35 Burst results for "Access"

The Latest: Group files civil rights complaint against Idaho

AP News Radio

01:02 min | 16 hrs ago

The Latest: Group files civil rights complaint against Idaho

"A civil rights complaint has been filed against the state of Idaho for allegedly discriminating against older patients in its coporate care rationing guidelines the group justice in aging is asking the U. S. department of health and Human Services to investigate Idaho's published crisis standards of care guidelines the emergency plan that's been enacted to prioritise patients while hospitals are overwhelmed with cold with nineteen the advocates say the guidelines discriminate against older adults especially black and native Americans by using factors like age to determine which patients first get access to lifesaving care state officials as Idaho standards are based on ethical obligations while protecting medical resources public health officials in Arizona Utah and northern Texas had to modify their crisis care plans after similar complaints were filed Jackie Quinn Washington

Idaho U. S. Department Of Health And Utah Arizona Texas Jackie Quinn Washington
The Hunter Biden E-Mail Coverup Is the Clearest Evidence Yet of Media Corruption

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:47 min | 1 d ago

The Hunter Biden E-Mail Coverup Is the Clearest Evidence Yet of Media Corruption

"Im in houston texas about three hours away near the campus of a very very left wing. University of texas in austin is our friend. Katie mcfarland former deputy national security adviser. She's in the lone star state to talking forget. Her book is revolution trump washington. We the people all right. Kt there's a lot to cover today. You ready ready to buckle up. I'm reading all right story out. Hunter biden emails. They looked to be authentic Legit i guess for two million dollars you could have hunter biden moolah as people trying to unfreeze freeze libyan assets. This is very dangerous. The white house is for sale. We know that. Kim your take on that and then what other black males floating around around there. Yeah i'm not surprised at this story. I think a lotta people for a long time. If now that the biden inc was a pay to play scheme whether it was with ukraine weather was with russians whether it was you know chinese anybody. That was the way you got access to. Joe biden vice-president and probably way to get access to him as president is to pay the family to get married. Get something what has always upset me about. This is why the media crush the story so the new york post had. The story had a laptop have the emails and in trying to report it the rest of the media crush them in fact the social media twitter banned the new york post the oldest newspaper in the united states banned them for their having a story that was critical of joe biden during the presidential campaign so to me. It's a bigger problem than just corruption. The white house. It's it's corruption the media you know the watchdog. We're not watching. In fact they were actively working on the other

Hunter Biden Katie Mcfarland Biden Inc University Of Texas Houston Austin Texas Joe Biden White House New York Post Washington KIM Ukraine Twitter United States
New Report Says Hunter Biden Demanded $2 Million From Libya

The Dan Bongino Show

01:43 min | 1 d ago

New Report Says Hunter Biden Demanded $2 Million From Libya

"Very serious story With broke yesterday on Business Insider broken incredible story about Hunter Biden again I say incredible because it's not incredible What's incredible about this story is if the media would have done their job before the 2020 election where remember that poll in November of 2020 one in 6 voters would have changed their vote if they knew the level of corruption from the Biden family and hunters deals Remember that poll Well this story Business Insider which is covered by Fox as well At Hunter Biden is alleged now to have tried to scam Libya out of $2 million too to try to get some funds Libya had locked up released Clearly trying to pay Hunter Biden who is a grifter for access to his dad to get money's Libya felt they were owed released so they were going to give 2 million to hunter according to the Business Insider report Now what's incredible about the story What's incredible about the story is it's totally not incredible And if the media would have done their jobs back in 2020 before the election when they knew Hunter Biden was running a huge grift scam campaign with his corrupt loser dad sitting in The White House now It's likely the election would have turned down not just differently but far differently Joe Biden likely would have lost this race in a landslide But because the media worked with the intelligence agency to hide this valuable information from the public because they are corrupt they effectively rigged rigged rigged left he's like you're not allowed to say that You don't tell me what we're allowed to say You can stick that up your wazoo We say what we want and we speak the truth It is now clear as day that the FBI tried to rig the 2016 election with the Hillary Clinton campaign In fact fact the verdict is in Fact the gavels

Hunter Biden Libya Business Insider Biden FOX Joe Biden White House FBI Hillary Clinton
Dissecting Fulton County Fraud With Audit Expert Heather Mullins

The Charlie Kirk Show

03:14 min | 2 d ago

Dissecting Fulton County Fraud With Audit Expert Heather Mullins

"We have an audit expert. Who's been doing. Phenomenal work for real america's voice. Heather mullins high going heather. Thank you for joining us today. And thank you for the great work that you are doing. let's start with georgia and the audits. You've been doing a of work for real america's voice as an investigative reporter. Tell us what is the status of finding out what actually happened in the two thousand twenty election in the state of georgia charlie. There's actually quite a few investigations going on in georgia. The one most recently that i covered this week was A lawsuit filed by a group called voter. Gpa they're an election integrity group. That's been working in the state for over twenty years They filed the lawsuit. Too much unseal. And forensically analyze the absentee and mail in ballots in fulton. County georgia specifically. It's the exact same ballots that we saw in that state farm arena video that went viral of people scanning and ballots that they pulled out from underneath that people at one o'clock in the morning after observers were sent home well. Those ballots are the ones in question in this lawsuit and a judge so far have actually already unsealed then and what the the plaintiffs were given where the digital ballot images so every time a ballot is scanned in the voting machine Creates a digital and that is stored so they had access to those unfortunately in the resolution on images such poor quality that the forensic expert asked for a higher resolution and so where this case was a couple months ago was the judge had actually ordered that the town officials had to rescan those ballots at a higher resolution and hand them the images because georgia's secretary of state fouls degrees in his lawsuit claiming that it's anybody touch those ballots. It'd be felony. Charlie almost to try to like stop the audit from going forward and so this judges like all right. We'll working we're gonna take these people that can legally handle those ballots and we're gonna make them re skin them at a higher resolution so this case went back to court on monday and the attorney representing fulton. County is gonna georgia's talk criminal. Defense attorney is a guy named don samuel who tiny white collar criminal defense course at georgia university but then thinking right so he started saying that. The georgia bureau of investigation. The secretary of state office had already done an investigation and and there was no fraud like nothing was found and was basically trying to say you know grant my motion to dismiss this case. Will the judge said. Can you cite the report. Is anybody in this courtroom. Have any report from the secretary of state office. The georgia bureau investigation on anything. They've done that pertains to essentially counterfeit balance. Nobody had any answer. So the judge pause this lawsuit and is giving the secretary's day gb. I twenty days to basically bring them up to speed if they've done anything and if not i mean we go back to court on november fifteen the judge then move forward to continue until about

Georgia Heather Mullins America Fulton Heather Charlie Don Samuel Georgia University Georgia Bureau Of Investigatio
A Perpetual Pandemic Is Extremely Lucrative for the Pharmaceutical Industry

The Charlie Kirk Show

00:42 sec | 3 d ago

A Perpetual Pandemic Is Extremely Lucrative for the Pharmaceutical Industry

"Pharmaceutical industry and the pharmacists walgreens. Cvs they don't want you to be able to get access to ivermectin. No one really makes money with that. They don't want us to be able to follow the way of india that was able to turn the corner. A perpetual pandemic is extremely lucrative for people that want to go to nine booster shots. Twelve booster shots. Fifteen booster shots. Being a state of fear is very profitable for america's ruling class. fear creates power on. Certainty creates profit

Walgreens CVS India America
Even CNN's Jake Tapper Is Calling Out Anthony Fauci These Days

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:28 min | 5 d ago

Even CNN's Jake Tapper Is Calling Out Anthony Fauci These Days

"Ouchi is so discredited at this point. Even jake tapper calls them out over the weekend on cnn. Jake tapper is trying to get foul ci to his belief that boosters are needed for everyone now and who knows about boosters. i read an article about antibodies. And how the rich are supposedly running around getting antibody tests all the time to try to stay on top of that issue and it is. It is a kind of a reasonable question. Where are your antibody. What's your antibodies level. After a vaccine after the shot. And i know there's different types. The one is the mr a or the md anna supposedly part of the virus. So if i got the johnson. Johnson vaccine in march will my blood tests show antibodies. Now i don't know and this article said that people that have access to you know concierge medicine doctors. They're running off getting antibodies tests. What does that tell you somebody. I know that had that had coverted. I've shared this with you lot. It's anecdotal but it's true doesn't have any antibodies. According to her blood test

Jake Tapper Ouchi CNN Johnson
After Setback, Democrats Vow to Push Ahead on Immigration Overhaul

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:11 min | 5 d ago

After Setback, Democrats Vow to Push Ahead on Immigration Overhaul

"The senate parliamentarian ruled yesterday. The democrats are not going to be allowed to use it to grant a path to citizenship for all the illegals. Some major roadblock big big blow to the democrats who were stupidly hoping to provide a pathway for millions of illegals using reconciliation so they could have only passed with fifty vote threshold as opposed to the usual sixty votes so now democrats according to access plan to go back to the parliamentarian to see if there are ways to provide other kinds of legal immigration status to the undocumented populations. I mean chuck schumer told reporters issued a statement. We are deeply disappointed this decision but the fight to provide lawful status for immigrants in budget reconciliation

Senate Chuck Schumer
Haitian Government Asks Biden Administration to Pause Mass Deportations

MSNBC Morning Joe

01:56 min | 5 d ago

Haitian Government Asks Biden Administration to Pause Mass Deportations

"The haitian government is asking the biden administration to pause mass deportations of migrants back to haiti amid a surge of haitian migrants crossing the rio grande river river. Nbc news correspondent. Morgan chaska got exclusive access to the southern texas encampment. These migrants are now calling home. These are the men women and children calling the shade of texas border bridge. Whole the group. Mostly from haiti. Now number nearly fifteen thousand strong. They've come here with little hoping to claim asylum and turn launching a massive mission for state and federal agencies secure. The border provide and process every single person over the last few days we moved approximately thirty three hundred individuals. We expect that number to increase in the days ahead. Our crew granted exclusive access to visit with those whose futures remain uncertain. This woman named yvo telling us she's been here more than a week and his barely eaten for many. They're only nourishment the food and water handouts. That can't come fast enough now has been only a matter of days since this group's swelled in size underneath the bridge but as we push this direction you can see that there is already a small city that has formed here in the shadow out this rich plants from the riverbank being used in some cases as temporary roofs as children playing the shade. Everyone trying to do whatever they can to stay cool. Massive accusations along the border began this morning. Some planes flying migrants from san antonio direct to port-au-prince haiti others are being bused to other processing locations. Such as paso laredo. Those flown home today returned to a country still reeling from a devastating earthquake. Deportation flights only expected to arrive in the coming

Haitian Government Biden Administration Rio Grande River River Morgan Chaska Haiti Nbc News YVO Texas Prince Haiti Paso Laredo San Antonio AU Earthquake
The Gut-Brian Axis

Food for Thought

01:28 min | 5 d ago

The Gut-Brian Axis

"Now is a good time to go into the evidence surrounding something could the gut brain axes i guess kind of it is and why suddenly become not suddenly. I'm bane. i guess discovered why it's important. Yeah great ray. And it is so much in evidence around the gut brain access and what we do know from. The studies is that the gut brain axis is all these microbes have a two way communication between basically the entering nervous system of the gastrointestinal tract so alcott and the central nervous system. Which is the brain the vegas nerve and is referred to as the gut brain axis now. This communication occurs via the power sympathic nervous system which also is known as the rest and digest mode and this is the complete opposite response to our sympathetic nervous system. Which is that fight or flight mode which gets us ready. But the power sympathetic returns our body to the state of calm and rest whereas the sympathetic massive nervous system get the body ready for that fight or flee which can increase blood pressure breathing slowing down at digestion and take him blood and oxygen away to other parts of the body. So it's important that people know is this of two way. Communication almost like a highway caused going back and forth between the garden rain.

Vegas
How the FBI Is Using Personal Data to Track Down Jan 6. Protestors

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:18 min | 6 d ago

How the FBI Is Using Personal Data to Track Down Jan 6. Protestors

"Stick with one more detail of this investigation that some may not be aware of. And i i haven't rehearsed any of this with you. I mean. I read what you write. But we don't clear talking points through guests. We never do talk to us about how and this is from. Friends is friends of mine. I mean i. Was there on january six. I was in the front row listening to the president and then i had friends who were in the massive crowds who knew people who walked to congress to do with the president told them to do which is to be peace and patriotic. And now i'm hearing stories of people who are living in alaska liv living in ontario. Sorry in in Oregon living thousands of miles away from dc who are in dc for the january six Celebration protests whatever you wanna call it and to a having the fbi. Knock on their door. And who are being tracked down and interrogated or interviewed based upon the location of their cell. Phone on that day is are people telling me fantasies. When i hear these stories julie now the fbi has collected. I believe what they call meta data from all of the cell tower. I don't know how this works But they are getting all the information location of private american citizens who are assembling freely in dc and then using it to track them down later yes and working with cell phone providers to get that to confirm the identity the cell phone number. It's picked up with the owner of the phone so they're working collaboratively companies giving away the information or they absolutely are yes and so so. Google is for all of the Cell providers facebook and twitter are helping as well to access archived access information that was on deleted social media accounts. They're going back and getting say posts or facebook messaging turning those over to the feds so they can use that information a really interesting case to talk about facebook memes. That were used in a court document against somebody And so they're all working collaboratively so it's not so people who weren't inside the capitol building did nothing wrong people who were just in

DC FBI Alaska Congress Ontario Oregon Julie Facebook Google Twitter
How the FBI Is Using Personal Data to Track Down Jan 6. Protestors

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:18 min | 6 d ago

How the FBI Is Using Personal Data to Track Down Jan 6. Protestors

"Stick with one more detail of this investigation that some may not be aware of. And i i haven't rehearsed any of this with you. I mean. I read what you write. But we don't clear talking points through guests. We never do talk to us about how and this is from. Friends is friends of mine. I mean i. Was there on january six. I was in the front row listening to the president and then i had friends who were in the massive crowds who knew people who walked to congress to do with the president told them to do which is to be peace and patriotic. And now i'm hearing stories of people who are living in alaska liv living in ontario. Sorry in in Oregon living thousands of miles away from dc who are in dc for the january six Celebration protests whatever you wanna call it and to a having the fbi. Knock on their door. And who are being tracked down and interrogated or interviewed based upon the location of their cell. Phone on that day is are people telling me fantasies. When i hear these stories julie now the fbi has collected. I believe what they call meta data from all of the cell tower. I don't know how this works But they are getting all the information location of private american citizens who are assembling freely in dc and then using it to track them down later yes and working with cell phone providers to get that to confirm the identity the cell phone number. It's picked up with the owner of the phone so they're working collaboratively companies giving away the information or they absolutely are yes and so so. Google is for all of the Cell providers facebook and twitter are helping as well to access archived access information that was on deleted social media accounts. They're going back and getting say posts or facebook messaging turning those over to the feds so they can use that information a really interesting case to talk about facebook memes. That were used in a court document against somebody And so they're all working collaboratively so it's not so people who weren't inside the capitol building did nothing wrong people who were just in

DC FBI Alaska Congress Ontario Oregon Julie Facebook Google Twitter
Children Should Not Have Access to Smartphones

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:28 min | 6 d ago

Children Should Not Have Access to Smartphones

"A lot of the kids that were like twelve and thirteen. I said how many of you have phones and every hand went up. That's really bad. I'll be honest with you guys. No person should have a phone until they're eighteen. If that and i'm not trying to make you feel bad but i grew up without one and it was one of the greatest gifts from god that i grew up without a smartphone. Like this this weird creepy window into talk controlling your children. It's easy to give your child phone because it keeps them entertained. And you don't actually have to worry about what they're doing half the time i asked them i said. How long do you guys spend on your phone like six hours seven hours. I said you guys should smash your phones. I'm not kidding. And i'm happy to get into. This is how i think. Technology has really played a role. I had a reporter once. They say you're anti technology. Yeah okay sure yeah. I mean in my anti smartphone. I mean i'm anti what what what it's made us. Be calm of course. And we know so little about the neuroscience of what this does to our interpersonal relationships to spiritual development to mental health and so challenged them provocatively league because it gets young people's attention because we're in competing for attention with students because they're on talk all the time in which is disastrous chinese by operation. That has mind. It's true that has mind all your children's data and they all have it. I asked them and they're like oh. Yeah we use it on my gosh and yeah i just told him i said get off the phone and start living in the real

Exploring the Inner Hebrides

Travel with Rick Steves

02:24 min | Last week

Exploring the Inner Hebrides

"In some ways. The traditions of scotland survive most vividly in its islands off the west coast. These are the hebrides we've invited to of our favorite scottish guides into the studio to share stories and tips on their favorite islands. Liz listener is from fife. Cullen mirrors is from glasgow. And they're both here with us now to share a little better understanding of scotland's inner hebrides. Thanks for joining us. Thank you he cullen when you Think about the hebrides. We hear that word a lot hebrides. These are the islands off of the west scotland. But there's inner and outer hebrides. What's the story there. So and our hebrides. They're basically the ones that are closer to mainland scotland to hebrides further out. So probably most people going to visit islands of scotland and are of to access lists when you're thinking of the inner hebrides which ones are your favorites in which one's the most popular with tourists. Well open which is on the west coast of scotland is known as the charing cross of the islands as the saying the air unto the lord belongs and all the it contains except the kyle's in the western isles for these are all mic planes mcleans caledonian mcleans of the fatty company. So people will come to open. And that's the jumping off point to go to the islands. So open is the charing cross. Charing cross would be the big train station in london. Somewhere you depart go to different places so open would be the jumping off point. It's the big port on the mainland. From where the ferries go absolutely so. Kyle's what is kyle's kyle's of the stretches of water so the leyland's eye for the straight and on the missiles ago everything the lord's except for the aisles and the waters and that could make prince how the the the metrolink and forwards to the islands they caught passengers. The coty fleet the cardi tourists. So this is the ferry system caledonian mcbrayer because every time i think of an island scene. There's a dramatic ferry coming across. It is just beautiful thing. And you have the jumping off point in the real terminal Open and so people coming from moscow will die sleek connect with the on out so an answer to your question. Probably the most popular are the ones closest mull. Iona we can come back to 'cause i owned is really accessible as d. Are right for a particular reason

Scotland Liz Listener West Scotland Fife Cullen West Coast Glasgow Kyle London Moscow
Former NYPD Commissioner Bernie Kerik on America's Heinously 'Loose' Borders

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:52 min | Last week

Former NYPD Commissioner Bernie Kerik on America's Heinously 'Loose' Borders

"Bring back america's hero new york city police commissioner former new york city police. Commissioner bernie carrot bernie thanks for staying with us exports bernie as police commissioner nine eleven. You experienced what happens when america's borders are loose or non-existent as they are right. Now you experience with the influx of migrants who are not vetted does an ends with thousands of americans dead. What are your feelings about. The influx of gani migrants on planes being transported here by the biden administration. Without any real vetting. What does that make you think of nobody. Nobody knows what happens. When look people into this country that you know wanted the minds of this country. And i don't care what the president says. I don't care what milly general milley says or the president's press secretary. There's no in how you can bet the people coming in from afghanistan and here's why aghanistan was ruined by the afghan government which is a logger of power. The taliban is taking over. The taliban is a terror group. We don't have a diplomatic relationship with this country. They're not going to have relationships with russia. China in iran have nothing to do with the united states. Only to get money lewis. That's what they're gonna do. They're not gonna give us their intelligence On operations they're not going to give us access to until we have two hundred thousand people coming to this country and if they're not in a us dod database or cia database or an fbi database. They're not in one of those. We don't know who the hell they are. We don't know where they came from. We don't have any background on then and we got nowhere to go get it.

Commissioner Bernie Carrot Ber Gani New York City Biden Administration Milly General Milley United States Aghanistan Afghan Government Bernie Taliban Afghanistan Russia Iran Lewis China CIA FBI
Access, Travel Rules Influence Missionary Vaccine Policies

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | Last week

Access, Travel Rules Influence Missionary Vaccine Policies

"Access and travel rules are influencing missionary vaccine policies covered nineteen vaccine refusal rates may be higher among white evangelical Christians but the international mission board which deploys thousands of missionaries is not hesitant about the shot the I. N. bi is the global missionary agency of the Southern Baptist Convention it announced this month that it's requiring vaccinations for missionaries they're sending into the field amid the pandemic other faith groups are approaching the issue in a variety of ways the church of Jesus Christ of latter day saints is giving unvaccinated missionaries assignments in their home countries the United Methodist Church strongly encourages missionaries to get vaccinated but does not require it I'm Walter Ratliff

International Mission Board Southern Baptist Convention Church Of Jesus Christ Of Latt United Methodist Church Walter Ratliff
Biden Threatens New Ethiopia Sanctions as Tigray War Widens

CNN 5 Things

01:12 min | Last week

Biden Threatens New Ethiopia Sanctions as Tigray War Widens

"Today. President joe biden signed an executive order authorizing broad sanctions against ethiopian and allied forces involved in the ongoing conflict in ethiopia. The new order does not immediately impose sanctions but it says it will if the parties don't start to negotiate a ceasefire and allow for humanitarian access. The white house is looking to see action in weeks not months. The situation in tigray has become dire. Cnn has uncovered evidence of mass detention sexual violence and horrific killings hundreds of thousands face famine and humanitarian access has been largely cut off. Cnn's nema l. bagger who has reported expensively on the abuses has more on the situation for months now we have been investigating atrocities committed by ethiopian and allied forces into gray. It's clear to us this marks. A new chapter in the ethnic cleansing of the region escapees eye witnesses from the if you open. Border town of hamadeh described to us a renewed campaign of mass incarcerations and executions the numbers. That that's telling us are extraordinary. We're talking about possibly over ten thousand people detained just for being today and they say.

President Joe Biden CNN Tigray Ethiopia Bagger White House Hamadeh
Telegram Emerges as New Dark Web for Cyber Criminals

UK Column Podcasts

01:35 min | Last week

Telegram Emerges as New Dark Web for Cyber Criminals

"Of course is has been highlighted over the last number of months as being a platform of choice of people that are Organizing events to protest against locked on or other things but the demonization of t. Telegram is continuing appears here with the financial times plus a cybersecurity company producing the information. That box up this article telegram emerges as a new dark web for cybercriminals. So we've got to shut tub telegram dying straightaway thought signal. Was the dark web for this week. It's telegram this week. It's telegram so this was an investigation by cyber intelligence group cyber and together with financial times. And they say that they find a ballooning network of hackers sharing data leaks on the popular messaging platform sometimes and channels with tens of thousands of subscribers lured by its ease of use and light touch moderation and many kisses. The call ted resembled that of the markup is find the dark web a group of hidden websites that are popular amongst hackers accessed using specific analyzing software We have been recently witnessing a one hundred percent rise and telegram use usage by cyber criminals. said cyber and so We've got to shut down straightaway away or at least bring it under the The online harms legislation. And make sure that it's Well regulated or make. Sure the telegram put some kind of back door in there so that The uk intelligence agencies can easily access

TED UK
FAA Says Ground Stop for United Airlines Lifted

Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

01:20 min | Last week

FAA Says Ground Stop for United Airlines Lifted

"This morning this as united airlines has lifted a nationwide ground stop that was due to a systems outage now united was experiencing the system wide outage that prevented boarding at some airports nationally including ding ding ding denver. Dia so you might. You're flying united this morning. Frying those friendly skies who might want to make sure that your flight has not been delayed now. Apparently unites app and website. Were also down for many. They just couldn't access either the app or the website. So what you might want to do once again is just a double check and make sure that your flight is on time and says fortunately the nationwide ground stop has been lifted But just a reminder that it did prevent boarding at some airports nationally including a denver. Now my understanding. Was you know if you had a connecting flight that so many of us do united was doing everything it could to hold those flights At your connecting airports by once again word to the wise just check in with united this morning to make sure that well all systems are go

Ding Ding Ding United Airlines Denver United
"access" Discussed on All About Access

All About Access

02:05 min | 5 months ago

"access" Discussed on All About Access

"High pk here in this episode. I'll be talking about my journey as a developer of assistive technology. Any journey has ups and downs and my journey has had more than its fair share. But this journey continues. I've had cerebral palsy since birth. My first exposure to technology started from my college days for my entire childhood slash school days. I had absolutely no exposure to any form of technology when i finished schooling. I wanted to do computer engineering. But i was told that i couldn't because i couldn't draw scientific diagrams and i needed help with my love exercises slash practical. I had to settle for commerce. Even when i did come face to face with the computer. I quickly realized that. I couldn't use it like a normal person. I could press only one key on the keyboard at a time. And i also had multiple problems in using the mouse so nothing about computers was going to be easy for me quickly. I spent some time in trying to figure out how i could use a computer. Despite all my limitations the answer was that i had to use assistive. Technologies every user needs to use a specific combination of assistive technologies to be able to achieve an optimal level of performance slash productivity. Any less or more than this optimal level and the user is not able to function adequately in previous podcast. I have given details about how i use my computer. Never had i imagined in my wildest dreams i would get an opportunity to work on a couple of projects in the area of assistive technologies but as destiny would have it. I did get such an opportunity barely three years into my career. My experience in these projects was more like a roller coaster ride. Initially everything was good. I was asked to work on some software. Which would be used with the hardware device resembling an access which

first step
"access" Discussed on Access to Inspiration

Access to Inspiration

05:27 min | 10 months ago

"access" Discussed on Access to Inspiration

"Britain has.

"access" Discussed on Access to Inspiration

Access to Inspiration

05:48 min | 1 year ago

"access" Discussed on Access to Inspiration

"I own energy and obviously energy doesn't pay your bills off. Yeah, that's always a tough area. So if you don't have a supportive partner, you are not going to get anywhere. That's only going to make your life a lot more miserable. So sure that side of a bit up and make sure that if you say you are signing on a partner make sure you tell him or her what they're in for and they know what the real truth of it is. Second thing is you have to be able to challenge your beliefs every single month it is you cannot hold fast to a single belief and say I'm going to live or die by this you have to make sure you consider evidence that contradicts your beliefs all the time. And in a lot of cases admit the possibility that you are just playing Rock that's a very very important thing and also knowing that when you're wrong, it's okay to reset and reboot. It's just plain impossible to know everything but it's also knowing that you have the ability to challenge everything that you know, and that's what entrepreneurs is. Is about it's okay to challenge those things that you know come up with your assertion and go out and do your things. So that's also one one more thing. That would actually help me out. The third thing is having the ability to keep your feet on the ground, but your head in the clouds that all thing to do obviously, but you have to know when a reality is reality and and at the same time have the ability to Future think and dream. It's a very difficult scenario when you're faced with the possibility of not being able to make payroll this month, but you have to know think about your product that is going to come down the road and that is going to be successful in a year or two Stein, right? So you have to have that ability to keep that longer-term time frame Vision with it and have the ability to drive yourself towards that being bipolar in that sense is also very entrepreneurial quality and being able to manage those things without letting that affect you or wage. Moralizing you is a very important quality as well..

partner Stein
"access" Discussed on Access to Inspiration

Access to Inspiration

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"access" Discussed on Access to Inspiration

"So you know very well that it's all in. English writes all the signs and Everything was in. English. So I grew up in this multicultural environment, but it was predominantly Indian values and culture, and then it came to France spent seven years studying in France. So added another layer of French culture. Then, travel around the bold for COUPLA years it Southeast Asia Canada then immigrated to the US in nine, hundred, ninety nine. So exactly twenty one years ago. So then of course, I, spend next ten years building my career and the US because I wanted to leave. American dream. But it's only in the late thirties about twelve years ago that begin to feel the need to integrate these different pieces that happened but later so we'll say the fuss thirty, seven, thirty, eight years I was kind of focusing on collecting experiences and it's only in the late thirties I begin to put. It all together to create something more coherent might call Midlife Crisis Nabi when wondering evaluating where one's going I agree with that or not your actually go through a midlife crisis happened earlier at a big health crisis when it was thirty five to six, where basically I had the symptoms of autoimmune disease. The doctors couldn't really understand what was happening and it was kind of systemic breakdown. The whole system was breaking down I couldn't sleep was losing weight I couldn't concentrate and it was quite a scary. That's when I reconnected with roots because the western doctors couldn't improve me but. I remember that India's a cult traditional medicine called IR radar, which is a five thousand year old medical knowledge. So I was in California and I found this clinic which offered traditionally in medicine and that saved my life was able to rejuvenate myself for detox myself but not only that from physical level. But I think it kind of reconnected with my deeper being because I rediscovered my roots I also got clarity about what I should do next and that's really exactly when I begin to realize that I'm Indian and I'm French am American. But what happened is that once they? Came to America and I. Think I kind of tried to become American and I kind of repressed my French and Indian background and that's when I said no, I can't do that. So I begin to go back to France do more speeches, client engagements in France, and then eventually I begin to reconnect with my Indian roots which led me for the past ten years. Of course, writes books on innovation leadership inspired by Indian wisdom through that crisis that challenge that you had with your health nappy you were able to revalue it. I'm wondering what you think that all of those. Elements the Indian the French and the American, what do they each bring to the navy today I've been reflecting on it for many years and I would just give some stories that could be quite interesting to illustrate these points. Let's start with Indian wisdom and that connects to the notion of leadership. So the difference between the Western interpretation of leadership and the practice of leadership and the eastern tradition of defining leadership. So the story goes like this. Apparently Alexander degrade when he tried to invade India came with his grand army and at some point..

France US India autoimmune disease Southeast Asia Canada Alexander California America
"access" Discussed on Access to Inspiration

Access to Inspiration

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"access" Discussed on Access to Inspiration

"Should grow at least one crop. Even if it's in a window box grove crop of potatoes, just one you God have two chickens best waste disposal system. You will ever have a you X and it'd be the best eggs you've ever had what could be better. Besides these guests, we have several pioneers people who have led the way in their field of endeavor. The first is major becky freighter Becky is a military helicopter pilot I'm was the first woman to lead the Royal Navy helicopter display team the black cats I mean also speak to non to Mugabe the first African female to run seven Madison's on seven continents on seven consecutive days a mammoth effort I'm sure. I asked onto have she believed that she could do such an achievement. You know sue to, as you'll Canavan no hundred percent that she can do it. You just gotTa get to a point way you actually. Dante Monet's fear. You do things afraid. You experience both emotions of courage and emotions of being nervous and you accept them as deeply human as they are because they aren't debris human. So I, thought show believe in yourself. And number two. It's an understanding that carriage like net brown puts its beautifully it's action not about winning or losing. So I got to a point way before registered for the race I was like am I showing my show I can do that assignment coach appoint way I said I don't need to be show courage is not about finishing these marathons or not it's about showing up and right now I'm deciding to show up once you see it as an opportunity just to show out. then. You just do that to show up. I. Hope that this preview has given you a taste of what's to come. And that you will enjoy these amazing stories from people around the world. Look hype for the first and the new CDs next week where I will talk to Navidad you about consciously reinventing how we live and work..

Dante Monet Madison Becky Canavan Royal Navy Mugabe Navidad
"access" Discussed on Access to Inspiration

Access to Inspiration

08:05 min | 1 year ago

"access" Discussed on Access to Inspiration

"Transcend your day to day challenges and reflect on what you are capable of achieving. Thanks for continuing to send us your feedback about the impact that these podcasts are having on your work and your life. It truly heartening for us to know that they're making a positive difference. And you may recall that the final episode of series three. Adventure poll roles talked about the importance of being useful. Well. He has put his idea into action an agreed to be our first accessed inspiration ambassador helping us to spread the message of the podcast to a your audience. We. Thank you for your ongoing support. Another. Key member of our team is Matias Guru. Who Edits our forecasts and makes them sound great. Matthias who lives in Argentina Talk to me about his work, which involves more than just getting podcasts. And I was also curious to find out if the podcasts have an inspirational effect on him. So tell us what is your job when you're being signed designer? What does it involve were electorally some detained a lot of things, but my work involves much more things for example, Chiloe. So why each Taylor that's part of my job I studied electro acoustic composition university while I was studying music and it was playing. Would make a living from playing. Then you see that Yukon well, but are different ways to but I started working in editing sound many for television and then for movies, and then two years ago I found besides like people per hour like. Where you can work online on to another place in the world and then studied editing podcast on my field of work expanded. It became anything that is related to sound editing or creating effects or the music playing. Mainly status sound in different ways and the other half on my day is I teach cello I deeply sons in the music school here, and well, we thought of that I make relieving idea was enjoyed doing different things learning different things when it will see younger I was learning I thought through a focus, justin famous focus just in sound I studied engineering I for a couple of years before deciding to go into completion all related so far. I've managed to keep it like that. So really saddened is at the heart of everything that you're doing whether it's teaching cello whether it's editing film soundtracks, editing podcasts, you're doing I. Guess I'm wondering when you're listening to. Was Folk within you. That's a good question when I started studying completion, it was electrical state competition in that kind of music you focus in sound in some of these self it's not focusing just enough votes or in Melody's eat focus on the south. So I studied sound and we studied how that year works and how physics of sound work and I was fascinated by it just the ideal air but the good spy breaking and at some point something heated something else on that by Brayson, was transformed in different ways to get to your ear and your brain makes some interpretation on. Here something and you feed it something been a lot of things happened and then they become something completely different inside every person. You would hear something something I would something else just by sound depending on your experiences. Well, I'm eating your fascination with the process itself created and the effect it has on the recipient you if I was always fascinated by that when I studied. Competition then I studied realized, I was really fascinated by but then you keep on studying a menu loose at it'll be of that feeling and that's why I started saying once in a while thing about that because those sensations are the ones that I think we shouldn't lose those feelings dad, did you studied at something like that fashion for just for some and then different ways on whatever I did bad not to loose that feeling that the region feeling that Basham I think three important. Anything that's trumping your podcast not. And you're absolutely right. That's what we're aiming to do is to instill it the passionate belief in else that wants drives them to take action to do something different on. It sounds like from your early experiences in some that you were motivated to want to learn more about that's. So, when you've been listening whilst editing accessed inspiration podcasts. s what has struck you by any of the episodes you've parrot cause you to perhaps reflect differently about things. I think that mainly this feeling because. The name of your podcast season I think that that's what you're aiming for in every interview or the people that appear in your podcast. The had these these feeling I was mentioning right daily specials on cavity search. You don't hear them saying well adjusted. This is just my job. That's that's all. They are looking for something else always looking for something else. I think that's crucially knife. We should always be looking for something else and looking to enjoy as far as we can because different situations sometimes than others but as long as we can be looking for something else that feeling I think it's really important in fact, lately that may be more choice with choose projects that have this kind of feeding 'em right down within two or three other perks in regular basis on. The old cub inspiration message. It's something like because it's not just editing uninterrupted buddies being part of something else. Why did I also get that message so it's spying me and I may impact by team that is also helping to inspire other people so that as a general thing, I think is really important. So the essence of what your heating having an inspirational effect on you as you're listening to podcasts that's right. I'm sure our listeners. To learn a bit about you, Mataya send the work that you do and please keep up the good work in editing. These podcasts is being great to speak to you. Thank you sir. It's a pleasure for me to think about this team and I really appreciate it. Now looking forward to the upcoming sees that are two themes that standout from all of the episodes which are sustainability and pioneering. The Kovic Pandemic has caused many people to evaluate. Their lives. and. It's been a wake up call for us to address some of the bigger societal issues such as how we interact with one another. How we consume resources on how we reconnect with nature? Some of our guests in this upcoming CD's talk about these topics. Navy. Jew is a leadership thinker whose tach Toke on frugal innovation has been viewed over two million times. He has some fascinating thoughts on how we need to reinvent how we live and work. We also have an pollutant. Van Is John who is transforming the stationary industry by making paper from rocks. She founded did her company. In two thousand. Fifteen. To create alternative and more sustainable approach to how paper is manufactured. Also be speaking to far Jonathan Cook. whose regenerative farming approach influences how he operates as a daily farmer. John believes that we need to reconnect with nature to better understand where our food comes from. I think everybody.

John Chiloe Matias Guru Yukon Brayson Matthias Taylor Argentina Basham justin Melody Jonathan Cook. Mataya Van
"access" Discussed on Access to Inspiration

Access to Inspiration

06:46 min | 1 year ago

"access" Discussed on Access to Inspiration

"We hope their stories and insights enable you to transcend day to day challenges and reflect on what you are capable of achieving. Today I'm speaking tonight. Yankel describes herself as Global Green London. As an expert in the Arctic North Atlantic and the Nordic countries. I'm fascinated to learn from about her expedients growing in Greenland. What it's like for those living and working there and how it's changing so welcome to the podcast. Thank you. It's a pleasure to be on your podcast. To tell us about what Greenland's like. Because many of the people listening to this may have never been to the country, and it be useful to get a sense of the size and scale. Definitely and I think you're right. A lot of people have not been greenland and a lot of people probably don't know really where it is. Green, room the largest island in the world. It's situated. Up North it's so big white spot. You can see on Annapolis a basically next to Canada. and. It's an area of about two million square kilometer, and that number might be a bit abstract, but when you put it into perspective, or let's say that you take greenland and you put it on another map. It's actually the size of western Europe. It goes from Denmark in the north to two. Harra in the south. And about one third of the size of the US, so it's quite a large island is L. Sand Lake it, but it doesn't have many people living on I. Understand No, that's true. Only about fifty seven thousand people live in the entire island, so armee there you see that it's indeed land of contrast, and I understand that you're obviously than finite species. Such smoke relation in the world's. Yes, indeed and again there's about fifty seven thousand people living in Greenland, but around ten thousand people of these are people from Denmark. Because as you might know sue, but not a lot of people notice that Greenland is actually a part of the Kingdom of Denmark, so there, some mix of inhabitants, as well and I'm for example, a product of that I'm a product of Danish among who lived in Greenland for about thirty years in Greenlandic father. I see so. It's great to get a sense of the country. What was it like growing up there as a young person? Growing up in Greenland and for my part in the eighties I think about my childhood ingredient list being very safe and I also think about it as inducing we with a whole lot of responsibility, that's how I still view being brought up in Greenland, or in the Arctic that you get a tremendous amount of responsibility given to you so when I was a child, we would walk everywhere ourselves. We would walk to school all we walk. US We walk to friends, and so forth so at an early age we would learn to take responsibility for a lot of things ourselves, and obviously coming from a small town, and I'm from the capital of new, which is today, an artsy retro, but still small when you compare it to other capitals so coming from a small town. It was easier, but nonetheless it gave you a whole lot as a child, and I find that we weren't protected as much as I find. Kits are being now and our parents weren't what you would call. Helicopter parents would have to. Go out there and experience and learn a lot of by ourselves, and also another important part of growing up in Greenland and growing up in the arch, obviously the connection to nature, and what nature teachers teaches you as a child, and that's regardless of whether you had parents who haven't boat where you would go out sailing every weekend, or during the summer holidays, nature would always surround you and would teach you so I think. Think. That's one of the key aspects of growing up in the Arctic and Greenland in the eighties, but also now and from growing up there now, what were some of the significant things that helps you to get a broader perspective and house? Global Perspective as you talk about no well I think I was fortunate, first and foremost that I grew up within a family that, even though they live their everyday life in Greenland was. Towards Denmark where my grandparents lived, they hats should have an international outlook for example. My Dad was a huge fan of JFK. At the time I think he's at generation that was a huge fan of development taking place in the US at that time so I, both ways had that international outlooks through my parents, and obviously with the larger mobilisation gradually taking place in the eighties that helped me. Me A lot, too. So that gave me an opportunity to become an exchange student in the US I was a senior in high school for a year and a small town in northern California, and that really white my horizon, and gave me learnings back then, but also learning so today that I find stems from that time. What would be some of the examples of I can imagine it be A. A bit of a culture shock to move to northern California from Greenland as a youngster. Yes, it was a culture on one hand definitely on the other hand. Obviously, the US is so dominant within popular culture, so I did through TB and through music I did have a certain feel of what it was, and obviously when I was told that I was going to California, I immediately thought I would. Would go to Los Angeles or San Diego some place by the beach where it was warm all the time in that respect, I got disappointed I came to a small town in the forests of northern. California called real with four thousand inhabitants at the time, so that was a learning in itself. That just because you come to the US, it's not necessarily larger and bigger and greater obviously is A. A from the outset, but coming into communities and getting to know the different communities in people you get the nuances of the differences between, but also the similarity between Google. That was a great learning for me. I'm imagining we'll come back to this later in our conversation, but it does seem like the idea of relationship and communities a significant factor. That's important to you today as well it definitely is. Is and if I step to another of unity, I had while I was a teenager after I had finished high school in Greenland I also had the opportunity to join a use expedition to the Antarctic, called one step beyond,.

Greenland US Denmark California Arctic North Atlantic Arctic white spot Global Green London Kingdom of Denmark Yankel Europe Annapolis Los Angeles Canada. Google L. Sand Lake JFK sue San Diego Greenlandic
"access" Discussed on Access to Inspiration

Access to Inspiration

02:26 min | 1 year ago

"access" Discussed on Access to Inspiration

"Improve our <Speech_Female> service to you. <Speech_Female> And if you haven't <Speech_Female> checked youtube yet <Speech_Female> on our website <Speech_Female> access <Speech_Female> to inspiration <Speech_Female> dot org, <Speech_Female> you'll find transcriptions <Speech_Female> for all <Speech_Female> seas to podcasts, <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> the others will be <SpeakerChange> getting added <Speech_Music_Female> soon. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> So on, see these three. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> We will kick off the series <Speech_Female> talking to Salen <Speech_Female> who <Speech_Female> is transforming <Speech_Female> the infrastructure <Speech_Female> sector in New Zealand? <Speech_Female> In order to make <Speech_Female> it more representative <Speech_Female> of the world we live today <Speech_Female> and more <Speech_Female> appealing to a diverse <Speech_Music_Female> range <SpeakerChange> of talented <Speech_Music_Female> people. <Speech_Female> Santa's work <Speech_Female> reminded me of <Speech_Female> the Dalai Lama. <Speech_Female> If you think <Speech_Female> you're too small to <Speech_Female> make a difference. <Speech_Female> Try Sleeping <SpeakerChange> with a <Speech_Female> mosquito <Speech_Music_Female> I'm very <Speech_Music_Female> staunch about. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> King areas <Speech_Female> where I can make <Speech_Female> a difference in leaving <Speech_Female> a positive magazine <Speech_Female> and. <Speech_Female> I think the infrastructure <Speech_Female> seek to is a <Speech_Female> great way. During that <Speech_Female> infrastructure is not <Speech_Music_Female> as concrete <Speech_Female> bridges, actually, <Speech_Female> infrastructures <Speech_Female> built to improve <Speech_Female> the wellbeing <Speech_Female> about people in <Speech_Female> very <SpeakerChange> passionate <Speech_Female> about that. <Speech_Female> Then, there is <Speech_Female> Virginia. Go Thais <Speech_Female> whose love <Speech_Female> running was the impetus <Speech_Female> for her <Speech_Female> to set up a charity <Speech_Female> in Hong. Kong <Speech_Female> that provides sports <Speech_Female> as rehabilitation <Speech_Female> to <Speech_Female> particularly <Speech_Female> vulnerable refugees <Speech_Female> and asylum <Speech_Female> seekers. <Speech_Female> All you need is a pair <Speech_Female> of shoes in the outdoors. <Speech_Female> She says <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> I <SpeakerChange> think you <Silence> <Advertisement> also need some energy. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> When you <Speech_Female> go, you exercise <Speech_Female> even. <Speech_Female> As a CISE, <Speech_Female> your cortisol <Speech_Female> levels <Speech_Female> your stress. Hormone levels <Speech_Female> dig down. <Speech_Female> Refugees face <Speech_Female> a lot of <Speech_Female> anxiety, <Speech_Female> a lot of depression <Speech_Female> but <Speech_Female> Here's the <Speech_Female> and very simple <Speech_Female> exercise. Just <Speech_Female> spending some time <Speech_Female> in nature really <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> helps to <Speech_Female> get them <SpeakerChange> in <Speech_Female> a happy place. <Speech_Female> Isn't <Speech_Female> enough to wet your appetite. <Speech_Female> One of the <Speech_Female> conversations I'll <Speech_Female> be having with Nyongo <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> about what it's like <Speech_Female> to grow up in Greenland, <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> where a love <Speech_Female> of the outdoors <Speech_Female> on acceptance of responsibility <Speech_Female> comes <Speech_Female> at an early age, <Speech_Female> it's also <Speech_Female> a part of the world <Speech_Female> where cultural identity <Speech_Female> is becoming <Speech_Female> more important, <Speech_Female> so listen to <Speech_Female> what Nyah has to sail, <Speech_Female> not all <Speech_Female> this in lots more <Speech_Female> to enjoy <SpeakerChange> in the <Speech_Music_Female> next few weeks. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> For. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Remember <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> if you're enjoying <Speech_Female> the CD's, please <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> take a moment to <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> review on Apple podcasts <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> or tell <Speech_Female> your friends if I toss <Speech_Female> so they can <Speech_Female> subscribe to. <Speech_Female> You can find us <Speech_Female> on facebook. Twitter <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and Lincoln <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> just search <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> access to inspiration. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Twenty <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> five minutes of inspiration <Speech_Music_Female> brought <Speech_Music_Female> to your device every <Speech_Female> week I <Speech_Music_Female> look forward to connecting <Music> with you soon.

"access" Discussed on Access to Inspiration

Access to Inspiration

05:11 min | 1 year ago

"access" Discussed on Access to Inspiration

"This series is even more geographically diverse than the first two CDs with guests from Germany Greenland and Hong Kong as well as other amazing individuals talking about their work in new. Zealand Venezuela and England. Before I dive in and tell you what we have coming up over the next eight episodes. I'd like to let you know about the impact that the podcast series is having. And the feedback. We're getting from our listeners. Let me start to this podcast at the end of two thousand and nineteen, we wanted each episode to have a positive impact on you our listeners. And that you would be inspired to do something differently or reflect on your own situation with some new perspective from what you discovered in the interviews. So we asked you and several view gave us your feedback, thank you. I spoke to to listeners in particular. To heat in their own words. How has impacted them? Firstly Evelyn from the Netherlands. Who particularly enjoyed the conversation with John? David Bar, tour the astronaut. So I've been thinking about it because there were a lot of little bits of inspiration that I got from the podcast, I loved where he said I talked about dinner tables when he was growing up. And how when there was a question, someone would run. Grab the encyclopedia, and they would all figure it out as a family, and I just love that sense of curiosity, and that sense of family like bringing those two things together and I thought. I WANNA use that. So I've been trying to incorporate that also in my home schooling, but also even like dinner table conversations. I have a four and a half year old. She's constantly curious about life, but there are so many things that my answer to her is. I don't know I. Don't know the answer to that. Then not just stay there, but actually like okay. Let's figure this out together, and it's brought like a whole new energy also into our learning and growing together, which is really really neat. I think a lot of things were unexpected to be honest like it never really even considered what kind of people go into becoming an astronaut. What kind of people shoes that as a career as a profession? I loved how he said I think you asked. Asked him at some point like. Does anybody fail or does anyone sort of drop out of the pre-programme? He said will over the course of all the time that he's been there. Only one person ever dropped out so I don't know it just felt like it was just interesting. It was interesting to hear him say how he went from being young and wanting to be either a cowboy astronaut and choosing this profession that was so about adventure. Just the whole storyline. It just took me into not only his life, but also thinking about how all of us have our stories of how this sort of wines in how we ended up to a particular profession. How little I really know about all these different professions that are out and the people that are making the choices to go into them, and so I think the whole journey was like a big wonderful surprise. And then I spoke to Mike from the UK who was moved also by what the astronaut had to say, and also an earlier interview with Celia Garland from one whose career journey resonated particularly with him I was. Five dickey's nature of Korea's a loss of the IB golf. Not Training somethings working your way through a hierarchy. seized. Came along. Is this a? billion. Lucky And similarly a astronaut. Reese's rushing defined to civic work were. Since to. Belong and Love all sorts of possible. May need you. Won't nine. Did allies. Genius! Her. Comedy screenplays. Smith. Anyway. I'll quite happy died leads. Listened to begin with the his. Session podcast balls. I also. Saudi since since. Is Is, it gets very useful back in. The. Triggered me so something more concrete came out. The notion acting physically simulations, we shall see the essential missile. One Turkeys. I now charity. Hospital. Wheel to be doing some more kissing also. Things. Has Been Listening to. From farms hugely enjoyable. It's very motivating for us to hear. These examples of highly podcasts are having a positive impact. But it's not just the listeners who are learning for sixty percent of our guests so far. This is the first podcast that they have ever done sewer introducing them to a new communication medium. I'm helping them find a way to share their stories which we are very proud of. We're also trying to.

Evelyn Smith Hong Kong Greenland Venezuela Germany David Bar John Reese England Celia Garland Korea Netherlands dickey IB UK Mike
"access" Discussed on Access to Inspiration

Access to Inspiration

10:20 min | 1 year ago

"access" Discussed on Access to Inspiration

"Welcome to access inspiration. Today I'm speaking to Marlene. Emory and Shannon Rivera and they both have a keen interest in conservation. Welcome to both of you. Thank you guys know Shannon to you I if I can just give a little background to your expedients I understand. You've worked in Asia. The Amazon region will she on out a North America particularly wildlife trafficking issues while I fe- ability on conservation and you've got a particular focus on illegal wildlife trade. Yeah that's true and Marlena you also come from a really interesting background a former. Nfl Cheerleader Professional Dancer turned conservation. Biologist and filmmaker correct your voice. Sounds like your angle is coming. From the storytelling aspect survey Shen and shines. Aspect is a by the evidence based science behind it. Yeah I think it's a clear way to put it in Yang. There you go. That's the way it works. Well together bring different things to the table. So how'd you to one another? Just a whole bunch of different worlds. That came together in this really similar interest. We were both dancers based in San Diego and we met each other through mutual friends. Mutual jobs and we worked together in that field. But then eventually our lives really evolved to more engage in conservation and again we saw a lot of overlaps and just from that similar background knowing each other in the dance industry. We really started thinking like I think we could probably work together in concentration as well and it kind of just fit in some of the work that I was doing in Sumatra I invited. Marlene along in the start of the story. We ended up traveling really well together and had a lot of similar ideas and crew some of our projects together or backgrounds quite intriguing in terms of your patients what they did and how you grew up nine by the outdoors. Swerving back so again. My Dad was a professional falconer. My mother she's a bus driver. She was a avid horseback rider. So I was always active outdoors. Grew up fishing camping so I think I was really to just be running around barefoot outside around animals my whole life. I've just always really loved nature and that's kind of I think probably what planted the seed for me. You know and then as life has it you go off and you're going to school and I was taking dance and then you do chair and you kind of get caught up in that and that world and I think you know once you get two for me. It was like early twenties out well. Is this something I'm passionate about? Is this what I WANNA do? Forever and sort of really thinking about what could my life be like? And what am I passionate about? And then I just kind of started exploring from there and it's just bought me back to wanting to do stuff with wildlife nature being around animals outdoors as much as possible similarly just thinking conservation has been a part of both our lives in funnily enough growing up completely separate not even meaning tiller twenties. I also grew up on a ranch. My Dad was a professional writer. Really strange but that was my introduction downloads but always finding what you WanNa do with animals. Is that actually a job? Is it something that you can actually pursue? That's not just a hobby and I think later in life we both on out. We're GONNA try for this. We're GONNA do it and it's been interesting journey. I would say it's something where we're still trying to navigate. It should be honest and it definitely took a while of trying different things and seeing where you fit in depending on where your other interests are. What your skill set is and I think it's interesting to see that we both have ended up on different ends of the spectrum in the world of conservation but like she said earlier a pass still really do overlap and a lot of ways which has been a really need both. So there's something coming there to clearly the rent that the influenced your childhood had on your love of the outdoors totally. I think it is for every human as a child you are more inclined to getting involved with the world around you in every kid has they're drawn to other living things they want to be around it and I think the world changes you as you grow up to either become more separated from it or not think that you're a part of that world and I think just my own personal nature but also my mom being able to say. Do what you want. If this is a part of you keep it. I kept that child. Inside of me of this is what was always important to me other living beings that share this world with me and I just never wanted that to die and I think at the end of the day. It's something I see is such a blessing because a lot of people aren't exposed to that and don't even have that opportunity I think nowadays especially I see how children are being raised and how things have changed so much. Kids are leaving behind computer screens and and phone screens nowadays and we were so lucky to be that lost generation. That still had that fifty to play outside being the dirt being in nature and so I fully westwood just even been able to have those planet early on in life. Because maybe I wouldn't be doing what I'm doing today. I think the Candy. Sometimes people who have a fixed idea for their career will be. Who is really heartening to hear the both of you. Follow your passion and created for yourselves the life that you want to and if I can come to you I I know you've got a particular interest in the illegal wildlife trade and those animals that are then rescued. How they are treating each tells you that. Yeah it's it is. It's a really tricky area. We don't hear about the illegal wildlife trade a lot but it is some people have ranked second as the most illicit illegal trade in the world. And we don't see it. It's kind of this silent thing that's happening around us but really involves so much of our world and my interest really started because I traveled since I was young family. That live all over the world and I've been able to expose different cultures. You start seeing wildlife in different tourist areas and people want to be when they travelled to Thailand when they travel to South East Asia. Interrupt places you WANNA be around the wildlife that you see so I was starting to see that people are getting engaged with animals but incorrect ways and they're being illegally trafficked being taken from the wild exploited and it's driving down species so for me. I wanted to know if these animals are ever rescued which is already very rare. It's what's happening to them. Once they're rescued and the truth is we don't really know there's not a lot of effort being put into it and they're actually ending up back in the trade again and being exploited in different ways. I was in the Amazon. There is a baby monkey that had shrapnel in his side because his mother had been shot down because someone wanted to baby monkey to hold was just a reality. Check for me that someone needs to do something about this and I wanted to expose it a little bit more but it is definitely something that people don't want exposed so is it. Tricky failed to work in. And how do you navigate your way through that when you've got to be a bit of a detective to work out what happens in those situations the is interesting and I think it's taking a look at yourself in this world and saying how best am I able to be an have an impact because going into communities and cultures that you're not a part of you can't come in angling to change everything but really understanding what your impact could be and how you can maneuver those rooms in those industries in a way? That's safe but also where you can impact in do something good so for me. It's definitely been trial and error. I mean I bought a one way ticket to the Amazon and wanted to change the world and realize that's probably not going to happen in where I felt like I found the most power was in education and they went back to school and I got several degrees and looked at how research can really create the knowledge that we need and maybe that will help implement some of the management's topping on the ground with local people so you've got the evidence space science behind what's going on here and then marina you tell the story in a slightly different way so the same values the same important interest in conservation for example one of the things. I saw your website will helping profiling story and young men. In Mozambique Teaching People to swim tells about that as an example of how you make an impact sure so like we said earlier I've fallen more on the storytelling around finding media as essentially conservation tool to be able to share stories. So for example. You know people who are on the frontlines of conservation around the world. A LOT OF TIMES INSTANCES. Some of the people doing the most amazing work. You're never going to hear their voices. You're never going to hear their side of the story and it's kind of crazy. Love hate with technology and media these days on one aspect of IT media and technology takes us away from nature and it kind of create the separation from actually experience the tactile experience. We were lucky enough to grow up with. Where is it's also such a powerful tool to reconnect us to it? So I really want to focus on the positive that technology things like social media and being able to engage with people all over the world and share stories all over the world for people who don't have that. Say the voices to do that too. That's really important for me in terms of fuelling my passion and going to going back to the Mozambique example so I was traveling throughout. Mozambique with my husband we were on seventy seven month road trip throughout Africa looking for really cool contribution stories on the front lines and we stumbled across this group of young men who were teaching swimming lessons as well as about Marine Life Courses. I guess in in local schools and just getting the young students really excited about the wildlife. One thing that's really crazy about. Mozambique it's eighty percent of the community live near the water and survive on it for their livelihoods yet. The majority of local met Mozambicans. Do not know how to swim so it creates this fear of the water. Which how can you love something in? WanNa protect them that you're afraid of and you fear and so they're going and just teaching swimming lessons to children gotta local community lodge to lend the pool so we just wanted to go and feature their stories and and tell that and one thing that's really great about storytelling as it can bring and funding for a lot of these projects. So they've since been able to expand on. We made a little fun Promo Video Velvet. They're doing I mean just kind of helped get their word out there. Which helps people build a support? What they're doing on the front lines. Which if no one helped tell their story. How do we know? How can we be supportive of that so I think that's really the power storytelling for me in the arena of conservation? And so you're both detectives in slightly different ways. You're following the story. You've got a hunch for something that needs to be evidenced or told Yeah. I think that's a great way to put it. You always have a question. What is happening here? You know that you can tell the story but you need. The information is happening. What are the numbers? What are we looking at? I'm in a Lotta Times. Scientists can't tell their story. They're horrible you don't want to listen to them. You put though petite asleep but they have the information I really appreciate the storytelling aspect because this information should not just stay up in ivory tower. We really need people to know about it because there's some serious issues happening and I think that's really beautiful. I don't think you can't have one without the other. You really do. Need both aspects of you need the people on the frontlines doing the hard work like Shannon like the gentleman I'm telling you about in Mozambique Ocean Guardians and then you also need people willing to help share what they're finding because you can't do it all and.

Amazon Shannon Rivera Mozambique Marlene Nfl horseback Marlena Asia Shen Emory San Diego North America Mozambique Ocean Guardians Thailand Sumatra ivory tower Mozambicans Africa
"access" Discussed on Access to Inspiration

Access to Inspiration

03:26 min | 1 year ago

"access" Discussed on Access to Inspiration

"But the median prices about ten thousand dollars. It's very much out of the reach from an average people. We suspected there'd be many more people who would want to be able to save stories of loved ones and so that's the trim for us we all. We want to give saga to as many families as possible. I just know that when people use it they will be a day in the future when they are so happy that they did. That's what I really look forward to. It seems to me Amelia. That you're actually kind of changing the way that families communicate with one another through if you look at a bigger mission since absolutely there is probably about half of the things that my mom and my dad recorded of things that I never knew about them. And that's actually pretty consistent with what we hear from. Our costumers is even when they're very close to family. They're really surprised. How much more there learning about their loved ones. I definitely think for us that the mission is to help people build deeper connections with the people you care about most regardless of how you're separated by distance or by time or age. I'm really picking up three failings. That might summarize our conversation. One is determination the other is drive on. The third is direction on my sense that the expense of Education. That helps you shape where you went with your life in its direction has really been core foundation of what you're doing now with saga. I think that's absolutely true for me. I think it's very personal and very poignant that this is really a business in many ways that I started for my own parents because it was something I wanted to take for them and so it's absolutely just meant the world to me to see it. Grow and attracted investment support in job to see people come in sign up and tell us about the impact on their own families and it makes me really happy that something. I could do for them speaking of Kobe. Nineteen one of the things that I'm also really excited for us to be able to do. Is we are going to be extending a year's worth of free access to saga to any family that lining up during this time so we're actually not going to be charging as we normally do. We're really hoping that it may help. Some families who are looking to stay connected during this times actually was older loved ones who may be further away. Well that sounds like a brilliant offer and I'm sure we'll put the links to the site in the show notes from this podcast Amelia. It's been a real education to spend the last few minutes having a conversation with you in learning about your lights story so thank you so much for being with us. It's been fantastic to talk to you. Thank you for having me how fascinating it will discover that Amelia's business saga wasn't park created out of frustration. Due to a problem she had but she could not solve. Unh- technology is now helping to create deeper connections in families. I've used saga myself to cord some of my expedition stories from the Arctic and the Antarctic. So I do hope you take advantage of errol for of a year's worth.

Amelia Unh errol Arctic
"access" Discussed on Access to Inspiration

Access to Inspiration

02:53 min | 1 year ago

"access" Discussed on Access to Inspiration

"The People. We are.

"access" Discussed on Access to Inspiration

Access to Inspiration

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"access" Discussed on Access to Inspiration

"Hi It's sue stockdale. Welcome to another episode of access to inspiration. Today I'm speaking to Laurel Herrmann..

"access" Discussed on Access to Inspiration

Access to Inspiration

06:44 min | 1 year ago

"access" Discussed on Access to Inspiration

"Hi I'm Sue Stockdale and welcome Gypsy you the second CDs of access to inspiration podcast bringing you conversations with people from a diverse range of backgrounds people who may be on a light Q. And from whom we can learn from and gain inspiration about wars possible to achieve and our work on our lives over the next few weeks I will be speaking to seven new guests including an astronaut who has traveled over two point eight million miles in one hundred and twenty six earth orbits and has logged over one hundred ninety hours in space. I'll be speaking to a cruise director who has responsibility for looking after three thousand guests on board ship every day as well as to dynamic young women from Hawaii and San Diego who are influential in the world of animal conservation. You will learn hair. Career Path is not always a straight line to your dream job why we may be more harmful than helpful to animals when we visit them in wild places. And what amazing. Scientific Research is being undertaken on the International Space Station but before we dive into CDs to several listeners have asked me to share a small story of my own so keep listening to hear me. Explain to former. Tv news anchor. Roger Roca why? We began the accessed inspiration. Podcast as usual. If you enjoy the PODCAST. Please recommend it to other people who may also get inspiration from as well or leave us a review on itunes own. My name is Roger Raka and we're talking today with sue stockdale suicide. A polar adventurer an athlete a motivational speaker and a businesswoman. She was the first British woman to ski to the magnetic North Pole. Back in one thousand nine hundred eighty six. And we'll hear more about that but first hi sue. Hi Roger Space here. Nice to speak with you. We'RE GOING TO BE TALKING TODAY. About the sues latest enterprise which is something called access to inspiration. But before we get to that. I want to find out a little more about how you got to where you are. How did you get started with your adventurism? How did you begin to start a step outside the boundaries of what most of us do and start to do extraordinary things like of course to the magnetic North Pole? Which is something most of us have even thought about well? Roger Sold to seeing ferrets in the newspaper. I've always had a love of adventure and trying new things and way back in Nineteen ninety-six so not grab that said wanted ten novus. Arctic explorers to Ski Three Hundred Fifty Miles to the magnetic North Pole. While Miami wild that sounds somewhere cold. I wasn't even quite cure wetlands but when I said till for the application for it came back as a brochure and it was all pictures of men and it said are you man enough for the ultimate challenge. Well you can imagine that was like a red rag to a bull and it really motivated me to apply and be part of the team and luckily I got through all the selection process and became one of the team members. So that's how it all started. I guess we should say you weren't coach potato before that you had already been an athlete. What are some of the things you had done? Prior to that yes. I enjoy running and I competed competitively in track and field. Athletics running seafood meters and I was very proud to represent my country Scotland. What it really taught me though was about hardware compare students and never giving up on. I think those are qualities it can really be useful today in business as well and that took you sort of two different places in the world where you worked for example with the UN awhile and good part or some other. Things like theft in almost experiences. You're really seeing the power of being inspired by people around me. I was working in a war zone with the United Nations. And you know we were there to try and make a difference in country where there was a oversee a war going on and it was seeing the resilience Beaten so not only the fellow employees around me were trying to do the best job possible but those that were in country really trying to bring their lives together so I'm just always fascinating to buy how ordinary people can really be. Ed's relation to others and I think we don't necessarily get enough about inner lights show. You were inspired by the things. You observed how did that switch into you realizing that you could take part in inspiring others after that North Pole expedition. I didn't want that amazing experience that I've had to just be autographs in an album so I thought imagine if I could perhaps share some of my story Ford I had encountered and had managed to be successful in something that I never imagined was possible. Maybe that could help inspire people to get to their own north coal and whatever that means for them so I started off in a business as a motivational speaker initially and I realized that you know everybody really gets a lot of benefit from being inspired. Of course. You don't have to be on a stage to do that. That our people around us all the time that inspired us. Sometimes it's by the meaningful conversations are that are have with them on a lot of the work I do. Today is as an executive coach. And you know when you end up having a conversation with somebody where they just tell you a story that we've tried and or they hardship. They've endured and highly will come at you know it's so inspiring to be able to hear their stories and their ordinary people doing ordinary things and I think that we can all benefit from speaking to and learning from people around us. You've been doing this now for a number of years successfully the latest thing that you are involved in which we want to talk about now is the thing called access to inspiration overview of what that is yes. Visually building a community where people do get access to inspiration in many different ways. So we're launching podcasts. Eighties which will provide inspiration from talking to people from a number of diverse backgrounds including professor brain science. Somebody who's a naturalistic gloss floor person. Who supports people in the diddy industry to manage their stress and to be more effective and this people are all different backgrounds from all over the world to. I'm going to find out about what inspires them to do what they do to hear. Some of the stories of the challenges that they've been captured in highly overcome them so listeners. I really hope that you enjoy sees too. And if you haven't yet listened to the PODCAST IN CDs one please to go back and listen to them again..

North Pole Sue Stockdale Roger Roca Roger Space International Space Station Roger Raka San Diego Roger Sold Scientific Research Hawaii director Athletics UN itunes United Nations theft professor Miami Ed Scotland
"access" Discussed on Access to Inspiration

Access to Inspiration

12:17 min | 1 year ago

"access" Discussed on Access to Inspiration

"Lauch Neiman. Come winner two thousand eighteen phone terra women of the year award. She Dons Driving Farming Women Amd Iceberg coaching and lives in New Zealand. Welcome Lushnje I'll thank you very much. It's lovely to be here now. You background bludgeon. CNN is really interesting. In terms of heavy ended up in New Zealand being responsible for Merck milking I understand six hundred cows and coaching tell us how how it all came about is actually quite a short story because even though I was born in South Africa I did want a lot of young people do after they finished Sunni. And you go off on your e and I actually ended up in England backpacking for a while and I made a lovely boy from New Zealand. Who happens to be the False generation dairy farm and he convinced me that New Zealand was land of milk and honey. And that's how I've ended up now. Living in beautiful parts of the world at the bottom of the South Island sends amazing. And I'm really interesting to understand the leap from dairy farm to Being a coach that's not what usually people necessarily do. I go to a point in my life square inch walls. Sort of crossroads being married to Afam Afam and unfortunately I can't take full responsibility for looking six hundred cows because that's mostly by husband's passionate. I'm just more business partner so I married a farmer raising kids. Stop doing the staff and at that stage with kids getting older Indonesia's much and I was looking looking for something more and a lot of soul searching trying to figure out what's really interested me in what may become alive are we came back to the fact that it was people that I loved working with and stumbled across coaching and data was the transition from being mostly involved in dairy farming to becoming our coach. So when you discovered coaching as a profession if you like and something that you could do more of Hell did you get into being trained sains learning more about how to coach and even thinking about who your market would be when you're in the state of New Zealand like it was a pain point for me was a crossroads because when I was that farmer's wife that had given up a big part of hi Jane Tea and married someone in taken on vegetables industry in Business Kenya's Latoya secretion of rediscovering. Do I was was my identity. What did I enjoy doing because I put all that aside for quite a while because I chose to be the stay at home mum and the supposedly by farming business and when I looked around me I noticed they will also other women that were very similar so in a way the mock it was already dead when something that was very close to home and I knew? I wanted to farming women's to help them to rediscover themselves and figure out what they wanted besides family and farming and that's actually what led to coaching and was good old doctor. Google bid such and such again came across tem. Coaching you know back in two thousand eleven the New Zealand especially like you say from farming background. It wasn't a very common concept and so the market was something that drove me to find. Coaching are already knew it was a pain point. I wanted to try and help to resolve. It took me eighteen months to build up by self confidence to actually go out and sign up to coaching calls. 'cause it cost a lot of money for someone who was used to not spending money on herself and that's been a long time justifying defined decision. Would I ever even gigs one client era. So I imagine that you had to have a great deal of belief in yourself that you you get a return on that investment of learning about coaching. And I know that you are of the Frontera Daily Women of the year award which he's a very prestigious award in New Zealand. Also any benefit around getting that award and the coaching that you doing. Yeah they're very much intertwined in some ways as the award was a recognition of the work that I have been doing for the last five years with women in the farming sector in museums. It's also taught me a lot more credibility and it's given me a platform to talk about the things that I'm passionate about. So they are very much intertwined. I imagine that when you have adt belief that something will work out opportunities come towards you that you can benefit from such a. But it's so shoes because sitting there. Yeah before I started taking my coaching training and like I said I didn't know if I ever get a single client and it is amazing once you take those steps and do something that does open Sunday. Seems like there's a flood of people that I actually interested in finding a coach and I haven't had a problem LEM filling my books in terms of the support that you offer to women in the media industry tell us a bit of bite. What sort of ways is that you do that for the start of issues that you come up against it basic your health with? I love working with people that are looking to continue driving before they. He's sort of end up at the top of the boss of and I liked working with people to help him get clarity around. What is it that that makes them thrives and also what are the obstacles that get in the way of striving so it's very much a focus on full wellness even before health can realms becomes an issue that makes sense and in terms of people taking coaching in the daily industry? You talk about it being quite an isolated remote coach business in its own right just because of the geography etc.. How do people view it when you offer them coaching? Is it a difficult sell. I think in the beginning when I started out in two thousand and twelve it was unknown in a little bit difficult and I think what didn't help was me positioning myself as a life coach because I think that made it more intimidating and to think people perceived to be vulnerable what has helped for people in the sector to stop taking. Coaching is what I've seen. A lot of organizations and individuals do which is attached coaching as an integral part of leadership in coaching as being attached to a lot of leadership programs in the dairy industry and positioned as an incredibly useful tool for all leaders and I can get really help the uptake. I think because it's not being positioned as what we traditionally consider soft skill. It's almost being positioned as one of the hot skills that you have have to have. And that's helped with a lot of men looking into. Coaching is a big leadership. Toolbox and women as well to find that it's because I've also been a cultural a number of leadership programs in New Zealand even though I started off his position as a life. Coach transitioned into more leadership and professional development relevant coach. And that's what made it easy as well that it's snowing. Attracted women want to grow their leadership skills and contribution the industry and they've been very open open to looking at coaching caucus. So when you say that it's viewed as a part of leadership in the toolbox that people would have access to to be more more effective leaders. How do you measure the success of the coaching interventions? That you have. It is a good Christian. And it's a difficult thing to measure in southern longtime way of measuring. It is to notice where the people I actually have positive changes to their lives and so the big picture in terms of an industry. What will be great to see? Is the culture industry changing farming industry so instead of being all about awed farming in our family bessette if we can start seeing the next five years ten years in our culture is becoming a lot more open and positive in local a well-balanced I think will be a real indicate I bet coaching has paid a part of that. Because obviously being faceted and there'd be lots of factors involved it's a challenging thing to measure the impact. So I'm hearing you say that it's around in a way changing the individual so there's a human element to who individual element. There is also link. You ideally would like to see the Ryan the business in society in a way that there's a greater impact holistically or absolutely absolutely. It's it's one of my pet projects is I would love to see us I own. You don't get the farming sector but it's why society as well that if we can catch pitch each individual person to be driving in obviously there's going to be positive impacts on that passes family that cousins farming business the communities communities that are made up of farming businesses and then you know the wider New Zealand and then the whole entire world. I was curious to think about what you have learned about. Hugh since becoming a coach. I think is more about coaching me. But it's very hard to try to but I've learned the power and the impact of just listening to someone the impact I can have by creating a safe and non judgmental ngel space and create that space for someone else to get clear thinking I have learned how powerful that is is a very the interesting thing to learn especially for someone like me who loves talking and as you know when you're a coach most the child in theory where listening so it's it's been incredibly powerful to learn about the power of this. It's almost the simplicity. I'm heating of that message. Really being there and giving somebody their your attention mentioned this so powerful yes. I think more and more that I coached the more. I love that. Our lives are so busy and everyone's running around all the time doing multitasking multitasking. And people really value and appreciate an hour where they get to talk about themselves and being foltz because very rarely we. Are we getting that in life anymore uninterrupted hour. That is dedicated to you. So yeah the power of being able to listen blunt a lot else. I've learned a lot about my own muscle development because it's been mirrored in my clients. Personal Development is impeded incredible journey. Do you have any top tips or point that you think. Our listeners should pay attention to for their own health and wellbeing. I don't really like giving advice because I don't ever feel like I know that other people but I think the one of Moscow's that I live by that really helps me get clarity in stay optimistic and positive is I. Try to ways anchor myself with the talk. Thought that we only get one shot at this life. This is not a rea- so we don't come back and do over and I think to myself almost on a daily basis. Why not give this my base shot? So I think it's a bowed creating an awareness and focus in Karachi about what you actually actually want out of life. What's your definition of a successful life and it's Kinda like what would you like your eulogy looking ahead to the end of your life so you can look back? I really helps me stay focused on while I'm here I WANNA contribution I WANNA serve. I also want to do it in a way that is fun and unhealthy and sustainable and flexible. And so if I know what the end goal is it helps me in my day to day or week to week activities and interactions because it keeps me focused on what I see is the prize so even kind always tried to help them get clarity around. What is the quality of life that you are giving yourself permission to achieve back question? And the downside things helps meet onto a whole lot of other things While that's a powerful thought to leave us with considering Lushnje. Thank you so much for your time. Today it's been great talking to you. Thank you very much. It's been a.

New Zealand CNN Lauch Neiman Frontera Daily Women South Island Indonesia Afam Afam England Google Lushnje Merck partner Kenya Karachi Latoya Jane Tea Ryan Hugh
"access" Discussed on Access to Inspiration

Access to Inspiration

11:37 min | 1 year ago

"access" Discussed on Access to Inspiration

"I'm sue stockdale from access inspiration in this podcast CDs. We aim to give you a little inspiration as you hear about the lives. workup people who perhaps are quite different to you. I hope their stories and insights enable you to transcend your day to day challenges and reflect on what you could be capable of achieving leaving this podcast was accorded on the impressive Cunard liner the Queen Elizabeth and so the sound quality may not be perfect as we were sailing across the Bay of Bisky at the time and I'm talking to a man who has earned the title adventure of a year in two thousand six when he successfully became the first person to cycle on aid around the perimeter of Africa a distance of thirty six and a half thousand kilometers. It took him over two years to complete the.

sue stockdale Bay of Bisky Africa Elizabeth
"access" Discussed on Access to Inspiration

Access to Inspiration

14:03 min | 1 year ago

"access" Discussed on Access to Inspiration

"MCI today. I'm talking to climb steeper an award. Winning business coach leader Loves Helping to through surfing. I know you've got a lot of business. Experienced running fast growth companies. You have coaching skills. That you've been using for many years with clients as well as a passion for performance which I understand began in your childhood with an interest in cars. Yes indeed yes as a young young boy. I was always active. Could never sit still But the thing I love to do was to play with my toy. Cars make imaginary roads and villages drive around. And that's really where it all began in my imagination so from that imaginary world of cars clive. How did you get into motor sport for real because I understand that you have worked in Formula One and also a team manager for probably in one sense because I was stupid? I just wanted to find out what it was like going. I That was I was always trying to ride my bike as fast as I could wear my father worked on field and they used to raise go-carts so I got to meet some of the people there. Somebody had to go up for sale and I saved up my money from working in the holidays. And that's where it all began. Go karting into the world of being an employee and less a leader in the end of Motorsport headed that workout It's well it was slightly serendipitous I had really developed a strong interest in motor sport through my school days race and was very much a fan of certain drivers. And would you know. Read everything I could and watch everything I could and after I finished university there was a a job advertisement which I didn't think that I would be able to To succeed in getting that job because I didn't have the experience but I wanted to work emotive so I applied And it was really through that that I started. I joined the tire engineer knowing nothing about tires and very quickly learnt and I think out of that what became clear is if you have a genuine passion for something you can really quickly develop some of the other skills. Is that a necessary. Because you want to frank yourself working for goodyear and you were able to move your way up through different working with different types of drivers. Tell us a bit more about right that I think when I first started You know we were all young guys. I was a young engineer that we young drivers with people of all sorts of culture. I therefore from all over the world and one of the things that A became clear to me very quickly is when they're in the pulpit the the driving you know the high on adrenaline emotion and in those days there wasn't the technology that we have today so it was very much down to the engineer. Particular tire engineer to understand what the driver was was wanting from the car. And what they were doing to the car. And so the ability to navigate through that sort of emotional control emotional intelligence challenges was actually very very very important because you had to adapt to different different cultures different emotional levels but also to be able to ask good questions that you could quickly get to. What was it? The core of the issue with the COP because you never had very low so it was the ability to you ask good questions Make quick decisions and therefore make good decisions. Those were the things that I think. I really love very quickly At at Goodyear and I know that that leapfrogged you into working in a lot of other fast scrolls industries I understand creating solutions that had never existed before four that must have been fascinating tales motorboat that yeah it was it was it rigid. Bring together some of the things that I learned in racing. Not that I knew that at the time. Uh but I think when you're going into the unknown and to an extent I think you yourself will know this with some of your endeavors to confidence in an an and belief that you can work And perform well in a risk situation that you've prepared for the venture that you're going to do performance are I've talked to on this the ability to make decisions quickly and to assess things quickly and having agility and adaptability. If you're going into the unknown it might the oil work out quite as you expected and I think that again the emotional control they have to stay positive and focused. When you're you that an all of those aspects that I'd learnt in racing it was creating the environment and the culture in the team in those different organizations and with that some excitement Edmund for what we were trying to do and also I think one of the other very key for me? I call it. Lubricant was to have fun and To have some humor remote was going on because there would be mistakes and those aspects have to be have to be accepted and dealt with. I I understand the importance of giving people. You've space to be creative as you say clive make mistakes. I also understand these days and business. Perhaps there's not such a total of mistakes is being made or risks being taken. How would you balance both of those things I think for me? What I what I've created before ours is the tolerance framework? So that people know that that it's you know the everything cannot be perfect. I think the other piece that is involved in this is human transaction. It's human conversation. I don't know that the tolerance can always just come by pressing a button on a computer and it being a yes order now because there's applied learning that comes from you know. How did that mistake happen? What was happening? Is it telling you something else. Because sometimes we can think the the problem is. He's where the incident occurred but actually it may be with something else which could lead to bigger issues so I think one of the things around tolerance and the reason for it to gain the understanding now. I imagine that those skills are also useful for you when you're working now in your career as an executive coach tells about some of the situations and issues that you work through your coaching clients often where the clients are having Challenges it really trying to get a underneath not just what the challenges but what is going on around that situation. Sorry sorry I I live in an old house with old clocks often. It's about trying to have the conversation with the client without any sense. It's all of consequence of blame. It's just looking at the situation to understand the parameters and then begin to explore what could be done to WHO To improve the situation and I think the other thing is trying to help clients to look at things with full would view rather than a review view in other words worrying about what has happened in the past. It's learning from that and then looking forward as to how things can improve. So it's walking into the positive. The sense I get from how you're describing that Clive is that the coaching relationship sounds like it needs to be very safe space for client to work in competing that right you'd be absolutely correct. Well done it. It's it's not only safe but also it's I encourage urged them to think without constraints so to consider things that they might not considered before. Don't worry if it sounds silly. Don't where if it something you can't do now but if it might help the situation going forward let's look at that. How and why an explorer which comes back to your earlier question about working in areas of innovation and creating things that have not been done before all you have to think differently? That might assume then clive if you want your client your clients to think differently perhaps put the challenge to you is. How do you encourage yourself to take risks and think differently? So how do you role model what you want to see in your clients. One of the things I try to do is To put myself into their the their boots into their perspective and think about things from from their their points of view and given I work across across a number of different industries. It isn't about having the industry knowledge per se. It's it's understanding the boundary conditions. And I think the other thing and I do. Both when I'm in. The coaching session and off to the coaching session is to do some deep reflection on what went on on what could have been done differently to see. If there was anything else I could I could have done over the next so deflection is is an important part of off helping you to take risks and start your own comfort zone. Is that something you do on your own or do you work with a coaching supervisor. That I worked with with myself family supervisor. I I'd say it's a bit more than import guts is absolutely vital I think minorities from performances if you are not reflecting on your performance if you on preparing yourself for the next performance. It doesn't look. I can't just jump in my racing car and drive at the Front of the grid. I could drive in the middle of the great right but I wouldn't be able to get to the front. I have to prepare for it so I think that preparation is is very important. Good preparation comes from good reflection so that really runs up all of the things that you've been doing. I can see a thread really running through your career around agility and by agility I mean speed speed over flections speed and agility change direction and also speak from your love of racing cars. Would you say that that's something that's a threat from your career. I think that's a great question I think for me. The danger with speed is people think can think could assume that something's being done too quickly. I think it's about doing things well and quickly. One of the things that to me is very important is the speed of assessment and within that is the quality of says assessment. And that's what I do as a as a coach as a business person is what I do a race drive around an instructor. You have to assess things well and do it very quickly. You can't have indecision Fascinated I recently listened to a an interview with a ex world champion. It became a successful businessperson as person and they said one of the things that I noticed is despite some of the very bright people around them within the world that they were working they would take a long time to make decisions whereas he was making decisions quickly. Wouldn't always get them right but was very very very you know close in most occasions and I think that is one of the aspects that can happen with the with the sort of career. If you like Dr had. It seems. Like they're the attrition process going run that learning cycle reflecting acting taking decisions. One one might imagine. Hi Jen that you've been running that process perhaps a little a lot of times in your career and therefore a lot of learning has been gained so my my final question to you. Clive really is what are some of those key elements of wisdom or tips that you have gleaned that would be useful so for our listeners to think about in your career in coaching in Motor Sport and leading businesses. Wow there's a question I think If if I base it on the that we all want to do well at whatever it is we do and therefore I would summarize that as performance and I know not everybody likes the word performance. It makes them worry because I think they have to win the the sort of areas. If you like of wisdom I would pass on his I if people spend time thinking negatively ah a challenge them to to to consider why the Spending more time thinking positively because there's positive in pretty much everything that we do as well has the can't be negative but if we focus on our desired outcomes and we maintain that focus and find the positive. We can move things forward so I think not dwelling on the negative is is one thing I've learned you know and I've been involved in things that have not gone well clearly and also I think applied learning often people. People think that everything has to be new an awesome. We know more than we give ourselves credit for so if we use good reflection we can We can learn from what what we know and what we've done. I think one of the other things is never to standstill. The world. Today moves very quickly so we we always have to be aware of where we can Improve so there's not to say we need to reinvent the wheel but it's it's at least looking in knowing where we can improve if if we have to and I think the final one for me is is to have what I call an island in the week is to have a period of time in the week where you can ten escape from the work or the precious. Whatever it is you do and you can just take stock of what's going on and relax because if we try to just keep pushing all all the time alternately the performance will drop thanks clive? I love the idea of island in the week. I'm going to think about how that can be created. Finally how can people find find out more about you and the work that you do on social media. The I have a twitter account so they can get me at clive steeper and also I have A A website. which is clive steeper dot com? So both of those are very easily accessible areas where people can reach out to me all catch up with what I'm doing brilliant. Thanks for your time today clive. I've really enjoyed talking to you. Thank you very much..

Clive engineer goodyear MCI clive steeper karting supervisor COP twitter Edmund executive instructor Jen