you feed it. How you grow your inner garden depends hands on what you're eating and you can create a nasty garden with weeds and toxins and bad stuff and poisonous plants or you can create a really flourishing rich garden it it actually takes care of you and also the other thing that a lot of even physicians are not even aware of is that most of your immune system is got? Yeah yes so I mean I had one patient in particular particular who I saw. Who came in? It was a great story. She came in And she was Having a MS as their diagnosis she also have community autoimmune disease multiple sclerosis and she also had infertility and I did a a complete workup on her. She had Despite osas had had bacterial overgrowth also had sensitivity to gluten and had also some not a heavy now big level but some level of of Mercury in the body. So so I worked on a diet worked on You know both prebiotics and probiotics to clean up the gut got her completely of gluten and Lo and behold I guess what her multiple sclerosis went away. Amazing disappeared are not not to say that you all her medals out to not to say that all cases of multiple sclerosis this are due to that but there are many pathways to multiples. Close the door. Many pathways to Alzheimer's disease or any disease Aaron disease exactly because the body hit will manifest it in and only certain inflammatory pathways but and then ultimately she got off of her medications her. Ms To this day is in complete remission. She has no symptoms on nomads. And as the side effects you've got pregnant. The personalization of medicine is what functional. Medicine is all about. and that's really what's different here about. How are we practice medicine at the ultra wellness? Because we're looking at each person as an individual or creating personalized medicine and personalized health which is radically new way of thinking and we we just lump everybody with the same symptoms in the same categories. But it doesn't tell you anything about the cause and I always say just because you know the name of your disease. I mean you know what's wrong with you all right. And that's what we do too very detailed histories here through very advanced diagnostic testing. Look some of these things so the microbiomes ecosystem of bugs and our God. It's trillions of bacteria area. It outnumbers ourselves by ten to one outnumbers. DNA my one hundred one and it has been linked to everything from disease to cancer. Heart Disease Diabetes Obesity to autism to Alzheimer's. I mean the list goes on and

Autoimmune Disease Metabolic Disease Heart Disease Ackerman Ms Sinophilia Alzheimer's Disease Alzheimer Baca Osas LO Aaron
"ackerman" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

WCBS Newsradio 880

01:45 min | 10 months ago

"ackerman" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

"Ackerman and Michael the Carolina Panthers have just made a coaching change firing Ron Rivera in his nine season the giants a spot or into the finish again after stew straight dismal season it doesn't seem as if anyone is safe right now co owner Steve Tisch told WNBC that he and John Meryl sit down at the end of the season and discuss the future of both the GM and the coach the Yankees of struck out twice before and Gerrit Cole but aren't deterred reportedly meeting with the Astros twenty game winner today they're also set to meet with the World Series MVP Stephen Strasberg tomorrow the island is a bit of brother fresh air compared to the other locals thus far there five points out of a playoff berth and a first place I should say the Metropol division and go over their third straight tonight in Montreal after allowing just one goal in the last two games the devils will try to put last night's ugly first buried behind them when they host the golden knights to Jersey allowed five goals on route to a seven one loss in buffalo St John's Saint Peters the first meeting between the two schools since nineteen seventy six the red storm looking for their third straight win and Rucker's takes on Pittsburgh sports first at twelve and forty two best every hour I'm a Jack of before I Stansberry research Hey listen if you're not invested in the stock market right now you should pay attention for months the financial media has been doing a huge disservice to regular investors across the country reporting mixed messages resulting in confusion and fear but today two of the most well respected analysts in the world to attract a massive following former hedge fund manager Dr Steve sugar route and one of the most prolific stock pickers in the country Matt McCall decided to sit down and film a prison Tatian for anyone interested this presentation is available online right now at stock market event dot com you see we are in the final inning of one of the biggest stock market events in history that this could be your last.

devils Dr Steve sugar fund manager Pittsburgh MVP Astros Michael Matt McCall Rucker Saint Peters Ackerman Montreal Stephen Strasberg Gerrit Cole Yankees GM John Meryl WNBC
"ackerman" Discussed on The Business of Sports With Andrew Brandt

The Business of Sports With Andrew Brandt

04:47 min | 11 months ago

"ackerman" Discussed on The Business of Sports With Andrew Brandt

"Welcome to another edition of the business of Sports with Andrew. Grant this college sports edition all about the NCAA and the topic does your which is his name. Image and likeness and whether college athletes can profit off of that name image and likeness that they bring with them in have while they're participating sitting in cf Lennox. It's a big topic. It's gone a lot of ways I've had a previous podcast with Andy Schwartz an economist from cal Berkeley as well as Gabe ABC Feldman sports law scholar from two lane. We've talked about it at length. I've talked about at length but it was time to get the Yes to talk about it. That's Val Ackerman. And she is of course extremely impressive background working with the NBA working with the WNBA working with USA basketball. Maybe one of the most accomplished pushed women in all of the business of sports. Now Commissioner of the biggies conference which full disclosure I am part of in my work for Villanova Villanova Law More Sports Law program which I run for the past six years. I wanted to get val on talk about her. And her co author Gene Smith the Athletic Director at Ohio State in the recommendations to the NCAA Board of Governors and the three divisions on what they're going to do about this this issue were still in the formative stages but with litigation going still continuing from the abandoned case. Which I'll talk about in a minute and of course states jumping ping on some more aggressively than others California? I now hear about Florida Illinois. Another's wanted to have her talk about it here from the person responsible at at the top level for these recommendations so wanted to give you a little bit of setup again. What we're talking about here is is not the university paying so the fair pay to play act as it's named in California is really a misnomer? There's no pay to play. There's a pay to play lawsuit out there. Jeffrey Kessler the Allston case that case that issue is unresolved this is not that this is name image likeness profiting off your name image likeness so it has nothing to do with pay for play never in these recommendations as you'll hear from val is the issue the paper played discussed it's not even a thought by the NCAA. It's not even a thought by California by Illinois by Florida by these states contemplating eating something for college athletics so full disclosure. I am at Villanova. I've known val for a long time. And I know the Deputy Commissioner Vincent Castro the former aide did Villanova very well as well. But I think it's important to hear what they're talking about. There's a lot of information out there. There's a lot of misinformation misinformation out there about what athletes currently have a lot of people. Don't even know that student athletes at universities have NJ universities have have cost of attendance. Not All sports but the sports you would think of that require that and val talks about different numbers involved with this now in the billions being parceled out for cost of attendance as prescribed by the o'bannon case that I mentioned the sort of the start of this movement to have student athletes treated more equitably now again the NCAA invalid never going to get to pay for play at least not not any time soon. But they're talking about some changes and this is a move now. Maybe it's brought on by all the thought of exploitation tation which I think is an unfair word and all the thought of what's been going on but we have a move by the NCAA. It's not a move like California. It's not a move like like other states. It's not move that people think is enough some people but it is a move so I wanted to know where it's coming from. How are we going to deal with endorsements mint with players players coming in with value? How they leave with value the important words here as also kind of mentioned in the abandoned case are tethered to education? So I asked val about that is foul about the benefits that she contemplates in in in lieu of. You've kind of monetary compensation so they're just not there where there is other companies paying these athletes not the university eighty or some kind of third party. Trust that I've talked about where money comes in. The athlete only gets it upon separation from the university graduation or otherwise. But they don't really you know we're not there yet so I wanna be clear and I wanted to be clear in talking to Val Ackerman all about this so again..

"ackerman" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

03:32 min | 1 year ago

"ackerman" Discussed on From Scratch

"Or my kids. Don't go into stores. In fact, if my wife goes into whole foods, Mike kids are like dad mom went to whole foods, which told me not to tell you. That's great. So you are. Does not go grocery shopping, but I'm in stores every week because you're in retail. But the relationship with food around where food comes from could be you know, it's important to teach kids. This leadership was not the most constant in these years. It seems so Joe ran the he was the CEO for the first let's see he left in two thousand four. So he ran the business for the first year of opening then where is he in the world? Now, I do not know, you know, when we started the business, I built a lot of the technology, and the, you know facility operations, and Joe was the food guy, and we split up the responsibilities and we landed up parting ways, but I was probably thirty three at the time. And and while I understood every gut to the business and having been investment banker. I wasn't exactly saying, hey, I'm qualified to be a CEO, and I'm very much an open book person. And so I really wanted other people to come in that I could kinda learn from I knew our business, but actually running a company with something that. It wasn't something I've done before. So over the course of the next bunch of years, we've had several people come into the business who took on the CEO role. And I, you know, played a very serious role some president of two chief financial officer and operations and so forth. And then, you know, five six years ago, I ventured into on the full-time CEO role. And and no longer brought in those those people feel like God. I wish I'd done that sooner. I just wish I had more confidence in myself in retrospect, you can always say that. And there's been a lot of people in courage me to do that. But, you know, I'm I'm very cautious about you know, what I know what I don't know. And I think I've always been more of a student in life, and I've always enjoyed learning from other people. I think now I feel like I'm so far ahead of where I was back then in terms of understanding leadership in the executive position, you mentioned that your, you know, your student in life. What were you like actually as a student growing up in New Jersey? How would people how would your friends or are your parents kinda describe you very kind of in my head so thinking through problems, I would sit for days trying to work out and build models or other types of things. I was a musician. I was an artist, but actually in college all I actually really. Was escape structure play my Qatar in Vail, Colorado. So I had I had gotten to gotten my Canadians ski certificate as a scheme structure certain level. So I can go right to teaching adults. And as far as I was concerned when I was about nineteen or twenty I was just gonna teach game. Now, you went to be you went to Boston University. Yeah. When did that treatment and Louis kind of said guitar in a ski shop or lessen banking, and it was literally almost a coin toss. And I landed up I figured, you know, what if I go banking and make a little bit of money. I can always play my Qatar. If I play my Qatar in a in a bar in Colorado. I may never leave. So we're going to go banking. What do you like to Qatar blues? I've I music is a big part of my family and my house in SoHo we've got the drums bass all my Qatar sitting around in all my my daughter's great drummer my son's great guitar player. And we jam all the time. Thank you very much for joining us. Thank you. Mike guest. His. Jason Akron, the co founder of freshdirect. I'm Jessica Harris. This is from scratch..

Qatar Joe CEO Mike guest Colorado Jessica Harris investment banker freshdirect New Jersey Jason Akron Vail Boston University executive president Louis SoHo chief financial officer co founder five six years
"ackerman" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

02:41 min | 1 year ago

"ackerman" Discussed on From Scratch

"Everyone to do is bring back in their cards. We wanna validate all the paper. Could make sure because God forbid they come in and the paperwork. Not right. You know, we don't want anyone to get in trouble. And literally the next day several hundred people didn't show up for work. There was some public acrimony with your co founder Joe he had a rather public feud with his former partner fairway a leave it at that. But you know, you are in a market with sharp elbows. I mean, it wasn't just fairway who was kind of threatened by your presence. But even gristiti's and supermarkets are very low margin business. I think especially in New York City, it is fierce. How how did that play out? Can you give some examples of that are very cautious to give you the real stories because it is a down and dirty business. I think a lot of players in New York were very uninterested in fresh ripe being part of the the food group in New York and through mechanisms on the supply side, and otherwise there's a lot of behind the scenes pressure for us not to be in business. Any other color? You could give to that. While look I think that most will will attempt to kind of threaten to not, you know, carry your product if you supply players, and there was a lot of, you know, people threatens to to not want to sell to us because if they did they lose existing relationships producers who were threatened by the existing incumbents said that maybe we shouldn't sell to you. 'cause I lose my shelf space at this traditional retailer. You're not known, and they are so they felt wrestling. We'd a lot of that pressure. You're kinda swimming to bathing suits in that, you know, in the early days, not only are you launching new snoop company. But it was kind of an it was a new concept and e-commerce wasn't as mature as it is today. So people even being afraid to like use their credit card online. Like, can you talk to me about like, those kind of systematic obstructions? Well, that's you know, we really dating or selves with this conversation because we forget when you go back to the late nineteen ninety s that there were. The same fears people were afraid in fact, when I started the business, I didn't have an Email account. And I had my chief technology officer facts things to my house, and he kind of freaked out. It's like, look, you're starting commerce company. You're gonna have to kill your facts. But we had also tried. Yes. Because we were nervous that online was not a comfortable place yet. And so we had ideas on sending DVD's and catalogs do people. And so was very much at that very early stage of comfort, and we did get a lot of calls about credit card security and all sorts of issues like that then and you were in convinced yourself, right? That BS you'd be a delivery service. But how committed were you to the online.

New York City wrestling gristiti chief technology officer co founder partner Joe he
"ackerman" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"ackerman" Discussed on From Scratch

"So we have a quality team that every single morning rates all of the produce. They walked the lines. They taste it. They they look at it. They give it a no one through ten and that immediately publishes on the site. So when you're shopping that day, you know, how our quality team rates that specific piece of protest that day has not always been this streamlined new worked on a business plan in nineteen ninety nine. Tell me about your wife's thoughts on the business in the early days. Or when you were a kind of conjuring up the idea. Well, you know, go back to in the in the nineteen ninety s my wife we were both like real foodies. She would go to probably six different shops. She had this cheese shop, she liked the pasta shop she liked and she got a Protozoa certain store, and there wasn't a single place that all of the great fresh foods procured em. I told her about the we're going to start this online business. She goes. Oh, Honey, that seems great and very patronizing. Like, there's no way I'm gonna use this because I have my stores, and I said, okay. But if we. Disfie- you with respect to your quality needs. You know, do we have shot, and she was actually quite skeptical about the business and others were quite skeptical too. Because at the time there had been a company web van which we know is the poster child or the reciprocal the poster child of those days that spent about a billion dollars on, you know, online groceries. How did you say to yourself? Oh, we're going to be different. There's one real huge difference. Where others have said, hey, let's build an online delivery business. The idea was actually about how do we get quality food better than the retail store?.

billion dollars
"ackerman" Discussed on The Crypto Street Podcast

The Crypto Street Podcast

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"ackerman" Discussed on The Crypto Street Podcast

"God dammit i can't remember the the promotional code loans launch party interlogix party to get ten percent off of all of anything that has our logo on it the crypto sri pockets logo wonderful guest and i were were pleased that that were joined by crypto ethan on twitter ethan ackerman one of the sharpest young people in my opinion that i follow i know these guys mirror what i say before we started recording ethan you're talking pretty high level to me and i was just like i'm just gonna shut my mouth as episode because ethan way smarter than i am welcome thanks for joining us yet thank you for having me you flatter me so yeah no problem let's just to give the viewers or listeners a background on how you got into crypto maybe a little bit about yourself yes sure so on my name is ethan ackerman i go by non twitter i've been trading for took earn sees and fielder markets for about four years now i started off when i was a sophomore in high school i stumbled upon cryptocurrencies almost by accident i think a friend of mine hosa joke about it on facebook and got me interested interested in it you know i i found out about doj coin just because that was you know the joke of the day and that was you know in the big pump was going on that was when wollongong upping doj coins that was in the news so that was sort of high found about out about currencies and cryptocurrency trading on the more research i did the more i was like acid.

twitter facebook ethan ackerman doj ten percent four years
"ackerman" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"ackerman" Discussed on From Scratch

"Well you know i had this he had this younger brother peter who was ten years younger and he went into the sinkhole banking and it seemed a lot cooler than making fabric books so i lenses up going in that direction and then i eventually came back by the way this time you're raising three children i will is going on at home during all of this well you know was interesting i left banking because i was travelling forty eight weeks out of the year leaving sunday night coming back on friday and i said to my wife who i love dearly as it this is just no way i could be a dad yeah and and do this so building a business in new york i can work twelve hours a day but i could see my kids for breakfast and see them at home you know at night and that's kind of what i did and i i see them everyday do your kids sharp go to the grocery store well or if my kids don't go into stores in fact if my wife goes into whole foods my kids are like dad mom went to whole foods which you told me not to tell you that's great um so yeah our family does not go grocery shopping but i am in stores every week because you're in retail on but dear relationship with food around where food comes from could be you know it's important to teach kids this leadership was not the most constant i in these years it seems so joanne there he was the ceo for the first letsie he left in two thousand four so he ran the business for the first in the foreseeable of opening up and then where is he in the world now i do not know you know when we started the business i built a lot of the technology and the you know facility operations and joe was the food guy and we split out the responsibilities and we landed up a parting ways but i was probably three at the time and and while i understood every guts the business and having been investment banker i wasn't exactly saying hey i'm qualified to be a ceo and i'm very much a openbook person and so i really wanted other people to come in that i could kinda learn from i knew.

peter new york ceo joe investment banker joanne forty eight weeks twelve hours ten years
"ackerman" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"ackerman" Discussed on From Scratch

"Right program for our customers so that you would consult with confidence and she was super excited because she got you know people were are passionate the food she got to pick a perfect you know cantaloupe and she got her name on it and it becomes now our number one selling program i'm jessica harris you're listening to from scratch my guest is jason ackerman the cofounder of the online grocer fresh direct fresh direct works directly with farmers and chefs and bakers to deliver fresh ingredients prepared meals to consumers fresh direct also has a service called food kick which makes sameday deliveries of simple items rather than having to order a day in advance your very fortunate that you had the moxie to invest in the infrastructure did you have any precedent that you are looking to to say you know reagan and just go big or was a kind of on a win i think the days and banking refinance a lot of big companies and so forth the dollar's were the idea didn't scare you if it was big and we didn't have the facility to do it than we knew we'd be in more trouble so we said is better to bat big and have it be a little smaller than the other way around arrests be could nationally service it into turn out to be the right bet and you also had to invest heavily in just sierra your technology and inventories systems can you talk a little bit about kind of how you evolved were actually we we really had three big things going on during the bill i heard like forty great from professionals from all over new york see the best of the best and we had this group of food people and then we hard technical engineers so we actually build up a 2run fifty software engineers um and we implemented sap which is a big manufacturing system i hired engineers conveyor control so we actually built up all that and we we spent probably twenty five million dollars just on systems technology and systems day one we realized that a lot of what we did and some of it was right some of was wrong and we rebuilt enhanced and particularly things like last smiled distribution in know the trucking in the routing we've really evolve that piece of technology that we did understand day one what's in.

new york sap jessica harris jason ackerman reagan twenty five million dollars
"ackerman" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"ackerman" Discussed on From Scratch

"And and some of the most wonderful incredible people we had whole families who work with us and that event happened and we gathered every once again like look immigration says that they're going to come to an audit what we need everyone to do is bring back in their cards we wanna validate all the paperwork and make sure because god forbid they come in and the paper works not right know we don't want anyone to get in trouble and literally the next day several hundred people didn't show backup work and jessica hance you're listening to from scratch my guest is jason ackerman cofounder fresh direct will hear more from chastened coming up the i'm jessica harris this is from scratch my guess is jason ackerman cofounder of the online grocer fresh direct fresh direct launched in two thousand two from its headquarters in a former paper plant in long island city queens prior to starting fresh direct jason was an investment banker at donaldson lufkin jenrette focused on supermarket retailers there was some public acrimony with your cofounder of joe he had a rather public feud with his former partner fair way i'll leave it at that but the you know you were in a market with sharp elbows i mean it wasn't just fairway who was kind of threatened by your presence but even gresty dis and supermarkets are very low margin business i think especially in new york city it is fierce how how did that play out m can you give some examples of that are i'd be very cautious to give you the real stores because it is a down and dirty business i think a lot of.

jessica harris investment banker joe jessica hance jason ackerman partner new york
"ackerman" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"ackerman" Discussed on From Scratch

"Two friends and also when we had gone out to raise money to the marketplace the general marketplace it was kinda right around were web van was collapsing may i was pretty much the threeheaded dragon so people i thought we were actually out of her mind so it was really difficult to raise the money so we discover together from friends and raise a bunch and uh and launched it and i mention peter ackerman is your your father's brother and he's known i in there i think it was that early 1980's for working with michael gin i in the junk bond area selling junk bonds what was his perspective on what you're doing while he was head of capital marcus a direct so with mike and so he was responsible for a lot of these the was called sponsorship so he father the cake yours of the world and so he had been of all four 400 acquisitions and a lot of actually were in the supermarket sector and uh you know we had been talking about this concept i brought an initially he was skeptical but after the work we put into it he felt it was a very interesting battening and i had a makeup pitch like any other investor to him you spend the majority of the one hundred million on building this very state of the art plant and then what happens and then we hit the go button and then we had four customers there was the world's biggest but dago it was very actually nerve wracking because you know you spend all this money and you have all this anticipation than than you turn it on and what we did as we we went to rows of an island first and we we we built these fruits and vegetables eightfoot rubber costumes and we we dressed up a bunch of people and we put him onto the islands and we've jumped around and said here's fifty dollars a free food and fresh food we didn't give away a bottled water just fruits and vegetables and we we scared a lot of children and we are but we got it known and quickly we got some traction in the marketplace and was a lotta learns very small at that time but we learned how to kind of reach some customers really it was like as grassroots azir dressing i've been afraid of the loan thing block by block.

peter ackerman mike michael gin fifty dollars eightfoot
"ackerman" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"ackerman" Discussed on From Scratch

"And i said okay um but if we satisfy you with respect to your quality needs in onto we have a shot and she was actually quite sceptical about the business and others were quite sceptical too because at the time there had been a company wed van which we know is the poster child there are the reciprocal the poster child of those days and that spent about a billion dollars on new online groceries how did you say to yourself oh we're going to be different there's one real huge difference we're others have said hey let's bills an online delivery business the idea was actually about how do we get quality food better than the retail store and we looked at the supply chain and realize that if we build these direct relationships and do our own manufacturing and don't have inventory in all these stores and have better cold chain and make sure the foods prep right that actually the food is a better chance of being fresher than it does at the store so the root of the business release started from how do we make food better not how do we make a home delivery at the time you were at banker at doj focused on supermarkets and you met joe fidelity who at the time he had just left fairway he had actually help to cofound and there's some controversy round this the uptown fairway at store that he had run was called by choice and basically it was a precursor to this kind of producer to consumer model how is it that you met joe so actually joe was working in a part owner of the fairway 100 and 25th should if you remember being a new yorker was kind of first place you walk into a cooler to buy your meat and joe is a great food guy um and i had left bank at the time and was looking to bring on a food executive to build some concepts that i had in so i walked into the fairway store because i thought it was a great store and i said who's the.

doj joe fidelity producer executive billion dollars
"ackerman" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"ackerman" Discussed on From Scratch

"The the i'm jessica harris this is from scratch my guest is jason ackerman cofounder of the online grocer fresh direct fresh direct is one of the first companies to disrupt the traditional food supply chain by sourcing food words produced in delivering it to consumers without going through the national retailers fresh direct makes deliveries in the new york metro region and parts of new jersey connecticut pennsylvania in delaware fresh direct launched in two thousand two from its headquarters in a former keeper plant in long island city queens prior to starting fresh direct jason was an investment banker at donaldson lufkin jenrette focused on supermarket retailers welcome iq so i want to start by kind of visualizing what you're headquarters the look like how would you describe it to somebody who hasn't been there well you seem them the movie willy wonka majorca factor imagine that so a brother than having rivers of chocolate there are rivers of all sorts of food flowing uh we have kitchens making prepared meals and bakery an meatcutting and fish cutting and cheese caves in protest raping room so it's just a whole range of experience of food the temperatures range from almost sixty degrees to minus thirty six degrees are minus twenty ice cream is happy at minus twenty and we have about nine different temperature zones in the building this is celsius yes how many miles a conveyor belts do you have in your warehouse uh many many miles many miles lots of sorting machines and conveyor belts in than lots of technology you have an internal rating system can you tell me about that you know when it comes to produce a one of the great things about being in a physical stores you get to pick and choose one line we do the picking for you so we have a quality team that every single morning rates all of the produce they walk the lines they taste it they they look at it they give it a no one through ten and that amelie publishes on the site so when you're shopping that day you know how quality team rates that specific piece of protests that day the business has not always been this streamlined you worked on a business plan and 1999 tell me about your wife's thoughts on the business in the early days or when you were a kind of conjuring up the idea well you know the go back to the in the in.

jessica harris pennsylvania investment banker jason ackerman new york connecticut delaware amelie thirty six degrees sixty degrees
"ackerman" Discussed on Writers Who Don't Write

Writers Who Don't Write

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"ackerman" Discussed on Writers Who Don't Write

"So have you been receiving any like presser appraiser i criticism of your book outside of the united states i'm really curious of anybody you know in syria iraq afghanistan or or anywhere in the middle east is red your book in hill in kind of icao put their thoughts on paper well the sadly of the publishing industry in afghanistan is not as uh it's not as robust as we would like it to be so i did a little bit of tea television in afghanistan on the book came out on vows by the efforts like i don't have an afghan publisher it has not been translated posture were dari from my first book uh accounted turkey and you know have nice reception there that's about as far east as we wet uh event dark at the crossing uh is just coming out of national it's come out of the uk kim added italy uh in some other places the i think was interesting for incident greenonblue uh greenonblue came out of the ukraine in the you know it was very warmly received which was nice thinking was interesting jim that's a culture that you're leaving rasping with sort conflict in these ideas perpetual war uh which is a theme that's very prevalent in greenonblue and so i was her interested going to on book tour in ukraine onto talk with ukrainians who really felt that the they were in in a similar spot with their war those being funded eastern if they could not see how the war was going to end uh so um you know lots of thousands in response to go.

united states iraq publisher ukraine jim syria afghanistan uk greenonblue
"ackerman" Discussed on Writers Who Don't Write

Writers Who Don't Write

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"ackerman" Discussed on Writers Who Don't Write

"Amber laughing put some rain for monday are you kidding like these three enforce our generals cannot figure out how by watching a bunch of propaganda at being told a great story you know why a bunch of twenty twenty one year old guys would go halfway across the world the fight a war in the desert you gotta be kidding me like we're the best it is this is all we've done i mean you know what's the recruiting commercials for the marine corps like they don't get it i get it doesn't mean i'm gonna to enjoy the islamic state but i get it i've watched you know i've written dhabi i've watched the i've watched their recruiting materials their videos are sweat it out and i totally get out of your twenty one years old living in belgium uh uh you know is an immigrant beyond the people you're you also particularly welcome you can't get a job have someone say why don't you come back to come to a araca and denounce fight with your brothers trickery the new state where young i get it no i don't agree with like completely understand it uh so you know i think what you know would we live in all you know what are we live in a world where more people would sit there are actually just try to get it and so i'd consistently of maize um buyout oftentimes just are the lack of empathy that can exist in understanding people whose world these are diametrically opposed to you you know it's worth if you you know if the the first step in trying to counter those diametrically opposed worldviews understanding in of 11 even make the effort to understand it you'll never counter them with a set of with the value proposition that that that the it's better.

belgium Amber twenty twenty one year twenty one years
"ackerman" Discussed on Writers Who Don't Write

Writers Who Don't Write

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"ackerman" Discussed on Writers Who Don't Write

"So you know the character who is an islamic state fighter you know i i i want to hear from in exactly how he views the world and and again as a journalist um you know i've got with guys who were former members of alqaeda or members of the islamic state uh in heard their their point of view an down some of it i can i can understand the others parts of you know i can i can understand how being you know a twenty thirty year old male living in the middle east right now rocky you're syrian your suny you know i can understand had you'd be militarize wanna fight it feel like you need it to carve out on this a separate state in idea in their certain places where i don't understand but i sit there and i left sending to write the character uh you know i do the best job i can do of of trying to bring the reader into their into their point of view without being a draconian redacted about it on but to try to give an honest render is at the reader can that make up their mind about as to what they found and did you encounter that same stumbling block with dark at the crossing at all where you needed to give yourself the the sort of permission euro seeking when you wrote greenonblue i'll less less so uh i think you know part of that too is just the former me you the riding in the first person is very rare and yeah dark at the crossing has written i mean it's written a close third person so um you know doesn't doesn't isn't quite as internet and down the out in harris is really this man of sort of two two identities uh so uh you know i think if you know with a story is and you know you're characters are um you know you you go with the story and frankly i i have a fundamental worldview that is people across cultures and gender or origin races like you know uh you know we have far warren comment as a species than we do different uh and i think we have huge capacity to understand one another and.

harris middle east warren twenty thirty year
"ackerman" Discussed on Writers Who Don't Write

Writers Who Don't Write

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"ackerman" Discussed on Writers Who Don't Write

"Hamann with each other now i have more in common lee afghan soldiers i fought with had that huge experiences with an idea with the guys aren't the high school with a much more caught where those afghans and um you know in same with you know that the interplay in turkey the crossing between harrison jim in a jim this american special forces soldier it harasses passenger through that jim has the went telling harris in a you might not like me and you might have a lotta misgivings about me the you and i have been similarly defined by this experience on which is the war in iraq which you're hans harris in many ways and you know in the book is sort of an exploration of you know harasses separate separate nonwar identity the identity the near the wartime identity has you which he shares with people uh both american in syria that he has misgivings about sort of him resting with that identity is showing you talked about that you know in those are things you know i understand down justin a lot of detail from from my own experience so i mean in many respects i mean heiress is sort of his his me in a lot of ways the one is hardest for me to understand how to go about approaching is an without trying to give too much away there's a character in this novel is actually uh with diet and he is not totally unsympathetic and i just like trying to think my way through approaching that just seems like the biggest stumbling block i would encounter if i were try at the same thing without much perspective into the culture i i think is isn't writer you you have an obligation i short i have an obligation any character that steps onto the page is that i need to allow them to make their case to the reader is other make their case before god.

Hamann jim iraq syria writer hans harris justin