37 Burst results for "Ackerman"

Fresh update on "ackerman" discussed on Jim Bohannon

Jim Bohannon

00:52 min | 8 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ackerman" discussed on Jim Bohannon

"Welcome back to the Jim bohannon show as we speak with the Elliott Ackerman. And we're talking about his book the 5th act and about to comparisons between the Afghanistan and Ukraine among other things. In terms of U.S. foreign policy, you've been in a position to defend the aftereffects of such policy for a number of years and I'm sure you must have some thoughts about what it is that you were defending. Well, I think you know ultimately you're defending the interests of the United States, which is, you know, which is your country. When we look at the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the war in Afghanistan in particular was a war that result that was the result of the September 11th attacks. And as Kabul was falling A. number of times with a. Hello? Calm and Liv. I was focused on getting them a job. And if something happens to the veteran, then today on hate collagen, better water that cares, Jane's on the line. Hey, halligan. How can I avoid using all those plastic water bottles that harm the sea turtles? Jane are always on drinking water system helps eliminate the equivalent of 15 billion single use plastic bottles a year. So you see, colgan cares about sea turtles too. Aw, plastic pollutes and collagen cures. That's catchy Jane and

Jim Bohannon Elliott Ackerman Afghanistan U.S. Ukraine Kabul LIV Iraq Jane Halligan Colgan
Fresh update on "ackerman" discussed on Jim Bohannon

Jim Bohannon

00:58 min | 8 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ackerman" discussed on Jim Bohannon

"So rod for breakfast at land decker for dinner. USDA approved. Welcome back to the Jim bohannon show at one 8 6 6 5 O Jimbo one 8 6 6 5 O 5 four 6 two 6 our guest is Elliott Ackerman, a marine veteran of 5 tours of duty in Iraq and Afghanistan a recipient of the silver star of the bronze star with V for valor and the Purple Heart. He is also an award winning essayist for such publications as esquire The New Yorker and The New York Times. The only fair and free election ever held in Vietnam was held in 1967 in South Vietnam. And the incumbent governor government won, although not decisively, there were a lot of others in the race and nobody got a majority of the vote. And the Viet Cong, of course, before they urged people just to boycott the election. The third thing you know, well, we're going to bring about all the goodness and equality and wonderfulness that communism brings, which of course is a croc. Under Ho Chi Minh, there's never been a free election in the Vietnam at all. In the meantime, in Afghanistan, one thing that I really wonder about Elliot Ackerman is not like the Taliban was anything new. They had run the country for quite a while. They had yanked the fingernails out of daughters and wives who dared to paint them. And this is what these people wanted that they refused to fight to defend against. I mean, I don't understand that at all. Well, I don't think if you look at the scenes from one year ago at Kabul international airport, it's pretty clear that this is not what a very significant number of Afghans wanted because there was this mass rush for the exits at the Taliban took power. But as is often the case in warfare, you have a tyranny of a minority over the majority. And Taliban rule in the 1990s was a ferocious yet small Taliban basically terrorizing a much broader Afghan population. And sadly, it seems as though Afghanistan is now regressed to a similar type of rule that we saw in the 1990s with the Taliban. So I don't think the Taliban can necessarily be construed as having massive popular support across Afghanistan, what they represent is an insurgency that the United States and NATO along with our Afghan partners were never able to completely extinguish and that insurgency was successful because at the end of the day the Taliban were effective at waiting us out and our result crumbled. Again, all I can say is that if before I would allow my wife or daughter to be brutalized by these pack of savages, I would fight like a Tiger to the death, and that's the part I didn't understand. Oh, well okay, the Taliban's back in power. I didn't get that. I mean, anyway, whatever. It's done and gone. Well, 8 6 6 5 O Jimbo one 8 6 6 5 O 5 four 6 two 6 Elliott Ackerman makes comparisons between Afghanistan and Ukraine, what would that comparison be? Well, I think it's important to hold these two events in conversation with one another. So in Afghanistan, last summer, we see the greatest military catastrophe that NATO has ever experienced since the creation of the alliance after the Second World War. It is important to keep that in mind because obviously Vladimir Putin is he's weighing whether or not to invade Ukraine is certainly watching NATO's performance in Afghanistan. And what do we see? We see massive NATO underperformance in Afghanistan. So when he's trying to determine what the response will be when he invades Ukraine, he certainly at least in Afghanistan sees a NATO alliance that can not hang together that has very little will to fight. And I'm sure was emboldened by that. What is sort of remarkable then is that within 6 months of probably the greatest capacity NATO has ever experienced, we see one of its brightest hours occur in Ukraine when Russia invades Ukraine in February of this year. And the alliance now after having completely underperformed in Afghanistan, now over performs. It sticks together despite Putin holding the energy supplies of Europe hostage. And is able to up to us up to this point, respond relatively effectively to Vladimir Putin. So again, it's important to hold these two events together because they certainly have a bearing on one another. Of course, the NATO reaction in Afghanistan was one of the oh, we're tired. We don't want to do this anymore. Whereas the NATO reaction in Europe was this brutal thug is right next door to all of us. I mean, the end result was that Finland and Sweden joined NATO in exactly the last thing that Putin wanted, despite his calendar reading 1938 instead of 2022, so and it's something that NATO learned my lord the Russians are vastly overrated because Putin wanted this thing over with in days. And it's been 6 months and it's not over. And if he can't handle Ukraine, he wouldn't have a chance against NATO. Well, I think that's certainly the case. And I think that when we talk about the cost of war, the cost in Ukraine for Russia has been has been massive in Russia fought the Soviet Union rather fought a 9 year war in Afghanistan and lost 15,000 troops killed. The war in Ukraine is 6 months old and certain estimates have Russian depth well in excess of 30,000 killed. So Ukraine has been a disaster for Russia. And there's an irony here because in many respects, one of the reasons that Putin invades Ukraine as you try to restore Russia to its Soviet borders to its to the borders that it had before the collapse of the Soviet Union. But what precipitated the collapse of the Soviet Union, one of the key contributing factors was a Soviet war in Afghanistan. So Russia is now invading a country like Ukraine, getting bogged down in order to expand its borders when in fact such actions are what brought it back brought about the contraction of its borders at the end of the Cold War when the Soviet Union collapsed. As they as the marine veteran Elliott Ackerman one 8 6 6 5 O Jimbo one 8 6 6 5 O 5 four 6 two 6 and we'll be back in just a moment. Traffic. All right. This wagon commute is killing me. You mind if I turn on Yale radio? Out

Afghanistan Taliban Nato Elliott Ackerman Jim Bohannon Esquire The New Yorker Governor Government Jimbo Elliot Ackerman Kabul International Airport Vietnam Viet Cong South Vietnam Putin Usda Vladimir Putin Ho Chi Minh Russia The New York Times Iraq
James Ackerman: Angel Tree Campaign Is a Year-Long Initiative

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:27 min | Last month

James Ackerman: Angel Tree Campaign Is a Year-Long Initiative

"Because every campaign that we've done, this audience has donated well over $200,000 to send Christmas gifts and the gospel and a message from their mom or dad. In fact, if you don't mind, take just a few seconds, James to walk through the angel tree campaign because hey, before you know it, we're going to be at Christmas time. We are. And the angel tree is really a year round initiative. So right now, as we speak, we are working with chaplains to distribute angel three applications in prisons all over the country. We distribute to just over 1300 state federal prisons and high profile jails. And encourage moms and dads in prison to sign up with their children for angel three. We then take those applications towards the end of summer, process them, and then distribute those kids to churches all over the country. 5 to 7000 churches a year participate in angel tree. And in any given year, we have 250,000 to 300,000 children signed up to be served at angel tree Christmas. So it's happening right now. The parents are signing up their kids. All right, I'm going to put everybody into a holiday spirit because it may be June 23rd, but Christmas time will be here before you know it. And I get very excited at the idea of our audience delivering these Christmas presents and the gospel to these

James
James Ackerman: The Devotional Written by Men & Women in Prison

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:12 min | Last month

James Ackerman: The Devotional Written by Men & Women in Prison

"How about this 14 day devotional written by actual prison fellowship academy participants. I've gotten tons of feedback from listeners who have visited delighted at receiving this devotional for free. The devotional, I think we're in our 5th version of it. And the devotional was the brainchild of one of our prison fellowship staffers who said, you know, there are really strong believers in prison. And why don't we draw on their experience to write a devotional for people who aren't in prison? And so we make that devotional available to our followers, who are donors, to other people that are interested in prison fellowship. And yeah, it's 14 day devotional. That where every single devotion is written by a man or woman in prison who actually identifies their first name and the verse that is really moving them and shares their narrative and a devotional for us to experience is a very, very powerful book and as I said, I think we just finished publishing our 5th version and we're going to continue to carry on these 14 day devotionals written by men and women in prison, but for you and I on the outside.

James Ackerman: We Welcome Anybody to Apply for Prison Fellowship

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:30 min | Last month

James Ackerman: We Welcome Anybody to Apply for Prison Fellowship

"James Ackerman, the president and CEO of prison fellowship with us here on the Mike Gallagher show. Let's talk a little bit about the academy. Because again, we've had sort of two missions to narratives that I've shared with our audience all over the country. A Christmas time, it's the angel tree campaign, but I wanted everybody to know this month about prison fellowship academy. Talk to a specifically about what the academy does, what it's all about. Yeah, so the prison fellowship academy is a yearlong intensive program that men or women apply to get into. These are men and women in prison apply to get into. There's a lot of work involved. All the curriculum experience is grounded in biblical principles and the gospels of Jesus Christ, but we welcome anybody to apply for the president's fellowship academy of any background of any faith or no faith at all, but everything we teach is rooted in the Bible. And so the whole goal of the prison fellowship academy is to guide men and women to begin to understand what it means to be a good citizen and begin to practice the habits of good citizenry. And so good citizenship. And so that is what the president has in a nutshell. That's what the president follows your academy does. There's 178 academies in 33 states as we speak. The program is growing substantially year over year and the results are unbelievable in terms of men and women returning to our communities who are healthy and productive citizens.

Prison Fellowship Academy James Ackerman Mike Gallagher
James Ackerman: Transformative 1st Experience With Prison Fellowship

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:27 min | Last month

James Ackerman: Transformative 1st Experience With Prison Fellowship

"With all the years you volunteered with prison fellowship prior to becoming the president and CEO. It is an amazing revelation to know, wow, these are people. These are people who hurt. These are people who have fallen, but they want that path to redemption and to get back into becoming productive citizens again. Yeah, that's exactly right. The first time I stepped into a prison was in 2004 as a guest of president fellowship to see the prison fellowship academy, which is what we're talking about here. And the experience was transformative for me because I realized that these men who was visiting with that day are people. And we all have made mistakes. We've all made mistakes. Not all of our mistakes have led to us serving time in prison. That's for sure. But we've all made mistakes. And we begin to see that men and women in prison are people as well. In the book of hebrews, the apostle Paul encourages us in Hebrew 13 three to remember those in prison as if we are serving with them. We're called to have an empathetic relationship with those in prison. And when we do, we begin to see the stories that you are experiencing through these letters that are being written to you by people that are experiencing real transformation, who decided you know what? I need to get my life together. Whatever I've been doing is not working for me and I need to be doing something different.

Prison Fellowship Academy Apostle Paul
James Ackerman: Prison Fellowship Has Been the Highlight of My Career

Mike Gallagher Podcast

00:53 sec | Last month

James Ackerman: Prison Fellowship Has Been the Highlight of My Career

"Can you just start by telling us what it must feel like to be the president and CEO of a ministry like prison fellowship that is when we've got so much so many challenges we're facing right now as a country and we see crime in the streets and raging inflation and the divisiveness we're experiencing as a people, it must be gratifying for you to be able to go to work every day and do what you do with prison fellowship. Oh, this has been leading person fellowship has been the highlight of my career to be Frank. I love doing the person I love working with the men and women in prison. And helping people to see that there's a better way. And that they can overcome the brokenness of their past and the stakes of their past. And step into new beginnings and live productive and healthy lives, which results in safer communities.

Frank
"ackerman" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

One Life Radio Podcast

04:26 min | 10 months ago

"ackerman" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

"Are live from dallas. Texas this bernadette with junior in the mix. And we are continuing with courtney akron. She is the author of patients as well as my pocket. Meditations for self compassion my pocket. Positively five minute bliss and my pocket gratitude. So happy to have you with us today. You can find courtney at courtney ackerman on instagram. Were talking about the book of patients. Two hundred and fifty ways to be the more patient new. So so courtney in your book you've listed two hundred fifty ways to be more patient. What types of methods are practices are in the book. What is a ton a ton of different Types of of exercises and techniques But most of them are gonna fall within Like mindfulness exercises the ways to be more more mindful and grounded in the present moment There's the meditations in there some guided meditations. There's also things like affirmations. There's some journaling prompts there's just some some questions. Just them really reflective questions that you can ask yourself And then there's really fun stuff like you know. Thought exercises like time traveling in your mind. You know. I'm like really fun and kind of wins colin's in there to And that's all interspersed with just a bunch of really great quotes about patients And i don't know about you. But sometimes all i need to do is is read a good quote on something and i'm like oh yeah That's me i see myself there. No absolutely i love quotes. I think everybody does There was so many of them on patients. It was hard to choose. I added a couple to our social and along with your post but You know one of the things in here and this is really important. A lot of people don't don't think about this. It's in the senior book it's called. Challenge your perspective so when you feel impatient you might start to sink into a negative perspective. Spiral and i do people people do that. They do it all the time. And so you challenge. I think it's a great exercise to challenge your perspective right absolutely. I think it's a good idea to challenge your perspective. Most of the time yeah absolutely impatience or negative thoughts or you know frustration anger. Whatever it is. I think it's a really good practice. A habit really to get into to challenge our own perspective. No for sure. Let's talk about a few methods more methods from the book. How does a mantra our mantra. Help us to be more patient. Do you do you see. Do you do that do you like. Oh really chant do you..

courtney akron courtney ackerman courtney dallas Texas colin
"ackerman" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

04:06 min | 11 months ago

"ackerman" Discussed on From Scratch

"I eventually came back by the way at this time. You're raising three children. What was going on at home during all this well. You know it's interesting. I left banking. Because i was traveling. Forty eight weeks outta the year. Leaving sunday night coming back on friday and i said to my wife who i loved dearly. I said this is just no way. I can be a dad and do this. So building a business in new york. I can work twelve hours a day. But i could see my kids for breakfast and see them at home at night and that's kind of what i did and i see them every day. Your kids shop go to the grocery store or kids. Don't go into stores in fact if my wife goes into whole foods. My kids are like dad. Mom went to whole foods. You told me not to tell you. That's great So yeah our family does not go grocery shopping. But i'm in stores every week because you're in retail. I'm but the relationship with food around where food comes from could be. you know. it's important to teach kids. This leadership was not the most constant In these years it seems so joe ran the he was the ceo for the first. Let's see he left in two thousand four so he ran the business for the first verse year of opening. And then where is he in the world now. I do not know you know when we started the business. I built a lot of the technology. And the you know facility operations and joe was the guy and we split up the responsibilities and we ended up Parting ways But i was probably thirty three at the time. And and while i understand every gut to the business and having been investment banker I i wasn't exactly saying hey. I'm qualified to be a ceo. And i'm very much an open book person. So i really wanted other people to come in that i could kind of learn from. I knew our business but actually running a company with something that it wasn't something i've done before so over the course of the next bunch of years we've had several people come into the business who took on the ceo role. And i played a very serious epsom. President of two chief financial officer and operations and so forth And then you know five. Six years ago eventually then took on the full-time ceo role and and no longer brought in those Those people feel like god. I wish i had done that sooner. I just wish. I had more confidence in myself. In retrospect you can always say that and there's been a lot of people in encourage me to do that but you know i'm a. I'm very cautious about You know what. I know what i don't know and i think i've always been more of a student in life and i've always enjoyed learning from other people. I think now i feel like i'm. I'm so far ahead of where i was back then in terms of understanding leadership in the executive position. You mentioned that your you know your student in life. What were you like actually as a student growing up in new jersey. how would people. How would your friends or are your parents kinda describe you Very kind of in my head and so thinking through problems. I would sit for days trying to work out and build models or other types of things. I was a musician. I was an artist but actually in college all actually really wanted to do was be escaped structure in play my guitar in vail colorado. So i had. I had gotten to Gotten my canadians Ski certificate as a scheme structured a certain level so i can go right to teaching adults in as far as i was concerned when i was about nine hundred gonna teach skiing now you went to be. You went to boston university. Yeah when did that treatment. And louis kinda said Guitar in a ski shop or investment in banking and it was literally almost a coin. Toss and i landed up. I figured you know what if i go back and make a little bit of money. I can always play my qatar. If i play my guitar in a in a bar in colorado i may never leave. So we're gonna go banking. What do you like to plan that guitar blues. I've i music is a big part of my family. And my house In soho we've got the drums bass all my guitar sitting around and all my my daughter's a great drummer my son's a great guitar player and We jam all the time. Thank you very much for joining us. My guest has been jason ackerman. The co founder of freshdirect. I'm jessica harris. This is from.

joe new york louis kinda new jersey colorado vail boston university skiing jason ackerman freshdirect jessica harris
"ackerman" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

05:16 min | 11 months ago

"ackerman" Discussed on From Scratch

"You're very fortunate that you had the moxie to invest in infrastructure. Did you have any precedent that you are looking to say. You know what we're gonna just go big or was it kind of on a whim. I think the days in banking finance a lot of big companies and so forth the dollars or the idea didn't scare you if it was big and we didn't have the facility to do it then we knew we'd be more trouble so we said it's better to bet big and have it be a little smaller than the other way around us. We couldn't actually service it and it turned out to be the right bet. And you also had to invest heavily in just your your technology and inventory systems. Can you talk a little bit about kind of how you evolved. Actually we we really had three big things going on during the the bill i heard like forty great food professionals from all over. New york's the best of the best and we had this group of people and then we hard technical engineers So we actually build up a team around fifty software engineers and we implemented sap which is a big manufacturing system. I hired engineers convey control so we actually built up all that and we we spent probably twenty five million dollars just on systems technology and systems. Day one we realize that a lot of what we did. Some of it was right. Something was wrong. And we rebuilt enhanced and particularly things like last mile distribution. You know the trucking in the routing. We've really evolved that piece of technology that we didn't understand day one what's an example of that. Well we've got hundreds of vehicles running all throughout the tri state area thereby appointments. We will go to the same house seventeen times a day you know. When we were first delivering we really didn't have any technology in the field and we basically had you remember the nextel push button phones So we go out the trucks and and Hey joey how you doing. You're making the deliveries on time. Yeah boss delivery so going great and like okay. We think we're running on time. We had no idea if maybe joy was actually just having a hamburger with his friend right now actually not making deliveries and we really had no idea what was going on the field. We just wait for customers call. Say hey where's my delivery. And we say well. I don't know i thought he made it so. We learned that you know we had to get knowledge. There are a lot of times where we had to put in all sorts of technologies to keep track of and really understand exactly what was going on in the field and so over time we've migrated to a huge amount of tracking and scanning and devices to know at any one time where everybody is so that for example. If we are running late we know in advance and we can actually call the customer before relate to say. Hey this is when he can expect it to be there. It's going to be late today. Do you have a background at all in operations because you were. You know this banker Which certainly his very hands off with all of that. Capital as an investment banker. You you you have certain skills and you have lots of schools that you you don't have those that you don't have is running anything exactly so so that was pretty clueless but it seems like instinctively. Well go ahead. Well we truth. Is we We have had a family business since one hundred years. manufacturing and as a kid i grew up in my dad's factory i worked in the summertime. Thousands of hourly workers and kind of that was always in my you so follow my dad around the factory and i worked there in the summer. So kind of making things was a bit more my blood banking was. You mentioned your father. He made Books of fabric swatches. What was the name or is the name of the company. It's no longer here But it was economy color card basically when you went to go redecorate and you wanted to flip through all the different fabric samples. You got the hardware store. We made those books so it was a lot of cutting and correlating and design and putting the books together and and A lot of Automation of manual labor and big factories throughout new jersey. and brooklyn. Now when you say that you know that rubbed off on you is there anything in particular or some examples that you you really transferred you know he. He when when i was fifteen he made me work over the summer on the plant floor In running this coalition line and there was when i tell you twenty seven different nationalities on the floor. And i had to run to lions ahead about seventy workers on them and it was really my first experience of understanding the cultural differences in how they work and how they saw. I didn't really see or understand. The differences and actually is a manager had to make choices on how to build teams relative to culture backgrounds. Other things and how well are they wouldn't work together and It was really an eye opening experience for me. Especially then when you're faced with the same human capital issues in the early days and the business actually is much different than what my dad did know the end of the day behind. The you know the the wizard of oz curtained. There's still three thousand associates who are making food and cutting food in packing boxes and making delivery and those associates are the ones who get and do all the work on behalf of the customers and you know. They've got to be happy and they've got to know how to work together and they got to feel valued and a lot of that came from. You know working back then when my dad was there any sense that you might go into the fabric swatch book business. Well this He had his younger brother. Peter who was ten years younger and he went into this thing called banking and it seemed a lot cooler than making fabric box. So i landed up going in that direction..

nextel joey New york brooklyn new jersey lions Peter
"ackerman" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

05:53 min | 11 months ago

"ackerman" Discussed on From Scratch

"Security and all sorts of issues like that. And you were in convinced yourself right that bs. You'd be a delivery service. But how committed were you to the online component well as retailers. We deeply understood and believe that great quality. Fresh food was a general driver to a store. But we didn't know. Is that if we delivered that with the barrier of online and not touching feeling. how much would that impact. So but to be honest we had no idea. We had no idea how bigger smaller how consumers would react. You mentioned that mistakes in the early days. Were the norm rather than the exception. What are some examples of those. We talked about parking tickets but what are some mistakes. In the early days i remember The big for the first lessons just how much new york customers just want what they want. And there's no room forever. So i remember. It was literally the third day and this woman had ordered some food. And she ordered. Twenty three cans of can't artichokes and apparently we only shipped her fifteen cans. She calls customer service. Customer service was right by my desk. The agents like look jason. You gotta take this custom. Because she's freaking out she's like listen. I'm having a dinner party. I ordered these things. This is really important to me if you don't get it here within an hour i'm calling the new york times in your businesses over mike. God my businesses over so i called the supplier. I drive up to the bronx. We get have them open up the warehouse. I get the nine extra cans of things. I get in my car. I drive through housing like running to her house and thinking. There's this big dinner party. She's gotta make make the stuff that she's gonna make ring the door. Bush opens up and she's in her nightgown. And i'm like here's your here's your artichokes and She's like thank you and you know of the many lessons it's looked people don't care if you make a mistake. They just want their stuff. There's no toleration they were gonna tell you anything. They want what they wanted. Was it your feeling that that things were working despite all these like hurdles here and there that you know when you look beyond that like oh you know we are getting customers like what was going on in your head. Well actually once we got through the initial test phase. And and and barry park in rhode island. We started rolling out in manhattan. We took those big jumping costumes. We went literally to murray hill. And we went it when i tell you block for block. We had five block rid of the entire new york city and we would take these guys out there and we go on the streets and it was amazing how fast we built up a database a customers and by the time we had made it to the upper east side. We're about to go to the upper west side. We had sixty thousand preregister customers on the upper west and lower westside before we even opened so i was no longer worried about how big this business was going to be. Okay so the band was there. I was scared to death. How we're gonna actually service this business and get the experience right which is always a big challenge and there were other moments that we really learn like what happens in snowstorms in fact. I don't know if you recall when sandy superstorm. Sandy came around. Our facility was actually quite close to the water lines when it happened and During that storm we actually lost about sunny five percent of all of our trucks because they were parked close to the water. We kinda came in the next day and Our trucks didn't work and we had actually no way to make deliveries. You know there were the romans like that were you know you. Just don't even know where and how you're gonna kinda get through the next day. So what did you do with food. You know at that time. Remember a lot. Electricity was out new york. And i would say that was probably the biggest single waste. Event in hall of new york. Refrigeration wasn't working a lot of places. So yeah there's a lot of food now. I was the food. A lotta food. Etiquette thrown away delivers couldn't get made and you couldn't even get food into new york in fact you couldn't get fuel into new york. You couldn't even feel your trucks. It was probably the biggest in most interesting learning experience. Having to resort the business after that storm and give away a bunch of the food. Yeah well actually in our business we do we. We formed a long time ago. Great partnership with city harvest one of the things about our business because we don't have lots of stores that you have to pick up where one facility so city harvest basically lives in our facility every single day that they're there and everything that we don't sell to the customers that we don't think should go out to the customers it goes right onto a city harvest trucked in it's out into the into the into the food banks right away that day so almost all of fresh food gets consumed the through the consumers through the food banks. Do you have any specific examples of Some suppliers whom you work with you know for us. The stories of the producers really about connecting with the passion. So we were we were in arizona at a cantaloupe farm and How many people have picked up a cantaloupe. And you kind of look around. You're like all right. You're pressing it or you're scratching your like. How do i know if it's ripe. Nobody really knows how to do it to form. We said to the woman who owns the says. How do you know when it's ripe. And secondly why is half the more the cantaloupes right and half or not. She kind of explains that well see that field over there. Well i got a in order for me to hit the price that the retailers one i got a cut that whole field all at once. Some of them are ripe. Some of or not. But i can't afford to go back four or five times civil. Gee i bet our customers would love to have right cantaloupes every single time. Could you do that. And she said well. I i know how to do it but that might cost a little more money. We said okay. Well tell us what it'll take so daily as you came back and she said right across much more amount we said good. We'll take the whole field and we said what we'll do is we'll brand new farm and then we'll do a guaranteed right program for our customers so that you can shop with confidence and she was super excited because she got you know people who are passionate about the food she got to pick a perfect you know cantaloupe when she got put her name on it and it becomes now our number one selling program..

new york barry park sandy superstorm murray hill bronx the new york times jason rhode island mike manhattan Bush new york city Sandy arizona
"ackerman" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

05:23 min | 11 months ago

"ackerman" Discussed on From Scratch

"We do the picking for you so we have a quality team that every single morning rates of the produce. They walked the lines. They taste it. They look at it they give it a no one through ten and that immediately publishes on the site so when you're shopping that day you know how quality rates this was civic piece of produce that day. The business has not always been this streamlined. You worked on a business plan in nineteen ninety nine. Tell me about your wife's thoughts on the business in the early days. Or when you were kind of conjuring up the idea you know. Go back to the in the in the nineteen nineties. My wife and we were both real foodies She would go to probably six different shops. She had this cheese shop. She liked pasta shop. She liked and she got a protozoa. Certain store and and there wasn't a single place that all of the great fresh foods were procured am nine. I told her about that. We're going to start this online business. She goes oh honey. That seems great and very patronizing like. There's no way. I'm to use this. Because i have my stores and i said okay But if we satisfy you with respect to your quality needs you know we have a shot and she was actually quite skeptical about the business And others were quite skeptical too because at the time there had been a company web van which we know is the poster child or the reciprocal the poster child of those days That spent about a billion dollars on online groceries. How did you say to yourself. Oh we're going to be different. There's one real huge difference where others said. Hey let's build an online delivery. Business with the idea was actually about. How do we get quality food better than the retail store and we looked at the supply chain and realized that if we build these direct relationships and do our own manufacturing and don't have inventory and all these stores and have better cold chain and make sure the food's preparation that actually the food is a better chance of being fresher than it does at the store so the root of the business really started from. How do we make food better. Not how do we make a home delivery at the time. You were a banker at deal. Jay focused on supermarkets. And you met joe fidelity who at the time he had just left fairway he had actually helped co found. And there's some controversy around this the uptown. Fairway store that he had run was called by choice and basically it was a precursor to this kind of producer to consumer model. How is it that you met you. So actually joe was working Part of the fairway one hundred twenty fifth street if you remember being new yorker was the kind of first place you walk into a cooler to buy your meat and joe is a great guy And i had left bank at that time and was looking to Bring on a food executive to build some concepts. That i had in so i walked into the fairway store because i thought it was great store and i said who's the who's running this place and they pointing to the office and i went upstairs and Met joe and joan just kind of literally spent the entire day talking and we really hit it off around the business. And that's how connected you partnered in one thousand nine thousand nine but it wasn't until two thousand and two that you actually started making her first deliveries to roosevelt island in battery park. Initially were some of the hiccups in those earliest days. That you can remember everything. So first of all. When when joe and i got together and we were actually with opening retail stores and then we we kind of jointly developed. The idea of of meekness an online business. We didn't really have any idea of had a constructive business so the first idea was to build a ten thousand square foot warehouse and we would get stuff from the wholesale markets and and we really know how big it was but after a while we decided that this is going to be a huge business or a total bust and so we went for it and we. We bought this building long island city and we constructed a three hundred thousand square foot warehouse. Put in all this automation and It was really trying to figure out hata. How do you do this business. How do you build all this stuff because we are nervous at once. We launched if it took off. We wouldn't have time to figure it out so it took us almost a solid two and a half years to actually take the paper and construct the business so you really did a lot of things on the front end rather than kind of leaning on your heels and kind of seeing what would happen in a way we. We made a bet you know we. We definitely got aggressive in terms of the scale of the bet that we were going to make the investment that we made to put all the upfront technology and production we built kitchens and bakeries and cutting facilities and technology before any revenue. Now you had one hundred million dollars that you got mostly from friends and family. I know your uncles. Peter ackerman who supplied the majority of the capital. It was both a combination of family as well as friends if they are having been a banker. One of the few skills that gave me was actually raising money and we were able to go out and speak to friends And also when we had gone out to raise money to the marketplace the general marketplace it was kind of right around with web van was collapsing. i was pretty much three headed dragon so people thought we were actually out of her mind so it was really difficult to raise the money So we just cobbled together from friends and raise a bunch and And launched it. And i mentioned peter ackerman. He's your your father's brother. And he's known i in the i think it was the early nineteen eighty s for working with michael. Bill can In the junk bond area selling junkins. What was his perspective on what you were doing. He was head of kep. Marcus at drexel with mike and so he was responsible for a lot of these. The was called sponsorship so he followed the cake yards of the world..

joe joe fidelity roosevelt island battery park peter ackerman Jay joan michael Marcus mike
"ackerman" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

05:06 min | 1 year ago

"ackerman" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Because of the manifestations of certain i mean look the bio weapons lab was that really real or was that the cia. Like destiny of this. I'll i'll take him. Despite the lessons of history at their word you described it as a crude bioethics weapons okay but like okay leaving aside the questions of deliverability of such a thing to united states from seven thousand miles away in that circumstance. Sure arrest the guy grab him. Do what is necessary to bring him to trial and don't transform and keep the united states transformed onto a perpetual war footing. I don't accept that. The existence of real security threats is a justification for the disfigurement of american institutions that protects actual people's freedom. What we mean by protecting national security is very often protecting a hegemonic prerogatives rather than the safety of actual people and the the example of not taking the strike on abu musab czar collie demonstrates how fungible the commitments to protecting people are when they come against commitments to that hegemony. And you might want to say that. I'm somehow contradicting myself. By you know being willing to entertain the prospect of arresting. Abu subs are cowan. Putting him on trial and finding a way to resolve the circumstances that threaten the united states through mechanisms other than constructing the architecture of this war but once again. I have to come back to. We did it your way. How well did it turn out. I don't mean you. Specifically jack. I mean not my way. I don't mean you specific with. I do mean the way they played out has a tremendous amount of elite purchase. It has a tremendous amount of elite justification and will continue to and i think if we wanna talk about the burdens of continued prospective threats. That come out of the war on terror. Then it is those elites who have to answer this question. It is those elites who should be made to answer for why there is such persist terrorism despite twenty years of your war on terror. In what might that finally tell us about the value of the war on terror and its relationship to the generation of those threats and its relationship to the degradation of american democracy and its relationship to the lack of safety felt at home by vulnerable communities particularly those who are besieged by the sort of terror that the war on terror is uninterested. We are not looking at things. Like the el paso murders as terrorism. We are not looking at the tree of life. Synagogue shooting as terror. The mother emmanuel murders white tab. It's the oldest most violent and Most enduring terror in american history. And there's no war on terror against that that is left out of the war on terror. Now i certainly don't believe there ought to be a war on terror against that. Believe that instead. These are symptoms of a sick political culture. that can only be confronted politically. And that right now. What we are. Seeing particularly after january six is that we are securitizing a response to january six instead of watching a broad political challenge to discredit and keep from power the architects of january six those who justify january six and so on and so forth the more that the response takes the form of reorienting aspects and tools of the war on terror. The easier it will be the next time. There's a trump like figure in power to have those people say all right if that's how you want it. Then summer of twenty twenty is just the beginning fellas get ready for what this looks like when we use these tools against you. I certainly don't believe to go back to one of the first points you made absolutely in this conversation that such a thing goes away inside an atmosphere of an abolition of the war on terror. I believe that is rooted very deeply in american history. And that is what has to be confronted. The war on terror can only be an engine of those noxious forces. It isn't an alternative to it. Spencer thanks for a great interview. And congratulations on your book. Fair podcast is produced in cooperation with the brookings institution. The music is by so few are audio engineering. This episode is handling. This episode was edited by gen patio. Please rate review wherever you get your podcasts. And there's always thank you for listening.

abu musab czar collie united states cia cowan Abu jack el paso emmanuel Spencer brookings institution
"ackerman" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

05:46 min | 1 year ago

"ackerman" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"The work of a really active engaged diplomat. I have my criticisms about him. But zalmay calls aunt ultimately recognizing that the taliban fact all else has failed. The taliban will remain a fact in afghanistan. And unless there is some deal. We've the taliban four withdrawal or the united states is just deciding that it will control afghanistan indefinitely. There is no choice but to negotiate an end to the war. And i i kind of just. Don't find this as puzzling as you seem to. So then it's not valorous. He had to do it but nevertheless he did. All of the previous presidents before trump. Don't obama not just tries almost comically fails by negotiating with an impostor it is still the case that trump decided to take the step of open negotiation with the taliban that the trumps of that era during the obama administration certainly trumped himself would have immediately lambasted obama for doing what have lambasted bush for doing. We're seeing the proof of that in that trump right now is calling. The taliban victoria's biden having surrendered to it ultimately trump Was the lesson that the war's themselves are no more than just political cudgels to win political power back at home trump. Like everyone said during you know the start of his administration trump does the quiet part loud. Trump is the subtext of the war on terror. And that's why the text is so fungible. Only as long as the subtext that civilizational violence that retribution under guys of patriotic righteousness as long as that remains the rest of it. You can do with it as you like scale the wars upscale the wars down. Say you're there to take the oil try and take the oil. That stuff is all things that can be used as necessary for the broader purpose of accruing our at the expense of vulnerable people. Okay so let's turn to obama. You know you describe how he was a pretty profound anti war candidate. He gave a speech that you discuss early in his presidency where he said that perpetual war would prove self-defeating alter our country and troubling ways. You respond to that by saying a great tragedy of the obama presidency is that this insight did not guide his actions and the question is why. Why did obama not follow through on what i believe. We're gonna deeply-held commitments. But you might think in parts of the book you question. That obama isn't the omnibus antiwar. Figure that i think people both hoped he was or fear he was and he had that on the campaign trail as you note. I mean he said he was against iraq but he he did quietly say we're going to keep doing stuff in afghanistan and so i just wanted to make that point. I covered all this time and tried to write that At the time that that this was a very nuanced position which i think is probably a deeper commitment of obama's than any anti war position obama loved subtlety. He loves complexity and he loves substituting. I believe moral rigor with bureaucratic rigor and we see that throughout his presidency when he gives his famous As a state senator two thousand two speech about dumb wars the only dumb or he identifies is the iraq war and he's argument throughout two thousand eight and also was kind of the arguments that after two thousand four. The democratic party sort of wished it had in wish it had as a as an option to it. Which is that the problem with the iraq. War is that it is a distraction from the real war on terror which has to be fought and governs accordingly. But as ben rhodes put it in you quote. Ben rhodes governed accordingly because he fathered there was a real threat there. Do you think that's wrong. Well that isn't actually what ben sets well at one point ben does say that but another point in the book when i asked him why he didn't why obama didn't end the war after killing osama bin laden i think there he points to the reeler reason there which is that like. Let's say that obama says the war on terror is over and starts dismantling the apparatus. There's another terrorist attack in the world ends and what he's trying to express. There is something that i believe is very real and was it was a real constraint on obama which is that a. there's always going to be more terror. Be america's extremely violent exploitative and repressive actions in the muslim world hyphen sure there will be more terror and then and finally the fact that there will be the prospect of more terror. Leads to what we've seen throughout the nine eleven era which is political fear. That is what ben. Is that the fear that still governed. Obama prevented him from exercising. Leadership prevented him from doing what at various points in obama's speeches in his rhetoric she recognizes is the right thing to do. This is what happens. When obama gives a speech at the national defense university in may of two thousand thirteen where he says that an indefinite war will alter our country in profound ways and then just sort of lets that hang out there and doesn't develop it. Obama had an opportunity.

taliban obama zalmay afghanistan obama administration Ben rhodes iraq trump biden Trump united states bush ben democratic party osama bin laden national defense university
"ackerman" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

08:35 min | 1 year ago

"ackerman" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Even you say in your book that the most valorous active is disgraceful. Presidency was the accord with the taliban to this withdrawal and peace process. So isn't a complicated figure on this front. Everything that you say is a fact. But i disagree in pretty much every respective of your interpretation of it when you say that. His anti war rhetoric found a place within the republican party. It absolutely did. The trouble is look at that. Rhetoric is now that rhetoric now is talking about a surrender tip a taliban and the civilizational danger to america of leading an afghan refugees both those who actively aided the american war effort and western interests there in those who didn't so that i think speaks more to the enduring legacy of trump as someone who is willing to use anti war rhetoric when it suited his quest for power. It's also true that the national security bureaucracy lines up against trump except for all the cases. Wait it doesn't as we the department of homeland security and it's aggressive prosecution of interior immigration enforcement locking people up in quitting them in inhuman conditions. And also you know so. Many of the so-called lions of the war on terror is. I often call them in the book. The adults in the from hr mcmaster to jim madison particular. These were people who were very willing to use trump as a vehicle and acquiesce to those aspects of policies that that they found tolerable. Madison particular stood over trump shoulder and applauded at the pentagon when he signed the most one band. Someone who i think represented for a lot of respectable upper-middle-class liberals and democrats in never trump republicans as is opposing. Bulwark against trump. And it's very selective when they in fact do that. The national security bureaucracy acquiesces trump over quite a lot or fines. There are more areas of commonality than they are areas of departure over things. Like as you can see from the reports that the odeon. I publishes how expansive surveillance continues on a glide path throughout the trump era. As you say that kept america out of new wars. He said okay. Sorry he says he he keeps out of new wars but he not only escalates the wars that he inherits in afghanistan especially before he realizes that. There's no other option but to sue for peace with the taliban but remember this person also sent fourteen thousand troops around the middle east particularly the gulf states to keep on a kind of accelerated wore posture with iran and then assassinated qassem soleimani risking really very badly risking a calamitous a new war with iran and it was really more iranian restraint than anything the united states did. And then finally you know. There is an unfortunate tendency in elite national security circles to view acts like bombing a country as an alternative to war rather than on a continuum with war and when trump ultimately attacks Syria without any sort of congressional authorization but instead to applause from you know not just the famous example of them brian. What's his name on. Msnbc who says when the bombs drop you know this is the day trump becomes president. You you really see the ways in which rain. Trump's rhetoric contradicts trump's reality. The common perception is to go with the rhetoric and view that is the important thing rather than the actions that trump takes. So i acknowledge all that and i said at the top. He wasn't a dove he in some senses. Ramped up the war but there is a puzzle. I mean we need to explain why he committed this valorous act of most valorous activists disgraceful presidency. Who knows how engage. Trump was on any of this stuff because he was kind of a it was kind of a random walk through his presidency. But we know it sometimes. He did class with his military and trying to wind things down on some dimensions. Not all i agree. And they had been troop drawdowns and their work. Was this valorous. Act as you describe it. So what accounts for two things account for it. One trump like a very good politician and like a politician who is unburdened by trying to The general consensus in favor of the war on terror both parties that there is no popular demand for the wars themselves. There is lots of very cultivated popular demand particularly on the right for extreme reactions violent reactions repressive reactions to non white people and their perceived allies trump recognizes that that's the order to mine inside the war on terror rather than as a lot of trump's elite enemies focus on the kind of carbonized husk of these failed wards and the second element of that is trump recognizes debt. A threat to his power comes from within the security agencies that are at least nominally. Independent of the presidency and seeks instead to suborn them and this he accomplishes through a series of purges. This year accomplishes through intensification of politicized pressure on them. The arrival of apparatchiks whether it's sessions in his crew Whether it's bar and his crew whether it's real clowns inside a liberty crossing like rick grenell and john ratcliffe trump ultimately uses the rhetoric of a deep state which is not really something that i think we. We have in america in the way that exists in turkey pakistan egypt and so forth but one of the reasons that the united states doesn't have that and has something else that i call the security state a kind of federated collection of security tribes with their own interests of associated with elites in both parties in essentially the major constituency. I'm in this case for the war on terror but the way a deep state manifests in can manifest and can incubate is through the erosion of the rule of law that we have certainly seen accelerate throughout the nine eleven era and on personal allegiance to a political figure. In this case trump wasn't fighting a deep state trump was constructing one and we ought to really grapple with the implications of all of that. Just last point on this and i don't mean to present too much but it seems curiosity. That trump did something this you know. He was on a path to pulling us out of afghanistan. That obama couldn't pull off. And i'm not defending or trying to glorify trump just trying to understand. It seems to be the his case in his attitude towards the endless were either by many of your criticisms about how he ramp things up and deepen the problems but on other dimensions. Paradoxically you know. He did set us on the path to what's going on now in afghanistan and we'll get there in a second It just seems it just seems that we don't have a complete theory of how that happened. I mean i think my book offers one you just may not find it compelling. I tell one more time. The theory once more is that trump is a lagging indicator of the war on terror. He's a lagging indicator of the war on terror as it fails and accordingly you will manage aspects of the war on terror in increasingly violent But not necessarily coherent ways because he recognizes the overseas. Wars are the expendable thing about that. So what does trump do before he sues for peace with the taliban he escalates the afghanistan war functionally doubles the troop presence in afghanistan in two thousand seventeen in a kind of amazing speech where as he announces it. He kind of recognizes At several points in the speech that like it may not in fact yield anything and in particular it won't necessarily because it didn't.

taliban jim madison united states qassem soleimani Trump iran department of homeland securit republican party afghanistan gulf states pentagon rick grenell john ratcliffe Madison Msnbc Syria middle east trump brian egypt
"ackerman" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

04:04 min | 1 year ago

"ackerman" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

"But also The political roles that occur after nine eleven are of left on a still dressed feeder set from the cold war and various both democratic republican and security state actors kind of dress themselves in the in in that clothing particularly in on one level the rhetoric of a existential struggle occurring all throughout the world. That is as One acting cia director would eventually make the title of his memoir. The great war of all of our time. Tom know it's also easy to forget. But very conspicuous when you go back to reading the elite journalism of that time. How thrilling the war on terror was for certain intellectuals and certain reporters for certain intellectuals in certain journalists and certainly certain editors the war on terror was a grand mission that ennoble the united states that the united states was still capable of great things. This did you see boogie nights. Yes you know that scene where dirk bigler is coked up. And he's crying in the mirror because he's trying to get erect. Yes yeah that's the culture after after nine eleven for a whole lot of intellectuals that they're getting off on how powerful the united states can be because they know how powerful v- united states was in they don't recognize how powerful which to say how determinative of so many millions of people's lives the united states remains in that moment and all they want. Is that chance once again to tell the world the way it's going to operate from now on you had respected new york. Times columnists go on television shows to justify the necessity of an unprovoked war of aggression by saying the swaps of the middle. East needed to be drained. And those who are obviously. I don't buy this analysis. It'll this description of problem at where he goes with it. But those presumed to be enemies of mid journey who inhabit those swanson benefit from those swamps. Need to and i quote suck on this and that's just an incredibly pathological response totally To trauma that occurs at a time when mainstream intellectuals respected political figures are very casually diagnosing.

united states dirk bigler cia Tom new york swanson
"ackerman" Discussed on Assistive Technology Update

Assistive Technology Update

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"ackerman" Discussed on Assistive Technology Update

"Windows users talking about features coming out with fifteen which will be coming up here. Pretty darn soon starts off by talking about the fact that it was twenty ten win facetime actually came out. That was ios. Four which is also the first one not named iphone os. Steve jobs original idea was to make facetime on open industry standard. But of course. That really didn't happen. You can only do it with your friends and family who own apple devices but with this new. ios fifteen. What you're going to do. Is you open up a meeting like you normally would on facetime and it gives you a create link. You take that link you copied you email it send it off to somebody else. They click on it. They're able to open it and join. They're not able to do everything that you can do. On a regular apple device on a facetime call but they are still able to do quite a few different things. They're able to change their cameras. They're able to send an share links with folks. There is external microphones in ear buds. Change the view if more than one person's on a call so they're able to use a lot of the features that have been limited to apple users up until now linked to this over in the show notes but it is pretty cool that now if you are someone who loves using facetime on your apple devices you can finally talk to your friends with android phones or windows computers so listeners. Recently i've become aware of the us department of veterans affairs specialty adapted housing assistive technology grant program. We're lucky enough to have dr jeff ackerman on the show today from prehensile technologies. They're one of the grand recipients and he's here to tell us all about the grant program their innovation and really all about prehensile technologies jeff. Welcome to the show. I'm really excited to get into talking about technology. And about pre ansel technologies. But could you start off by telling us a little bit about yourself and your background. Sure so i am. Jeff ackerman teach in mechanical engineering from purdue university a really enjoy their.

apple Steve jobs us department of veterans affa dr jeff ackerman prehensile technologies ansel technologies jeff Jeff ackerman purdue university
National Disability Strategy Pledges to Make Homes More Accessible

Assistive Technology Update

01:54 min | 1 year ago

National Disability Strategy Pledges to Make Homes More Accessible

"Our first story today comes to us from. At today it's titled national disability strategy pledges to make homes more accessible and upgrade job support stirs written by sarah srb and it's about a new program in the uk trying to make housing more accessible commuting more accessible and have better job prospects for individuals with disabilities story talks about the united kingdom's new national disability strategy. This is supported by one point. Six billion pounds of funding and it's focused on improving inclusion in the workplace tackling the disability employment gap and making sure children with special needs and disabilities are at the heart of the strategy. Some of the things that it seeks to do is first of all introduce workforce reporting for businesses and more than two hundred and fifty staff on the number of individuals with disabilities to encourage a more inclusive kind of workplace also launching a new online advice hub available to both the individuals with disability as well as the employer and this is there to provide information and advice on disability discrimination in the workplace and also teach them about flexible work environments individuals rights and the employer's obligations around reasonable adjustments. Or what we call here in the states reasonable accommodations. One thing that i really did like about the story is that it all started off with the united kingdom disability survey and this over fourteen thousand respondents. Now it doesn't really say anything about who the respondents were. But from what i get from the story is it's individuals with disabilities living in the uk. So basically they ask. What are the barriers the you have. What are the things we can do to help you. Because as many folks no assistive technology is a wonderful thing. But if it's not used in the right place for the right reason at the right time is not that great so they really actually reached out to the people and tried to make sure that they can actually get what the folks needed in their hands at the right time

Sarah Srb United Kingdom
"ackerman" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

The Nicole Sandler Show

02:44 min | 1 year ago

"ackerman" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

"In parallel to discussions with lafayette and everybody else I a new listener to the show a week or two ago. Said how would you like to speak with somebody who was who performed at the original woodstock you know right now. Fifty two years ago. This moment. What doc was going on. It was august. Fifteenth one through the eighteenth fifteenth through the seventeenth eighteenth anyway so The person he's talking about is a friend of his The singer melanie. Remember melanie and actually i was. I was sent trot. I thought i was sending laffy a direct message on twitter last night and i asked her remember. Melanie lay down candles in the winter. Candles in the air. You know brand new key. Look what they done to my song ma and so anyway i just wrote that you remember her and i thought i was standing at just to lathi well. It went out on twitter. Regular and people started responding. Yeah love melanie. I remember her. Why is okay well She did a thing. Her son is also a musician. They did a recording over. The last week of her woodstock set they recreated at song for song recorded it and put it up on the internet. And it's available for these three days for donation or for whatever you want to pay. You can watch it for nothing if that's what you can afford Or you can pay whatever you can afford. And it's up there. So she and i've been communicating via email. And here's the thing her piece. It was all about peace. And i thought well. Maybe if laffy can't be here tomorrow. Maybe melanie join us. So i think melanie is going to join us tomorrow. Well-spent we'll put time aside like the first half hour to talk. I want to take your calls because today all we heard from david so i wanna get your calls on what spencer ackerman said what you think how we get past this. How do we move on knowing what we left behind. Do we have any responsibility to the people there. Spencer ackerman things we owe reparations. Don't know so we'll talk about it and then we'll get an injection of songs of peace. How did the lay down go. Well we'll get to tomorrow okay. Because it is that we came to sing songs of peace. So i'll just throw that out there anyway. As i do lately i will leave you with the news because yes there was. Lots of news made last night in over the weekend. So with that. I'll see you tomorrow. Thanks for listening everyone.

melanie lafayette twitter doc Melanie Spencer ackerman david
"ackerman" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

The Nicole Sandler Show

06:04 min | 1 year ago

"ackerman" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

"But nevertheless it's important to point out that biting his doing no such thing despite the fact that people like me would argue that the united states is an obligation to throw open and millions of people who are trying to save their lives and their children's lives into safe harbor in the united states. Not just the few you know. Low numbers if thousands the biden administration is seeking to take out because they worked for the america right. I would argue that taking out. Those you know extracting those Who worked for the united states In afghanistan is a moral floor that's operating in the administration is immoral ceiling and the administration is not challenging these politics. We heard biden talk this afternoon. Defending the withdrawal. That's well and good but listen also to what he said. One you said that He continues. I think the the actual quote was will maintain a laser focus on our counterterrorism mission. There in other parts of the world so you he does see the other aspects of the forever wars continuing if someone inconspicuously and what he didn't say is that they are going to let all these people who are seeking desperately to get out of afghanistan into the united states where they will finally have this as a harbor that america is putting itself did. It's leaving them behind out right but let me ask you this. We're running. you're getting close to the end of the hour. Spencer ackerman but you know joe biden was was caught in this situation. He said i will get us out of afghantistan We needed to get out of afghanistan. Twenty year war that we've sunk lives and money into did he do the right thing here. He's getting a lot of criticism today. What are your thoughts on how he did it. Well he's he's definitely withdrawing. Us troops from afghanistan He was obligated to do that. Right here. the twenty twenty deal that he inherits from trump which. I consider the only our active and disgraceful presidency I i want the way i would put it in. There has been for a very long time. Deep antipathy and wafer-thin support amongst the american public for these wars fighting to his credit. He is also influenced by it Because as you know an experienced politician he recognizes that there is very angry. Constituency amongst arising left within the democratic party that is looking toward abolition of the war on terror. He needs to kind of stay on his good side. At least that's put him in positions where i give him credit for For pursuing but at the same time. He's not going nearly far enough if we're looking toward the abolition of the war on terror now did we recognize the danger. It poses to american democracy. I hear you And and what about the you know the the people left behind. I know you wanna swing. Open the doors as do i. I feel for the women. The children the young boys the the just the people who want to move forward with their lives and it looks like they've been pushed back fifty years in overnight. Do we have any responsibility to them. We absolutely do. We have a responsibility to resettle everyone who wants out of afghanistan. We owe them reparations. Reparations united states destabilized afghanistan not just in this war but previously in the nineteen eighties. If we want to have a hope of making this right that comes with material obligation. We owe the afghan people alive. They can leave. I hear you need more war. No means indicating the consequences of our war. This is obviously too big a subject to cover in thirty minutes. The book deals with a lot of it. Obviously not the events of the last couple of weeks in the last twenty four hours but this is the world reign of terror. How the nine. Eleven era destabilized america and produce trump spencer. Ackerman it's available now and by the way you can subscribe to spencer's newsletter as well at forever. Wars dot sub stack dot com By the title of your newsletter. I'm guessing you don't think the wars are going to ever end. They will be forever believe that. I don't think that we're doomed to be forever at war What i mean by the title is that if we are not paying close attention to this and then acting accordingly We we we. We will be a very dangerous circumstance and so accordingly. We need to have with precision and rigor tracking the permutations the continuities and the departures of the war on terror. Okay there's a lot lot to digest here. I suggest we read the book and then reconvene spencer ackerman thank you so much. I've been following you for years. It's a pleasure to talk to. I really appreciate your joining us today. Well thank you so much for such a substitute interviewed nicole l. Well i appreciate it. Take care you too bye-bye there you have it spencer ackerman and what. Yeah that was a treat for me. Because i have been Reading him and following him for a long time he has one of those original You know He's been doing this for a long long time We ran a little bit over but that's to be expected isn't it. Let me tell you what's happening tomorrow. Tomorrow's tuesday gotta laugh is supposed to be here because it's her week on but she. She had a rough night last night and she emailed me this morning and she said. I don't think i can make it.

america afghanistan biden administration spencer ackerman biden joe biden trump democratic party spencer Ackerman nicole l
"ackerman" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

The Nicole Sandler Show

06:28 min | 1 year ago

"ackerman" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

"Everyone i'd say happy monday. it's not really a happy occasion though it should be right. I mean look back after twenty years in afghanistan. We're out of there right. That should be it. What what more do we need. Well except things. There are not good. There's that old saying you break it you buy it well. We didn't break afghanistan. let's put it that way. Afghanistan was broken before we got there. We just you know. Overstate are welcome. Not that we were ever welcomed but we should have gotten out of there. Well we should have never gone in. But that's you know that's another story We can't totally rewrite history. We did go in and we stayed for twenty years twenty years. That's insane right. That's too much. So i wanna take us back. We've got a great show for you today. I wish i could take credit for The booking genius today because spencer ackerman is our guest as spencer ackerman has been covering issues of national security for his entire career and he just released a new book. It was out a week ago tomorrow. Six days ago. It's called reign of terror. How the nine eleven era destabilized america and produce trump. If i could have chosen who. I would like to talk to today. I think spencer ackerman given this. The release of this book was at the top of the list. I you know. I made the mistake of saying. It was fortuitous. Timing and someone said you know given the vents. It doesn't that doesn't sound too good. I don't mean to You know dance on anyone's grave or make light of a really bad situation but it was fortuitous. Timing on the booking today just happens to be the day they gave me When i said yes yes. I wanted to interview spencer ackerman. So they said how does monday august sixteenth looking. I said it's in the book we're live. He'll be with us. Live at the bottom of the hour so we have not spoken yet on and some days i do pre record the interviews today. I did not. He will be calling a will be calling him and it'll be a foreigner At the bottom of the hour so before we get there. I want to take you back and give you a little bit of historical context so we are coming up on the twentieth anniversary. You know this of nine eleven yard the day we were attacked and guess what afghanistan did not attack us nor did the taliban nope. The taliban did not attack us. You know who attacked us. It was Al qaeda al qaeda and the reports we had were that al qaeda was based and they did the planning and afghanistan. and that's why we went to afghanistan. that's why we attacked afghanistan. You see so much of it. Just never made sense. It didn't then and doesn't now to be honest But here we are and So just a few days after the nine eleven attacks Congress decided well going to go into afghanistan. And out of. I i you know the usual number of representatives in the house of representatives is four hundred thirty five right so this I get say there were four hundred and thirty. Five members of the house on september fourteenth. Two thousand one could have been down a couple. i'm not sure that's why i'm qualifying it. the only one member of congress stood up and said no we do not go into attack afghanistan because of this and so i think on a day like today we do need to take two minutes two minutes and four seconds actually and salute barbara lee because she was the only one who stood up and did the right thing. September fourteenth two thousand and one joan from california's Recognized half all done thing. Hold on my friend all done. I got a speaker. I rise really heavy heart. One that is filled with sorrow for the families and the loved ones who were killed and injured this week. Only the most foolish and the most counts without understand the grief that really gripped our people and millions across the world unspeakable act on the united states really reform or ismay however to rely on my moral compass my conscience and my god for direction. September eleventh changed the world. Our deepest fears now haunt us yet. I am convinced that military action will not prevent further acts of international terrorism against the united states. This is a very complex and complicated matter now. This resolution will pass all the we all know that the president can wage war even without it however difficult this vote may be some of us must urge the use of restraint our state of mourning. Yes some of us must say. Let's step back for a moment. Let's just pause just for a minute and think through the implications of our actions today so that this does not spiral out of control now. I have agonized over this vote but came to grips with it today and i came to grips with opposing this resolution during the very painful yet. Very beautiful memorial service as a member of the clergy so eloquently said as we act let us not become the evil that we.

spencer ackerman afghanistan al qaeda taliban Afghanistan united states Congress ismay barbara lee house of representatives joan california
Can Fasting Improve Autoimmune Conditions?

Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

01:36 min | 1 year ago

Can Fasting Improve Autoimmune Conditions?

"Does fasting impact commune system. Will we know fasting when we when we do. Intermittent were especially extended fasting. We're going to up regulate automa- in autophagy is our bodies self eating and healing and cleansing process. It's also going to reduce inflammation and. That's because we know that insulin. This hormone that takes sugar out of the bloodstream and puts it into the cells. Also triggers inflammatory gene pathways ramps up inflammation in our body. When we're not eating. We lower we lower insulin and therefore we lower inflammation. now there's also studies about. How fasting improves the microbiome. It's like in a sense kind of like mowing and weeding your lawn. Right it's regulating your internal microbiome and ten and actually studies are showing that it favors. The development of good healthy microorganisms like ackerman zia recent affiliate which helps produce healthy mucus lining for your gut which helps prevent against the formation of leaky gut. So we get an improvement in the microbiome improvements in the tight junctions and the stability of our gut. We reduce overall inflammation and we also regenerate immune cells so when we have autoimmune conditions or chronic inflammatory conditions. We have a whole bunch of bad immune cells that are traveling around in our system and when we fast our body actually regulates starts to destroy more of these bad immune cells and forms newer healthier immune

Ackerman Zia
"ackerman" Discussed on Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

03:48 min | 1 year ago

"ackerman" Discussed on Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

"It's so much harder for you so apparently trying to unionize i graduate since mike many universities across the us and that's very large part of it. We don't have a say in our contracts in the expectations in how much we get paid are how many hours were supposed to be working. Leave no safeguards for an advisor. Wants us to work hundred twenty hour weeks. We really don't have a way to combat batman so that's a large part of our unionization efforts is really just trying to take back some agency in our working conditions and really be recognized for the value that we have and the way that we contribute to stem and to the against I gross. we're always trying to redefine success. And i'm so curious. How has that changed for you at or when did it change. Why did it change. I think as i've grown in my advocacy and then my involvement is placed much value on my communities and addressing. The needs of others is like a selfish brat. Before but i think i find myself thinking about my community and people that i may or may not know but that i can help by stack shins that i can take and so i think chimi success is doing good friday people for me whether it's doing science and learning something that the world of know before or that is a helpful clinical use for example like a pharmaceutical or if it's educating on disability discrimination and there's so much you can do that really reaches beyond you and your immediate community can be such a wide definition are all doing good his success to me. Well emily this was such a pleasure. Oh my god. I've had so many. I opening moments and and i really really appreciate everything that you've done in of your work even personally and even in academia. You're always trying to figure out a way to do good and it's such a good reminder that could be your north star. I really really appreciate that. Yeah thank you so much for having me. If you wanna learn more about emily's work you can check out. Emily ackerman dot com. And if you learn more about folks with disabilities and disability rights you can check out the disability visibility project dot com pro boss. Radio is a production of i. Love created studio. Original music composed by this episode was produced by juliana clark the mining leonard christopher nolan and courtney. Cossack engineering was done by stephanie lar- with help from venus shah. Our editorial director is clermont's special. Thanks to taylor nor agency and kaley until next tuesday..

stephanie lar taylor juliana clark kaley Emily ackerman courtney hundred next tuesday emily dot com friday leonard christopher nolan twenty hour agency venus shah clermont chimi Love
Shaping the Future of Health Fueled by Nurses with Mary Lou Ackerman

Outcomes Rocket

02:37 min | 1 year ago

Shaping the Future of Health Fueled by Nurses with Mary Lou Ackerman

"Mary lou. Thank you so much for joining us. Today i'll thank you for for having always excited to share nursing stories and talk about innovation in healthcare. Thank you yeah. And so before we dive into the work that you're doing and your view on nurse. Leadership tucked us a little bit about what inspires your work in healthcare. There's so many so many reasons you know. Of course helping people to live their lives. Underpins the inspiration or energy. I get from working in healthcare that with the numerous opportunities that a career in healthcare offers as a nurse. I've enjoyed every opportunity from my early days as a front line nurse working with individuals and their families into leadership positions working with staff ensuring that they have what they need to provide. The best care possible went into Focus on health. Informatics know understanding what we need to do and the impact it has on patient experiences and now using all of those experiences and knowledge in my current role in innovation design testing solutions at service models to really help reshape the future of health. It's really hard not to be inspired as a nurse. Not only with all those opportunities but the impact that you can make on how people live their best lives through any one of those opportunities at. It's really meaningful work mary lou. And you've done so many things from bedside to executive it's fantastic to see that you've done what you've done and so as you focus on the work that s he health is doing the work that you're doing there. How would you say the organization is adding value to the healthcare ecosystem. Se health is well known. In canada's a leader in home and community also bringing excellence and innovation to seniors lifestyle family caregiving. Our mission is simply to bring hope and happiness and delivered to deliver holistic life care individuals for over a hundred years. We've been providing care in the place. People call their home you know. This could be their own hallmark senior living facilities in clinics in schools or even on the streets last year we impacted the lives of more than one hundred fifty thousand people who approximately seven million visits. This is a whole lot of opportunity to bring hope and happiness by inspiring these carry exchanges with individuals that are really meaningful and impactful in my raw had the privilege to work with nurses health system partners and technology companies who are looking for solutions to modernize the delivery of healthcare now it's with these partnerships that were able to design his service models enabled by the technology to augment clinical care and enhance those care experiences and ultimately changed the way individuals experience health.

Mary Lou Canada
How Is Celiac Disease Diagnosed?

Food Psych

01:30 min | 1 year ago

How Is Celiac Disease Diagnosed?

"Silly disease can't be self diagnosed. And the only way it can be diagnosed with a blood test to see if you have the genetic marker for steel eac along with a blood test for i g antibodies. What's known as a a as an awesome while. You're eating gluten so you need to see if you have those antibodies while you're eating gluten because that tells you whether your body is in fact reacting to gluten and the technical name for this task for anyone who's gonna take this to the doctor and ask about it. Technical name is the serum anti tissue trans glue. Tammy's i g antibodies test or anti t t g. I g a test is quite a mouthful but you can ask your medical doctor about getting it and generally providers with an md or the only ones who can administer this test working with a provider who doesn't have an md. Usually they cannot prescribe tasks like this or right for tests. Like this. And i would really recommend working with an md instead of an alternative medicine practitioner. In your workup for silly disease. Anyway because there's a lot of misinformation and false diagnoses out there about gluten related disorders that are floating around in the integrative and alternative medicine world which is really. Rife with what i call the wellness diet that sneaky modern guise of diet culture that pretends to be all about health and wellness but his actually just another form of deprivation and dietary perfectionism

Tammy
"ackerman" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

04:33 min | 1 year ago

"ackerman" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

"In films and i've sent them over Posters from king kong. And frankenstein and dracula and and some of the objects. I have from the films like the exorcist. And the metal luna mutant from from this island earth will no trouble. It was only call me by my main street. The movie of his. That really impressed me. Now that i know it was all done by hand would have to be jason. The argued the skeleton seen in jason. The it to me. yeah it was. It wasn't done by computers this the other night. The one of the new outer limits really had do. I haven't seen that thousands of little little creatures and none of makes it all computers haven't seen the new limits. I like the old one that was that was the classic. Very classic you covered into your magazine back in nineteen sixty three years. I have those issues hanging around somewhere. See wanna show your listeners. Bela lugosi dracula. Ring wishes was television. That's the actual an actual ring. Oh yes there's the back woah. Oh that is that is folks that which you could see this is. This is an incredible thrill for me to see this ring. Which i consider the original dracula one of the best. I haven't in my collection. I watched it. And we watch it all the universal monsters. I have such a very soft spot in my heart for the original frankenstein. Oh even though even some of the bad ones. That weren't as good and i. I think epoca. Stella frankenstein is hilarious. It is so funny and the what makes it work. Is that all the actors playing. The monsters played straighten. They don't they don't goof on the image of the monsters and yet they're able to have fun with it to. It's historically but the original frankenstein. With james whale and dracula and and the original wolfman i mean jack pierce what a great makeup artist indeed. The was kind of tragic. He didn't exactly have a funeral. Had a bit of a memorial. But i don't think about ten or twelve people were were there and now the The ed wood film. It's a little known fact that i was edwards literary or perhaps illiterate area agent and That picture is so inaccurate. I knew bela lugosi the last three years of eli. He never used a cane. Never say so much as a hell or a damn real gentleman and they have him seen. He's absolutely scatalogical things in the film particularly a running down. Boris karloff which never did in my presence and they show pathetic little group of eight or ten people at his funeral. Will i happen to be the one hundred first person who passed by his coffin out of one hundred and three of us and there was no such thing as well as Wild mongrels in the theater yelling and screaming and tearing up the the the seats when lugosi in because he was in a hospital in that happen and they He didn't fight around with a fake octopus. That was done by george becua- a double for him. Altogether incredibly inactive the inaccurate rather the only saving grace very good impersonation by Johnny depp and of course landau rightfully got his his oscar. If it hadn't been written by two kids. Who weren't even alive when. Bela died if they had asked me. What kind of those questions. Well don't don't spoil it with accuracy you know we've made up our mind. Let show shame. I'm surprised i would have if i were doing something like that. You'd be one of the first people. I approach back because i mean you knew bill. I mean you have to go to people that. Are you know what this man was liked to do. Some kind of accurate portrayal was like. That's a shame. That really is a shame man. It's great to hear that again. Those are the interviews. I treasure of the ones of the folks that aren't this any longer. Because it's timeless to have their voice there is forrest j ackerman. Just flown in. From horror would carla sena to be on scifi talk..

Boris karloff Johnny depp two kids Bela lugosi eight forrest j ackerman james whale bela lugosi ten people Bela thousands of little little cre jason one hundred king kong bill double carla sena twelve people george three years
"ackerman" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

06:56 min | 1 year ago

"ackerman" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

"Designer in film. I am emily and i play jennifer. Going twelve mortiz. Five high on the best of sci-fi talk he was an agent a publisher of famous monsters and an avid john collector. His name was forty ackerman. And even coined the term sci-fi here is a vintage conversation with the late great for ackerman course meeting the los angeles science fantasy society and in nineteen thirty five and recently. We had the sixtieth anniversary. A van vote was there and i gave a little reminiscent talk about it in the earliest days. Great gods came down from mount. Olympus science fiction authors like david h keller and arthur j burks and edmond hamilton and We young fans were thrilled by them. Then a young fella named wayne woodard came to the club and our eyeballs popped out when we saw his fabulous artwork eventually became hans. Buck ray bradbury was so impressed by box work that he took it with him to new york in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine for the first world science fiction convention. I went bradberry fifty bucks to spend three. And a half days and nights on a greyhound bus to get there and one hundred and eighty five was first world convention. Now there may be eight nine ten thousand out of the hundred and eighty five. We had a banquet so expensive. The only twenty nine could afford it. I couldn't even afford to lend. Ray bradbury the money. It was one dollar a plate. Ever pay back fifty dollars Yes he did and He must be thinking in terms of inflation because he never fails at any lecture he gives. It's gone up. I i let him sixty then seventy five. I think except ninety dollars in his memory. What was it like in the early days when you started famous monsters of film which i consider one of the fathers of all the genre magazines well in in one thousand nine hundred fifty seven there were fifty five of its chartered. A plane fans in new york and flew over to london for the world science fiction convention and afterwards we all had a couple of weeks on the continent. I went to france and in paris. I noticed a movie magazine at ordinarily was about all sorts of films. But this was totally on fantasy. So i just picked it up for my collection. Got back to new york. And as literary agent which i still am representing about two hundred authors of science fiction i met up with the publisher who've been putting out kind of a poor man's playboy call after hours and fourth issue is sort of science fiction oriented issue. I had a little futuristic story in it and think a feature called. I was a spy for the fbi. The fantasy bureau of investigation and I was a sci-fi addict and so on and publisher took one. Look at this French fantasy film magazine and in he's mind i could see it all turning into english and he thought well he'd have a ready made one shot here he did care for the magazine was about brigitte bardot or marilyn monroe or the beatles as long as he could sell copies he didn't expect subscriptions or that it was survive well. He was frustrated that no single individual owned all of the photos in the magazine and he would have to deal with half a dozen frenchman and also any began. Translating it seemed was kind of dull and dry and he was going to give up on the notion. And i said well don't look now. I've been seeing these of films from nineteen twenty two libra that i have thirty. Five thousand stills at that point it's grown about one hundred and twenty five thousand now so he didn't know if i was for real came out to hollywood to check me out when he saw was all true. Sat me down at a dining room table with a typewriter and For twenty hours a day. I was there with that hot typewriter. It was smoking so much. I was afraid to go to die of cancer and the publisher had an imaginary sign in the air. Said i'm eleven and a half years old and i am your reader. Mr ackerman make me laugh. Well i had no intention of making anybody laugh. I thought this is once in a lifetime. I intended to put something called wonder. Ram which would be kind of an encyclopedia with one full. Page on frankenstein and dracula and king kong but So i wrote it to a formula making half year. Old kids laugh and about six weeks later i was in a swimming pool and the mother was there talking to another mother. Said you wouldn't believe that crazy magazine. My kid brought up with all. These messed up faces at there. There was a picture of a mommy and it said he fell into a swimming pool and became an instant mud pie and everybody in the pool was breaking up and i thou that came out of my fingers about six weeks ago. Well i issue of famous. Monsters was not distributed nationally it was just a tryout in new york and philadelphia and unfortunately in in new york it was a big snowstorm and snow was up about three feet around the kiosks and the publish. It was afraid this is going to be death. Doom and destruction that nobody would be going out to buy playboy or live or look or anything let alone our curiosity but at the end of four days he called up and said oh my lawyer we got fifty letter. We got two hundred letters here already just from the new york and philly and he said if it carries on like this around the country i think we have a big hit on her hand. He said you think you could possibly squeeze out one more i said. Well i don't happen to believe in reincarnation. But in case i'm surprised and i keep coming back for the next five thousand years. I think yes i can go on and on and on without repeating myself so just before i left l. a. put to bed issue number two hundred eight and then bringing halloween to the kids at the country for years. And these kids have grown up and turned out to be steven. Spielberg george lucas and john. Landis stephen king's at his first story when he was fourteen years old might finally published. It gave him sudden riches. A check for twenty five bucks man who gets ten million dollar advances for books. He hasn't written yet. Do.

wayne woodard london david h keller fifty dollars arthur j burks fifty bucks edmond hamilton ninety dollars sixty new york marilyn monroe france twenty five bucks one dollar Buck ray bradbury emily philadelphia bradberry three Ray bradbury
Murder Suspect Christopher Buggs Mistakenly Released From Rikers in New York City

The Adam Carolla Show

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

Murder Suspect Christopher Buggs Mistakenly Released From Rikers in New York City

"A new york city murder suspect has mistakenly been released from rikers island and he is still at large Fox news reports that twenty seven. We have his picture in case you see him around Twenty six year old. Christopher bugs was jailed without bail at rikers while awaiting trial For more than three years. He's accused of fatally shooting fifty five year old man outside of bodega in brooklyn in two thousand eighteen and he was arrested three days later but in a different criminal contempt case a judge sentenced bugs to just thirty days and that sentence was mistakenly listed as the final disposition in the murder case jail. Staffers didn't realize the error they released him on tuesday corrections officers warned. He is considered armed and very dangerous.

Christopher Bugs Rikers Island Fox News New York City Bodega Brooklyn
Netherlands Faces Unrest As Protesters Demonstrate Against Curfew

Morning Edition

02:34 min | 1 year ago

Netherlands Faces Unrest As Protesters Demonstrate Against Curfew

"A new curfew in the Netherlands was supposed to slow the spread of covert 19, but it ended up setting off the worst civil unrest in four decades. There in a small Southern city protestors looted a supermarket and in Amsterdam, rioters threw fireworks at police officers. Bloomberg News journalist YOST Ackerman's has been covering the unrest from Amsterdam and he joins us this morning. Thanks for being here. Good morning. What happened last night? I mean, just what can you tell us at this point? We've had some unrests ever since the curfew started on Saturday evening from 9 P.m.. It's a nighttime curfew, obviously, and we've had undressed for the for every night since then. You have to say that last night was the columnist since we've had over 100 arrests, which is way fewer than we have in previous days. So as as we've noted, this has been happening since Saturday night. Can you just explain what is animating these protests? It's about the covert restrictions. But what specifically Well, if I'm reading local reports, because this has been happening all over the country and have not been physically there because we called it sure e think we have to distinguish two very distinct groups within the protests were part of the group. For example, we saw this on Sunday here in Amsterdam Beautiful Horse Museum and the Tax museum in the center of town. There are people protest in who believe that the government is infringing on their personal freedom and their protest ng that and obviously the curfew. On top of the block down. This country has been in lockdown since mid October. The curfew is sort of added to that, Andre. Some people are protesting that particular bit. The second group and this is very, very group and very Confusing because it's unclear who these people exactly are. But it's clear from reports and also social media clips on video that some people are basically doing this just to incite violence and riot smashed shop windows. It's a trap with no other motive just for the sake of violence. That is what officials are now trying to determine its clear that officials years of government officials but also legal authorities wanna stand down on this. Which may in part have been. The reason did last night was a bit more quiet and previous evening because police was Out in major force across the country, but that's what they're trying to determine. And then once they've determined why they're doing it more importantly, try to recoup the damages, for example, for shopkeepers. Bus stops that were smashed, etcetera.

Southern City Yost Ackerman Amsterdam Bloomberg News Amsterdam Beautiful Horse Muse Tax Museum The Netherlands Andre Government
Dick Johnson Is Dead Movie Review

Filmspotting

04:00 min | 2 years ago

Dick Johnson Is Dead Movie Review

"Locum to film spotting a couple of weeks back are overlooked. Oh, tours. Marathon had raving about Shantelle Ackerman's John dieleman movie about a woman who hardly left her home this week we returned to the marathon with Barbara. LODEN WANDA WITH JOSH allows us to wonder what may have happened to John Dieleman if she just walked away and left her good for nothing son to make those. Veal cutlets for himself while there that is a thought experiment though John and Wanda very different people i. don't know if it would have gone down just like this very different people very different films that marathon review of Wanda coming later in the show. But First Kirsten Johnson's Dick Johnson is dead a gift to her father and anyone who has a loved one struggling with dementia. She Kills Me Multiple Times. Resurrected Day. Did that. But now it's. The beginning of his disappearance. A eight most about my memory loss is it hurts people's feelings. Pena that you woke up in the middle of the mate last night. Fully dressed. Remember. Any of that. Yeah. What can we do that? Everybody has sort of prepare because everybody dies watch too much for that. After more than two decades as a prolific cinematographer shooting her share of relatively straightforward documentaries, which isn't to suggests boring inconsequential but more traditionally fly on the wall Kristen has now directed to inventive decidedly unconventional ones. Two Thousand Sixteen camera person was a memoir comprised exclusively of footage shot across the globe eighty six different countries Johnson filmed in I believe is the count the content was, of course, deeply personal, filmed and curated as it was by Johnson though only explicitly. So in home movie clips of her twin toddlers playing with our camera and scenes over mother suffering from dementia. Her latest could be called the act of killing Dick. Johnson due to the way she employs fantasy sequences to tackle tough truths as Joshua Oppenheimer did with his twenty thirteen doc about mass killings in Indonesia during the mid sixties. Johnson, the daughter and filmmaker is more upfront. This time we only hear her voice over we occasionally get to join her inside the closet over New York. City. Apartment she records it on an iphone and she's almost as much an on camera presence as she is a behind the camera one affectionately sometimes quite emotionally interacting with their beloved former psychiatrist father battling dementia like his departed wife before Him Josh. Rated Camera Person One of your top ten films of two thousand sixteen calling it an intensely moving and provocatively personal consideration of what it. Means to carry a camera especially in a world that is seen great suffering. We've established how Dick Johnson is dead is more expressly personal than camera person, but it also might be a more provocative consideration of what it means to carry a camera in a world in a family that has seen great suffering not that Kirsten Johnson necessarily crosses the ethical lines and putting her aging father. Through the ringer staging, sometimes playful, sometimes gruesome death scenes for her own Cathartic Purposes I. think we can probably forgive the time. He soberly complains that shooting in the cold on a Manhattan street while covered in fake blood is even more painful than when he had a heart attack. But how much is this exhausting process actually helping him to process the inevitable and does that even matter? But now it's upon, US Kristen Johnson says in her opening video the beginning of his disappearance, and we are not accepting it as viewers. We can't really ever know whether making this movie Got Dick or Johnson any closer to acceptance, which you can't evaluate Josh is whether experiencing Kirsten's death affirming stunts, brought you any enlightenment or at least enjoyment

Kirsten Johnson Kristen Johnson John Dieleman Loden Wanda Dick Josh Johnson Shantelle Ackerman Barbara Pena Joshua Oppenheimer New York Manhattan Indonesia
A Million Mortgage Borrowers Fall Through Safety Net

WSJ Your Money Briefing

07:33 min | 2 years ago

A Million Mortgage Borrowers Fall Through Safety Net

"Early on in the pandemic Congress set up a program to protect homeowners with mortgages from losing their homes. But about a million borrowers have fallen through the safety net missed payments and late fees or putting them at greater risk, and that's further heightening fears of an eviction and foreclosure crisis with more on why so many borrowers have fallen behind on their mortgages despite this relief program, we're joined by our reporter Andrew Ackerman Andrew. Thanks for joining us. Hi, Charlie. Thanks for having me Andrew. I, tell us how this program known as forbearance works. It's unique to this crisis forbearance in the past has been used very narrowly for hurricanes or very regional Zaslov this time it's being used to keep as many people nationally in their homes as possible who are harmed rather virus and it just means you can skip up to a year of payments on your mortgage. And then make them up later. Somehow there's a little bit of a complication because it it applies to all federally guaranteed loans which are most of the market Fannie Freddie or fha backed loans. There is a market for private loans or loans aren't backed by the federal government, and some of those lenders are offering forbearance and others aren't, but for most of the market people can get this. Okay. So when we talk about one million homeowners falling through the cracks, what exactly does that mean that means is that there are a million people who have for whatever reason stopped paying their mortgage their at least thirty days behind or delinquent, and they are not in a forbearance plan. This includes both borrowers with Fannie and Freddie loan as well as people who have a private loan alone from a portfolio loan with a bank or something you know securitise in the private markets will don't. They know about the forbearance program are they scared to participate what exactly is going on here? That's a good question and I think the data's kind of murky but the from talking to lenders, some consumers, some counselors, the picture that we have is that a lot of people don't understand what forbearance means so they don't. Really know what their options are. The other thing is that early on especially early on and still somewhat today the messaging from the lenders was you can take a forbearance, but you're GONNA have to pay all of your mis- payments in one lump sum at the end of the forbearance, and that's really scared people that the scripts that the mortgage companies go through with people on the phone have changed significantly and there's a lot more outreach and education efforts that some of the lenders are trying the consumer groups in some lenders. Say It doesn't go far enough. They'd like better marketing but those are the two factors. There's uncertainty or it's an unknown thing and there's this fear that people have to pay everything back at once and that's just not feasible for most people. Why don't you describe for us the process of trying to obtain forbearance how hard is it? It shouldn't be that hard. There's no documentation requirements. You Literally Call Your Service and you say you can't pay and you WANNA forbearance and they're supposed to the the law, the a rescue bill from March called Cares Act. It says that people are entitled to up to a year. It's says six months that can be renewed for another six months. You have to ask for it. A lot of the lenders have been offering customers short of six months at a time they've been doing three-month for. That can be extended another three months and then twice more beyond the initial six months. Just kind of depends on the lenders it's supposed to be really easy to get. It's still confusing even the we've talked to people who got the forbearance and they were also getting letters from their lender saying that they were at risk of foreclosure because they've missed all these payments and so you get these contradictory messages from your from your lender those lenders are saying hey. Just ignore these letters these contradictory letters we were required, send them by state or federal law, and just know that you've got a forbearance but we still talk to people who said that kept them up at night. Well, I was wondering, for instance, people were jumping through hoops trying to find information about forbearance on the telephone well that he has also been a significant issue if. You talk to counselors and some of the consumers we talked to they would say that I mean they describe this kind of bureaucratic nightmare to be honest everything has happened kind of quickly if you talk to the lenders, they say they're moving to kind of implement this forbearance plan on a scale that's never been envisioned for forbearance before. So they're hiring people to take calls their. End Result is at least initially, the times were significant. People were waiting a long time to get someone on the phone when they did get people on the phone calls might be dropped or they'd be sent to voicemail at the servicer and then they wouldn't hear back. So you have to kind of call the main number again, unfortunately, a lot of the servicers that the way. They're set up you can't just call one representative at the servicer. So you just of are dealing with somebody different every time they're following a script. So what they can say can be kind of very tightly controlled, and if it's with jargon people who aren't very skater even people who are sophisticated and don't know a lot about the mortgage market, you know it can be. It can be very confusing. These terms are not it's not intuitive. Are there a significant number of borrowers who've been in forbearance but of defaulted? Anyway that's the peculiar thing. There are significant numbers are what I would I think it's fair characterizes significant. There's about two hundred, fifty thousand people who were in forbearance at one point since the pandemic there now, no longer in forbearance and. They. are still past due on their loan and it begs the question. We don't know why that's the case. I haven't been able to find someone situated like that. But that's what the data shows and we we talked to people who had experience during the last crisis in two thousand eight and there were always people who just the lenders couldn't reach out to you know they. Knew, they were behind, they thought they were in trouble, and so they docked there servicer at every turn and it's speculative. But people think that that's that's this population kind of fits into that camp and so there are some efforts to reach out to those people. I would also say that two hundred fifty thousand is relatively small. There's fifty three million mortgages in this country Million people have been on forbearance at some point since the crisis started were down, it's under four million. Now, most of the people who've exited forbearance are either performing on their mortgage or they have paid off their loan. So it's an alarming number. It's relatively small and the whole universe and the whole mortgage universe. But there is also a concern that as people kinda hit the six month period who still need help that the number would increase because they won't know they actually have to request the extension, the additional six months. What are the next steps to watch for in this forbearance program? What's on the horizon forbearance figures overall spiked In April, May I believe June and they've steadily declined since the summer or late summer and what will be interesting to watch whether or not that trend continues or you see more people who need help, and probably if you see that, you'll see more people kind of falling through the cracks here where they don't know how to get help that sort of based on macroeconomic trends. Major companies are laying people off tens of thousands of people, and that's I think the Big Question Mark Wall Street Journal reporter Andrew, Ackerman. Thanks a lot Andrew. Hey. Thanks for your

Andrew Ackerman Andrew Reporter Federal Government Congress Charlie Fannie Freddie Fannie Freddie Representative FHA
What sewage water can tell us about the spread of COVID-19

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

02:56 min | 2 years ago

What sewage water can tell us about the spread of COVID-19

"Testing for the corona virus is still limited and way too slow to keep ahead of the pandemic. So now dozens of cities and countries are turning to the Sioux worse to try to find out if cove nineteen is spreading in their community, a Massachusetts based startup called. Analytics, tests, wastewater, and raw sewage for the presence of the novel coronavirus. It started a free pilot project earlier this summer with hundreds of wastewater treatment facilities, and now some cities are starting to pay bio bought for regular monitoring. It's branch of research called Wastewater Epidemiology Dan Ackerman has been reporting on this for member station W. G., B. H.. He told me the scientists new, but since cities are desperate to get a handle on the virus, it's finding new converts. You know a couple early studies. That are not yet peer reviewed by independent experts. So take all this with a grain of salt, but there are a couple of early studies that show this wastewater data can actually be a leading indicator of reported cases. So if a city is closely monitoring what's going on in their sewage, if they see a spike in cove it in that sewage that could give them a few days to prepare for like maybe surge capacity in the hospitals or maybe institute a lockdown to stop it from spreading. Can you give us some examples of cities that have used this technology so far in Cambridge, Massachusetts? Not far from where bio is headquartered. Their public schools district. Actually recently announced that their planned for the fall is to use bio bots sewage data in kind of monitoring whether or to continue with the in person portion of their classes. So they have named three indicators that they're GONNA follow in. One of those is how much covert is in the sewage, and if that gets above a certain threshold that might help trigger them to close down in person schooling and move to remote only. How accurate can it be in terms of estimating you know from rates in a certain amount of sewage? How do they correlate that to a number of people who might be infected the rate that an infected person excretes covert in their stool is really variable. Researchers are still a long way from getting exact numbers of infected people based on the sewage data. So they're sampling raw sewage and looking for genetic material of the corona virus and to be clear this is quite different from clinical. Testing, that would say whether an individual has covid by about looking at a CD sewage in aggregate. So like everyone's waste mixed together and that's a way to quickly cast a really wide net and find out how much how much the virus is spreading. You can get a sense of the trends of whether an outbreak is getting worse or getting better, but you still can't nailed down in exact caseload. So that is one reason that we really need to continue stepping up clinical testing efforts.

Massachusetts Dan Ackerman W. G. Sioux Cambridge
Power 5 Conferences Are Moving Towards Canceling Fall Sports

John Batchelor

00:36 sec | 2 years ago

Power 5 Conferences Are Moving Towards Canceling Fall Sports

"Two of college football's power. Five conferences have cancelled their fall sports seasons due to concerns about the virus. Click. Nevel tells both the Big 10 and Pac 12 leaving the option open to play football in the spring. But all fall sports are postponed. Dr. Doug Ackerman with Oregon State University, says help risks associated with Kobe, 19 played into the recommendation not to play specifically the cardiac, you know, side effects of Of potential covert infections that we don't know enough about. And so we became more concerned about that. Medical experts were advised by both conferences and university presidents. I'm

Football Dr. Doug Ackerman Oregon State University PAC Kobe Nevel
How to Do #MeToo Without Prison

Unladylike

04:58 min | 2 years ago

How to Do #MeToo Without Prison

"When the METOO movement caught fire in two thousand seventeen. The loudest demands centered on calling out offenders and seeing them prosecuted. But metoo founder Toronto Burke has been clear that mass incarceration is not the solution. Today's guest. Dr. Eliza Ackerman agrees. Prison doesn't work. The fact of the matter is only three percent of people who commit rape will adversity a day behind bars. And, the process of going through the criminal justice system is incredibly incredibly harmful for survivors. They are disbelieved, they are victimized again. Their entire sexual history is put on display in the courts. So knowing all of that we are looking for something that actually decreases harm. decreases, violence increases, empathy decreases recidivism, and that's what we find with restorative justice. Dr Ackermann is a criminal justice professor at California State University at Fullerton where she specializes in research on sexual violence and sex crimes policy. She's also a pioneer in her field of resolving sexual violence through a process called restorative justice. So ordinarily, our legal system response to criminal behavior with three questions. Questions what law was broken, who broke it, and what punishment is warranted. But restorative justice asks who was harmed, what are the needs and responsibilities of everyone affected and how can everyone involved collectively repair the harm that was done. Basically, it's all about healing survivors, communities, and offenders today. Eliza is guiding us through the restorative justice approach to sexual violence. Would it feels like for survivors and why it's a promising path toward preventing sex crimes in the first place all to find out? How can we do me to without prisons? Harvey Weinstein in an orange, jumpsuit has come to symbolize me to era justice, but the movement's original vision resonates far more with transformative and restorative justice approaches. Right. So toward the end of last week's part one. On feminism and mass incarceration prison abolitionist. My Shinwari told us about the transformative justice model that model aims to resolve harm without creating additional harm and without involving the legal system at all restorative justice shares that goal, but it can be put into practice both. And outside the system, what it entails is creating safe spaces. For. Survivors and for people who have caused harm to talk about the impacts that sexual harm has had, and it gives the survivor, a safe space to talk about really the very intimate aspects of sexual violence and the aftermath of that. It allows the survivor to ask questions of people who have caused harm. It also allows those people who have caused harm to ask questions at gives them insight about the behavior Dave engaged in that they would never get. From being processed through the criminal justice system, the term restorative justice was coined in nineteen, seventy, seven by prison psychologist, Albert igla-s, but its core principles come directly from indigenous forms of conflict resolution like sentencing circles and peacemaking courts most. Restorative justice programs focused on youth offenders and family welfare cases. But in recent years, experts like Eliza have started applying it to adult cases involving sexual violence for a number of practical reasons. Yeah. Many survivors don't trust police to properly handle their claims and many know their perpetrators and don't necessarily want to face them in a criminal trial plus evidence suggests that the restorative justice approach is both more empowering for survivors that going through a criminal trial and that it's a more effective method for perpetrators to actually learn their lesson and not re-offend. COMES BECAUSE? People. See as soft. Right they see you've done something wrong. You need to do the time for it. But Harsh Punishment Austin to anything to reduce harm to anybody, and if you ask the men that I have worked with what they would rather do face may or face another survivor, sit in a prison south, they will tell you prison cell every time. So I think once people understand that restorative justice is not soft. And, that it's actually much much more difficult to do. Maybe they'll get on board.

Dr. Eliza Ackerman Dr Ackermann Harvey Weinstein Metoo Founder Toronto Burke Rape Fullerton Shinwari Albert Igla-S Austin Dave Professor California State University
Actor Jordan Fisher Gets His Dance On In New Netflix Movie

Weekend Edition Saturday

00:45 sec | 2 years ago

Actor Jordan Fisher Gets His Dance On In New Netflix Movie

"New Netflix movie work it. Quinn Ackerman is an overachieving teen with her heart set on attending Duke University. But she knows that perfect grace are not enough. I need you to to help help me. me. Get Get on on the the dance dance team. team. Don't Don't dance dance it it off. off. Working Working competition competition is is in in five five months. months. I I don't don't need need you you stinking stinking up up the the place. place. Start Start my own damn team. Then you probably can guess where this is going. The quintessential dance movie with a teen love story between the straight a student and a choreographer played by Jordan Fisher, whom she begs to coach. Her team of misfits You might know multitalented Jordan Fisher from Broadway. He was in Hamilton and he was in another teen romcom toe. All the boys PS. I still love you. And he joins

Jordan Fisher Quinn Ackerman Duke University Netflix Hamilton
Body acceptance vs. liberation

Real Talk with Dana | Nutrition, Health

05:56 min | 2 years ago

Body acceptance vs. liberation

"So Johnson is the founder of the Intuitive D. and she has an amazing new book about intuitive eating out that we're GONNA get into so last episode that she was on I. Think is episode eighty three a Lincoln in the show, but you should definitely listen to that because we talked about misconceptions about intuitive eating and we talked about health at every size. Like Y. You're saying got into this work so welcome back. Thank you so much Dana I still can't believe that it's been a year since we last talk. That is absolutely nuts but I'm glad were chatting again. Will it's funny because it feels like this spring has felt like four years, but like an actual year ago. Like last summer doesn't feel that long ago. Yeah, it's just like a time warp. I don't even know. I was just GonNa say it does. It definitely does feel like a time work? So one of the things that I wanted to hug today, and we're going to jump right in just so we can get straight to the meat of it. Since you have a new book that's out and we like obviously WanNa talk about that, but the things that you talk about in the book that I think is so so helpful for people to understand whether you're new to this whole body, positivity, Acceptance Movement, or you're like kind of dipping your toes intuitive eating your like, but wait like. Isn't this what it isn't like? Earn people being unhealthy and everything like that. So could you talk about some of the? Biggest myths or misconceptions about like body acceptance in the body positivity movement. I think the first one that comes to mind if it's just like so common when when I'm talking with clients about this is like this perception that you know body acceptance work body, positive works should result in like you feeling really good about your appearance or like loving. No way that your body looks loving your the roles and you know whatever all the stuff. It loving, your solid cellulite, and like while obviously, there's nothing inherently wrong with trying to strive for like having a good relationship to the appearance of your body. I think that like. Really like the meat of what we need to all work on shift towards is. Kind of having a bit more of a neutral relationship to the appearance of her body at really like spending, less time and energy on the appearance of our body are thinking about the appearance of body So that's kind of I think that's like the first thing that I think when I think of the misconception around that work. And can you talk about? Why we're all so obsessed with our appearance, and it's funny, 'cause like. We women men everybody like our whole culture around the world. Really can you can say is to some degree like. With appearance America definitely a lot more right, but that then gets tied into like health and morality and Food and manipulating your appearance, but then it's funny because we see that Barry overtly in like Diet, culture, fitness, culture, and everything like that, but then it even translates into like this bastardisation of body positivity that it's like. Oh, well I have to love myself all the time and I find not loving myself in everything about me all the time. That I must be failing. Right yeah, no, it's! It's so true, and it's like I feel like I mean I I don't have the widest. Lens on this because I've grown up in this culture, but also like it's very clear that like we have like culture going on, and we're constantly exposed to imaging, and like the ideal quote, unquote imaging. Everyone's closing the the best selby. Constantly so and and we're just inundated all day every day from every angle, and not to mention were inundated with. One particular kind of body over and over again, and it's like if you don't once before you realize that that that's what's happening. It's just like okay, so obviously. That's I should look like, and it's just very like subconscious thing that's going on but yeah I think culturally like we're just so fixated on On appearance because of this imaging of or being inundated with all the time and I, also kind of feel like. It's. I don't know it's almost like escaping deeper stockholder like on an individual level, but it's like we're all kind of like running from our we're. We're so disconnected for emotions that like if we just focus on like okay. Well I've heard for perfect. My appearance show up perfectly that I'll be happy. Great the perfect you know. Yeah definitely I, mean 'cause we know as clinicians right like a lot. A lot of people will use dieting or exercise, or this kind of like obsession, or some people call it like drive right to constantly improve themselves, and this goes beyond dieting and bodies to lick. This goes along with perfectionism. It can go into work, and it can go into. You know really every of our lives, but when we're so let's call it a nice word that people say driven right to go in pursuit of any of these things. One of the deeper reasons that people tend to do that is because they are running from something. You're running from emotions that you don't WanNa feel you're running from like maybe past traumas or like, and some people would call that coping mechanism, but then the farther at that goes, it's not necessarily a healthy or helpful coping mechanism anymore because you're just running from those problems right and especially with something like dieting that ends up being this thing where it. Explodes in your face. Right like you're using this coping skills like. GonNa make myself smaller. I'm going to stick to the Diet. I'm going to not take anymore. Whatever and then like you find yourself physiologically, you're driven to eat the cake and like do all the things the opposite about it literally explodes in your face, and you're like. Oh, I just don't have the willpower. Oh, just like suck. I need to try harder, so it's like you end up in like crazy like cycle and thinking that you're the problem in that cycle.

Acceptance Movement Dana Founder Johnson America Barry
"ackerman" Discussed on Going Solo with Matthew Mayer

Going Solo with Matthew Mayer

03:42 min | 2 years ago

"ackerman" Discussed on Going Solo with Matthew Mayer

"There was a guy in the English Department at Stanford With My Dad I don't know if he was a full professor that time or not, Willard Wyman And he had this thing that he did in the summers where he was subcontracted by the National Forest Service to do trail building and trail maintenance in Yosemite and in the Stanislas National Forest. And After my mom suicide I was one lost little boy. I worked with Wyman and some other kids all from troubled, but you know I I I'm not quite sure what the criteria was for. You know who was on these things. But to have spent. The summer after my mom suicide. Building trails in Yosemite. absolutely saved my life and this hit me very strongly only a couple of months ago and now. There's a tr- and the guy was asking me. He said were were, did you? Were you involved in the last trail? And that's that's the name that was used only within the forest service, but apparently that come up, and and there was some some. Sense that I had something to do with that well, the the w. a the the was ackerman wyman Ackerman citizen citizens, so it was a little cutoff trail that went past, Rogers Lake that connected Pay Valley to to twelve meadows. And only a couple of weeks ago, I had a photograph of Rogers, Lake and and This is what saved my life. Oh, there, okay, just found not only the map, but the picture of of Rogers Lake. That saved my ass. to be to be in that greatness and in that beauty. I think I'd always loved. You know the outdoors and the rest of it, but. that that shortly interview put me back in touch with. That salvation and that literally talking salvation. This back. Think, this is what. Senator my life around something, great and beautiful. and which is why I need. Why I need to live here as as opposed to you know Moreno Palo Alto I. Mean you know the now Miranda that what they say that Brennan's is now the most expensive county live in the United States and Paolo Alto Course Being Palo Alto. Thank, God I still own the building. That was the office for Windham Hill. That's that's GonNa pay the bills for the rest of my life. Anyway I digress in a big way but I. I'm GonNa. Take some pictures now. I'll show you this, but you know for us to. You know to get into nature and and and surfing. I mean to these day to this day. Being out in the waves is is also salvation. To be in a lineup. He have you served at all. You know on an funny story, so it was my first time in Hawaii this last Where were you? Where were you always in? Nollie! My my younger brother was getting married. and..

Willard Wyman Rogers Lake National Forest Service wyman Ackerman Stanislas National Forest Rogers, Lake Moreno Palo Alto Yosemite professor Palo Alto English Department Stanford Paolo Alto Hawaii Pay Valley Windham Hill Senator United States Yosemite. Brennan