20 Episode results for "Acadia National Park"

Why Are Scientists Asking Hikers to Stop Stacking Rocks?

BrainStuff

05:44 min | 1 year ago

Why Are Scientists Asking Hikers to Stop Stacking Rocks?

"Today's episode is brought to you by H and r block. If you want your taxes handled by the pros but don't have time to get out to an office or if you like me find yourself immobilized by lap cats you can get expert tax. Prep without office. VISIT WITH H&R BLOCK TAX PRO GO. It's the easiest way to have an expert do your taxes for you just upload your Docs and an agent are block tax pro. Does the rest so that you can get back to your busy day or your cats go to. HR BLOCKED DOT com slash tax time today to learn more. It's better with block doc. Young rocker is a podcast. Coming of age story about finding a home in rock music and learning to flourish in your own weird way. It's also a series of letters of advice to my younger self as she navigates the pressures of adolescence. The lessons seals with social anxiety body issues relationships and discovers the transformative power of music. Theory and rocker comes from double. Elvis productions is created and hosted by Mitchelson Elson and executive produced by Jay. Brennan of disgraced land listened to dear young rocker on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts. took him to brainstorm a production of iheartradio. Pay Brain stuff lauren. Vocal bomb here. If you've been out on a hiking trail lately you've you've probably noticed them. Suddenly popping up everywhere. Small intentionally stacked piles of rocks. Called Cairns and environmentalists worldwide are increasingly increasingly alarmed because moving rocks can have numerous unintended consequences for insects animals. And even the land itself people have been in stacking rocks since the dawn of time typically four directional or burial purposes such structures have been found in Greenland Northern Canada and Alaska and were built by Anita People's for specific purposes like navigation to indicate a food source or to warn of danger. More recently park officials began creating them on hiking trails else especially potentially confusing pads to help ensure that hikers don't get lost in eighteen ninety six a man named Waldron Bates created a specific civic style of hiking Karen in Acadia National Park. The Bates Cairns as they became known consisted of a rectangular stone balanced top two legs and then topped opt with one stone pointing to the trail. These Cairns were replaced by standard ones in the nineteen fifties and sixties but the park began rebuilding the historic Bates Cairns in the nineteen ninety S. Acadia no contains a mixture of both. What's concerning scientists? Today is the new practice of creating rock piles as an art. Form form or for alluring social media posts because stacking rocks is not an innocuous practice many insects and mammals head under rocks to live reproduce reduce or just escape. They're predators so move a rock and you might destroy a home stack a few. And you may have just exposed the hunted to their hunters. And and while that may sound melodramatic whether you're stacking rocks in the woods on the beach or in the desert your actions could inadvertently knock out an entire colony. Or in the worst case scenario threaten and endangered species some rock stacking fans note that they're being responsible by returning their rocks to the spots where they found them after after creating and then disassembling artwork however the second move rocks you may compromise species habitat in an unrecoverable manner. In addition moving rocks in any fashion contributes to soil erosion as the dirt ones protectively packed under them is now loosened and more prone to washing or blowing away. Why should you come upon? Stacked rocks especially in national parks. Leave him alone. And if you're hiking don't automatically follow where they seemed point. The National Park Service recommends checking with Park officials before setting out on a hike as every park has different rules about kearns. You wouldn't want to remove those intentionally set as navigational AIDS nor would you want to follow those. That may have been randomly. If artistically assembled by visitors in the end let your actions be guided by the important principle principle. Leave no trace. Today's episode was written by Melanie. Red Zeki McManus and produced I. Tyler client grainstuff. Production of heart. Radios has to works for more in this month of other stack topics visit our home. PLANET HALF WORKS DOT Com. In for more podcasts. My heart radio. Although the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows available now from Iheart a new series presented by t mobile for business us the restless ones join me. Jonathan Strickland as I explore the coming technological revolution with the restless business leaders who stand right on the cutting edge edge. They know there is a better way to get things done and they are ready. Curious excited for the next technological innovation to unlock their vision of the future church in each episode. We'll learn more from the restless ones themselves and dive deep into how the five G. Revolution could enable their teams to thrive. The restless ones is now available on the iheartradio APP. Or wherever you listen to podcasts. I everyone I'm Katie. couric here to let you know that my podcast next question with me. Katie couric is is back for. Its second season. I'll be diving into some big issues like this country's devastating maternal mortality rate. The rise of astrology and a a little thing called the presidential election listened to next question. It comes out every Thursday on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your favorite shows.

apple Bates Cairns Katie. couric Acadia National Park Cairns Waldron Bates National Park Service Mitchelson Elson Red Zeki McManus Brennan Alaska executive Jonathan Strickland Greenland Melanie Jay
Scientist seeks old vacation photos from Acadia National Park

Climate Connections

01:30 min | 9 months ago

Scientist seeks old vacation photos from Acadia National Park

"I'm Dr Anthony Laser wits, and this is climate connections. If you've ever taken a fall trip to Acadia national park in Maine a climate scientist wants to see your photos don't worry. She won't judge outdated fashion. She just wants to see the trees behind you Stephanie. Sparrow of the University of Richmond is studying how rising temperatures and changing rain patterns affect the timing of fall foliage and Acadia she and her team have been analyzing satellite photos and scouring old newspapers and reports, and our preliminary research suggests that fall foliage has been occurring one day later a decade on average but she needs more historical data to confirm a trend because we don't have satellites. Eight that are consistent and robust before the year two thousand, we'd love if people would send in photos, the snapshots people submit by email can help establish a longer time line and verify other reports. She says surveys show that many people visit Acadia to see the colorful fall foliage. So knowing how it's timing is changing is important for park management and local tourism. It fall foliage peak particularly is occurring later and later, and later in time you can imagine that'll change some things for the way local businesses plan. So you're all snapshots could help this much love park and nearby communities adapt to climate change. Climate connections is produced by the Center for environmental, communication to hear more stories like this visit climate action's Dot Org.

Acadia national park Acadia Sparrow Dr Anthony Laser Maine scientist Stephanie University of Richmond Center for environmental one day
Guidebook Writing & The National Parks w/ Jaime Kaiser

Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast

1:06:26 hr | 2 years ago

Guidebook Writing & The National Parks w/ Jaime Kaiser

"And I just remember lying the ocean bobbing up and down, you know, looking at the palm trees, and I was just thinking how can I get back here? What can I do to get back here? Could I write a guide to this place? Does displace need another guide. And ultimately when I looked at what was out there started thinking about said, you know, what I'm going to give it a shot. Will be extra packet peanuts travel podcast episode three fifty seven. We all know that Maine is popular for lobster. But did you know that ninety percent of the US's entire lobster supply comes from that small state up north my question where does the other ten percent come from? One of the things that I love about watching the tour to backpack brand grow over the last five to six years is that they were one of the first brands really focused on building a bag specifically for travelers and what I mean by that is when I started traveling. I started backpacking there were not many companies out there that focused on travellers all the backpacks were focused on hiking and camping and things like that. Which is great if you're hiking and camping and doing things like that. But not so great if you're looking just to travel around, and so when Tortuga backpacks came out, I was absolutely thrilled because they made a pack that was built for travellers one that was not top-loading, you know, that you had to shovel all your stuff in. And then when you had to get some at the bottom you had to take every single thing out. They did not make bags like that. They decided that they were gonna make bags for this. Crazy, huge subset of people travelers, but not travelers who were specifically going camping, hiking and things. Like that. So super excited that through two backpacks came out with their version one way back when when I was a newbie traveler, and I'm so excited that I've been able to use them throughout my entire travels over the last four or five years the only backpack that I have used to a to a backpack. So if you're looking for the best travel care on size backpack out there, and you're not camping or hiking and doing that tiebreak tippety you're just going to go out and travel. Check them out or took a backpacks dot com. Don't forget to use the promo code e pop. That's E P O P all capital letters. That'll get you ten percent off your entire order. And don't forget if you're about saving money on travel, and you are about saving money on travel. Right, right. Make sure you check out our app jet. OJT? Oh, you can find on any of the app stores totally free to download it is going to help you find the cheapest flight out there. We just had some amazing deals to some great places. We're talking French Polynesia. We're talking von Awad to we're talking to Hiti some really really cool. Exotic remote locations for under for six hundred bucks under five hundred bucks. Crazy crazy deals have been coming out. So check it out go. Download it on the app store. JET? Oh, check it out. Download for free and you'll be getting cheap flight to your phone in no time. No. Hello travel nerds. And welcome to the extra pack of peanuts travel podcast this show that teaches you how to travel more while spending less. I'm your host Travis Sherry and joining me today someone whose work is grace the cover of National Geographic who has sold over one hundred and fifty thousand copies of his guidebooks. And who claims to have the best job in the world. I might have something to say about that though, James Kaiser award winning travel writer and photographer from James Kaiser dot com James, thanks for joining me and welcome. Thank you. It's a pleasure to be here. And I just learned right before we hopped on and start recording here that James is down in Columbia. So I got to pick his brain a little bit about Colombia. So you're there in bogus. Aw. Give us your rough itinerary. How long do you usually stay down there in Colombia escaped the winners is that typical for you for a year. Yeah. Pretty much. So my wife is Columbia, and we really like splitting our time between the US and Columbia, and obviously. Summer is a great time to be in the US winners a great time to be in Columbia. So if varies every year, but you know, we got back here about week and half ago. We'll probably be here until the spring awesome. And you're a bit of a double threat here you both in established writer of a bunch of great guidebooks and also an award winning photographer. So right off the bat. I'm gonna give you a hard question. What are you better writing or taking the pictures? That's actually an easy question for me. It's taking the photos. You know, photography is just something that came really naturally to me. I was always interested in art growing up as a kid. And it's just something that that I do and sort of understand. It's just sort of a reflex almost whereas writing is always something that seems to be work. You know, it's sort of it's it's really a craft and it takes a lot to to. Right. Well, and you have to rewrite rewrite rewrite it's incredibly rewarding. When you do something good. There's no better feeling, but definitely prefer the photography. I'm with you man, the writing I I'm always super. Yeah. Proud when I get something out with it'd be a blog post or something written because it is a struggle. Like, even though I like it is a struggle. And I think what's kind of neat to James's so many people want to do it. But never do because it is that struggle, right? Like, oh, I've got this book in my head or I've always wanted to start a blog, and then they don't because they know that inherently writing can be really really difficult go. Yeah. And even I've read a lot of stuff by saints writers about the writing process, and even some of the top names, you can think of is even painful for them after doing it for decades. So it's just a complicated thing. But like I said, it's it's really rewarding. And especially when you know my words helped people travel better. Yeah. And we're going to tell let's let's dive into that. Because everything you do whether it be the photography or the writing is based around this love of travel, and this idea that you want to help people get out there. See more understand more. You'll have a better experience where did the love of travel for you come from. What you know? I really have to say a lot of it came from my parents, my parents were and continue to be a global travelers. They love it. You know, when I was growing up in small town main in the nineteen eighties. We did a lot of crazy trips. We went to Africa. My dad, did some volunteer work there and brought the family, you know, went to Egypt Europe. Now, that's a lot more common back. Then I mean that was really kinda crazy especially going to Africa. I mean that was like the end of the world. This is before, you know, cell phones, the internet, but I really think it was early experiences. You know, gave me this incredible perspective on the world. And I think that combined with being a very small town. It just made me want to explore maybe wanna go out and see what was out there. I to this day. It fascinates me is always interesting. And it's something that I love continuing to do do where do you think the love of travel for your parents came from? And maybe you know, because you know, when asked this question we have about. Half the guests say, hey, it really comes from my parents or I or someone when they were growing up. Maybe it's grandparents or aunts and uncles what have you? But hey, they traveled a lot growing up, especially international. So it was bred into them a bit. And then have the people and myself included in that I traveled but not much. It was all, you know. Hey, we're going down to Florida. We're doing this. And I kind of found it on my own and bit myself with the travel bug versus having happened to me as a kid. What about your parents were? They did that get passed down from their parents, or do, you know where that came from for them because that's crazy? Take your kid Africa in the eighties. Right. Like, that's the thing that really happens for most people not normal. And there are a lot of people that question my father, saying the. You know, my father. They definitely did some travel. I remember he tells the story about going to Mexico City when he was a he was a boy with his family, and the thing that he couldn't get over was that his taxi driver was named Jesus. And I don't know. Maybe that's where it started for him. You know, Jesus the taxi driver some people have an inherent curiosity about the way things are the way the world works. You know, they really wanna know more. And I think that if that's sort of your personality type, and whether that can be an herited or learn, you know, I don't know probably a little bit of both. But I think those are the things that really kindle the passion for travel, and maybe there's people that they have it. But they just haven't been on a trip somewhere where you know, that sort of a, you know, it lights spark in the end for me travel is all about learning and learning comes room curiosity. So I really think that that's probably the root. When you first started out, then so like your kid, you're traveling around. And then you you went to school. And then you went to university during that time period. Was there ever a thought that travel would just play a secondary role? Like, hey, I'm going to get a regular job. And of course, you're going to travel, but you're gonna take vacations versus now, you know, the life that you have hey, you're bopping between Colombia and the US. You know, you able to be location independent where like was that on your radar and kind of a goal from the from the gecko or did you have to go through some terrible maybe times jobs and things like that to actually come out on the other side. So it was incredibly haphazard. I did not think that my future lay in travel writing photography. I was an engineering major. I studied engineering in college. I always expected, you know, a get a regular job, and, you know, be working for for the man. Maybe I think I had a bit of independence streak where I thought, you know. Well, eventually, it'd be great to to my own business. You know, that would be a really interesting thing to do. I just kind of fell into it when I graduated from from college it was nineteen ninety nine and I went on a trip with my dad to Hawaii. Actually, we went to a why there was a guidebook that we picked up there that had been clearly self published by some locals, and it was like the guy to Hawaii still lose the guy to Hawaii. I mean, it's like the best selling guide in it's not from a big corporate publisher. It's just some people that did it in only. Mainly and looking through it. I was like, wow. That's that's incredible. That's amazing that these people did this. And I realized that there was a national park. Right. Where I grew up in Maine Acadia national park, and when I started looking into it. I realized there wasn't a real great guide to Acadia. And so after I graduated college I said to myself, well, you know, I'm going to have to get a real job pretty soon and probably not gonna like it can be abrupt shift from the college university life. I'm just gonna take a few months, and I'm gonna do my own thing. And you know, I think I'll attempt to write, you know, a small guidebook to Acadia, and I was envisioning like almost like a pamphlet. Naievety is bliss by friend. Yeah. And it ended up snowballing into a full book with photos, and you know, that's when I really got involved with tog Raphy, and it came out it became the best selling guide to Acadia. It was sort of this crazy dang where you know, halfway through the project. I didn't even know what I got myself into. But it was sort of what I realized how much work was a head. I realized it was too late to quit. So I had to keep going head. I known how much work would have been. I probably would never have started. But the results were great people loved it. You know? It was the best selling book wasn't you know, enough to really live on live comfortably. But I thought, wow, this is incredible. You know, maybe maybe there's something here. Maybe I could do the someplace else. And so I moved out to California. I did a guidebook to Joshua tree national park had the same result with that. And I've essentially been doing doing it ever since so totally unexpected. But I'm really happy. It turned out the way it did. I wanna talk about that process that of the first guy book, and then obviously subsequent guidebooks. I'm sure followed a similar process, except you actually knew what it would be little more a little more a little more each time when you were doing there, Katie when you thought is going to be a pamphlet, and then you start realizing I want there's a lot more. I want to say there's pictures I can put in here. What like a how long did that take? And then what did the process look like forgetting it to something that was then self published? Well, the as I said the process was completely haphazard. I just had a sort of general idea, and it took a year to put out that first book, and it was really a crash course in doing multiple things at once, you know, was doing the writing doing the photography learning about self publishing. You know, at the time desktop publishing was sort of at a point where you know, one person could sit down and put it all together. But you had to learn the software. You know, there were there were no YouTube training videos back down. There was no YouTube back then it was really a struggle to figure. It all out. I think my engineering background actually really came in handy because I was comfortable with software technology sort of learning things on my own. But it was really a crash course, I got the product out. It's the type of thing that I look at it today, and I sort of cringe. I I see all the arrows that I made. But it was good enough at the time. You know that sort of set the template for for the future projects. And really what I try to do from the very beginning is say what kind of guidebook would I like to see like as a consumer? What what are the things that? I wanna see in a guidebook to Acadia national park, and the things that I wanted to see I wanted to see photos because photos really helped plan a trip. They really, you know, if you wanna choose which hiking trail, you wanna go on if there are some photos, and if are in color that can give you a much better sense of what the hike looks like than just a written description. I knew I wanted to have a lot of great background information about the geology about the wildlife about the history. You know, these are these are things that I'm fascinated in. This is why love to travel I love to learn. And so many of the guide books that were out there at the time and still to this day really sort of. It's like, you know, here's a list of thirty hotels. Here's a bunch of restaurants. It you know, it was really disordered the basics of the Mississippi's of staying alive. While you travel rather than the joys of learning. And I I wanted to learn so really I just took all these things that I thought I really would like to see in a guidebook, and I put them all together and other people of you know, they agreed. They they bought the book, and they felt the same way in that. It's it's the philosophy. That's still you know is true to my guidebooks to this day. Like, what did it look like in was or if there was a breaking point between? Okay. Getting it out because that's one thing obviously, huge mission to finish a guidebook get something that that is published, but then the second part or maybe even an probably even the more time intensive and and I wouldn't even say the second half because it takes it takes up. More time is the marketing or just getting people to know about it. Because so how what did that look like because that that's a tough thing. I know a lot of people would struggle the first part. But then they might even get to a point where they could publish on. And now all of a sudden, all right? Well, who's gonna find this and how are people going to find it? Because like you said this was pre internet was there, but pre kind of internet marketing and stuff like that. Where do people find your book? Was there a big break that you found or something like that? And I had a website back. Then people were amazed. Oh, you have a website. That's incredible. You know, that's amazing. The internet was there. But it wasn't what it is today. That said there were alternate. You know ways that people got their information. They got their information through newspapers through magazines, you know, and those really moved markets back. Then I mean, the phone book that was huge for businesses. People used to pay tons of money to be in the phone book. You know? So it was the there was marketing there, it was just different than it is today a lot more analog. And you know, what I did? I I was really fortunate because Acadia national park is located on an island off the coast of Maine, which means that all of your customers. Your potential customers are going to end up on an island. There is an enclosed space where they are going to go to and what I did when I got the books. I put him in the back of my truck. I drove around to every store that I could possibly find. Whether it was a gas station or a bookstore, or, you know, convenience store, and I just walked in. Twenty one years old. And I said, hey, I have this book. I'm a local guy you I grew up right nearby. I did this book would you like to carry it? Honestly, I think a lot of people took pity on me they were like odd is this this young guy. You know, like, I don't know of his books. It good. But he seems like, you know, he's Arniston he's into it. And they're small business owners. So they understand the problems that can come with the challenges that come with having a small business. So a lot of them were like, yeah. Give me five copies, you know. And I think they thought all by five copies and Bill sit here on the shelf all summer, but you know, I'm helping this young guy out who's trying to do his thing. And you know within about a week. I was getting phone calls from everywhere saying, hey, we'd like another five copies, we'd like ten copies. And so it was a little bit easier. Because like I said, it was a it was a concentrated geographic area people at that point were still sorta. Of, you know, picking up stuff like that getting their information when they got to a place as opposed to researching beforehand, and so that all that that really helped out as far as getting everything launched what then made you decide to move on to Joshua tree. Had you been out there before and you thought all right? This is my second favorite national parks. I'm going to go here. Or was there? Some other thing in your head where you thought. All right. People are coming here. They have to cut like same thing. They have to come through a certain area. They're not getting away from me. You know, I'm gonna get into this guy Booker their ads, you know, more than anything else. Again. Remember, I thought this Acadia book was going to be a one time thing. And then I was going to have to get the job. Right. And I wanted to move out to California, I spent my whole life growing up in small towns in New England and southern California was about the most exotic place the go too far away from home as possible. And so I moved out there and Joshua tree is basically the, you know, the national park in southern California. It was a real. Challenge because you're dealing with a completely different landscape. I mean, you know, Katie is on the coast it gets doubts glove in green, Joshua treason. Desert in southern California. I didn't know the place at all I went there, and you know, sort of head to learn as I as I went whereas with Katie I spent my whole life growing up there. I knew like the back of my hand. Josh Autry was was very different challenge. But it was really because I wanted to live in southern California. And Josh intrigue was there, and I decided to to give it a shot, but it was great because going to such a different environment going to such a different place with a new set of challenges allowed me to sort of Bill. My skill set. And really look at the process in the different way instead of knowing everything in advance, I had to learn everything. And I had to learn about, you know, okay. Got a study up on the ecology of the desert's that kind of thing. So again that was just sort of a random thing. But it worked out. Oh, well in the end, and you know to this day might guidebooks Josh trees, the best-selling guidebook to Joshua tree. So still going strong does one guidebook outperform all the others. Is it seasonal or do? You have one that. Like, hey, this is far and away. The most popular one out of all the ones that you've written. You know, it's interesting. It's sort of varies from year to year. And I don't know why that is. But it seems like some years, you know, all of a sudden everybody wants to go to Acadia and other years. Everybody wants to go to Yosemite. It just kind of Eris they all sell within a certain range, but it sorted definitely fluctuates from year to year. What was the biggest difference between you kind of touched on this like having to learn that was the biggest difference between Acadian and Joshua tree. But was there something with the process that you did different? Like were you able to sit there and say man, I turn this around a lot quicker or hey, now, I kind of know the marketing, and here's what I'm gonna do. What were the biggest differences between that first guidebook and that second? You know, it was it was just a new set of challenges. So the things that I had sort of learned become become comfortable with on the first one. It was like I got this is going to be easy. I know how to edit photos. Now, you know, I know had organize information. But they're just there's always new things, you know, the desert's very different place than, you know, coastal New England, and as I continue to work on my craft, you know, becoming a better writer becoming a better photographer. There is always more to learn. And I think this is going to be true for the rest of my life. You you can always find sort of places where you can improve place where you can make yourself better. And they might be sort of incrementally, smaller changes. But in some ways that makes them even more difficult. So it really took, you know, about four or five guides until I felt I had a real handle on the whole process from you know, when I when I go into a place. Okay. What do I need? You know, what's the checklist of things? What do I focus on first what I focus on sex? It's been a continual learning process. Yeah. Let's walk through that time line because I'm fascinated here of of what it looks like let's walk through from the beginning. Katya was what year and then just yeah. Tell us what year and then. And then when those guidebooks went out, and then we can go back and dive into specific ones. Yes. So Acadia came out. The first addition came out in two thousand. Josh few came out in two thousand three Grand Canyon in two thousand five Yosemite in two thousand seven and then at that point I made a real departure from national parks. I moved down to Costa Rica, we can get into all that and that wound up being a real big challenge. And that came out in two thousand two thousand thirteen was the first addition. So that's where the rough time line. I t you're you're kind of flying not flying. But like two years two years two years away now doing a country of this going to take a little while longer when and I want to get into that. Because that's obviously then a whole 'nother challenge, but when did you and your head say, all right? This is this is what I'm doing. Now. I am a I'm a guidebook right on from a travel writer, when did you actually feel comfortable saying, this is me not all this is me right now. But in the back of your head you thought you were going to go back to engineering or something. Yeah. And that was constantly in the back of my head the whole time, you know, for the first year or two, it's it's fun. You're like I'll get a job you start getting into it. And you know, your friends got jobs there's removing along in their careers. And you're thinking this doesn't work out. You know, how am I gonna switch gears here? But it was really I know the exact moment that it happened after I came out with the Grand Canyon guide which was like third guide that guide won several national guidebook awards when the Benjamin Franklin award for small publishers for the best travel guidebook the independent publisher award. And really at that moment. I knew okay, I've got something going year. This is something that people are responding to you know, I'm going all in. I still felt like I was sort of building things up. And I wasn't you know, I hadn't arrived. But it was clear that all the momentum was building. And I had a good thing going. This wasn't just a one off head. So that was really when I felt like, okay, I'm going all in and. What was it about the national parks at captured your attention was it because you like traveling to them or did you think? All right. I also have a bit of a formula with I've done God books in national park. So I wanna sought myself in as the national park guidebook guy. Yeah. It was a combination of things one. I absolutely love national parks. I mean, spending time outdoors going hiking spending time in nature. It's something that I've always loved as the world has become progressively more digital. I love it even more because it's such an amazing opportunity disconnect in sort of, you know, let go and gather yourselves and reflect so it's it's always been a passion of mine. It was a combination of that looking at what was available for national parks and seeing that they're, you know, they're really weren't the kind of guides that that I wanted that. I was looking for a lot of them were made by big corporate publishers that they've got a template whether it's a country a city, you know, they slapped the template on send some people in there who you know, they do an all right job. But I, you know, I when you read the geology section when you read the wildlife section is clear that there it's not something that they're intimately familiar with really passionate about. And I am and I think that really comes through in the writing. So you know, it was a combination of things that I like seeing the opportunity and yet have having a good lifestyle going out in playing national parks. How long did you feel that you had spend in an area to to be able to write a guidebook on it? Because like you mentioned and listen, everyone there's. Different guidebooks for all types of people. But there are guide books that you read that you think all right. Someone knows this area very intimately and knows a lot. And then you read some and you're like, okay, someone came through and dare they know a surface level, which might be more than me. So I'm thankful that there's something. But you also get the feeling that they have in. They don't live there. They haven't spent a lot of time there. So for you. What was that balance of art? Now, I feel like I can write from it and really give someone a feeling for this place. Unfortunately, the answer is it depends. But really if it's a small park that you can really get to know I'm going to say fairly quickly fairly quickly on meeting. You know, talking about four months five months coming back throughout the different seasons. Because places change a lot between summer and winter. And you gotta know K. What's it like one of visiting the winner? What's it like when I'm visiting in the summer, you know, that's a lot different from going to say Costa Rica, which even though the small country, it's still a big country compared to a national park. And the nuance, and the culture and the language and all the complexities to come with that. That's why that was a five year project as opposed to align. These national parks being a two year project were there times, the Costa Rica thing that you thought okay, I'm just going to go back to the US and find another national park because this is a too much like I've been on how constantly I mean, it was in a lotta ways it was similar to my first guidebook where by the time. I realized what I got myself into it was too late to quit. There was no going back, and you just had to push forward. It was enormous complexity. I didn't speak Spanish when I arrived. I speak Spanish now. But that was a whole process going through the culture shock adapting to the culture it. It's just a different style of life. And really nothing could prepare me for it. You know, no amount of sort of academic studying in a universe. City, you know, reading about things I mean, you have to go there just experience it to really get a a sense of a flavor for it in some ways coming in as an outsider is very helpful. Because you can notice things that other people, you know, people that have been living there their whole life. Don't you know that that that can definitely work your advantage at it was it was a it was a constant, you know, funny discussion that I always had with Mike Costa Rican? Friends rod bring something up. I'm like, what are you guys think about this? And they just look at me like, I was crazy. They never considered it because it was always the way it was. And we have really interesting discussions about will. You know, I came at this from a completely different angle than you guys are coming in it. I think we both learned a lot through that process and that really helped me work through. Okay. What's my perception of Danes? What am I learning about this place? And how can I then distilled at boil it down into interesting good? Travel information that can help travelers, you know, how can this interesting cultural quirk that have stumbled upon help a traveller not make a fool of themselves or just simply get along better in a in a foreign land. You know, so really again stepping in way over my head. But that's sometimes the way you learn. That's right. What made you decide on Costa Rico? Why why did you venture down there? So is interesting in two thousand and six the Winter Olympics in Torino Italy, and I got hired to go and photograph the Winter Olympics for Yahoo which had just purchased a little photo site cycle. Flicker flicker was like, you know, sort of pre Instagram, and I think Yahoo bought it for twenty million bucks. And everyone was saying this is outrageous tech bubble. You know, like, that's let's enormous amount of money just to give you know. Listeners out there idea how distant in the past two thousand six was. So they had just bought flicker. They wanted to promote it a friend of mine was actually on the US ski team. And he was he had hurt his leg. And he was writing articles for Yahoo. So he's sort of brought me in went over there spent a month in the Italian Alps, which was amazing. But by the end of it. I mean, you're talking, you know, I'm out there shivering in the cold taking photos everyday for a month. And right after that, another friend of mine headed by to me down to Costa Rica, where his parents had moved to they were ex pats. They live down there. They ran a a nice little boutique hotel, and he said, hey, we're going down there. You should come. I said great, you know. So after a month of being, you know, in the in the mountains in in the in the winter went down to Costa Rica and just head absolute blast. I mean, it just blew me away. The natural beauty the wildlife, the friendliness of the people, and I just remember, you know, sort of lying in the ocean. Bobbing up and down, you know, looking at the palm trees, and I was just thinking how can I get back here? What can I do to get back here? Could I write a guide to this place? Does displace need another guide. And ultimately when I looked at what was out there started thinking about I said, you know, what I'm going to give it a shot and five years later, you wrote a guidebook now. Oh, man talking about that like the process to me seems so overwhelming especially with the country. But but even just say just, but even national park, do you go and give yourself an amount of time where you just go an experienced it. You say I'm not going to write anything on not gonna take any photographs. I'm not going to jot anything down I'm going to come here and be here. And kind of you know, in a way like let it wash over me. And let me just experience this place. I is there do that. And then start the process of cataloging documenting. And all that or do you just say, no like, you're? Scribbling notes from day one. I would say every time I try to do that. And it lasts about maybe half a day. And I just can't help myself. I started noticing things. I started seeing great shots. And I just can't sit there and do nothing when I when I see you don't amazing shot lining up. When I see, you know, really interesting travel tip or great piece of information. I have to write it down. So you're like from the jump. You're like all right. Whatever anything I hear. I don't even know if it's gonna make it in who knows. But you're you're documenting right right away. I tried to just take it in. I honestly do every time. I try, but it's just I can't help it. It's like it's a reflex. Like, you know, I just can't sit there. I I have to I have to, you know, capture it you're like me man, I tried to travel slow, but then I find myself in an area. And I think well, I, you know, I'm so close to hear what am I going to be back and all of a sudden there's five things in seven days versus oh, we rented an apartment for three months. You know? I'm with you. I get it you that urge is too much. I think that's the curiosity the wander lost. And and the idea that you're there, and you don't wanna miss something. And so yeah, it's kind of hard to step back. I think being a guidebook author is probably a lot of people's dreams, or at least until they start doing it. I know for example, when I was, you know, we're starting our website. And we're like, oh, we're gonna write about this two nations because we've experienced in our way, and I want other people to experience it that way. And to this day, we still right like little destination posts and stuff like that. So I think that's most travelers are a lot of trailers, what are things that people don't know about the process of actually sitting down and writing a full on guidebook and to be clear. I do think I dream job. I really do love it. But people always focus on the dream. And they forget about the job. And you know, a job is a job because there's stuff that you have to do that you don't necessarily. You want to do travelling around is the fun part? That's that's the part. That's the dream. You're going around you're experiencing things. And when I run into people, you know, as I'm traveling, you know, start chatting, and I tell them what I do they say this is incredible. They're on vacation. They don't have any responsibilities. They say, wow, you do this all the time. It's incredible. What they don't see is the seventy five percent of the time that I'm sitting in front of my computer, like just about everybody else putting everything together editing, the photos working on the writing working on the organization working on the business side of things working on the promotional side of things the these are all vital parts of the job. And that is most of the job travel is really, you know, sort of the really fun fractional part but sitting down and really getting it done. And like I said I enjoy it. But there's definitely days when it doesn't come easy. You know, when you're writing, and it's just not flowing, and you just have to power through any Kansas Constan. Procrastinating said inside because then it's never going to get done. You know, like any job if you're a graphic designer there's going to be days when you're stuck in a rut, and you just have to power through it like everybody else, you know, the one of the trickiest things is probably self-motivation, especially if you're coming from a job where he, you know, you're used to having a boss used to showing up you got to do it. Otherwise, you're gonna get fired when you're working for yourself. You have to look in the mirror and be your own worst, boss. One of the hardest. Things is a lot of people don't understand that. You're not self. You're not unemployed yourself employed. You know, so if they got the day off they're going to be calling you off they want to do stuff. They wanna go for a hike. They want to go to the movies. And it's like, no, I can't do this like, I'm not unemployed. I'm self employed. And that is sort of one of the hardest. Things is the your friends and family, the people that know you love you sort of not. Sort of taking maybe taking a little offense. When you don't, you know, immediately respond to wanting to do something fun because you know, it's like you just can't take off whenever you want. You got to get stuff done YoM smiling. So big over here because for the first two years, I think that was my plight. I and and I also gave into it because I wanted to you want to go to launch I've got the day off. And you're sitting like, yeah. This is why work for myself. I'm going to give myself this treat, and then it's four days a week. And you realize, hey, whenever I come home from lunch with anyone. I'm not doing anything because I'm ready for a nap or I've lost that flow. And so likewise man, it took a long time for me to have to sit there on in my own head. But also to other people to say, hey, I like if I was an office job, you call me up and asked me to go to lunch. I would probably be able to do it once a month. Right. Well, just imagine. That's where I am. Right. And so, and I had to do that and set limits, and I think that that is something that is an ever. Like an ever changing battle and about what we will always fight because you and I both we like to be out there. We like to do stuff we like to be around people. We like to know, we're curious. That's why we like to travel, and so kind of dialing that in and saying, yeah, you can do that. But not right now, definitely something that I think I'm improving at but never. I mean, it's never going to be completely there where I'm a hermit and say, Nope. Only working, and I think probably sounds similar for you. Yeah. And I think you know, it depends on your personality. You know, my brother. You know, he works at a tech company in San Francisco, and he wouldn't have it any other way. I he's very comfortable with that. He loves the stability. He loves the regularity of it. I have a different temperament, you know, I like it when things are sort of a little bit all over the place. But at the same time, I'm also kind of a glutton for punishment. So I don't mind being my own worst, boss. So so much of it just depends on your personality type. But I've been really fortunate to a found something that I think compliments might might personality. Very, well, I'm we're gonna chat on kind of some of your travel favorites in just a second. I wanted to give you a term. I you listeners can't see it. But all my shirt, I'm wearing right now. We're talking we have a phrase called I tackled the buffalo and exactly what you were talking about when you have to slog through that. Hey, I'm sitting in front of my computer. This is the unsexy part of my business or the part that's hard for me. We call it. Tackling the buffalo, and so likewise people say, hey, this is amazing. Get to do whatever you want like every single person at some point has to tackle the buffalo. Never. Is there job something that they always want to do? And so yeah, just slogging through in getting through on the other side. I think can be one of those amazing parts of job in its own way. Because you say, hey, I know I didn't really want to do is. Of course, we wanted to go out and travel and take the photos, but I know I didn't want to sit down and write five thousand words today. But I did and then you get to kind of revel on that. So you tackle the buffalo lodge? Sounds. I try try and tackle that both. I wanna I wanna chat a little bit about your travels and some of your favorite places as well. What did you travel lifestyle? Look like because you talked about going to Columbia and spending time in the US and Columbia. So few questions thrown together here one when you're in the US is there a home base is your place, usually go. And then also how often are you getting out and traveling to new places versus hey, I gotta go back to Grand Canyon or Katie or down to Costa Rica to obviously constantly be updating your knowledge of the places that you have guidebooks for. Yeah. As far as the home base main still where I return to you. I still have family and friends their kids. I went to kindergarten with still really good friends of mine. That's always going to be sort of, you know, my home. Obviously what I'm there. I go to a lot for pleasure for business travel around to the parks quite a bit. Try to update them about every two years, so really constantly going out there. But on top of that, you know, always want to visit new places, and it it's two different modes of travel, right? There's going back to the same place. You know, so well, and there is this sort of magical dang about returning over and over again to a place and really noticing subtleties. And and over the course of your life, of course, decades like getting to know it that intimately that's really really special at the same time either the other motor travel, which is going someplace completely new which completely different set of stimuli. And I always try to do that too. So I was trying to go someplace. Whether in the US or internationally once or twice a year. I'm fortunate. I got hired to photograph trips. You know, there's adventure companies that sent me out to photograph tracks or rafting trips for that kind of thing so often I can sort of check off that box. You know, where it's like both work and pleasure at the same time is going to place at which is a great way to travel for me too. Because I really like you now having that challenge of okay? Gotta get great photos. Got gotta write something good about this place. But really, yeah. Those two modes of travel and experiencing both I think sort of round things out nicely and to be honest. You know, it in the age of Instagram. I do think there is this sort of push to constantly be going to new places new and something different. And and everything, and I I really think people should sometimes slowdown and find these places that they really love and go to again, and again, and it doesn't have to be some exotic gusts nation. You know, you can discover a lot about places in your own backyard. That are remarkable. And if you spend more time, they're they're going to get better. And better at a lot of these places are really overlooked because everyone's going for that over the top, you know. Wow factor, but Dolder I've gone the more travel more I've come to appreciate sort of the subtleties of places what our few of those places for you, some just the highlights in your life. Whether they be place you've been to once or those places that you like I'm coming back here. Because I I just love it like, I don't why. Why wouldn't I continue to come here? Yeah. I would say with every national park. I feel that way the more. I spend time in each one the more. I understand how remarkable they truly are the more. I go on hikes. You know that have been on, you know, multiple times. Maybe even a dozen or more times, you just start to notice new things start to see it in a different light. And you start to appreciate. Wow. You. You know, the what what makes this place beautiful despite all the other places that are travel to is really singular and unique here. And I think that that helps a lot with sort of putting things in perspective, especially you know, as guidebook writer understanding, those things really make places unique. That's why you travel you wanna see someplace different you you want to experience something place different at with every single national park. I have felt that t and have a favorite are few favorites. I know it's like it's like asking people to pick their favorite kid, but I'm gonna keep pressing on this. Are there some that? You just say like, let's say someone said I can only visit five national parks shames like for whatever reason. What would you say? All right here here hearing here. Well, that's an easy one. I would say all my guidebook staring go you've got you've got five. Right. So they're so Erica. All right. But really for me. And this is again a product of where I was born and raised in. How I grew up a Katy. Always going to be my favorite national park. But that's because I have so much personal history. There you know, I worked in restaurants outside the park when I was in high school in college. You know, I grew up going on hikes, mom and dad, no other places going to replicate those experiences. So for me. I'm completely biased. A Katie is my favorite national part. That said I think that the most incredible experience you can have in any national park is a rafting trip through Grand Canyon. I never done another adventure that that compares to that. It's just out of this world. Every time I go on one. I think I can't believe that this exists in America. Just feels like something that, you know, could only be in the Himalayas, you know, or could only be in in some exotic destination on the other end of the world, but is right here in the United States. That's incredible. If you're looking for backpacking, hiking really hard to be Yosemite. It is just a wonderland of incredible hikes in backpacks. So again each. Park has their own kind of special unique thing but going back to your original question if I had two big it would be Acadia. Do you have one outside of Acadia that you think get overlooked bit? Because I give you an example, this I was going through the badlands a couple months ago. And I just thought like, I know this is here, and I've been to at once before is like a fifteen year old, and, you know, actually, didn't like I said to my buddy. Oh, yeah. It was cool. But then we went back, and it's like, whoa. This is way better than the first time. I was here. And I just thought it crazy to me that this doesn't get more, publicity or more visitors because I put it on par with some of the best places. I had been when it comes national parks. Do you? Do you have one that you think this is it outshines kind of the popularity that it might, you know, might have it probably deserves a little more. Yeah. So I used to say IRA national park in Utah. That I started saying that about fifteen years ago. So you're the one who started this trend. I blame Instagram, but. Now, it's now the third most visited as of two thousand seventeen is the third most visited national park in the United States. I'm actually working on a new book desire on as we speak that will come out next spring, but really for a long time. And I was just hanging out with somebody who's from you know, he he's a sort of a descendant of one of the original pioneer families that settled Springvale the town outside Zion on and he was telling me when I was growing up as a kid in the nineteen sixties Zion was the sort of park that nobody knew where it was. And you know, what was not nearly as famous as other places. He's like, but it was ours in Utah. Was it was hours? You know? It was it was our park that nobody else cared about or loved end. Now. Completely flipped. Everybody's discovered that it's this wonderland of outdoor adventure. Now, if I was gonna land next one went when we talk ten years from now, what's what's going to be the next one? So. Interesting, you know, park that came to my attention recently was north cascades in Washington, and it's about three hours from Seattle. And it gets I think it's something like under thirty thousand visitors a year. Now, remember, the big national parks. Get you know, two three million visitors a year, that's because north cascades you to access it. You really got to go on foot. You got a backpack. There's sort of a level of difficulty to get there. But the landscapes are just stunning. And this really, you know that plays into and I don't want to say that the only one I think the Channel Islands are incredible. They are off the coast of southern California, you know, the most populist one in most populous areas in the United States, and we've got the Galapagos of North America right off shore for some reason everybody ignores it, you know, there's lots of places like that sequoia and kings canyon. Those are great national parks on par with Yosemite. But you're seventy gets all the attention. Getting back to the north cascades in how you have to hike in. This is really key to visiting a lot of national parks. You know, everyone is aware that there are now there's huge visitation at the top national parks. You know, talk ten are just packed. It's becoming a bit of an issue in certain places. A really the way I look at it it it's no concentration problem. Everybody's going to the same, you know, famous viewpoint or three famous viewpoints, and they're all sort of packing in. Everyone's there's this one shot that everybody gets you know, when the light is right. And you know, they're sixty photographers all standing there and really get off the beaten pass, you know, I in any national park. I don't care on Memorial Day weekend Labor Day weekend, fourth of July. It is easy to escape the crowds and to have a wilderness experience and go to to see amazing places where you don't feel like you're stuck in traffic jam it just takes a little effort and it takes a little nod. Knowledge, and if you're willing to strap on a pair of hiking boots, and actually, you know, go more than one hundred feet from your car. You can discover something credible areas. It's just most people don't do it. And I think that's because most people don't know that that other option exists, and that's what I love about. My guidebooks is sort of showing people. Hey, step off the beaten path get out of the lines and go experience, he's amazing places for yourself. And I I sort of you this as a mission now where it's like, okay. The problem isn't over-concentration, I'm helping disperse people into other areas that line times are equally as beautiful, maybe even more beautiful. They're just not for whatever reason, they don't have that fame attached to them. You know, they don't have like the hashtag on Instagram. And I think the more that people do discover these amazing places that they can go to the better experience the more rewarding experience they're going to have. Yeah. As you were saying that I was sitting here thinking art will how many more guidebooks does James have to right now. He's five deep. He talked about doing Zion here. What do we have for national parks? I don't know if you know the number. As of the moment. It's fifty nine right in fifty four fifty three more guide guidebooks from you, man. How long do we got exactly I got the rest of my life to work on this? So I plan on doing until I die. Awesome. Awesome. I wanted to bring it back to because that was great. I'm glad we finally got you to pick some because I do think you're you're completely right? And I'm guilty as charged when it came to Yellowstone and just like driving through we had one day. Okay. I did it took the pictures. And that was cool. But felt even as you're doing it like man people are spending all summer here. People are spending every summer of their life here. You know, there's so much more to see and that goes for all the national parks, and where you can get off the beaten path. So can't wait to get. If I can interrupt for a second. I want to give you a great example from Yellowstone old faithful. Everybody knows old faithful. Right. You go there in the summer, you know, at one o'clock, two o'clock in the afternoon, and it is a mad house. I mean, it is just packed with people. They're all standing there. It's hard to get a good view feel like you're in Times Square. There's a hike. It goes up to an overlook. That's not that far where you can get up above the crowds. And have a bird's eye view looking down on old faithful. And yet everybody concentrates right around the geyser itself. That's a great example of the way to sort of, you know, step outside those off the beaten path and go there, and the other thing is, you know, I was there a few years ago photographing of a kayaking trip in the grand Teton, and we popped over and we spent the night at the old faithful lodge, and I went out. I thought know I wonder if I can get a picture of old faithful at night, you know, the stars the light. Lucians just nothing out there. And sometimes you can even see the Northern Lights is like I'm going to go out and sit on my camera and see what I can get and just being out there in the evening when everybody's gone home. I had old faithful to myself, and I got incredible photos and a lot of times it it's also that it's thinking, okay. You know, go there in the evening. Go there on the early morning. Don't go there during the peak hours, and you can still have these incredible experiences. So really again, it just takes a little bit of thinking outside the box, and you can really escape all the shenanigans account with you know, summer in a national park. Yeah. I mean, I'll give you one, you know, this. I'm sure you literally wrote the guidebook on the Grand Canyon. But my brother told me this. I'd never been to the Grand Canyon. He goes. All right, go to a place called shoshoni point. I'm like, all right. I wear is that his there's no sign. I I asked a range or they pointing me here. They said they put no sign up on purpose. Could you know, whatever still super easy to find? And I like I drove to it. And it's not even a hike. I mean, you walk maybe five minutes all of a sudden at this viewpoint Heather, and I stayed there for three four hours. And I think there were three other people came in this is peak tourist season no-one there. And that's very simple one. Like just again got off, you know, maybe five minutes from all the real famous viewpoints. And there's no one there, and it's just gorgeous. And I, but I wouldn't have known right unless my brother nasty ranger. Unless I probably picked up your guidebook. But yeah, it's even at the most popular places you can get off the beaten path a tiny bit and amazing experiences and some of the popular viewpoints on Grand Canyon on the south rim. You know, you go to the viewpoints, and they are just packed with people. There are trails. There's a rim trail that goes along the rim. All you gotta do is walk about one hundred yards in either direction, and you've got the place to yourself, and you know, in sort of one of these things is just it blows my mind, how people you know, they sort of they see where people aren't they feel like they gotta go there. And they feel like they gotta you know, do that. It's a herd mentality. And what I encourage people break out of that. It's fun. Yup. Yup. And I'm glad you're guidebooks help people do that. That's awesome. What about the biggest travel mishap you've ever had in your life? Whether it be at a national park like our be international. It doesn't matter. What what one that comes to mind? So it happened when I was. Six years old. And I was this is when I gone to Africa with my with my family. My dad was winging volunteer work when we started to stop in Egypt on the way back home. See the pyramids. See all that. And it was at the pyramids. My brother ran across the street to go there, you know, some camel rides or something like that. I started running after him, and I was sort of running in front of this van that was carrying us around, and I just stopped. It was one of these things in the back of my mind. You know, you teachers always tell you growing up look both ways stop and look both ways before crossing the street, and it was just a microseconds. I realized I need to stop and look both ways. And the next thing. I knew I was on my back, and I was looking up at a whole bunch of guys in Gita wearing white robes, and they were all like looking down on me. And I had actually been hit by a car car came in at hit my knees, really just sort of scraped up. It was really kind of a miracle. But a blue me back. Knocked me out. Six years old of looking up at all these guys, you know, wearing white robes one guy was trying to take me to a water source to splash water on my bleeding knees. Our tour guide me by the other. Are they were pulling me both ways tour guide took off his shoe was threatening the other guy with a shoe? This is like something that they do in that part of the world, they loved threatening with their shoe and. I just didn't know what to make of it. I was in shock. I literally I was in a state of shock. And that was definitely the the biggest travel mishap. I ever had clearly did not kill my love of travel. It's not like after that. I stopped going anywhere. Maybe that's what it made it. Maybe I thought, you know. Hey, this is this is exciting. Look look at what happens when you step outside of your comfort zone. That's right. Or maybe you're thinking if I can survive get getting hit by a car in Egypt when I'm six years old while then what are you going to throw at me that I can't survive right at that point. It exactly that. It's funny because I was I was actually back in Egypt. This is another great travel tip. I was there. It was the five year anniversary Zahir square revolution. So I believe that was twenty fourteen maybe twenty fifteen and it was right after the airliner had blown up from leaving Sharm-El-Sheikh. There was you know, reports of violence and all this stuff. I mean tourism the Egypt just cratered. Absolutely cratered. I had a friend who's working for the State Department there at that. I was planning on visiting and I called up another friend of mine. Who's also an ex Pat. I said, hey, I'm going to Egypt. You wanna go is like, I know it's a crazy time. Nobody's going there. But you wanna go and he said, yeah, let's do it. And we went there. It was incredible. It was about five months after the plane had blown up. No tourists, anywhere dirt cheap prices. I mean, the tours we took everything we did. I mean, it was it was incredibly cheap at it felt like going to different Egypt in. I specifically remember at one point we went into the great pyramid. And there's a there's a chamber in the Senator you can walk up to and I remember going there when I was six years old, David I got hit by the car, and you had to wait in line any sort of March up any do one revolution around little Rome, and you go back down when my friend, and I went there. And I think it was twenty fifteen we were the only two people Rome, and we were. There for ten minutes by ourselves. And that to me just drove home the lesson. You know, these Manian sort of takeover. I mean, it's understandable. It's scary. You see bad things in the news. We say I don't wanna go there. But you know, these sort of these these stories flash up in the news where it's like others riots in Greece. You know, there's there's terrorism in Egypt. There's all these things everybody just runs in the opposite direction often that's immediately after the best time to go. Because that's when everybody's working on fixing the problem. And there's no Taurus and over tourism is a problem just about everywhere now, so my friend. I, you know, we always joked relied, you know, the next time that is sort of a, you know, a disaster media flare up somewhere and everyone's running away. Like, that's when we gotta go. That's the best time to go there, and you know, people here as specially in our news, right? If you're hearing about foreign countries back. All right. There's this in Greece. Well, that might be in Greece in a part of Greece. Right. I think to it it just it's. So easy to say this country has issues not hey, this specific region of this country has issues. There's eighty five percent of the country is fine or or could be fine. So I think that's another part of it is. Yeah, you just hear one thing. And all of a sudden, I'm not going which like for people like you. And I is good because then you can capitalize on that. And so if somebody in Germany taking a look at the news right air, our and saying, oh, there's wildfires in the US, you know, in California and saying, well, I'm not gonna go to New York. Right. There's wildfires in the US. Right. Doesn't make any sense. And you know, we do that all the time with other threes. Yup. Yup. What else do you have coming up in the pioneer personally or professionally because you talked about design guide? So give us a little tease. You're on. When them I become an and what are your plans for the future? Then. Yes. So design guide it should be coming out in spring. I'm hoping by June first it'll be available. Really? I have just thrown myself into that project. I've been working on that, you know, all year and on so. So excited about it. Again, the more I learned about Zinar, I got into Canyoneering when I was there, which is essentially descending down slot canyons by repelling, swimming, hiking, scrambling, whatever you can slightly technical. But what's amazing is you can take Canyoneering courses outfitters outside the park and within a day. If you're a good student, and you learn you can go on your own. You can do some of the easier canyons really just remarkable stuff. Some of the backpacks mean overcrowding certainly initiatives iron now. But the things I found the places that you can go out park to escape that there's a million tricks and tips, and you know, a ways to avoid all that. So I'm having a lot of fun working on that guy. I can't wait till it comes out after that. Really? I just wanna do more national parks get as many as possible, I love exploring them. They're still so many that I think are underrated dead. That could use a good guidebook with really good information. And that's that's my passion. That's my specialty it sort of what a fallen into. And so like, I said the rest of my life. That's what I what I hope to keep doing. Nice nice. You keep doing the best job in the world. That's not a hard sell for you. Right. Do you have do you have a hit list? Are you saying like have you played out? All right after Zayn. My thought is I'm going to go for this or do or is it totally open to to kind of whims. And maybe what you want to explore like after you get done the project, then you'll start thinking about it. I mean, it's still pretty open. A lot depends on you know, I'm still running a business. So, you know, I gotta go to places like, you know, there are national parks that get their national parks in Alaska. The get under ten thousand visitors year. They sound incredible. To me you get dropped off. You know, a helicopter, you know, helicopter comes and picks you up a week later. That's amazing to me. But I don't think that would be a good business decision are highly sell more than ten thousand copies of that guidebook. Right. Right. I would like to do that at some point. That's ounce. Great, but really focusing towards a lot of the really popular parks again that I think have his over-concentration problem and really love to start promoting some of the other parts that are kind of getting the love that that the the more famous parks, you know, our because again, a lot of these are located people's backyards, and they they might know. Oh, it's there, but it's not Yellowstone's out you seventy but there's great stuff there. You know, so really really open to a wide range a different places. Although, you know, Hawaii sounds great Virgin Islands national park. Sounds great there. There's a lot of I. Lot happening there. Have you been somewhere cold recently? Because it seems like you're like, all right Acadia note. Now, I'm going to Joshua tree. Okay. I was in the talian Alps. All right now, I'm going to goes to Rica. My blood has absolutely thinned out. But I'll tell you this too. You know, when you when you haven't had experienced winner in a while. And you come back to it man is a good. It is a, you know, a you again, you realize the things he took for granted where you're thinking about a winners shoveling the driveway winner is, you know, you know, bundling up in your your code and being frozen solid. But it's also it's cross country skiing. Snowshoeing is doing all these great things. So I, you know, I would love to go to some of these parks where where you can do a lot more that I hope to spend enough time away from an east coast winner that I start to feel the way that you're young. So I just gotta get down to Columbia make sure down there for long enough, then come back and enjoy the winter wonderland held on down awesome. Thanks so much for joining me today in creating guides give real insider, look at these amazing places and for kicking my butt now to get to a Katie even more. Because even though it's I it's not really on my doorstep. We're talking it's nine hours away. But I've been up close enough to it and still never been. So you kick my butt to go there. I w-. Will guarantee that will wait till June. I go to Zion though, not gonna Zayn until you're guidebook comes out. So thank you so much remind people one more time, how can they get a hold of you? And also the best way for them to grab the guidebooks if they're interested. Yes. So James Kaiser dot com is my website. That's K A I S E R, and that is sort of a great home base. You know, it's got links to my social profiles links to to the books. You can buy books on Amazon Barnes and noble. Really encourage you to pick them up your local, independent bookseller. And also, you know, go into your local independent bookseller and say, hey, I'm looking for this guide by James Kaiser because a lot of times, they, you know, I'm still trying to get the word out to independence, and I'm an independent, you know, I'm not a big corporate publisher. And so it's great when in when in these, you know, discover my books and they consistently wind up carrying them for years after the discovery so go into your local independent bookstores support him asked for my guides. They can get a hold of it real quick. Yeah. The those are the best ways to see what I'm up to awesome. Thanks so much guys will link everything in the show notes will link up the guides again, you can get James Kaiser dot com. Love that though. Yeah. Go into your local bookstore. If they don't have it help James out like give it give a little love to the independent bookstore because it's going to help everyone you're going to get the guide book your independent bookstores. So they won't close. They're going to get to sell some great guidebooks, James. It's going to be in another place. So win win win their thanks again. James really, really appreciate you tuning in hanging out with us from Columbia. I can't wait to get down there myself. Thank you. It was a pleasure. I look forward to talk and again. Yeah. Thank you. Everyone for tuning in today for your continued support that makes us the number one rated travel podcast out there. And of course until next time. Happy travels.

United States California Costa Rica Acadia writer Katie I Grand Canyon James Kaiser publisher Acadia national park Colombia Maine Yosemite Joshua tree Columbia Yahoo Columbia Joshua tree Maine Acadia national park
Building a business while homeschooling: Lindsey Johnson: 127

Mom Inspired Show with Amber Sandberg

37:20 min | 2 years ago

Building a business while homeschooling: Lindsey Johnson: 127

"You're listening to the mom inspired show episode one hundred twenty seven with Lindsay Johnson. Welcome to the mama's buried show. I'm your host immerse Sandberg and this shows created inspire encourage and a little extra fun to your day. Hey, you guys I am so excited to have Lindsay on the show today. She is a mom of three that home schools and also has an online business. So I wanted to have her on today because I wanted you guys to know that if you're thinking about doing something outside of the kids, you know, wearing a different hat than being a mom and a wife, I wanted you guys to be encouraged by her story. And so I wanted you to hear her struggles. What her week looks like how does she do it? I just thought it would be great because I know that some of you are thinking about transitioning jobs from the job that you've been doing and maybe doing something different. Or maybe you're a stay at home. Mom, and you wanna start a side business or something like that? And you just don't know what it looks like and how you can do it. So I wanted to bring her on to inspire you to know that you can do it. And that you have gifts and qualities that you can offer to other people are you guys? Hope you enjoyed this episode. Let's go to the show. Lindsey. Thank you so much for coming on the show today, amber stomach cited, thank you so much for having me so Lindsey I start off every show as you know, with an icebreaker about travel, and I am a travel agent. So I love asking everyone. What is your favorite vacation spot? And why and this can be with or without kids. Okay. So growing up my favorite trip that we took was to Yellowstone National Park, and I would love to bring my family out west someday. And then probably number two was that matinee honeymooned in Maine. So we've just stayed in the continental forty eight. Yeah. I would love to see Hawaii someday. So that is definitely like my bucket list vacation spots. Yeah. We we really love to drive. So if we could take a vehicle versus via plane and just drive in sightsee as we'd go. That's that's kind of what we love to do. Yeah. So I just had to do. I did a. Podcast this morning for it's called the Nash chat is with the Nashville. Mom, and I she was having me on her show to talk about spring, break ideas. And I was talking to her about Hawaii because you don't need a passport, and so don't have passports for their kids, right and stuff like that. And I think people forget about Hawaii. And so, yeah, it's a great option Goto, especially if you don't want to hunker down and pay for all the passport costs, especially 'cause they only last five years for kids. But yeah, I like that you. Drove to Maine, and and that you like to drive we to have are that way as well. We drive a lot. And I was actually just thinking we need to get the girls flying. But we really have just utilized driving and where we can get with driving and that comes in handy, and it keeps the cost down. So I I know a lot of people are on tighter budgets or the big families. It's really hard to fly with a lot of people it gets expensive. If you don't have all the points and all that kind of stuff. So I'm glad you mentioned that where did you stay in Maine? We stayed a couple of different places, but our favourite was a little tiny cabin essentially near Acadia national park. Yes. It was really really cute. Yeah. Now, you're the second. Maybe third person to talk about Yellowstone with me. To second person on the on the podcast, but third overall in the past couple of months, what do you love about it like where would you go and stay with your family? Now, that's not something you would drive to right. I mean as far or would you drive? Well, I probably would try. They're actually we drove there when I was a kid, and we stayed in different cabins as well. But I we I grew up in a family loving, the outdoors, and yeah Easter and enjoying God's creation discovering new creatures in environments, and my boys now, they're seven and five, and they're very much the same like, they can tell you about almost every animal on the planet and going to see elk in all the wildlife in Yellowstone. Yeah. Would make them have an amazing big Asian, which would make me have an amazing. You know, if the kids are eleven it, then it's just great all the way around exactly though. Would you be camping? Or would you be trying to stay in a cabin or a hotel? What what would you be doing? When you go as with your family. I would probably seek out cabins overnight campers out of this points. Yeah. So maybe a mix of of cabins in hotels, will let's get started. How about you share with us what your name is where you're from? How many kids do have? And then we'll jump into. How you got to where you are today. Okay. Yeah. My name is Lindsay Johnson. And I am in northern Wisconsin. So we are living one mile one mile off the shore of lake superior. So I was born and raised there. I love the lake so much. We're kind of right next to Duluth Minnesota. If people are familiar with that, we're up there in the twin ports, and we have three kids. I'm married to that. And our kids are seven five and two. Okay. So here, you are you have three kids, and I wanted to go back a little bit and share with us what you do for your job. And then and then we'll jump into how you work all of that in and we can chat about homeschooling as well. Okay. Yes. So my business is called Verdi and Cal and I am a. Brand designer and writer for female entrepreneurs and small business owners. So I work everything from the logos of small businesses. The brand elements that create that visual that people connect with to the web, design and development of the online space that you used to attract your ideal audience in your clients to you and then the copy or the words on your site in the messaging that you used to speak to those ideal clients in hopes to grow a successful business. Yeah. And I wanted to share a how I met Lindsay is because I had her come and help me with the wording for some of you guys might not know this. But I have a vacation planning tool, and it really just kind of helps you budget and plan out vacations, especially those travel bucket list vacations that might cost, you know, closer to ten thousand dollars right down the road that you may need help figuring out how much this is going to be what do we need to put aside? And how old were the kids be when we can go there. So I had that tool, but I had Lindsey helped me to figure out. What do I need to be saying to grab people's attention when they come to the website, and and see this vacation planning to it? Because here's the thing. The vacation planning tool in essence is a spreadsheet. But how do you get the words across to say? Like, hey, this isn't just a spreadsheet. So I want to I wanted to use me as an example. So that you guys could kind of have an understanding of what she's talking about. If you're not really familiar with sales copy and all that kind of stuff. So that's that's an essence what she's saying that obviously, you do way more than that. But that's where you and I connected and stuff like that. So here's the thing. Why really thought it'd be great for you to come on is because there's so many moms that stay at home and would love to have a side business and make money from home. And I also have moms at home school and feel overwhelmed. So I thought. But you know, what this would be crate to inspire moms that might feel like they want to do something. But they can't figure it out, especially because they are home schooling. And even if you aren't home schooling. I this is a great to hear too. But I also wanted to give the moms that are home-schooling just to be like, hey, check out what is doing and like how she's trying to figure it all out. And also a lot of the moms the listen to the show, you know, they might be wanting to transition from maybe they have a corporate job or a, you know, a job like they might it might not be corporate. It could be anything and they want to transition or their stay at home moms. They've left their job to stay home with the kids, but the kids are getting older. And now they're looking for something. And so I feel like it's always good to kind of highlight people that are doing something and making it work working at around their family. So this is why I thought it'd be perfect to have you come on. And kinda just share your journey with us. And what that's looked like. Yeah. I am super happy to share. You do not have everything figured out guys. But I am happy to share who does what works in one thousand. Right. I mean, I feel like people who you would look at and think oh my gosh. They have everything figured out when you when you hear them if they do interviews like, I've I'm talking about people who are like have a lot of hours make a lot of money. I feel like they still will say they're not where they hope to be. I just feel like that's just something that there's always room for improvement and everything like that. So so here's the deal, you have three kids and they're young. And so and you have the business in you home school. So I mean, just thinking about homeschooling with three kids seems like a lot to me. So how do you even do this? So let's start from the beginning. Did you start with your business? I or did you start homeschooling? And then you added in the business. I had my business. I I've I had two kids at that point. So. So my boys were a nine months, and oh, probably two and a half almost three. That's when I started my business. So I had kids, but I was able to grow the business. I like to say slowly but steadily because I never experienced superfast increase or super fast growth that was always slow and steady. But that is what fit my family, and that is what fit how I wanted my life to look. So looking back. I really appreciate how the growth didn't happen overnight and overwhelming to the sense that I would just quit it all, you know. Oh, and can I just say something? So I won't say who's company this is, but I've experienced firsthand someone's infrastructure, not ready to take on the level of business that they're getting and it can just be very chaotic because it's it's they've become successful too quickly. So I know that everybody's dream. Come true is to like. Get super successful very fast, but you have to have systems in place, and you also then if that happens, you have to have people helping you so yes, I think that's a good point to say slow and steady because then you then you have the time to learn all the things at a good pace versus being like dumped on and and also really realizing like, hey, do I need to bring on some people. And however that looks so I'm glad you point that out because I do think that it's very easy to think. Well, if it's not fast or overnight, then I'm failing. Okay. So you have your boys and you're doing your business on. So how about you share with us? What it looks like for you like within your day and how let me back up for second. So you have to get clients. So so people might be thinking. Okay. So you have your business, and you do really great job. But how are you finding time to even get potential clients and all that kind of stuff, and then we'll work into. How do you actually find the time to actually do your work? Yeah. Okay. So in the beginning a lot of my clients came through word of mouth and referrals. I was and still am a part of several Facebook groups that were good for making connections, and helping other people when they would, you know, come to the group with an issue or problem that was a really good way for me to get clients in the beginning fast forward to today. This is skipping a little bit ahead. But at this point in my business, I am looking to grow my team because it is hard in the day to day of client work to actually go out and get new clients. There is not the time to be visible. There's not the time to build relationships and make more connections when you are head down in client work. Yeah. So that is that's kind of this place that I'm at right now is looking like, how can I scale this? How can I get more feasible, right? How can I bring people onto help in the back end? So I can be the front facing person off the brand. Yes. So with with that said, what are you feeling like you are what what is your hope right now to figuring that out? So can you give us an example of who you would want to hire out to handle what part of your job? So that like you said you can be putting your your face out there and getting more clients. Yes. So the big picture goal is to have someone on my team in each of the three big areas. So brand design web design and copywriting is still want to be in the trenches of every project, but also hold the role of like creative director. So I can oversee what's going on and still have my hand in the client, work, itself and delivery, and making sure everything is up to standard, but not always doing the actual execution of the work. Yeah. That makes sense. So if you could hire somebody today, what would you? What would be the first thing that you would want to offload that would help you the most right now, I think help in the visual department. So the brand design and building out client logos building out client brand elements and getting that process really really refined. Because that's essentially the first thing that people need when they come to me as solid brand solid logo. And I work with a lot of people who need all three. So they get my full service all inclusive brand package, which is kind of what I've become known for is all three in one. So you don't have to seek out separate freelancers to do that stuff for you. But before you need anything else, you really need a solid visual brand in a strategy behind your business. So getting that piece really strong for my own business would allow clients to like flow through the process of all three brand web and copy in a more seamless way. Yeah. That makes sense. And it made me think about. What like suggestions? Would you have for women that do have businesses and they're struggling to get the sails copy, right and marketing their product or service like what what is a little bit. What is the tip at that? You can give them that. They they need to focus on that the if they feel kind of all over the place. Yeah. So sales copy and messaging that is that is hands down my favorite part. Like, I love. I love a good strong brand story and a brand message. And the thing for women to remember when they are building their businesses is that they offer a solution to a problem. So whether they are product base business or they're a life coach or they offer services like I do like web design, maybe they're a cook. And they provide meals for other people. The possibilities are endless whatever solution that you offer to people that is what you need to drive home. You need to write about where your people are right now. Like, they're struggling with their housekeeping their houses not in order, but you offer the solution to organization you offer the solution to a common peaceful home. That's the transformation that you need to walk them through in your words that you write about so your copies about your business. But it's really about the people. You are serving. Yeah. I like that. So are you listening thinking, yes, I have ideas in my head, and I have business ideas that I really wanna pursue. I just don't know where to begin. Well, I have a program. Perfect for you. It's called gainful growth. And what it is is a step by step system to help you start a profitable business. So if you guys missed the episode with Alli Worthington, you guys need to go. Check that out after this episode. She is the one who created this system and on the episode, she talks about why she created especially for women and moms who don't have time, and they just need something simple to run their ideas through to see if they could actually work. So if you're thinking, I want to start a business or I want to have a great income doing what matters or possibly you. Just want to make your dreams a reality. Gainful growth is perfect for you. So some of the things that you will get with gainful growth is you will be able to figure out if your idea is worthwhile to pursue. So I know many of us have different ideas. Floating around in her head. So this will help you narrow that down. Also will your idea even work also to figure out how to do this and not waste any time and money or energy? And if this idea will actually be successful. So this is where gainful growth will have you covered. And what's awesome about this is it's not overwhelming. I love the layout. I've done it myself, and you can go at your own pace and Allie has given us the mamas buyers show listeners a discount. So if you go to gain full, growth dot com, use mom, inspired at the checkout. You're going to get this program for only ninety nine dollars versus two forty nine. I've talked to Christie rape from business boutique, and she's all about what problem are you solving. You know, so I like that you are leading with that. Because when that comes across than people, I kind of I think they're kind of like, oh, wow. Yes. I need that. And I feel like sometimes it's hard especially as women to pitch themselves right to sell them. So. Yeah. But if you're selling a solution, I feel like that feels a little bit different. Right. Like, you're kind of like, well, I'm selling a solution. I'm not selling you myself. You know? And so I think that's great information. Let's just go back into the day to day. So you have the kids your home schooling. Where are you working in your actual work? Like, what does that look like for you? Maybe we maybe we do a day by day or we look at it as a week, whatever whatever you think would give a better pitcher for everyone. Sure, I think probably probably looking at a week at a time as more. Accurate, because I never or a rarely have things that I have to get done certain days of the week. I have things that I made to move forward on. As far as client work and other things to grow my business. But I tried to never box myself into certain days just to allow the flexibility of like Mijo dron. Exactly. But a my day, I really try to start out with the home schooling with my boys. I have learned lately that I need to get proactive work done. And then move onto reactive work in what that means is for anyone who's not super familiar with. That is like get the work done that you're not responding to other people, you know, like with with home schooling is I know I need to get it done every day. So getting it done and off the plate. Let's move onto like my inbox, and I can deal with e mails, and I'm responding to other people or I can jump on social media and try not to get down the rabbit hole. But still it's I got the most important thing done for us. Yeah. Same thing with client work. If that is something that's really pressing that day, I focus on that. I before I moved to my inbox or anything else that will kind of lead me lead me down a mad at I'm not necessarily like in control of I agree. So do you work a lot at night or do you work at interior day on both little bit of both? My kids are actually really amazing independent play. Oh nice. Just been amazing. So since I've had the business and working as like, you know, part time side gig since two thousand fourteen the discount used to me. Now, if I have to pull out, my laptop sure, no I have a little bit of work to do. And then I will be done and move on with my day with that. So how long are you? What does your day? Look like when you were homeschooling like if you were to say if you start at a time, what time do you normally? And so that we can just paint a picture for the house. Yeah. So we typically start after breakfast so anywhere between eight thirty. And right now my boys are in first grade in kindergarten. So the book work that they have to do is really not that extensive. We can typically be done in two hours or less. Nice of actual. Schoolwork, and then we're reading or were exploring we're going outside. So we're doing other things. But like the math the spelling the language all the handwriting in reading that can be done in one and a half to two hours at this point. Yeah, I like that. And then that is the thing with home schooling. I mean, I know homeschooling moms, and they talk about that how it can become more efficient and stuff like that. So it's not like you're trying to do this whole day right in your day. Right. And so I think sometimes people think that too, but they're you're really able to condense it down and just get to the nitty gritty, and then kind of go and explore and all that kind of stuff and then work your work into it. Now, you have. You have a young daughter, right? How old is she do? Yeah. She's two two and a half right now. Okay. So how do you get your work done with having a toddler because I feel like a lot of people would be like I rarely can get my house clean with having a little one. So any thoughts on that? She she's funny. She's probably my hardest. One innocence that she wants to be with me all the time. We always wants to be with the boys as they're doing also hollering and art projects on on the days when it goes, really bad. Yeah. I make her take a nap and then do school because sometimes that is the only thing that gets done in a day. Yeah. Until bedtime. Okay. I've got my couple of hours. Sure. That then that, and that's why I wanted to ask you because I, you know, because I do think, you know, all different personalities are different and stuff like that. They some people may have really active kids, it's really hard to get anything done. So, you know, if they're hearing like, oh, my kids are really going to independent play. They might be like, well, that's really great for you. But listening to you talk about your daughter. They may be able to resonate with that be like, okay. It makes sense. You know? Yeah. So with starting your business and just working around your family and all that kind of stuff. What would you say has been the biggest struggle or obstacle that? You've come across. The biggest obstacle is the juggle between work life in mom life. When I am working on my business. I just wanna keep working on my business. Yup. But when I with my kids, and we're having a really fun day. That's all I wanna do. So to split. My time can be really difficult. Like, I have to weigh the opportunity cost of everything that I do. So if I say, yes to this one thing if I say yes to a project, a new clients an activity with friends, it doesn't really matter. What it is. If I say, yes. To one thing. I am essentially saying no to doing anything else or. Yeah. So that has become a really important way for me to decide what I should be doing with my time. Yeah. I agree. I run in to that too. Especially if I'm quoting for travel and stuff like that. And I've had to get back to people in say, you know, I respond to them to let them know. Like, hey, here's this information. But then if they if they come back to me, and it's later in the evening, I probably will shoot them a message. So that they know that I got it. But I'll say to them I'm done working for the night. And I will get back to you tomorrow morning, unless they're like literally traveling, and they need help that that's a different story. Right. So that's just something I've had to learn to kind of, you know, juggle because you could be like so focused on that. And then you're kinda like, oh, I need to change gears and sometimes changing gears is difficult like you were saying so you wanna stay with one and not move over to the other and the same vice versa. If it's worked and worked kids kids to work. So I think that's good to point out with two other moms that you might experience that another thing that I wanted to ask you as we get closer to the end is what is your advice for moms that are starting out with businesses or maybe they've been doing it for a little bit. And you know, they're finding it really hard to make money or as much. Money as they would like have you run into this problem or has it been pretty steady for you. This whole time. It's been studied enough, but I have gone through feast or famine seasons. So if you're going through a famine season a lot of it is like cyclical within the actual year the school year, the buying cycles of people what your audience needs when they need it. So if that is is where you are right now, you're not alone. And I feel like everybody does go through feast or famine cycles by nature of business by nature of online business. Especially when you're starting out for sure. But if you're if you're someone who is looking to like take it to the next level or just keep that slow and steady growth, going take a look at what's working in your business, not necessarily what you want to be doing. Most of all this thing that I had to learn because sometimes what your audience wants isn't what you want most of all and you have to shift Celinda bit to to kind of respond to what the market is looking for. Yeah. I like that you know, you need to be true to yourself. But you also do need to know your audience. And so you know because. Yeah. I mean, if you wanna be true to yourself and keep going like why I want to talk about this. You're gonna lose your people. So you have to decide which ones more I and if it's more important for you to be like, well, I'm just keeping this. Then you might realize that you are going to lose customers. So I think that's a good point. And even with doing the podcast. I definitely can tell that side. Sales of when people are listening. It really drops off in the summer because. Okay. Even I don't listen to podcasts up much in the summer because people aren't they are not in their normal routine. So things just kind of go down and same with the holidays. You know? So even when that that's not even a buying thing. That's just people listening, right? And so when when I noticed when all the schedules start changing best when thanks shift. And so so definitely that would be the same with buying, you know, services or products and stuff like that. When did you find for you for your business that it's the busiest within a year? Like is there a certain time is January or people kind of like, oh, let's do this. Or is it a different time of year for me? It's been like mid fall area too. And then it drops off during the holidays remnant kinda picks up in the spring again. But some are slow. For for my business. People aren't necessarily wanting to start a big branding project when their kids are going to be off school. Don't have. Yeah. I think so I think I think probably overall with moms like if you're targeting moms to like in general, like if you're businesses are targeting moms that are generally stay at home moms or doing businesses like they're not going to a corporate job where there were working and have a commute. That is the same. No matter what if it's summer or not, I think it definitely changes, you know. And so that is good for people to know and to recognize that so that like if you're starting off in the summer. So for example, I'll give you an example about the travel. I started really in may last year. It was slow moving because I just came on right after spring break all happened. So by the time, I came on people had already picked their summer plans. So I was like oh, man. And so now like right now, I'm getting like head up with spring break stuff. Right because. Okay, it it's it just was the end of January. Now, we're going to February. So it is interesting to see even with different, you know, businesses and stuff like that like how that all works out. But as we as we close I wanted to ask you, what is some advice that you would give moms who wanna start something they either feel like they can't do it or they or they have something that they're doing but feel really stuck. And what is some vice that you would give them to? I don't know to move forward or. You know, when your times that you were talking about like feast or famine during that time, did you ever think like is this the the wrong thing that I'm doing like did you ever feel that like to give people advice on how to push through? Yeah. I think if you own a business online or you work in any thing as an entrepreneur, you will go through times that you go all my word. This is terrible. Why? Why am I doing this? So again, this is not a feeling that that no one else experiences. Everybody experiences this at one point or another. If you're going through a really hard time or you feel stuck I've had the best the best experience in the best results by seeking out. Another like minded woman, mom person who is in this online space and being open invulnerable in asking them for their advice. Like one on one relationships with people who who can like Phil into your Cup like they can they can fill you up. They can encourage you. They can also give you tough love when you need it. Yeah. But it's a matter of like they can see the good couple months down the road when you can't see that happening yet. So they can point to like look you are on the right track. You are working hard. You're doing all the things. To to plant seeds and watch growth. And then eventually like here's this big harvest can't see yet. But I can see if we're you. Yeah. That is so powerful. Yeah. I agree. And that is good. I mean, it's hard to go through this alone. Especially if you're doing an online business, you're not really around co workers or anything like that. I'm I'm lucky enough to have a really good friend who does a podcast as well. And she lives in Oregon. So I don't ever see her. But it's it's kind of like. We can do a shorthand with talking because it's you know, she knows what I'm talking about. I don't have to explain everything if it so for example, right? What I can say, oh, man. My numbers are really low right now in the summer. She's like so are mine, you know. So she's like well mine kind of went up. That's interesting. I wonder what you talked about, you know, so. You know, because she hers is a little bit hers us to working mom. So so again, her her moms are all commuting to work still through the summer. So mine fluctuate a little bit because mine are my pockets is is not that it's not for working moms, but hers is solely for working moms. Yes. So so her stays a little bit more steady. And so and so I'm just like whacking the mic. So yeah. That makes a big difference. And I it it is nice to have somebody. So I want to say, yes. To your suggestion because I don't I don't know if people feel like they don't wanna go to somebody and share all that. But I say go to somebody have somebody in your corner. It is nice to have somebody that you can do this with. It's kind of like having almost a co worker, you know. You're working together. Even though it's like separate stuff. But you can kind of just be like this is really rough and all that stuff. So I appreciate that. So as we close, I just want to let you guys know that you can find Lindsay's information all on the show notes. So if you would like to reach out to her possibly to talk about, you know, your business and logos and all that kind of stuff make sure to check that all out. And if you don't get the show in your inbox every week, make sure to go and sign up for the E mail list. So all you have to do to subscribe is go to mom inspired show dot com. Scroll down you can enter your name, enter Email, and you will be all set. Lindsey. I have so much fun talking to you. And I hope that you I hope that people feel inspired knowing that like you can try to balance it now, I want to say this as we close though, I think people get confused with. Oh, you can have it all we can have it all we can do it all the thing is not everything can be though at the top priority. Like it can't. Everything can't be number one. And so I think that's the that's the thing that people need to understand kind of like what Lindsay saying it's like she's saying yesterday this then she say no to that not saying yes to everything, and I think people get really confused with that. And then wonder why they're failing or can't keep up. Does that make sense? Oh for sure you cannot have everything as number one priority. And I feel like it's important to say that you can't feel like it's a badge to be doing everything like we home school. But homeschooling is not a badge to me. In is something we feel called to do in this season of life. Yeah. But there are some days that I wish my boys would go to public school because because then I'd have the free day, and it feels selfish when I think of that with the normal mom thought. Yes, I think so too. So it's not like a badge. Owning your own business isn't a badge writing stay at home on his a badge being like working corporate career. There isn't a badge in my opinion. Yeah. But we can choose things to do. And if they're prioritized in the right order, family, work, whatever order that needs to be for you. I think it will all fall into place. Yeah. I agree. And I'm glad that you say that because I do think with moms everybody feels guilty about whatever they're not doing right like. Yeah. Oh, yeah. If you choose not to go to work. Not granted. I'm going to take this right off the table. Is that people who have to go work like that's a whole different situation. When you do it. I I think we'll Lindsay's also talking about is that like if you choose to keep doing your career, that's cool. But also, people decide to stay home. It's like you can't make the people that go to work feel bad. You know what I mean? And people who homeschool are like, oh, you must really love your kids more than people like me who since their kids off goodbye. No. So I say that. Yeah. Because that is not the case of what ever. Yeah. Yeah. So I appreciate that. Well Lindsey I appreciate you coming on the show today. Thank you so much for having me. And I just want to offer your audience of anyone wants to reach out to be personally like the D M on Instagram or my contact page. I love encouraging women no matter what walk. They are walking business. Not business work homeschooling. Whatever the walk is you need a piece of encouragement. Hit my inbox. Yes. It makes sure check out the show notes. And I will put all her information there. So you can go stalker. Like crazy. Just just kidding. All right. Thanks. Thanks so much, amber. I hope you enjoyed today's episode with Lindsay as we were talking about Yellowstone and all of the traveling places. I just want to remind you guys that I am a travel agent. And if you need my help, I am here to help you and walk alongside of you and help you plan these trips, and so all you need to do to reach out to me is you can go to mom and show dot com for slash travel agent and set up a free consultation, and we can start brainstorming or if you wanna go totally informal. You could always reach out to me on Instagram. My handles, amber, Sandberg or Facebook. It's amber Sandberg, you can message me just saying, hey, I'm thinking about this trip. You know, I don't know how much to save. I I don't know what are the options that I can do that is what I'm here for and I love helping people planned vacations small or large. So I'm here for you. So just wanted to put that out there that you can reach out to me. All right. You guys I will talk to you next week.

Lindsay Johnson Lindsey Yellowstone amber Sandberg Maine Facebook Hawaii Nashville lake superior Yellowstone National Park amber stomach Acadia national park Wisconsin Nash Minnesota Mijo Cal writer
Biomedical Espionage, Einsteins Eclipse, Transit Of Mercury. Nov. 8, 2019, Part 1

Science Friday

51:36 min | 1 year ago

Biomedical Espionage, Einsteins Eclipse, Transit Of Mercury. Nov. 8, 2019, Part 1

"Science Friday is supported by. IBM PROBLEMS INSPIRE IBM to push the world forward. That's why so many people work with IBM on everything from from city. Traffic to ocean plastic smart loves problems. Ibm Let's put smart to work visit. IBM DOT COM slash smart to learn more science. Friday supported by little passports. Ignite a love for science little passport. Science junior subscription is the perfect perfect gift to spark your child's natural curiosity action packed projects bring discoveries to life in exciting ways all while teaching your child. New Science CI- concepts order today at little passports dot com slash Friday listener supported awarded w NYC studios. This is science Friday. I'm Myra Plato later. In the hour we'll talk about why. Dozens of research research institutions are investigating potential cases of espionage and stolen research. But I the. US has officially started ready to process to withdraw from the Paris. Climate Agreement with the trump administration saying the accord would be would put too big a strain on the US economy joining joining me to talk about that and other selected. Short subjects in science is their own Charles Burke with director and contributing producer at Scifi. Have you on the side of the Mike Chair. Let's let's talk about this climate policy this week. President trump followed through on this promise. I mean this. This comes as a surprise to basically no John. He's been saying that this is going to be happening In this week basically was the first time under the process that they could start this withdrawal process of Formerly formerly formally notified the UN that they plan to exit the climate accord's In Paris and it would not begin. What for another year? You're right this is a year long process. If it all comes to fruition it would go into effect the day after the next presidential election in November November twenty twenty nine th if the president is reelected that's amp and then a lot of scientists thousands of them are saying. Don't do this right so yeah I in other climate news. There was a big Letter published this week in the Journal biosciences from over a thousand scientists calling climate change a a threat to the fate of humanity And saying you know really you. Action needs to be taken now. Let's let's talk about Out Flu Research. Scientists are deliberately infecting people with the flu right. I imagine there's a good reason for doing what you know. This is sort of basic scientific research on the. Ah edged is funding this project which will be run at four centers around the country And they're looking for eighty volunteers to participant. Where the call a human challenge study? Basically they take these these volunteers and deliberately squirt a specific strain of the flu up their nose and then they live in a clinic for a week and give blood samples and thanks wasps and all of that to monitor. How the immune system progresses over the course of the infection and they get re numerate? Did they do they if you go through with this. You know you're accepting the risk of a you will get the flu and who knows there may be other follow on effects But you do a couple thousand dollars but couple of grandfather. Yeah but you gotta gotta live in a clinic for a week with the flu. So it's a borderline all right. Let's move on to the last week. We talked and we talked a lot about on on the program about PF as chemicals and now researches finding that they're showing up in an unexpected place a nordic ski slope right so as you said we talked about these a lot last week some people call them forever chemicals. They're they're industrial chemicals that are used in manufacture things from Teflon Pans. STEW fire retardants but it turns out one of the uses that I wasn't aware of is in ski wax and So researchers found looking at the ski resort in Trondheim Norway but along the ski slopes that were elevated levels of these chemicals And what's even more concerning. They also found the chemicals in the earthworms living there and in a kind of rodent called a bank vault that feeds on the earthworms and they found that the the levels in the the rodents were higher. So fear is that it's accumulate bioaccumulating as as it moves up the food chain so to speak. So are they thinking that the people are putting it in the wax and the wax getting on it is an ingredient in the sort of lubricating accident on the skis yet to make them glide fat better on the snow so the wax comes off the off right on and snow the worms eat it. It ends up in the soil in the water. It ends up in the worms it ends up in the foles improbably than Fox's or whatever are gonNA eat voles went up in the Fox's his the of the food chain lay plastics food chain. Now I have There's some news this week. In spaceflight. The companies developing new vehicles for taking humans. To Spaeth sure developments Boeing and SPACEX are both competing to be part of what's called the commercial crew program that the people that are basically gonNA take humans into space to the International Space Station. Now that we don't have a shuttle or any other either way of getting there so Monday Boeing had a test of its star liner capsule and abort test where they Fired their capsule about a mile up into the the air and Pretended that it was suffering. Some kind of problem forced to abort and parents escape system during launch. You don't want to put people people in something with no way of aborting so they were testing this abort system and found that their parachute system mostly worked There are three shoots off on the craft one of them Apparently wasn't fastened on correctly. And so there was a problem with that one shoot but to other shoots. Were able to carry this. Capsule Capsule Back to Earth Safely so so yes so they assume that that no one would have been hurt if there had been people. They're calling it a successful test and they're going to keep going with their time line towards Maybe maybe early next year sometime trying it with people on board might have been a little harder landing than. I don't know how that we're expected Yan Dan and then another thing about that. That'd be the first time we land on Land L. or other capsules used to land in the ocean. Also got the SPACEX with their Crazy you know boosters uh-huh landing back down and they had a very successful test also right right so they released footage of one of their parachute tests and they say that this is the thirteenth successful. The test of their parachute system and they didn't rocketed up into space and they brought a mockup of their their capsule called crew dragon up in aircraft and kind of shoved drafted out the door with the parachute son to see what would happen but it was successful too. So that's a good sign Yeah I saw the beautiful pictures of shoots opening on a cheaper to do it. That way ended up. Finally how how could we let the week. Oh by without mentioning the Cannibal Aunts and a nuclear bunker right so this is a heartwarming study published in the Journal of Hamanaka this week and it goes back to Twenty thirteen when researchers found this colony of ants living in a Polish munitions bunker And it appeared that the answer fallen down some kind of ventilation pipes but they were living there with no source of food or lighter heat and the question was well. How is this happening so the researchers? I followed them. A followed the aunts and In two thousand fifteen went back founded. The colony was doing really well. There were like a million ads living there again. The question how the answer is cannibalism. The ads were eating the bodies of other fellow ants that had also fallen into the bunker but there is a a heartwarming warming at Yes so in twenty sixteen the researchers gave the ants latter act to the ventilation pipe and went back in two thousand seventeen a year later found that the bunker was empty the ants had all returned their host colony and they lived happily. It's missing the harp. Music is all right. Thank you Charles. Charles Burke was to science Friday director and contributing producer. Now it's time to check in on the state of science this is wwe. St Louis Public Radio News. Local science stories of national significance fall is busting at all over the rich Pastel of red yellow brown colour spark long Sunday drives into the country. Full foliage is a big industry in the northeast so researchers are working to better understand stand. How climate change may be affecting fall colors changes that may affect the bottom line for those tourism rich areas but to tease out the factors involved loved with the timing of peak leaf color? The researchers need data joining me to talk about one innovative way. They're collecting that data. Is Heather Goldstone allstone executive producer and host of living lab radio. She's based at W. C.. I in woods hole. Look at the science Friday excited to be with you IRA. How's the leaf season going? Well you know it looks pretty good where I am That's just one indication but you know it's it's been an interesting fall. Just temperature dropped last night. We're getting our first taste of winter here and at least on Cape Cod southern New England. Some of the leaves are starting to fall off. It's been a pretty beautiful fall. And that's good for the tourism industry right. Yeah I mean leave as as you noted is a billion dollar industry in New England so when we talk about the impacts of climate change on this tourism on changes in fall foliage it's maybe not the untold suffering that eleven thousand scientists were warning about in that climate emergency. You mentioned a few minutes Climate Emergency Declaration. You mentioned a few minutes ago but it does have. I've pretty huge Potential ramifications in an economic sense researchers understand the mechanism for the color change. But the cues that they're using to start the processor aluminum a little mercury murkier. You spoke to a researcher named Stephanie. Spiro the two trees get stop really making that green chlorophyll is day length length and temperature and once those cues become unsinkable. One could imagine with temperature increasing. We don't actually know what's going to happen on the broader level with fall foliage. So there's a lot of different variables that we're going to try and disentangle broadscale because we're like Acadia National Park a little hole you know. So Stephanie Sparrow is an Assistant Professor at the University of Richmond Mend but she's a new England native really interested in how climate change is playing out in New England. And as she said they're trying to untangle all of these things are looking at a temperature at precipitation in records over time they've actually had researchers out in Acadia national park where they're really focusing up in Maine this fall asking people if the quality via fall foliage is something they even consider in making their decisions because fall visitation to Acadia. National Park has actually doubled since the nineteen nineties. So they WANNA know if that's that's part of their decision and then in the middle of that is the actual fall foliage piece connecting changes in climate to changes in tourism They're trying figure out if fall foliage has changed in that swear people's photos come in so tell us about the you have a piece wish we're asking she's asking people to send in old fotos news. Yeah we'll because one thing they've been looking at satellite data right that gives them a really consistent record since about two thousand of being able to look at fall foliage from space base. But that only gets back to two thousand and they WANNA be able to go back a lot farther than that and and start to really piece together longer trend because of course fall foliage can vary from year to year hugely. So for that. That's where they're turning to their leaf peop- for science Crowd sourcing mechanism just asking anybody who's been to Acadia National Park to send in their photos of fall foliage. Because everybody's got shoe boxes full of old photos. We used to have them print it out back in the day right right. How do people participate in it? Well so most people are participating I think at this point Through social media you can find a leaf peop- for science or A. The N. P. for Acadia National Park Fall Foliage on instagram and people are just sending photos digitally You know that's easy for the the pictures from the cell phone era. Ah But as you mentioned it would be great. They would love to go further back and in fact you know one of the things she and I talked about is some of the challenges. At least when you've got satellite data that's consistent. You know how that photo was taken. What the settings were that you know? That color looks the same across all those photos. But they're gonNA have some work cut out for them trying to figure out everybody's everybody's photos from decades past. We'll help them out. We have a link on our website. If you want to help Sending those photo has thank you. My pleasure another Goldstone executive producer and host of Living Lab Radio at W. C.. I in woods Hole Massachusetts. We're GONNA take a break and we'll come back a tale of espionage in the biomedical lab. Stay with us. Science Friday is supported by better help. Online counseling is. There's something that interferes with your happiness or prevents you from achieving your goals. I live so better. Help is here for you. Better help offers. Licensed professional counselors who are specialized in issues such as depression anxiety stress grief krief and more. You can connect with your professional counselor in a safe and private way by phone text video or chat and get help on your own sometime science Friday listeners. Get Ten percent off your first month with this Coun- code Friday so why not get started today. Go to better health health dot com slash Friday and fill out a questionnaire to get matched with a counselor. You'll love that's better help dot com slash Friday science. It's Friday is supported by IBM problems. It's human nature to hate problems. But why is that after all problems inspire us to mend things. Ben then things make things better. That's why so many people work with. Ibm On everything from city. Traffic to ocean plastic new schools to new energy flight delays to food safety smart loves problems. Ibm Let's put smart to work visit. IBM DOT com slash. SMART to learn more sea levels are rising. Storms are intensifying. Fires are raging and some say all of this is going to make America cities even more gentrified. I'm Kai right. Join me for a new season of there. Goes the neighborhood from WNYC studios this time. We're partnering with W. L. R. N.. In Miami to explore explore a controversial theory called climate gentrification. Listen wherever you get your podcast or at there. Goes the neighborhood dot. This is science Friday. My reflejo science says many have set on this show over. The years is driven by collaboration and cooperation. Asian researchers review each other's proposals for new projects get close abuse of confidential data before new results are published but the FBI why has been warning that this culture of openness is leaving USO research open to an unexpected consequence theft and espionage and a new reporting from the New York Times this week revealed that dozens of research institutions are investigating individual scientists for potentially offering confidential essential intellectual property to China here to explain and the reporter who broke that story Gina Kolata medical reporter for the New York Times. Always happy to talk to you. Gina it's great to talk to you. Ira We go back a long time beginning of career research even mentioned that yes. Well unpack this story for as well. Why are institute so concerned about potential spying right now? Well I think they hadn't even thought about this as an issue as the Administrator ministration at the NIH said he took them a while to even sort of grasped. The fact that this was actually happening and what happened was the F. B. I.. Came to them in two thousand sixteen and said we went came to the NIH and said well. We wonder how science works I have is peer review work. What are the rules regulations? How does this all Oh happen? And apparently they had somehow seen things that they thought might be disturbing but they wanted to know what is required of scientists. And what how how. How if at all or things shared so this went on for a little while and then the FBI and the NIH started identifying situations where it looked like trans? There are things transgressions and from there they tried to say who are the scientists so a lot of people say this is like they're attacking Chinese scientists. They said no we look for something that looks fishy and then we look for the scientists so the fact that they are Chinese seems to if it into a pattern in a way but most Chinese most Chinese ethnic Chinese in this country like the vast vast majority have nothing to do with this. This is a relatively a very few people considering. How many are out there? But what they're doing when you look at what they've been passing along. It's hard to say. Oh it was no big deal. It's just an accident Kinda wasn't for some of those cases that yeah I mean I thanks for example. Okay well you know you I always say why do people keep putting things in emails. Ira I mean. Honestly how. Many times of emails tailspin just so damning for people but for example they had one person who had a co- a confidential research proposal that he was here she he was reviewing and it is a felony to reveal what you see so this person sends it off to a colleague China saying here are the bones and meet of what you want. Spelled meet 'em et at least didn't spell it right but that's what you were saying then. We have other ones where somebody said I should be able to. Let's bring the whole set of primary issue if I can figure out how to get a dozen tubes of frozen. DNA onto an airplane. The primers are used as a diagnostic test. This was not his take. It belonged to the university that was that was supporting them doing. The research and the end of taxpayers tax payers paid for the research so what was seemed to be happening is there some of these. People were getting grants from the Chinese government and as part of their and they're supposed to report outside sources of income they were not reporting this and as part of this grant they were required to provide information to the government. There have been companies. Set up in China. People have Have done research search. It's been taken to China and people. There have gotten patents on it so you know I was. I was telling your researcher who called me earlier. I said it's like it's not had a great analogy but it's like suppose I wrote a book and I gave it to my editor at a book publisher my publisher and before they could even and copyrighted or anything. My publisher had some friend at some other published mother organization or whatever gave him the book and somebody else published and copyrighted. Did you feel like what can you do. It's now it's it's not mine anymore. These you know these are dated. That don't belong. These are data reagents agents medical tests that do not belong to the people who have been stealing them. They belong to the institutions the US tax payers and they're gone and who alerted the FBI that this was happening the FBI will never talk about their investigations. I do know that one of the early things is it happened and I don't know if was the first he said it was the first other people said no with an early thing was there was a scientist with caught an airport with a suitcase case. Full of hard drives full of data that he was trying to sneak off to China. I don't know how they knew that was in his suitcase. But that was kind of a of an alarming thing now I also understand why Chinese scientists in the US worry that they're going to be targeted because there have been cases where people have been erroneously accused and once you're accused even if it's wrong your life can be ruined. I mean just ruined so I understand that but on the other hand I also understand the point of view of the universities and the NIH. You say wait a minute. This does not belong to the people who are stealing in and once it's gone it's gone. I mean it's like your best idea yet. This great idea for a story you go tell your editor. Your editor tells his friend and it's published by The New York Times I mean and then you say wait a minute. That was my story well too late. It's gone now. But we've had China but China has a long history of incentivizing using intellectual property theft. Right why so. This should not be surprised. I should it well. The problem is that this is this is a system of biomedical biomedical research. That has always prided itself on trust and honesty and sharing and that doesn't mean that trust hasn't been breached. I mean I can think of examples in the US where people have taken not nothing to do with China just within the US or people taking somebody else's ideas that they saw anagram puzzle even though it's a felony to do this and gone ahead and tried to develop them themselves. So it's not like you know it never happens but the system is has. It's hard to have a system like ours and put the kind of controls in place that would prevent this. I mean their ideas for how to do it and they make a lot of sense but they're going to change the system So we're we're Some of the scientists trying to cover up what they were doing saying. Oh now I'm just taking a vacation you know. Bring over what they were saying. Things like this is totally unfair. I didn't do anything or I didn't know that I wasn't allowed how to do this. Or they have lawyers. Who say they're totally innocent and some of them? Yeah some of them who were who were under. Suspicion just went an off China and established lab. They're they're gone but others others are lawyers who say wait a minute. You know. They didn't do anything wrong and maybe they didn't see see that's the other thing people said. Well why don't we have all the names and we do have due process in this country and it takes a long time that doing investigation and get an indictment tightknit and get a conviction and I understand why the universities and the FBI are being very careful about releasing these people's name. Some people identified themselves else. They went off the shine. They identified thousands said. I didn't do anything I'm being accused. But those who are still under investigation. There's quite a few of them. I understand why their names names and and all the details about them were not released. Go to the phones Eight four four seven two four eight two five Tom and Castro Valley California. Hi Welcome Tom. Yes hi I Just wanted to ask As an individual you know. NPR programs in the news. Different things Keep popping up about you know China. Stealing this China you know counterfeiting Matt China doing that And you know their stuff happening out here in California California and Silicon Valley. You know and universities that have research grants are large companies. Autonomous Vehicles is is another area where when we look at these events one on one But then you spread it over you know many any many many different things One starts to wonder about the entire relationship with China and whether a single trade agreement is is going to resolve any of this. You know what what are. The answer is to to on a broader to to apply the. What what your guest just saying? It's happening in one area to you. Know the broader intellectual property theft across companies and universities. Nationwide that's a really good point and I was told that of as you pointed out it's not just the biomedical field. I'm a medical reporter so that's was so it was I. I went after for the medical. I looked into the medical field but the National Science Foundation. The Office of Science and technology. Everybody is concerned about this. And everybody's asking. What are we supposed to do? I don't think that anybody people have said like I said they have recommendations they have advice. I don't think we have a policy in place that would would stop. Stop any of this yet. So do you think the the the discussion mouth this is going to stifle. Then the the intellectual discourse that scientists happen the other asking me and your your guests. Well actually. Some of the ideas are not. I can't imagine them stifling things but they would prevent some of the thefts for example. If you're reviewing a A grand proposal you have to. You can only do it if you're using a secure cure computer and you are not allowed to copy anything you see print anything you see you sit in a room and you read it now. You might remember you. I take notes but it's GonNa be a little bit harder to hand it off after that there's At at MD Anderson. They got rid of things like thumb drives drives and stuff so you can't so easily download stuff and and and pass it on but you know I heart because science is a collaborative elaborate of enterprise. I can't imagine that that they would put controls in place that would prevent science from researchers researchers from talking to each other collaborating with each other cooperating with each other share sharing reagents when everybody understands that. That's what's going on uh-huh and includes people in China. I mean it doesn't mean just because you're in China doesn't mean you're trying to steal something for the government and there are how many cases hundreds of cases potential better being being investigated seat. That doesn't mean it's going to go farther. Maybe they'll find out it was a mistake and in my i. Would it be fair to the people who are being investigated and to be fair may not only be Chinese. Who are well what they told me I said well what other countries they said basically it it just keeps coming back to China? We haven't seen it with other countries so far so far. Let's go to the phones to Alex and New York. Hi Alex I go ahead. Yeah so my Actually on just share a quick story. My aunt was working for Brandon versity back in the nineties and You know her very close. Coworker was involved in something like this. She she You know they had worked together. For many many years and The coworkers husband was retired scientists and he got involved in something similar to this where he was leaking. A lot of this Research back back to Folks that he had contacts with and and you know his wife my aunt Koehler says she got in a lot of trouble. This was back in the nineties. So this has been going on for a while and You know unfortunately it's basically human nature. We're we're dealing with you know it's happening and all all verticals not just research okay. So where do we go with this. Gino are we gonNA see prosecution indictments coming down along well probably probably but they haven't the there have been a few they haven't involved. NIH funded research but they have involved people who are doing by a medical research and we're getting funds another ways but the NIH things are still winding their way through. Because you go from a universe be finding something that concerns them they send it to the NIH the NIH investigates investigates. They send it to the Office of Inspector General. The Office of Inspector General Investigates if they think it's the crime was committed they send it to the FBI I than the FBI looks at then it can go to a grand jury. I mean it takes. It does take a while and it. Hasn't it hasn't been that much time yet. And not that mice time yet his path. Are we fearful. You mentioned this a little bit in passing at the hoping that it doesn't turn into a racial issue for all. All researcher researcher were might be Chinese for example. Well I think that what I heard is a lot of people who are of Chinese ethnicity. Worry about that I I do trust the I only because I've known them probably as long as I've known you IRA some of the people at the NIH you say look. We don't know the ethnicity Mississippi of the person we're investigating. We see what it looks like a transgression and then we find the person and if you trust them then you have left. And I do then you'd have to say well. It's not that they're going after Chinese so many Chinese scientists. Anyway you start going after them and looking at everything they do. You could never never go. You couldn't get anywhere I am. I replied Oh this is science Friday from WNYC studios talking with junior collado medical reporter for the New York Times. It's about the espionage in In universities and intellectual property Are Do you think. Universities are going to be cracking down or be in giving more secrecy to what they're doing or trying to keep it private. I think they're going to be doing and once again. Nobody I think universities. Don't WanNa talk to openly about this. Because they're so afraid of being accused of of racial profiling but I think what they're doing. What what they might be doing is some of the things that MD Anderson least admits that they're doing and some of the things that they're that they're doing is like? I said they got rid of you if you when you when you travel. You can't just take your normal laptop they don't have any External hard drives. They got rid of their thumb. Drives they have so how much security they showed me some redacted emails and boy were they heavily redacted and it was in a system called box. They gave me a password to look at these things and of course I. I didn't know the names of anybody in there was a lot of black on. This page is but anyway in order to get into box I got. I got to have a password and and get in and look at this stuff. I couldn't copy it. I couldn't I couldn't print it or anything and then my password expired so I went to look at it again again. I'd say wait a minute. I can't get back into box. I had to get another password. It doesn't even last long. It was so secure. You feel like you know it was you. Couldn't it'd be very hard export anything unless you just sat there manually writing down everything you saw. While we're very happy that you're you could take time to be with us today and to Always continue your great work and as a medical reporter always falling your stuff thanking Gina. Thank you Iowa. It's always good to talk to you. Thanks for having me on the show. Welcome junior collado the medical reporter for the New York Times. We're GONNA take a break and we're to talk about a very famous moment that made Albert Einstein in overnight celebrity. It happened happened two hundred years ago this week. Remember the famous story about you. Know the watching the total solar eclipse in the bending the starlight around the son-in-law kind of stuff. Yeah it's been a hundred years. I can't believe it either. We'll come and talk about that anniversary after the break. Stay with us. Hey there IRA here coming coming at you with some great news about how you yes. You can make a big impact right now. Science Friday has a dollar for dollar donation nation match in effect which means that if you make a donation right now it will be doubled. Yes I said doubled. You heard me say this before are any size. Donation makes a difference. And that's never been more true then. Now I know you care about science Friday so don't wait on this opportunity. -tunities go to science Friday dot com slash. Give and double your impact thanks. Science Friday is supported by better help. Online counseling is there something that interferes with your happiness or prevents you from achieving your goals live so better help is here for you. Better help offers. Licensed professional counselors who are specialized in issues such as depression anxiety stress grief and more. You can connect with your professional professional counselor in a safe and private way by phone text video or chat and get help on your own time science Friday listeners. Get Ten percent off your first month with this count code Friday so why not get started today go to better health dot com slash Friday and fill out a questionnaire to get matched with a counselor. You'll love that's better help dot com slash. Friday science. Friday is supported by IBM problems problems. It's human nature to hate problems. But why is that after all problems inspire us to mend things. Ben Things make things better. That's twice so many people work with IBM on everything from city. Traffic to ocean plastic new schools to new energy flight delays to food safety. SMART Mark loves problems. Ibm Let's put smart to work visit. IBM DOT com slash. SMART to learn more. This is science Friday. I'm I'M IRA Plato. Did you catch that. Twenty seventeen total solar eclipse. I saw it up there in Casper Wyoming and I know many others who pilgrimage far and wide to watch it but I knew years ago a total solar eclipse was much more than just an amazing sight to see. It was a chance to test one of the most controversial concepts of the day. Einstein's idea of warped space if you could actually observe a total eclipse of course many a yearly scientific. Expeditions were foiled by war or bad luck or bad weather but finally in May nineteen nineteen. Scientists were blessed with a clear view view of the black and disk of the Sun and stars around it and on November six thousand nine hundred ninety one hundred years ago this week. They presented their observations to to the world and that forever changed our view of Einstein and his theory reason. Albert Einstein became an international celebrity literally overnight. Joining me now to tell. The story is science to Ron Cowen. He's author of gravity century from Weinstein's eclipse to images of black holes. He joins me from London London. Welcome back to science Friday Ron. Thanks take us back to those early days of May of Nineteen Nineteen Arthur Sir Arthur. Eddington has gone out to observe the eclipse. What's he what's he looking for? What's happening right right? So he went in a colleague went to precipitate which is off the west coast. If Africa another team went to northern Brazil. I mean they were looking to see when the sun is present will all stars get deflected by the mass of the sun and you can only see that During a solar eclipse at least at that point they didn't have the technology Because it would be folly otherwise the sun would swamp the brilliant light the bright light or the sun would swamp the The faint light of the stars. You needed an eclipse But there was a lot of drama because first of all this was just after World War the end of World War One. This was British astronomers his daring to test a theory of german-born scientists when there was still a lot of hostility and there was drama at the two sites because they were clouds. Yes in fact and in Principi Addington could just have three stores that that he could look at on photographs rafts to see the deflection In northern Brazil at sobral One of the instruments just did not work properly probably due in the heat of the of of the sun before the eclipse so They had to scramble And what was at stake was Newton. Right who who was Oh my God I mean the planets revolved around the sun because of The Way Newton explained it or this up store was this upstart Einstein with his crazy theory. Right and then and then they finally published the result a hundred years ago this week and it confirmed what Einstein had predicted about. Just where those stars it should be right. They announced it in November six nineteen nineteen in London at the Royal Astronomical Society. That's right yeah and you know some. Some people were skeptical but most people were welcoming But and then the next morning you know November seven both the front page of The Times of London. It was interesting on one side of the front page. There was not about King George. The fourth fishing invitation for all workers cruise to take two minutes out of the day to remember. Honor the glorious dead as you put it for one but to the right of those articles also on the front page triple decker headline the normally staid times wrote revolution in space new theory the universe Newtonian ideas. Overthrown it is the new set off a chain reaction action around the globe New York Times followed suit with from story on November Tenth Light Solace. skewing the Heavens Einstein theory triumphs and had handed. Did Bert. React to all of well. You know it was interesting There were two ways he had learned that most likely The measurements were going to confirm his his work and he sent a note in the fall of November. Sorry sorry in the fall in one thousand nine hundred and his mother who is dying of stomach cancer and basically said Mother Joyce News. Today you know because They have demonstrated The deflection of light Any quickly sent a note to a notable German Journal very brief note on the other hand he His assistant also Rosenthal. Schneider asked him you know. What would you have done if if they they had found a deflection of light that was not Not Correct with your theory and he said well then I would be. I would feel sorry. The dear Lord is the theory is direct Yeah and search. And they've been testing this out for a hundred years haven't they. They still alantic chance they get the that they Bonnie can warp the space around. It is just constantly being looked at absolutely and of course has been you know. the Nobel prize was won twenty seventeen for the discovery of gravitational waves these ripples and space time that Einstein predicted we have the iconic connick image of the region right around a black hole from the event Horizon Telescope which is actually ray of Hundreds of Radio Telescopes Dopson working on concert to get you know this this image so and this the size and shape of the Halo of light around the shadow of the black hole. Aw indicated Einstein again once again was right. I one of the great ironies of this issue is that there was an expedition that went out right at nineteen eighteen fourteen as the war was broken out and they and they got arrested didn't it yes. Yes because they went to the Crimea in August nineteen fourteen and The team was promptly arrested as spies. Their equipment confiscated That was Erwin Finlay. Freundlich and he. He never had good luck. He tried several times other times. It was too cloudy and He yeah so that's that's that's true but you know it was lucky for Einstein that those earlier expeditions failed because Einstein when he first calculated. How much slight would be that He made a mistake AAC. He didn't fully perfect theory at and by Nineteen fifteen he late nineteen fifteen. He realized he was twice the amount that he'd originally calculated so if these measurements. Were done before. Then they would've would've been yes just quickly one other one other point on on ask about some recent confusion over how fast the expansion of the universe is happening. Hubble constant controversy about that Yes a little bit now. First of all the fact that the universe is expanding and even expanding accelerated rate is something that Einstein's equations predict But Yeah it's interesting. It's not clear it's really a crisis or not some I happen to think. I think that they will work it out and figure out one value for the Hubble constant which tells you about the expansion of the universe but again this was this goes back to Einstein Stein. Interesting Ron Cowen. Science Writer and author of gravity century from Einstein's eclipse two images of the black hole of black holes great book. We have an excerpt of it on our website. It's science Friday dot com slash gravity. Thank you Ron. Thank you next APP. It's time to talk about another object eclipsing. I've seen the sun only this one's much smaller talking about the planet mercury. Because this coming Monday November eleventh astronomy enthusiasts will be able to to catch a so-called transit of mercury. It only happens about thirteen times a century making it walk. It's really rare and it and it to like total. Solar eclipses are crucial for early. Astronomers trying to make sense of the mechanics of the heavens joining me to talk about the history and how to see so you want to see the transit of mercury for yourself. Dean Regas has here to tell us astronomer at the Cincinnati Observatory. Welcome back team. Oh great to be with you all right. Just tell us exactly actually what the transit means. Well this is when the the little planet mercury goes between us in the Sun. It's exactly lined up just perfectly where you'll look up and didn't see a little black dot going across the sun. I'll spare you my Sting impression but It is super tiny and I consider this the nerdy the eclipse this is very small and very subtle and it also takes a lot of safety to be able to see so I it. How long does it last for well? So we'll begin precisely at seven thirty five. Am Eastern time. That's when murkier will be in silhouette in front of the sun so Mercury will still be about forty seven million kilometers others from the sun and So just be right in between us. So they look like they're touching but Seven thirty five's went starts and then it'll go across the the disc of the Sun for about five and a half hours and exit at one. Oh four PM eastern time now how easy would it be for me to see do. I can't see it. You know with my backyard telescope can. Is it dangerous. Well that is definitely dangerous to do this without the right equipment because If you were to just be outside you would not notice anything different different. The son wouldn't dim noticeably You couldn't just use the eclipse glasses and look at it with the naked eye safely. Wouldn't even see the dot. It's that small so oh you do need a telescope need to magnify maybe about thirty to forty times to be on the safe side to be able to make it out and then you definitely have to have a filter on your telescope to be able to To See it safely so the best place to go is like let's say Oh to Dean Regas Place at the Cincinnati Observatory or other observatories and this. This is the kind of stuff that we get excited about because astronomers really love to share the universe with folks and so yeah check with your local Science club in astronomy Observatory and and see what they're doing most likely they're doing something The weather forecast in the mid west looking great so IRA. I'm looking for places to go any your any our listeners have uh-huh host me. I'm looking for places to go on Monday. We'll have to see what happens. What can be learned about this? Why such A? Why are astronomers so excited about out this well So for me. I like the history of it. This was I viewed in sixteen thirty one and this was something that It really lets us know how the solar system works. Ah Yohannes Kepler predicted that the he figured out the motions the planet so well that he could figure out when Mercury was GonNa Cross in front of the Sun. This is some detailed math. Have to be able to figure out and only one person sought in sixteen thirty one a French astronomer named Pierre Guest Cindy and he couldn't even fathom what he saw because mercury look so small. He didn't believe it when he saw it. He thought it was just a sunspot and so then future expeditions. Thought this is. This is something to do to be able to triangulate the distance to the sun on if you can measure mercury going in front of Sun from different places on the earth you can actually compute distance to the sun and this was a big thing that the nations around the world tried to do. And this is this how I you know. I was surprised to see how rare this event is. Because Mercury's zips around the sun so much faster than we do. I thought it might be more opportunities. But there aren't getting these three bodies lined up the earth mercury and son is a rare thing because So yeah mercury goes around the sun every eighty eight days and we we take a year to go around the sun so we all have to be in the same place at the same time and Mercury's orbit is the most tilted of any of the planet. So it's sometimes too high or too low. Oh and on the eleventh that it's going to be just right I'm IRA plato. Science Friday from WNYC studios talking with Dean Regas Astronomer the Cincinnati Observatory about The event the transit of mercury coming up next week you know we were just talking in segment before about Einstein and the one hundredth anniversary of him talking about the. The experiment proved warp space. But that was very much involved. Weinstein was very much involved with explaining reitman Heitmann Mercury going around the sun. Well that was one of the problems was that Newtonian physics wasn't explaining where mercury should be it. It wasn't It was kind of Not In its place where we are expected it to be and it was. Yeah things like the observing the that solar eclipse in nineteen one thousand nine hundred and other things where Einstein's theory really cold and it and it turned out to explain exactly where mercury goes and so now we can watch approach. Where Mercury is? We know we're mercury of everyday for from now until centuries the transit of Venus. There's also that right it's it's much more elusive at happens very rarely and there's a good story about a scientist in the seventeen hundreds who pretty much wrist everything to see it right. Yes I mean. We've talked about a lunar Clara Solar eclipses where the moon blocks the sun. We've talked about mercury going in front of Sun and Venus is the only other thing that can do that and we had one transit of Venus Genus in two thousand four and two thousand twelve and I hope. IRA saw one of those Because the next one won't be till twenty one nineteen vitamins vitamins. Yes that's right. Start Sleeping pretty well. I mean this is. It's going to be tough to make that one. And there was a fella in the seventeen hundreds a French astronomer named Khayam T- who made a journey to the Indian Ocean to see the transit of Venus in seventeen sixty one. He missed it it because of war politics and they wouldn't let him land and he decided I'm GonNa stay around here for eight more years till the next transit instead of dry going all the way back home home to France he stays another eight years and guess what happens. He got clouded out so eleven years. After leaving France he comes back the home and finds him self declared legally dead. His family divided up as a state. his wife remarried and so lose on the tragic victim of the transit of Venus. I'm hoping that won't happen to me with a transit of mercury here coming up so that say a he. He stayed the whole time he misses it. Stays the whole time for eleven years comes back finds out. He's declared dead and loses. His was fortunate everything he lost everything because of the stupid transit of Venus. And you gotta think it makes me think of travel in the seventeen hundreds you know going from Europe to Asia and Australia. That was like that was more difficult than us. Going to the moon. Today it was quite a journey as great. Well we'll look forward to Dana. See How many people can get out to an observatory and hope You know you have good luck in the weather. I'm breaks for you. I'm hoping so too because this The next one won't happen. The United States twenty forty nine. So I'm a patient man. But that's a Dean Regas stranorlar at the Cincinnati Observatory. And if you want more information on the transit of mercury had had a seat for yourself including some live web streams yeah visit science Friday dot com slash mercury. Thank you my pleasure. Tells Burke was his director our senior producer. Christopher and tally outta our producers are Alexa Limb Christine Taylor and Katie feather and we had technical and engineering help from rich Kim Kevin Wolf B. J. Liederman composed our theme music and on the Science Friday. Vox Pop APP. Or here's this. Here's the question for this week. We're asking for your stories about coral reefs. Have you witnessed coral reefs chiefs dying or disappearing. The you know not snorkel spotty used to go to. Is it now dead and bleached. We've talked about rebuilding reefs on an upcoming show. We'll talk talk about that and want to know what you've

scientist China Albert Einstein researcher IBM New York Times Mercury US FBI The Times medical reporter NIH Charles Burke WNYC studios flu director producer Acadia National Park SPACEX
Looking back at what the movie WALL-E has to say about how we live

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

08:39 min | 2 years ago

Looking back at what the movie WALL-E has to say about how we live

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by indeed. Are you hiring with indeed? You can post job in minutes. Set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist qualified candidates using an online dashboard. Get started today and indeed dot com slash marketplace. That's indeed dot com slash marketplace. And by click share with click share, and you're meeting, you can share your scream instantly from any device. Click share instantly projects any speakers laptop tablet or phone onto a presentation screen so everyone can work together share their ideas and create something great. That's the click share effect. Visit click share free trial dot com to learn more and sign up for your free trial. Sometimes scifi shows us who we really are. And sometimes we really don't like it looking back at the movie Wally. Law. Harry raleigh. Aw. From American public media. This is marketplace. Tech demystifying the digital economy, I'm Molly would. The Pixar film Wally is about a future where humans have ruined earth's environment with trash, they live in space. Captives two screens self-driving chairs liquified food and robots servants. One little robot is left on earth to clean up the mess until he finds love and ends up saving humanity. From itself this summer were bringing back our tech and entertainment series and to kick it off. Here's another listen to an interview we love on the lessons of Wally with great scifi writer, Kim Stanley Robinson, author of New York, twenty one forty which also imagines a world transformed by environmental collapse, as it happens Wally is one of his favorite movies. Well, it wasn't a hard call to make in two thousand eight it was just a social commentary on what was already happening in at the time and two thousand eight and now are not that different socially, and culturally. I guess you could just say, more has happened the Paris accord. There's a worldwide awareness of climate change in environmental collapse. And that was also true in two thousand eight so I would just say that the situation has been exacerbated in a way that Wally is pointing out things aren't as bad as they are in Weli. But we're we're trending in that direction. Both in good ways, and, and the really bad ways. There's also this kind of, there's also the very obvious message about how convenience becomes enslavement the idea of constant entertainment, and feeding and transportation that, that essentially takes away independence and autonomy. I mean is that that's like that is not an uncommon theme in science fiction? And I wonder if it's always been obvious really the humans in that movie, they're essentially like infants adulthood has been taken away, and against that Wally looks like sister. I you know, he's a worker bee. He doesn't. He has a stupid job to, to package trash into giant. Kayce grouper like columns since it's pointless in a way, and he's just being away at it, but then he begins to make all kinds of mature adult decisions falls in love joins a revolution. And overthrows the social order that already exists. The message is super clear, and I think it made people uncomfortable at the time in two thousand eight and I think it's still should make us a little uncomfortable. Did it? Do you think what was the what were the conversations about that? What we're people saying well, conservative commentators was saying, this is some kind of environmentalist scare message. And I, I saw Wally in a movie theater in bar harbor at the edge of Acadia national park. It was middle America on a summer vacation, seeing that movie and theatre where you got to eat pizza while you watch the movie and every movie gets around of applause. Well while he did not get around applause, the audience knew that it was being criticized for its habits. And there were lots of giant soft drinks in the theater as people were watching the movie, and then we were sitting back in recliners because of the. Pizza format of this particular theater. So it's one of the very few sat hairs that I think pokes them needle right in the in the heart of our lifestyle. And what do you think it says about independence and atonomy? I mean, there are some robots like you said, who break the rules to help humanity and of course, some humans to who sort of wake up to this utopia nightmare that they live in. Yep. That's right. I think it's a wake-up call like satires if they're not just going to be like nineteen Eighty-four ending with a boot on your face. They, they have to always end in revolution. In a wake-up of some characters it's funny, I think that it turns out to be a little machine with presumably really simple programming. It's a subversive message because it saying, you know, no matter how constricted your life is or your patterns. Are you can break out of them just by making a first gesture toward saving something? It's a well constructed consciousness raising film, especially given that it's basically a comedy with a kind of BUSTER. Keaton silent real. The first real of Weli is, is beautiful in that there's hardly any dialogue whatsoever. It's all done by visuals. So in movie terms, it's a it's a great success. In other way, that humanity is essentially saved is a is through the actions of a few. I mean, I'm thinking about the, the theater that you described watching this movie and not everybody wakes up not every wants to in fact, most sounds like it seems like don't right? Are we are too comfortable to embrace autonomy and independence? And I, I guess I wonder what the film also says about leadership. Well, I think it's a good message in the leadership can come from anywhere and needs to be mass source from below. And if anybody starts it, it begins to spread so I like it. It's really a revolution from below by ordinary activities. I think Americans do feel cocooned by crowd and people. Go on vacation in order to do something simpler and harder. People go down to the gym to do. Something physical. I mean, all of these are commodified versions of things that you can do for free just by walking out your front door and taking a walk down the street or or planting little garden. If you have land in, if not put it in pots, the urge is there, this is what I'm thinking the urge for more physical bodily life, a more balanced life where you aren't just a consumer, but are also producing something of your own. I think that urges there. So the movie speaks to something really deep inside all of us Saifi author, Kim Stanley Robinson. Big fan of the movie Wally, are there, techy movies, you want us to talk about let us know. We are M P tech at marketplace dot org. And now for some related links. I don't know if you spotted this about a week back, but Robert Downey junior was one of the featured speakers at remorse a conference about space exploration, put on by Amazon and Jeff Bezos. And he actually announced Wally will kind of kind of totally Downey announced a project called the footprint coalition whose goal is to help clean up the planet using advanced technologies. He said, quote between robotics and nanotechnology. We could probably clean up the planet significantly, if not entirely within a decade, which, I mean, okay, I'm down for that. Tell me more. Well, there isn't actually anymore just yet. But Downey said the project will officially kick off by April twenty twenty I signed up for more information on the website, I'm Ali would. And that's marketplace tech. This is APN. If you're a member of your local public radio station, we thank you, because your support helps those stations, keep programs like marketplace tack on the air, but for marketplace to really grow. We need additional investment from those who care most about what we do super fans like you help us keep telling stories that matter become a marketplace investor today at marketplace dot org. And thanks this. Marketplace podcast is brought to you by click share an award-winning wireless presentation system with click share, and you're meeting. You can share your screen instantly from any device, no more awkward small talk, or wasted time as you wait for tech problems to be fixed. Click share instantly projects any speakers laptop tablet or phone onto a presentation screen so everyone can work together share their ideas and create something great. That's the click share effect. Visit click share free trial dot com to learn more and sign up for your free trial.

Wally Kim Stanley Robinson Robert Downey Weli Harry raleigh Molly Pixar America Paris New York Acadia national park Keaton writer Jeff Bezos Ali Amazon M P
38. Mariah Reading: Sustainability through eco-art

Access to Inspiration

23:22 min | 4 months ago

38. Mariah Reading: Sustainability through eco-art

"Hello i'm sue stockdale and welcome to the access to inspiration. Podcast the shore. You can get inspiration from people who may be unlike q. We hope their stories insights enable you to transcend day to day challenges and reflect on what you are capable of achieving in today's episode. My guest is mariah reading who describes herself as an artist g us each trash recycled for the natural environment as a canvas to create hard impressionist paintings. Pariah is also a passionate advocate for the preservation of america's national parks having already visited twenty four of them across the country and she's been an artist in residence in three of them so far. Denali and acadia national park whilst others may walk on by a discarded plastic bottle or a piece of clothing lying on the ground. I'm curious to find what about what inspired mariah to pick it up and use the trash that she saw in those protected landscapes as the canvas for her work. Welcome to the podcast right. Thank you so mileage. So happy to be here. So as i said i have never heard of an equal artist before what is it. Any co artist definitely in up incoming type of art where artists use like recycled materials or just kind of sustainable ways to make our To reflect on the anthropology in that we're experiencing right now reflect on climate change and the changing worlds that were part of so using your four to highlight this thanks. So are you saying that if somebody's dropped a piece of trash than basically you pick up and use as the medium to create your art on. Yes so that's kind of the way the i've taken it and other artists has asked done loads of different things. But what i do. Is i find trash on the ground to hike and be outside as much as possible. So whenever i'm hiking might bring my pants with me or trash bags or gloves. Especially now and if i find a piece of trash pick it up in that essentially becomes the canvas of a paint job too. So how did you come up with this idea. This way of saying king. People often think of the candidates in easel or traditional store paper or something like that to draw had did you see that trash could medium of choice for you yeah. I studied art in college and it was my senior year. I took this sculpture class. And we did lots of rubber mold and concrete molds and we were just mixed these big vats wet heavy concrete to make sculptures with and it was a lot installation based projects. So i started to see. Just the amount of waste and trash. That we're accumulating from just my practice alone you have these huge wet bins of trash two or three of them. Every single class and wet. Concrete can't really be reused so we just had to throw it out. And i was a landscape painter at that point still am but i kind of drew this parallel between feeding landfills in creating landscapes materials that i was using japan landscapes that so inspired me for my whole life. I'm being harmed by my practice. So i really wanted to make that intentional switch. Things i thought would happen again so it was first hand experience just thinking about as you say the waste. That was being accumulates through the work that you're doing now you said you love the outdoors Particularly do you enjoy by the national parks in america. They're beautiful first of all their amazing space. Says that i feel very fortunate to have lifted an gotten to explore just getting to experience kind of how dynamic the country my i did across country road trip to move from age california wednesday graduated college and just starting at acadia national park where i am right now which is watanake confederacy land and making my way all the way to california leaving across the plains in the desert and we saw the grand canyon. And then we're all of a sudden on the pacific coast. There's just so much to offer in just so much dynamic beauty that just a lifetime of inspiration really can't describe how beautiful seeing all those different dynamic places in the unique colors than land formations. Each one had i think growing up in maine definitely gave me an appreciation for the outdoors. I know you've been an artist in residence in a number of national parks. How did that happen. That was another piece of advice that i was given by a mentor. Just exiting college straighten to make it on my own as an artist trying to paint the way she just told me to apply to as many residencies as possible and try to get your stuff in shows. Try to just get out there as much as possible. Have had this issue for traveling end when i started the project. It was the national heart centennial. That's why i happened to we. Through a bunch of different national parks and the national parks are were largely built off of artists coming through and being inspired by this land shooting out there paintings across the city and everything so that people understand the importance of why these places where necessary to protect and of course to have a long long history of indigenous populations being there and passing out oral traditions and creating their artwork based on the land too so it goes way farther back than just the national park. Fifteen thousand years people have been inspired by those lands so they had these residency programs. Artists can go in ba- fully immersed in the landscape and then in exchange a joni apiece. Slow be used as an educational tool for visitors to see you get to experience. The glory of the national parks and the results of your work are used by others afterwards that come to appreciate the parks for themselves right. Most national parks have a good online catalogue. So you can. You can't physically be at the park. You can still go through and see. The different artists were their catalog of poetry. Because writers get com dancers can come to not just visual. Artists was actually wonderful. Then when visitor centers are open they ever will be again. Usually there's a gallery area where the statements are listed in. You can go in and see the art which is always so interesting just to see how vastly different. People's approaches to the same landscape is in. Yes it's changing and moving and everything. Those who listening to the podcast might be inspired to think about how they could make a living from being artist and sometimes i think there is a sense that it can be quite a tough way to make a living and particularly thinking about couvert of late where you are able to get into those national parks and well places in quite the way you would have done before. What's your sense of the reality of being an artist these days. I think it's not a traditional way of making a living. But i feel if there's that passion there you have something that brings you so much happiness enjoy show. I like to not do that. I think would be harder. That would be more painful at done. My her share jobs. That didn't bring me happiness to make ends meet. And everything. And i remember telling myself when i started my art business that just the menial tasks of ordering Signing additioning in just those little nitty-gritty things. I loved doing that so much. More than the best day is at the job that hated. 'cause it's your vision through passion Artists are romantic people. The most part. And i would just so much rather lists at life than a stale one. That's a cookie cutter here. You go and with kobe. It's been a huge bummer. And released scary and stressful. But i also am very thankful that we're living in an age with internet and half as online sales and being able to purchase and support my artist friends just online super safely super easily. I think it's also been this level playing fields where the arts has been only relate you certain types of people have had access to certain fine arts and i think it's a really beautiful time that can scroll through your phone and see things that are hanging in the met or hanging in these big institutions or galleries or anything like that and it's awesome beautiful so in a way. It's made accessibility to arch more available for people. Because we're having to all view lake. Yeah i would say so and often just being is the latest in quarantine. Feel like there's been a lot of inspiration from that and people dealing with these emotions in expressing themselves and maybe even having the time to express themselves in ways that they didn't before when they had to commutes worker zigzag back and forth. So i'm going to reframe. It hasn't been the easiest but i think it's i important to grapple less. Hi it's me again. Remember you can keep up to date on all the news from us by connecting with access to inspiration social media you can find us on linked tin facebook instagram and twitter so just type in access to inspiration find us there and then let us know about what you think of the podcast cities so far also please held just one other person about the cd's it could make a big difference in their lives to and by just taking one small action. You could help to make a positive impact on them. Nope back to mariah mariah that you have collaborated with a number of big brands like maryland. Subaru for some of your work. How do those collaborations work. Most of them are different. Usually people find me on instagram. That's the main channel and just reach out. Usually they have a project in mind so for meryl. They had this new shoe that they wanted to promote so they actually sent me a go pro and had me fill myself like in the process of creating our hiking. I was living in big sur at that time. So just hyping from the redwoods to the ocean and going through that process in picking up trash and pay dang so. That was really fun. Because i consider myself a painter dot kind of it. So it's been fun to expand my horizons to more photography and videography and then subaru also had kind of this vision for artists feature projects. But they brought in videographer so it was just telling my story and professional. The offers came in. That was a trip russia. So do you see. This is an opportunity for commercial organizations. Who have an interest in understanding more by landscapes on recycling and sustainability and so on that they can collaborate with people like yourself to get a new insight into how to utilize recycled materials effectively. I would hope so. I think that's where a lot of the companies that are looking to collaborate with or have collaborated with they are migrating towards okay. How can be have less of a carbon footprint especially big car companies in the big way companies that have super large aggressive carbon footprints. I think it is important for them to snap out of that. And some of the smaller scale companies are making products out of recycled materials now in integrating pat more into just there every day launching products. So i think it goes both ways again just as an artist trying to make the world trying to get myself out there as much as possible and using those larger platforms took speaker truth and hopefully inspire others to make their own. Sustainable art tells a bit by the process of going along the beach shore hiking in the wild country and spotted a piece of trash had. Do you get the ideas on the practical sense of utilizing that trash to get into your finished. Product tells about how you actually do that. Have two different. They ins. of course it's been affected by cove. Ed 'cause i used to just pick up trash in trash in trash announced like. I'm a little more wary by atlantic mentioned before i usually when i'm going on big backpacking trips or hiking day. Treks i pack a little kit with my primary colors. Mccain's a little jar recycled gray water. And just go on out there. I i got started just taking up a piece of trash. If i find a water bottle off the side of the trail or lots of shoes a lot of the time just picking it up right there and then finding perch somewhere nearby and painting the actual landscape where the trashes found right than they are. Fled you love my player sketches. I think if more color studies sketches there are a lot of the time were gesture on only take a few hours. But sometimes you find a piece of trash and it's huge hubcap founds cracked aquaculture box last year. And there's no way. I can finish the piece. Just in one sitting oriented weather comes in the sun's about to set all these environmental factors as well. So in that case i would take the piece from the location and take some source images of where i found it and bring it back to my studio painted using the source image and then hike it back out to align at in photographic than there. That ones always interesting because sometimes seasons have passed so i have a few pieces that i found in the summer but i aligned in the spring. That's what landscape painting is. It's not a stagnant saying it's constantly in motion so leaned into that little disconnect. What you're saying there is if you fed hubcap halfway up lamentin. You could painted than in there if the weather turned you. Take it back to your studio on the backup to the mountain and take a photograph of it in situ in that landscape. Is that what you're saying he wants. The painting is done. I would probably complete it in my studio and then bring it back out. And it's like i'm hiking with little hubcap buddy reading new license these discarded literally in forgotten objects is the fun part of the process to. It's not just the painting standing or whatever or hanging on a wall it's bringing it back to. The landscape is part of the process. So i imagine in a way. There's an element of back story to a piece of art when somebody purchases. They're getting not just that that piece of our materialists scored alabama lovely image on it. They're getting the back story where it came from. And why right yeah. It's very interesting. I definitely think about where that he's came from and especially with single shoes just thinking about where the other shoe who walked in those shoes. It's very personal thing. I think it's like a portrait of the human experience upon the landscape. So thinking about things. But i personally lost through my travels and wear those pieces ends up wideness piece landed before me and there's a lot i think it's personal too so i cannot my own stories my own flair but i think people gravitate towards certain pieces because they remind them of affects remind for whatever they can put their own story on that but it is interesting. And i'm wondering what piece of trash have you found most challenging to work on. It's hard it's slick. Surfaces are hard. So i struggle with glass. I usually just end up picking it up in recycling yet. So i more gravitate towards plastic because that says a lot about where we are in the world right now with micro-plastics just embedded within everything. I gravitate more Struggle a little bit with fabrics before finding wet crumpled up t shirts that are shoved to the side trails or gloves in things of that nature but i recently just started a series called warm landscapes. So i am stretching and washing and cleaning the discarded fabric clothing. But then i'm ending up stretching that fabric around stretcher-bearers like a canvas bar so they'd be compass traditional surface. That looks like a canvas. But there's like a shirt behind it or sweat shirt or pants so that's been a fun process because getting started wet t shirts. I was like maybe not. I don't need to get that saw. I'll put that to the side so it's been fun seeing the project kind of transforming that way so in a way where people might think trash yuck and they avoid it or perhaps pick it up and hopefully somewhere more relevant as opposed to the countryside. You're looking at it as a medium from which to create a wonderful piece of art. Yeah sh vision right now. We're like how did you find that. Water bottle twenty yards into the duck forest. It's like a got it yet. it's really funny. And sometimes i see things like rocks. That has flexes reflective material Plastic and. it's been this weird switch remedy. Knew that is a natural thing that should be. Because i'm so ready to find trash and just technology but it's a good thing. If i can't find trash when i was first into nali that was my first artist residency. The six million acre park. It's huge and i barely found any trash so it had to use my own personal trash instead of finding things in the field and just realizing a good thing is to not be able to find you. Just water bottles glass in masks now just scattered across the street. So thinking into the future mariah. What are your ambitions in. Where do you want to take this approach to art. My ambitions are definitely to become a full time artist right now. I am a seasonal environmentalist interpreter naturalist and in the winter i focus more on our business and balance the two but i think the vision for the future is to just be a full time artist and i love working with kids and students definitely a social person and i think finding that balance is really important for me where i can be out in the field with others being inspired by what. They're inspired. brian soaking that. All in and i also worked as a teacher having that element and then being able to retreat to my studio. I last my me time alone. Time is get into the zone with my painting. So that balance is something that i'm searching for but i love the outdoors. I love kayaking canoeing hiking a lot. Lot of dreams and hoax and reconfiguring that in a world of cova has been another fun challenge. I could imagine a strikes me with your experience that you've had in education and in your sociability that you like being around other people. Have you ever considered encouraging other people to go along the same path as us for other people to become aeko artists. Yeah definitely when. I taught i taught at a case eight school. That was kind of my whole thing recycling much as possible and realizing that my goal as an artist and hopefully as an educator is not implant my like this is how i make are an you should make it that same way too but hopefully using my art as a tool or like an opening so that others especially the young upcoming generation right now school intel school right now they can take that idea but grasp on the ways that they are passionate about the world with they see the world so doesn't necessarily have to even be visual art. It can be anything science history writing there so many different ways to be sustainable across all disciplines. So i think that's my help. So it's a catalyst for change. It doesn't have to be another mariah approach to do equal in exactly the same way right. That's just one option out there that hopefully get the gears turn absolutely well. It's been really fascinating to hear from you about your approach to eco. Art is a new term. I've learned from our conversation today. And i'm hoping that quinn as Future we get into national parks. And well places that i find. You're opportunities for you to create your work but because people are actually more considerate about what they're leaving behind. Yes i really hope so. Too and it seem. There are a lot of us efforts being put forth to minimize personal ways but also gonna be consciousness own print but also have to be conscious of that brands. we buy from what their footprint isn't. Go up the ladder there because there's a lot of waste out there that is easy to ignore what it's gotta go somewhere absolutely. I want to find out more about you in the work that you do and look at galileo. Pc's mariah heim. They do that. I've got a website mariah leading art. Dot com. you can find on there. I've also got a facebook page mariah reading art and an instagram mariah reading. So you can just follow me on all those contacts me a few leg and say hello fantastic. Earliest will do that. It's been great to speak to you. Thank you so much for your time today. So nice speaking with you. Thanks for everything well. Maria story reminded me that what can seem like trash to one person may be seen as valuable by another and sometimes it's not until we explore new possibilities and ask the questions hotels. Or how else do. We come up with. Innovative ways to address bigger societal challenges. Next week i'll be in conversation with denise nurse tv presenter and co founder of a pioneering low firm about her career and have her interests in creating more diverse and inclusive working vitamins have weaved its way to a number of the business venture she's been involved with.

mariah acadia national park sue stockdale mariah mariah Pariah america california pacific coast grand canyon maine national park meryl kobe instagram japan subaru maryland facebook
Ronda Cobb, the Money Coach What Will Happen To Our Small Business

The Money Coach Ronda Cobb

22:35 min | 1 year ago

Ronda Cobb, the Money Coach What Will Happen To Our Small Business

"Hi everybody this is Rhonda Cup the money coach and I want to thank you for joining us in our show now remember. We recently updated the website. Go give it a shot. See what you think semi some feedback you know. I like to hear feedback. It's good it's RC. Money coach Dot Com. And you can also look into the new ten tape. Best Start Money Management Program. It is designed especially for people who want to get their finances back on track. Get things straightened out and give yourself an organized. Way To go forward. After all up this confusion created by sheltering at home so we created that class is completely virtual hip. Do sign up and then show up at your convenience online. It is a fabulous deals so look that up the ten date best start money management program. Now I also have people who email me for any business owner. Send me an email and I have a wonderful list of ideas for increasing your business. During this turbulent time and unfortunately I think that our small businesses are indeed in for turbulent times as we all know it started in February and it has not really let up. The Nation's governors seemingly declared an unspoken war on small businesses. In a way. That's how it feels to me. You might feel a little bit different but it has just been kind of awful leaving the big corporate giants open and labeling them is essential while shuddering. The small minority owned businesses are often minority Has Been Very painful to participate in into watch. I came across this article recently written by Berry Brownstein and he was kind enough to give me permission to share that article with you today. Sadly he was not available to share with us directly. But I'll do my best here to read it to you with enthusiasm distinction. It's called bearing witness to the destruction of America's small businesses ended appeared in this article. This thing called the intellectual takeout so and it's by Berry Brownstein now here. We go author and activist. Jane Jacobs once wrote Code. I was taught that the Americans right to be pre individual. Not at the mercy of the State was hard won and that its price was eternal vigilance that I too would have to be vigilant in. Continuing Jacobs added quote. I was made to feel that it would be a disgrace to me as an individual if I should value or should give up rights that were dearly but in quote many. Americans are far from vigilant right now. State and local government officials are strengthening their petty tyrant muscles as they promulgate absurd rules and prevent people from enjoying the outdoors despite some protests it pulls her accu it. Most Americans support continuing lockdowns. Maine's license plate displays D'Amato vacation land. Their motto is more than an aspiration. Maine has thousands of miles of iconic New England coastlines Acadia National Park thousands of lakes and the rugged mountainous end of the Appalachian trail tourism is one of the major industries in Maine as thirty seven million out of state. Visitors spent six point five billion dollars in Maine in two thousand nineteen. But that won't happen this year in late April Maine Governor. Janet Mills announced out of state deserves would be barred from Maine unless they quarantined for fourteen days. After arriving in this state this proclamation is slated to last at least through August of two thousand and twenty small businesses serving vacationers. Earn their living in a few short summer months. The governor's effectively closes them down for the year. Jacobs wrote quote. There is no virtue in conforming. Meekly to the dominant opinion of the moment unquote. What can Americans do so as to avoid meekly? Conforming bent on social media break. The law and risk imprisonment for most people civil. Disobedience is just not a practical option. Bill does have the constitution of Rosa Parks or Mahatma Gandhi yet. We can still take powerful action. We can bear witness bearing witness his three elements quote rights. You are Heke quote seen through there is those were being harmed abused bailed seeing histories is which means calling things what they are. Nc through humanities or futurity charities is which means the duty of never been silent about either of the first two because that is what the future or all humankind would ask us in quote railing against injustice is not witnessing bearing witness means being aware of the suffering of others not just the suffering from our view of the world. The media provide poignant stories about people who have died of covert nineteen. Their stories are tragic and yet other tragic stories remain untold. We need more witnesses to the MINI SMALL BUSINESSES. That are failing as the lockdown continues. Their stories need to be told with embassy. Empathy razzing from the deepest place of are commonly shared humanity. Today I bear witness to the suffering of the owners of edgewater motel in cottages. A family. Run Business in Bar Harbor Maine the gateway to Acadia National Park like most wetter guests. I return for the same week each year. Like ninety five percent of their guests. We are not residents of Maine. Edge waters business model depends on loyal out of State Repeat Customers. David and Jane Boden Own edgewater. David is the seventh generation of his family to a lipped on the edge waters pretty covering a span of two hundred twenty five years. His grandmother started the cottage business in nineteen thirty nine. Jane tells me that. The governor's actions have been paralysing and devastating like most small businesses. They operate on small margins. And don't have a large next week with no income. Their savings are rapidly disappearing. Quote every generation has poured their heart and soul into this property. Quote James Said and quote again to think we could be in a position that jeopardizes the history of this place is beyond belief in quote many of the businesses that make up. Maine's tourism industry are family run like sweater direct tourism spending accounts for roughly eleven percent up the state's gross domestic product and supports a host of other industries across the state. I Imagine Governor Mills thinks she will make up Maine's budget shortfall with a funny money hand out from Washington A. Federal government handout. May Bill the State's coffers but it won't save businesses like the edgewater. It's likely you've heard a government as courageous and decisive heroes story today. Economic Educator Don Boudreaux recently challenged us to tell competing stories. Competing stories can expose the consequences that stories of her ROIC government skip quote consequences such as how the diminished material prosperity caused by. The shutdown actually decreased our health and safety over the long run unquote if we bear witness to the suffering of America's small businesses and share stories about them. Perhaps the worst can be avoided. These businesses are counting on us without pressure. Government will not yield and once thriving businesses will be cruelly destroyed. Small business owners who serve US buying themselves imperil. We can tell their stories. Boudreaux writes that quote. Infantile government is hero. Stories are easy to follow the win large audiences in quote and then he continues quote. We must challenge with better stories that cartoonish tales that are now spreading byerly and that threatened to become a calamitous actual pandemic in quote. The edgewater is not uniquely deserving. There are many many edge waters yet. There's a story I can tell now you must tell. The story of the small businesses use support their future and America's future depends on our decision to bear witness. And that's the end of the article. Isn't that a great article? I found a lot of resonating information and a wonderful spirit in that article and that is why I wanted to share with you. I am certain we can all think of one two or a dozen small businesses that are equally frustrated by the intervention of governmental authorities. Were isn't really needed business owners. Who did nothing illegal? Immoral or inept business owners to employ the members of their community pay taxes upon Texas upon Texas received little or no bailout money Adler and yet are on the front row for being harshly punished and not properly represented. What can we do to help them to? Which can to support them as wet. Can you still afford to utilize them? If so then by please by all means vote for the small business with your wallet. Are you on a tight budget yourself? Perhaps you've been followed. Nadal out of money left for whatever reason one of you is still working. The other one in your household is not then please by all means offer to share their website. Upper share their story off participation their social media posts comment on their posts and leave in encouraging word. Give them a five star review from Prior Service. You experienced or just stop in and volunteer to help for a few minutes. Anything that you can do for most of the small businesses is precious at this time. Sometimes the best thing you can do is just stop in and say what what can I do to best help you? And then listen. They will tell you what they need. Maybe you're studying graphic artist and in no time flat. You could make them a few social media posts. What a great gift that would be. I would take that. I would love that. That is like I stink at that. But what else can you do to help them? What can we all do? We can put our shopping where our beliefs are for everything possible. You could avoid the big corporate companies for awhile shop local. Don't wait for Small Business Saturday to shop. A small business make every day. Small Business Saturday and shopsmall as much as possible for those that are truly struggling and their tourism affected. Maybe you could take a weekend at their place. Take a cottage. Take a vacation from your house and go and stay at their house. Maybe you could buy gift certificate anything you can do to help out so long as it does not break your personal budget. Of course I'm not talking about doing something crazy talking about doing something with money you were going to spend anyway in now if you've got a local farmer. A local market a local produce Margaret a local butcher A local hardware store any and all of the things that used to make main street America. Mainstream America go there instead. Walmart has been feeding at the trough being in essential businesses entire time. It's time for somebody else to get a term. It's only right as small businesses. Please do email me and grab those free ideas. Y Well a lot of them. Were resonate with your business. Will single idea on that list work for every single business. No they're generic. They're meant for all small businesses. Not Specifics if you need specifics for your small business send me an email. It's what I do at done. Several proposals for small businesses lately. How can you get your feet back under you? How can you get moving? What can you do in these last couple of weeks or the next couple of weeks to put yourself back on the map? This is not the time as a small business owner to sit in your company. Was she cheer and Binge Watch TV? This is the time for you to be reviewing your strategic plan reviewing your marketing. Double checking cleaning doing everything you need to do. In order to try to reopen. We had a small business in our community that put out the word that they were going to have to close. The pandemic had shut them down. They weren't considered essential. They had a beautiful facebook. Page a lovely website and ability for people to order online and only took a few people within the social media network to share their sights share their plight and before they knew it they were overwhelmed with orders and they posted a picture of packages that were filled and addressed and waiting for the man and the ups man and the Fedex me to or women whoever the driver to pick up packages and take them to their desired destination. And they're in one. Small Business was rescued. So if everyone works together and you can use your fingertips. Use Your Laptop. Use Your smartphone. And if you're like me Your Old Dragon. You use the computer. That's on your desk. 'cause it's still your favorite and it still works. It's not broke. Don't make me fix it. It still works when it doesn't work anymore. I'll figure out the answer them knock on wood. Oh dear but really truly you can without much effort utilize all the small businesses in your area and the small businesses. That are just outside of your area. You'd be surprised what you can get if you just take a little Sunday afternoon drive. We used to that before there were so many gazillion entertainment things to do. You can still do that again. There's nobody in your car but you and your family. I think it could still go for a Sunday afternoon drive. Go and look and bind. What's out there you know and see what the small businesses look like. Who looks like they're struggling? Who's open? Who can use and let your fingers to the searching? You can do it. Just go look for small businesses in your area and you probably already now some people in your area so what I want you to. I want you to join me in shopping. Small as often as you can wherever you can because some of our corporations pay so little in taxes and take millions and millions up to billions in revenue out of our communities every year but do those same corporations funds literally to the managers of those corporations and their children. Do they attend your schools? Do they pay property taxes to support your schools? Do they attend your place? Where ship or your community center activities? Let's keep our stated priorities in mind as we head out the door to restock our own pantry because the small business you save may be run by the person who helps you save your small business. I want to once again. Thank Barry Brownstein for the well written article and for the permission to share with you guys. Today I couldn't have written it better myself and it was so well written with such a great example and said empathy for the plight of that small business. So do what you can do. Speak up speak out shopsmall and I know this shows a little short compared to the ones we usually do. But that's Okay. The message has been given. If you're a small business owner any need help email me. Rc Many coach at g mail dot Com. And if you haven't visited the new website please support me. I'm a small business to visit. The website are coach. And yes I have made a brand new course for you. The ten day fast start and if I get enough small business owners the send me an email and ask for one. I will make another one just for small businesses. Because you know the finances and the INS and outs of running a business or a little bit different than the finances and INS and outs of running a family business or family a household right until next time remember they always tell you be grateful and you will attract good things. I'm Rhonda Cobb coach. I love having you here.

Small Business business owner Maine America Jane Jacobs Governor Mills US Acadia National Park Berry Brownstein Dot Com Rhonda Cup Don Boudreaux Bar Harbor Maine edgewater motel Barry Brownstein New England David Heke
Podcast: The Glory of God's Creation--and America's National Parks

The BreakPoint Podcast

38:53 min | 1 year ago

Podcast: The Glory of God's Creation--and America's National Parks

"They've been called America's best idea. And now on the other side of the coronavirus lockdown the reopening for eager visitors, America's sixty two national parks preserved forever some of our continent's greatest natural treasures from mountains and canyons to coral reefs and ancient forest, there truly a lifetime worth of beauty and wonder- to explore, but do we really appreciate what we have here on this continent. Have we fallen in love with the way the Psalmist and the prophets and himself were plainly in love with creation and do. Do, we see nature and our role in it rightly through the binoculars. You might say of a Christian worldview. I'm Shane Morris and joining me today is a pastor who unquestionably fallen in love with nature, and whose youtube channel has become a hub for exploring and celebrating America's national. Parks Randy Smith is senior pastor at grace. Bible Church in Allenwood New Jersey and the cameraman and adventure behind the America's National Parks Youtube Channel Randy welcome to the breakpoint point podcast. It's a pleasure to have you. It is a blessing to be on the show I. WanNa just sit back and listen to you after that introduction. That was fantastic. Thanks I mean it's. Based on watching some of your videos, and seeing your obvious enthusiasm for nature, and for the National Park System, I mean it just mirrored so much of the feeling. I have toward the natural world, and toward you know the idea of creation as opposed to just naked nature. This is not something that just happened. This is something that's put here for us to enjoy to cultivate admire randy. What sparked your fascination with America's? National Park System. I get that question. Often actually it goes back to probably the early eighties I was just getting into high school as my cousin Kyle was finishing up college anyone on this incredible road trip and he took some buddies with them, and they visited the national parks, and that was probably my first exposure to the national parks. What I saw what he did. I saw the pictures that he. He brought back, and he showed to me, and that whole idea about going out and seeing the diversity of America. This was before I was even say it really piqued my interest so on my first trip probably back in ninety five a year. I got married and I. Don't know if you're married. Shane you have kids, but there was about a fifteen year law of National Park Adventures. Married and I have three kids. Doesn't apply as much as I can. Say to go the national parks from kids a little I said we went to the park across the street. About exactly but I just said it's something that I really found interesting. I was thinking of that great quote. Bike, Eric Little, the track athlete right that said God made me fast, and when I run I, feel his pleasure, and I experienced that right away so I one of my first trip in ninety five, a believer that point and I just felt God's pleasure i. I felt like I was in my environment, I felt like I was in God's world, seeing him in a way that I never experienced before. And then you know you kind of back it up a little bit, and as you go through life, you start realizing you need to develop your priorities default out who you are. What's important to you? Were your gifts are how? How God has made you different from other people what God has called you to do, and that is a responsibility Shane, as you know a Christian, we have continually to be examining ourselves and making sure our life is lining up with God's direction for so the National Park thing really to go back to your question kind of fit into that and I always see it. It as is for all of us as believers. God is of course on top of the pyramid is not part of the pyramid. He is the pyramid, and all things are done for him and then low. That is family of course number one, and then my career and church light, but as a pastor those merge together quite a bit and then below that i. Have found out my identity, instead of doing a lot of things doing a few things, and doing well and I have a quote. Ministry of Christian Quote Ministry called grace quotes. I enjoy exercising and I enjoy the national park, so it just became something that I I viewed were I cannot connect with my family going up that pyramid if that makes sense, but also having that permit terminate with God's glory so I- -Ccomplish God's glory. Czar deliver God's glory while. While ministering to and creating memories with my family, doing something that I enjoy doing and to me, that is like the best of all worlds, so you know what's important for us a year from now one hundred years from now thousand years smell and it's investing in other people worshipping God because really that's all that matters when it's said and done, those are the things that are eternal and the national park. Eventually going more specifically really accomplishes that former. Will. You've got a bunch of videos up on Youtube. Just exploring the national park system QNA's with union daughters talking about the parks that you visited your favorites. You have like a top ten list where you go through the best national parks in the country and I was really happy to see that dry Tortuga, national park down in the Florida keys made the list. You'll be shocked to know that I'm a lifelong Florida resident except for four years in Virginia but I've never been to dry TORTUGA 's I've been to the keys. It really enjoyed. It done some scuba diving. Diving there, but I'm sort of a west coast Tampa Bay boy and my family always went vacation down in Naples, Fort Myers area and Santa Bella, and so it was that was our local hang out, and it was really quiet, and it wasn't as glamorous as the keys, but we really enjoyed it, so I've got to get down there. Though to Fort Jefferson and dry Tortuga, because it looks absolutely spectacular and I'm just touched as a Floridian as a Florida man that you would pick that top of your list even after all those beautiful national parks. Out West. That one real fast. When I did that I was at top fifteen for me. Because I love the park so much, you can't really rank them. They are also different. Diverse they're all beautiful? So it's hard to put them in proper order side base that list upon personal enjoyment, so I'm not saying. Dry Tortuga two necessarily more is grander than the Grand Canyon or Yosemite or yellowstone. Upon joint that not to swallow for that might want to watch the video that came in at number one. If you saw that I took some flak from people out there like the wrong with you, so I'm glad to hear. I have a kindred spirit that supports because we went there and we had. A loved there. I've heard the stars are just incredible like gob smacking. Lee incredible out there. Absolutely. Absolute- You mentioned for Jefferson. You've got the history there. We went out to the remote island called loggerhead key basically had the whole. Caribbean islands ourselves for scornfully and then we'd Smet. We camped out on garden key. which is the main key there with a Ford is? Everybody laughed at me, had not to ourselves for three nights as well. We had a great time. There was a lot spectacular randy. How does time in creation change I? Think there's a change that comes over us and sort of a recalibration when we get out and we you know commune with God's creation. We see His majesty reflected around us. What do we discover in the overwhelming off both large and small scale wonders in nature? Great Question I think what happens is when we get out in nature. We realized that life is bigger than we are, and we'll be getting out in creation. I used that word almost always when I speak in my videos that I talked about creation. It's nice to see a lot of Christians. Pick up on these things when they watched the videos that we see that things are bigger, and it's not just the things are bigger, and the world is bigger than me and my problems, but really points to God that is bigger because all creation as we know, is there to reflect God's glory, and the more I can immerse myself in creation the more as a mirror. Call this general revelation, right? To the greatness of God, we can even talk about that some more as well so we see God and I. Think the way you said it was well put. It resets our life. It gets us back to putting things in perspective. We have a tendency even has believers to just really think too much about ourselves. Tried is our biggest weakness. It's the root of all of our sin. It's that love affair of self, and where we can get out and creation. We realize that I shouldn't think of myself more than I am. I shouldn't think of myself less than I am because again. Again, we are the apex of God's creation. We are the masterpiece in that sense of God's creation. Human beings are beautiful, but I just need to think of myself less in a census, the art of self forgetfulness, so just thinking of need less and creation really does reset that for all of us, and it gets my mind off of me, allows me to use the word recalibrate and understand that my priority is God. I am just a small little microcosm on this universe when you consider in a perspective, but yet one that God loves me so much that he would send his. His Savior to die for me, and when we really understand that from a biblical perspective, it puts us where we need to be in life, and we'd share that it seems like all the rest of this world then chases us back well, it sharpens the paradox of the incarnation, even because you mentioned how God came as a man to die for us in the person of Jesus, Christ, and yet this is the God who created the universe. This is the God who intimately governs the affairs of the Andromeda Galaxy and here we have him just extravagantly expressing grace for us through this in. In this tiny little place we call earth in that tiny little country recall Palestine I. Mean it's amazing. It's sharpens at. It doesn't dull it, randy I find an of course when you think about even in the Old Testament job what has gone do when he wants to humble a man of recalibrate his perspective on his own sovereignty, he gives them a tour of Nature Joe. Ms Per you know when God starts talking. It's pretty much a tour of nature. It's all the the weather and the animals, and the the monsters of the deep end job at the end of it says. I repented sackcloth, ashes, dust and ashes I didn't know what I was talking about. ECLIPSES hands over his mouth, because of creation because of what God has expressed, and then said I'm lord of this all these monsters, the answer to me. They're my pets. I find that not only does nature ground me, but it sort of resets my clock as if I'm moving too quick. What's going on here? Do you think technologies playing a role and distorting our internal rhythms as human beings? I, do I do I think we are going way too fast? I think this endemic has taught us that slowing things and being less involved in so many things has actually done good for ourselves and our families, a technology, obviously with all the notifications that were getting involved on different social media platforms are vying for attention and getting the priority Shane of our attention as well. I've been around. People with their phone is dinning every fourth sentence? We need to get away from that need to excuse ourselves those things. It'll be just on on silent here roof. We don't. Hitting. Absolutely you know. God has given us. Let's go back to creation. He's given us. General revelation, and we say that that is seen conscience in Romans too, but enrollments wanted talks about creation as well that creations dare that God's invisible attribute that God's divine perspectives at all that God is is eternal. Power is divine nature had been seen and the way Paul puts it. It's interesting is it is clearly seen even for the unbeliever, so you know we think about the solemness that said only the foreign heart says there is no god that. Air? And when our eyes are opened by the grace of God, and we are enlightened by the spirit, we see creation in a much different way than we ever did before, and again it goes back to that mirror that is showing us. God's amazing grace shows us guts beauty. God's wisdom God's Power God's incomprehensible nature. All these things are reflection back to who got. Is you think there's something in the natural world and creation that Christians can see or at least admit they're seeing that someone who's a non believer or even the secularist or an atheist can't see? Yeah I. DO I do I think it goes back to again? Romans one that all people without excuse. What is Paul also saying that tax that people are suppressing God right and I was compare that. When I preach China passage like that to someone holding from the East Coast that live about half a mile from the ocean, holding a beach fall under the water. You got to work hard to keep it. It down right the pop up and that's where you see so much. In Society of any time, there's anything related to Jesus or God talk. Raping the world just jumps on that so quickly you wonder. Why is there such a hatred? We live in an age shane of tolerance. We need to accept everybody's opinion, but the moment anyone starts going down the God road. You just see the here on people's. They can up. Why is it because it's that desire to suppress the truth and unrighteousness and creation Psalm nineteen one is declaring. The glory of God when we go outside, it is impossible to look around or even just look at you, said you have a shoulder to see the birth of a child, and say you know what it all just evolved. It's impossible I. Mean I was talking to? My kids recently went on a nice hike at the Delaware water gap. We did the Pennsylvania side which is mount. MINCY hiked to the top when the tallest peaks there and. And it's just an opportunity kind of deuteronomy six opportunities. My children to say look at this guys. How design of this leaf just evolve? How could evolution produce the diversity of colors that we explore? How can we see the vast mountains be at these small microscopic bugs at the same time I mean the colors to beauty everything and all working in harmony and symmetry with each other. It's amazing that there's a gun out there, we say. We don't have enough faith to be atheist. Because when we open our eyes, and that's why Paul says that all people are indeed without excuse because you go out, and there's clearly a beautiful intelligent designer that made these things in creation. Does that for us? It is a testimony to got is and that's why the world as we know. It's accountable to God. Even when they haven't heard the Gospel because general revelation, declares God's glory, and speaks of who he is. Of course we come in with special revelation to share truth as to the good news about Jesus Christ and how he died for our sins, and if we see him on the basis of faith. Faith that he saves us by grace, but it does speak, and it does show us God and that's the beauty of Christian. We go outside that we can see these things and see God in the midst of them. Would just the fact that we look at creation in recognize beauty I mean there was a new. York Times article last year. At some point, we did a break point on it, and it was about the extravagance of beauty and detailed this new school of evolutionary thinking that says well you know what beauty did not necessarily evolve to, and again I'm I'm slipping into evolutionary way of thinking and speaking here for the sake of argument did not. Not necessarily evolve for the sake of survival. There's too much extravagant beauty beauty that doesn't even serve an obvious survival end in birds and butterflies and plants, and and all these living things so therefore there must be some other selection mechanism, and they talked about sexual selection where females of a lot of species just like pretty guys, you know they like does see those extravagant feathers and those crazy colors, and all that good stuff, but we took it in a different direction. We said that well, you know we're assuming that all this beauty is designed for you know the other birds, and the other insects and whatnot, but what if it's designed for? Our is what? What if it's designed for the image? Bearers who are here to behold God's beauty intended and stuart it. That's a really compelling argument I think. The extravagance of beauty is an underserved and powerful argument for the design of everything. Randy ownership gears here for second, because you've done so much exploring in America's national parks and one of the things that you note several of your videos is that this tree or this set of geysers or this particular mountain range is unique in the world. There's something here. That is truly special about the American continent. We have some treasures that no one else has what are a few those treasures that we just gotta see as Americans. You know it's funny. I get comments a lot of comments. I try to answer all my comments, the best of my ability, but get a lot of comments international folks. And frequently. It's like I can't wait to visit. America or you got so blessed to live in that country and I think you know I love the fact that people are into international travels. I think that's great I'm not trying to knock that, but I think I get concerned when people are talking about the international travels when they're missing so much beauty, right here in America and have that diversity, I mean you're from Florida it an amazing tropical zone down there. She get down to the everglades as long as it's there until the pythons destroy it that is, but that's an incredible ecosystem down there. That is unlike any part in the united. United States and then you can get over to you know big. Bend National Park in Texas in your down the right on the Mexican border in this era, rugged climate with a completely different appearance, and then head up to the black hills or head over to Acadia National Park in Maine and see mountains that come right up to the east coast, which you see nowhere else on the east coast, so no matter where you go, even Olympic National Park in Washington state. There's a rainforest there. No people don't know that, but we've been rain forest right here in America, so one of the world's only if not the only temperate rainforest right incredible. Mountains we got to oceans. We got the rivers. We have so many things here. We have the Great Plains that are beautiful in and of themselves. You know the whole. California region southern. Utah probably giving you more than you want here right now, but. One of my favorite locations, you have five it national parks right there in southern Utah. You could take a week vacation and hit all of them for the most part. Credible places and they're all in a sense diverse from each other and unique so yeah, I just think there's so much beauty right here in our country and I talk to people in America and most people in America in your outdoors guy, they'll tell you. They've never been to any national parks any of them and encourage people to get out I think the concern that people have is. It's hard to plan the trip and it really isn't just you know we have the Internet. Nowadays and everything you need is right there at your fingertips, so I'd encourage you to get beyond that, and then the expenses I mean Shane. Let's be honest here. I'm I'm a pastor with four kids and a wife. August well I mean the money's not. Now Rolling in here you know, so, I mean if we can do, and you seem the channel and how many trips we done. You've found a very inexpensive way to do it now. You have to rough it a little bit. You're not eating steak lobster of young, and you're not sleeping in a five star hotel. You're actually on the ground at its aunt, but it can be done at a very affordable rate now let me also mention this to kind of related that these trips on a personal level have done more for our family. On a personal level on a relational level on a spiritual level that anything we have done. These are what stick out in our minds. The day to day operations as much as we live every moment to the glory of God are wonderful, but the all kind of you'll see they blend together after many years, but when you can take daughter and hiked the top of Half Dome A. Tell you what that's our greatest memory that we have or different daughter height to the top of Mount, Saint Helen's now these are extremes. You don't have to go to that level, but the things that we are doing as a family are creating our best memories together, and only the best memories but I think the greatest stimulus to family dynamics, because you are forced to be together sometimes in a tent for six to eight days. You're forced to be in a car together for a long time and when we say no electronics. There's nothing left to do but communicate and when you go to those tough situations, learn how to for Bayer be patient with one another. Be Kind to one another. How about even a First Corinthians nine? When you do these hikes that we do really discipline your body? You know that is an art of living. Have your mind discipline. Your Body and control your body in always tell people if you can't put down the bag of Doritos, he I can overcome that sexual temptations. Experience right right you do grant game. You've all my linen. A mile out of the Grand Canyon. Your body is saying I. Just want you have to discipline your body because you can definitely do it if you mind tells your body that I'm in control. Now you are and we'll stop when I feel like stopping so all these factors are things that people oftentimes don't think about. It's not just going out and having a good time. That's true, but there's many more things after you know. We've been married twenty five years now. That we've seen develop with our family over these national parks reps that have really helped our family dynamics and created greater unity and cohesiveness as a family. Folks my guest. Today is Pastor Randy Smith host of the Youtube Channel. America's parks. We'll get back to pastor Smith in just a moment for the past couple of months the Colson. Center and breakpoint have pivoted offer even more equipping content help listeners like you respond to and make sense of the world around us from our online event. Truth love together to free webinars with cultural experts like Ed. Stetzer Andy Crouch. We hope that you've been encouraged by these resources. If you'd like to show your support, please make fiscal year end gift before June thirtieth. You can give at breakpoint dot org slash equipping. With you right up until you said the thing about turning off electronics in the car during long road trips, I can't survive without the electronics distracted we the digital sedation for the kids at least in the car, so we got that we got one of those little TV's. It comes down from the ceiling in the mini van and they can be transfixed for hours by that, and it gives us so much piece, but I totally agree with you. My friend of mine actually calls time in nature a necessary nutrient. He says it's something that you as a human being just need. Need in order to be in a good state of mind, but it seems like especially these days with the proliferation of electronics with our kids and I said that as a millennial who has very young kids. They're already hooked to the Electron Ix. It's like a drug. How do you peel them away from that with your kids? You've probably had a situation where they've just been raised in the park system in nature. But how do you peel kids away from that and get them to take their necessary nutrient? You know to really begin to fall in love with time in creation. I don't WanNa. Come off as the guy. That's not the answer that does this. We are far from rainy. Smith has all the answers folks so implement them. Take note and I would say that when our kids were young, there are times, and maybe people disagree with it where there's nothing better than putting the video and just Kinda you let him chill out, and maybe let mom and dad chill out a little bit more as well so right I don't want to paint that picture, but as they get older and we really like I said we didn't do a lot of the trips when they were young. There are some inherent dangers. It just don't appreciate it. They'd rather go to slide then geyser at yellowstone, so I'm not going to take them. Three thousand miles away when I can take them across the street, so they get older and older now we're developing some more self. Control would developing more disciplines and lessons for life better applicable as you get older as a young adult and part of it. Let's just be very blunt. It's apparent saying it's not happening. You know it's not happening. Put the phone down I'm the MOM I'm the dead? We're the ones in authority. We know what's best. Not You and we're going to have a good. Good time without electronics. You know I didn't grow up in your generation. I grew up. We didn't have electronics. I mean the the coolest can. The block was the kid that like his dad bought a VCR. You know and everybody would watch the two movies that they bought on it. That's all you had. This was pre cable television. This is how old I go back. You want song. You GotTa wait for it to come on the radio and then popping the tape really quick and hit record. November that hard. To get up and turn the channel on the television set. We're talking. No. But I mean it's like it's our job as parents to set the rules and to not let the kids leave the family, our job as parents to lead the family and to do what's best. They might not get at the time, but that doesn't matter because they didn't get when I told them, they need peace for dinner or not ice cream. Though it just, this is part of life know this is part of them trusting their parents in having made good decisions for them. Them that a proven to be faithful and now when they're thirteen years old, and mom and dad say you know what we're GonNa put the phone down for a day or you know we'll give grace maybe a half hour at the end of the day you can get on and texture friends and some pictures, but we're going to put the falls down and we're. GonNa make sure that we have without any distraction concentrated family time together, or we can really talk to each other. A funny story! We weren't Acadia my daughter. An acadia national park in Maine great great place. Actually my wife and I did a honeymoon there. So that tells you a little bit about. Was that number two on the list in National Park, my wife. No, I watched. An? No No, no, no okay. I meant the National Park. Was it number two or three on the? The county was like around me there. You got me well. The number number six number six. Okay, that's right. Yeah, it looks like a beautiful place I haven't been I've never been to Maine, so it's just spent a week. There are still find new things to do, but we were at a restaurant. My daughter irrational, having dinner, and I look over. And I see a family that are praying at the tape on data into kits. First of all, you rarely see teenager still hanging around with their parents, so that was encouraging to me. And we live on the boardwalk. Right by the beach there and you always see everybody together, but you never see teenagers hanging out with the folks there. This is something that. We're really pleased with that. Our Children's still want to hang out with us or that. An old man like me still wants a daughter that enjoys being with her dad and going away in a nice one on one trip. Sean and Acadia and look over and I see a family to kids, Mom and dad heads are down the prayer table. And I taught my daughter on the shoulder. I said look at that that that encourages my heart. That really encouraged smart and we're talk. I look over and they're still praying and others. You know you believe it. There's usually just said that guide of how long ago with a prayer before the meal you know and they exceeded it. And like you're still praying over there. Wow, they must be really spiritual now. Look a little closer and they're all on their cellphones. Now island miserable. If they were probably texting each other at the table, but guys. Down and Our world is so busy so little time to spend together when we do get these opportunities maximize that time and make the most of the opportunity. And don't just have the small talk. Get into actual communication. Share your thoughts sharing your feelings sharing your beliefs, and when you spend the concert, it's hard to just grab a kid and have a deep talk, but when you're spending a week together, the opportunities present themselves a lot easier, and you kind of loosen up around each other little bit more were now you can have deeper conversations, and this is our job as parents to Kinda probe into their hearts, and talk to them and disciple them in these situations and again i. don't WanNa. Make more out of it than it actually is, but these trip Shane have done so much for us in that regard. Yeah I've heard much the same from parents on the other side of. Raising teenagers where they say that the things our kids look back on the most. Are these intentional trips? Were we just said you know what we're GONNA? Stop trying to do everything right at home every single day. We're just GONNA have sometimes together. We're going to go places. We're GONNA. Put Work Aside, and whatever else needs to be set aside and just get out with the kids and spend some time with them and those moments when they always look back and they remember them and I look back on my own childhood, and I see the same sort of thing. Thing where my dad and I get together and there's hardly time we get together when we don't talk about that time that we went to the national forests in California that right new acidity there, where we did a summit adventure trip and camped on the edge of a cliff for a few nights, and then swam in this really really cold lake with a name. I can't repeat on and the Christian podcast, and it's just amazing experience, and it really told me wordlessly how much I meant to my dad and how much he was committed to spending time with. With me, the he wasn't out. You know just having fun by himself. He wanted me to be there. He wanted to spend those few days with me and then have spiritual reflections on the way talk to us for a second here we're. We're coming up on the end of our time, but about conservation, many ecology a little bit because those are sort of dirty words, a lot of times in Christian circles right those of us who are very conservative on our politics wonder well. Is this a power grab by the government? What is it that the Christian should? Should think about ecology about preserving the natural world is part of our world view. Yeah, well, my perspective on that is I think we have both as unbelievers and believers. We've aired on both sides. We've gone to extremes. You hear a lot of Christians that because there is such a love for mother Earth Herb Day and the worship of Earth by an unbeliever that we have to let the pendulum swing so far the other way that we don't realize that we have a responsibility as God's creation as a sense, the Apex God's creation due to effectively stewart creation. And I don't want to worship nature, but I see nothing wrong with protecting and preserving nature. And see nothing wrong with cleanup days you know I swim in the ocean by my house, and it is a lot cleaner now than it was when we first moved to. New Jersey twenty years ago and that is a result of regulations at now again I know. There's Liza across with that, too so let's not go to extremes here and people that. That have gone out and made uppers to clean up the beach and cleanup Groshans and I'm benefiting from that I'm benefiting from the people like Teddy Roosevelt and the John Yours out there that have gone before us. It said you know what they want to develop. These lands your Florida Guide Biscayne. Bay is a good example. They wanted to develop those islands. Local community got up a grassroots effort the way I understand it and they say we gotta protect this and they did and I've been to Biscayne. Bay twice incredibly beautiful area. I'm thankful for those efforts I'm thankful for some regulations that allow us to do. These kind of things I'm glad that we can still experienced the wildlife and the animals. They're introducing the wolves now I believe back into yellowstone. Yellowstone and these are all. I think good things. We can go too far with them but I. See nothing wrong with being a good steward i. think that is our responsibility to be a good steward of creation. We are called to work the field so to speak, and that is our responsibility, but yet with that said I think we can go too far and begin to worship creation as well. And that's where it ends. Our desire for creation does not terminate on creation. Our desire for creation is to terminate to God and creation then becomes a window for us to see God and to see his invisible attributes as we talked about. It's like Lewis said in surprised by joy that if you focus on the thing that's bringing you joy this, reminding you of the great joy, for which he recreated then it's GonNa Become A. A source of idolatry destruction in your life, it's no longer going to be reflecting that joy, because it was never the source to begin with. It was only reflection of that joy, and that's what we find in nature. They will let you down. It will let you is. That's not how we are wired got an hardwired us to find our joy nature. Of many Erga boy, our joy in God. And you something else. Quick had an Orlando time, but I've enjoyed is there are things that I can do with my youtube channel to really boost my subscribers I? Know what I could do and I could just present the videos a lot differently. I can make them into almost if you WANNA go here, here's the things you need to see under the travel documentary to give you. The facts for people that would be would be travelers to go to a specific location and I've been tempted and sometimes I do that. That but I've been tempted to go the hold bag because I've really kept them personal because when I get that those channels don't get our people writing and saying you know what I really admire the relationship you have with your children. You've taught me lessons about God that I've never understood before. You've given me a desire to go out and explore creation and explore it with the people I love the most and begin creating those memories, and and I see the relationship that you have with your children because we do. As well as you see, and it's like that doesn't just come when you go to a park you on that. Sing Down with them as we pull the cameras. Okay now I know we can't stand each other, but let's put on a good show for the video year. You see there is genuine, and that comes I'm sure you and your wife retreat and your children this way these are years of building those relationships, and this is the overflow. This is the result of all those years of discipleship and investment and Love, and pouring into these kids that God has blessed us with these souls, and it's neat to see it. Come Out, and it's neat to see people see that comment on that and be inspired by that you know our church is a good size, church and pastor. It's hard for people to get. Get to know me personally, but they can watch these videos and see a side of me because I'm just a normal guy that they're like a like that guy. He's a guy like us. He's got like us. That makes mistakes knows how to laugh at himself has just doing his best to raise his family in the way that he sees washable, so it's neat to see how it started with. Just love the Americans Clark's, but it's blossoming things so much greater than that, and that's where I find my greatest satisfaction with the Youtube Chow. My guest today has been Randy Smith a pastor, dad and adventurer, and the guy behind one of the best outdoors channels on Youtube. It's an exploration and celebration of America's National Park System. If you WANNA check him out, just come to breakpoint dot. Org will link to his channel, or you can go right to youtube and look him up there. We'll folks. That's where we initially concluded our podcast, but I accidentally forgot to stop recording and Pastor Smith and I started talking about scuba. Diving Florida, which is where I live, and the beautiful natural springs here with his permission I want to share with you that part of our conversation because Pastor Smith Hits on a beautiful point as wonderful as creation is promised something even better, so here's pastor. Randy Smith again. I got a buddy. I connected with an youtube. He's got a nice channel -TUNI-. Lives in Florida and he has videos of the Florida Springs. Those Chris told. You done some diving kept secret. That's where I learned to dive. They look. Like two hundred feet, visibility on a good day and many of those springs. It's just like crystal clear water. It's so clean actually you can once you get down into that area. Where there's you know. There are people sitting there, peeing or something. You can just drink the water like there's this area called. Rainbow River a little bit north of me and we like to go there. There a couple times a year, but there are vents all throughout the river where the water just coming out your in filtered from the limestone layer under the state, and you can swim inside the vents. You can snorkel and hold your breath, and they're going this little cave and people got their initials inscribed on the sides, but it just crystal clear, and then there's a river of. Grass I forget what it's called, manatee, grass, or something like that on the bottom the whole thing, so it's like Turquoise water with the swaying bright green grass at the bottom and I always look at it and I said that's what the river of life at the end of revelation looks like. That's what it's. GonNa! Look like in the new Jerusalem when we see that flow in from the throne. Isn't that NEAT? That's another interesting conversation. Because how much of what we see here is a foretaste of glory oh absolutely. Feel like a lot of what we I think. Lewis made a quarter on these lines that I think it was even just mentioned to that so much of what we here. Never reaches its fulfillment here. It almost shows that there's needs to be a greater fulfillment in the future and I believe so strongly when people talk about having like I. Know if I really wanted to go there. It sounds like you know even if you played golf for ten thousand years, it's going to get bored after awhile even if there's no sand traps. You're not but here we have giant alligators wander randomly across the golf course, so that keeps. It really makes steam that that's not. That's what I think is going to make heaven so amazing. We know it's going to be beautiful, but the filming of those things and how many of those things we see here on earth are just like a small tastes like you know you like that experience. You like feeling. You have when you're with your wife. You liked that when someone gives you a nice compliment, you like the beauty of the seagrass that you talk about. These are just a foretaste of what you'll be experiencing with God and glory and I. It really seems like when we get there. We're GONNA. Look back and say yeah. This is nothing compared to what we're enjoying up here right now. But I kind of been getting prepared for this in living my life, not just in the sanctification process, but also enjoying the creation that got given us. Not, to be too much of a Louis Nerd, but that's what he meant at the end of the last battle. When he talks about the I mean, he's not just being a blatant politeness there. He's saying that. The things we experienced in this world. If we love them, it's because they remind us just a little bit of the world that God made us for in the world that we will one day inhabit. And with that we'll wrap up this edition of the break point podcast. Thanks so much for listening. Please remember that our fiscal year end is fast approaching recently, we received this encouraging comment from Colson center supporter I appreciate organizations like the Colson Center and many others that are in the trenches, working to bring reason and respect back into the national conversation. If the cultural center has been a blessing to you as well, please make sure to give before June thirtieth at breakpoint dot org slash equipment. For. The COLSON Center I'm Shane Morris.

National Park America Youtube Florida shane Pastor Smith yellowstone Pastor Randy Smith National Park System National Park System Shane Shane Morris Paul Acadia National Park Maine East Coast Grand Canyon California WanNa Eric Little
Out of Chicago  IN-DEPTH!

This Week in Photo

30:45 min | 10 months ago

Out of Chicago IN-DEPTH!

"Folks. In this episode, I get to sit down with Mr Chris Smith, he's the brain behind the out of Chicago conferences. Able to the back to another episode of this week in photo. I. Am your host Frederik van Johnson today. I'm sitting down with my friend and fellow Chicagoan Mr Chris Smith Chris and I. Talk about the latest out of Chicago Conference and how that win is pivot virtual all that stuff, and then how how he's planning to move forward in the future amidst this whole sort of sea change in the conference space. Chris. Math. Welcome to the show man how you doing. I'm great. Thank you Frederick great to be here. Thank you very much. Is Good to have you on man I'm excited to chat with you for a lot of reasons, some of which will become clear during this conversation but Yeah, that's a cliffhanger. So. Say to chat with you so. For the folks that may not have heard of out of Chicago the conference, what is out of Chicago give us the quick. Elevator Pitch Origin Story of that conference. Sure. So out of Chicago originally was my blog like I think has been like eleven or twelve years now but eventually, we started doing conferences in Chicago. This would have been the seventh annual get together conference downtown Chicago where was this eighth year I don't know but but that was what we did for a long time and then. You know we've. Seen over the years that coming in person all the way to Chicago because people would come from around the country around the world to it that we found that it's better to go. To the destinations where people want to shoot. So we've started now our conferences are around the country we're going to MOAB and Acadia National Park this year and Death Valley next year. So all sorts of different places and really have gotten a little bit away from doing the downtown out of Chicago Conference. But this year we did it online instead and it was fabulous and basically the response we got from everybody was don't go back to how you did it before this is awesome that we can do it. In our pajamas from home, and then you know just just get to see all the general things because because originally the conference was kind of all different. Genres I mean you've been an instructor in the past and we would have portrait people Lindsay Adler, we would have people you know doing landscape we had kind of everything lots of street photography, and now instead it's like, okay, we're GonNa go to the botanic. Garden. And we're just GONNA do flower and garden photography or we're going to like I said, Acadia National Park and when we're doing. Landscapes in creative nature photography. So so that's kind of how we've changed. But yeah, everything's totally different for everyone now right. So yeah. So everything's really changed the last couple of months. Yeah, and it's sort of it's a I. think that change was coming anyway you and I've had offline conversations sort about the state of the of the photo conference in Education Online Education Industry and how that's converging and The old school conferences are the attendance was going to getting lower and lower, and now after this latest adventure with co vid Can't conferences are getting getting canceled and moving online much like yours did yours was able to pivot a lot easier than some of those bigger conferences in my from my external opinion. And you correct me if I'm wrong largely because you'd already built sort of this next generation conference that wasn't, Hey, come check out these massive array of boats that that people spend gazillions of dollars on. Downstairs go to the education. You're kind of flip that on its head. Can you talk about that a little bit sure. So I mean when we decided to run our first photography conference, we were running it and I had never been to a photography conference before I'm like, I don't know what would you do it a photography conference well, you'd go out and shoot. You'd get to hang out. With the you know all these people that you follow online, it's like a really great networking opportunity and yeah, we'll teach them classes too but it was really different especially like a set like eight years ago most places like you come you watch one lecture then stay in watch another lecturer then watch more and go home or whatever, and then go to the trade show or whatever. So What we built was really based around shooting, and so we did a lot of the street photography and the downtown architecture photography in Chicago but. But by switching it that way, it made it a whole lot easier to go virtual. Well, that's kind of ironic because we're doing the shooting but it we didn't have this huge big infrastructure behind. We're just a very small company. I have a few people to help me run it and they're awesome by the way and. Is. A great team that I have and and we were able to it was unbelievable when this all hit and we didn't cancel another conference. We weren't planning on doing this normal out of Chicago conference. We were going to do something that was just architecture. which we weren't able to do of course but. But instead. We said. We've got all these instructors. We had seventy instructors at the thing I said I've got a list of. All these people we could email them immediately, we can ask, Hey, do you WanNa do this while in the best part of it was that they were all stuck at home and so they're like, yeah, I got nothing better to do. So all these years. Yeah. All were like excited about it and I mean it was really it was really meant as something that we wanted to do. But it was also a benefit foot benefit for our instructors who had to cancel all of their workshops I mean, that's I mean that's their livelihood is going around the world teaching, and so we did this instead to help you know cover some of those costs for them that they that they're losing. So so we we just a matter of like five days we were able to we already know. How we do our websites, we've got already got the instructors. We've already got all their BIOS in their head shots and all that stuff, and so within like five days I emailed everyone they all said, yes, we'd love to do it. I emailed like seventy people thinking probably like forty will say, yes, I'm basically seventy said yes, and so it was like, oh my goodness we got everyone doing this and then we put it on the website and it was like five days later we announced it and we had people signing up like crazy so. We had. Yeah. So cool that is that is that's the classic. Here the story over and over again and Silicon Valley with these startups that are in the right place at the right time and you know they happen to have build this widget that the world has shifted in now needs that widget right and you're you and they're like, oh, I can't who? Can't believe the demand for this thing we can't keep up very, very similar in the case, the world pivoted, right? Yeah. Two years ago you and I talked I was thinking you know I want WanNa do like out of Chicago school but we're going to do all of our classes online similar what you're doing and it was like Oh man and so I was thinking about that and so I'd already thought through all the technology unlike, Oh, well, we'll just do this and this. And this and boom, which just had it some so very lucky. Really the most surprising thing of all of it was how it was received I mean I think we had more positive feedback from that event than any of the other events we've ever put on I mean normally it's like people are going crazy about it and then there's one or two people go. To whatever but. But people absolutely loved it like I said, they're like do not go back to the old method for this particular conference, and so we're going to offer these and we'll still offer our in person conferences. We're still going to run our conference in MOAB four able to this year in September and then in Acadia in October and with a smaller number of people. But I'm really excited about doing it that way. Oh Yeah. He's bringing up Moab you're on the website so. So I'm excited about that one. I mean the Moab one is all about astro photography, and so we're going to be shooting, Arches Canyon lands going out at night with these instructors. And so it's GonNa change a little bit from what you see on the website right now not everyone of these instructors is going to be coming and we're going to have a smaller number of people but I am really excited to try this out. We're going to do like a hybrid model like you and I talked about Frederick. So we're going to teach some of the classes online. We don't want to. We limit these to one hundred people though we still don't WanNA put one hundred people all in one room, and so we're. GonNa teach those big classes online but that means we're going to have so much more time to shoot out in the field and we're gonNA, have more time to do small group interviews, reviews, which we always do. But we'll have time to do all of that to do one on one sessions where you sign up with one instructor and work one on one against ask whatever questions you want. So I'm really excited to see how those go and maybe that'll be a model for us going forward that we can do smaller numbers and. And do it kind of a hybrid model I think. So I think that's the definitely you and I've talked. I. Think that's the way forward the in the middle of this this. Global uncertainty. I think the virtual model is, of course you know because without Virgil, you'd have nothing right now. Right. So Virgil is the way to move forward but I think part of the the seachange in the world when it comes to this kind of stuff is ultimately a hybrid model maybe even leading with virtual and for those that have the means and the fortitude to come to the live version there's something there for them. You know it's amazing. So I think you're you're ahead of the curve and you said, you said you, you said, you're you think you're. Lucky that that all this stuff went down I don't think he's luck. I think it's it's that old adage of fortune favors the prepared and the bold right so you were prepared we would definitely old. You gotta be bolted to dive in any. Any kind of thing that no one else has done before is you know requires a certain level of fortitude let's say. So let let's talk about that. Let's talk about the the conference itself right this last one that you just ramp one of the things that people love about these conferences. The A. The physical contact shaking hands with people saying hello talking to their favorite instructor maybe it's Lindsay Adler and saying Hey Lindsay I love your work. Hey, I'm having trouble with this thing right here my camera can you help me understand the inverse square law That kind of thing, how did you? How did that get replicated into the virtual world? How are you able to kind of quince that thirst? Can I just totally changed the topic which is when we had Lindsay Adler as one of our instructors used to teach physics, and so she's like Oh let me tell you about the inverse square law unlike. The physics teacher. Let's hear about the Inverse Square law. Boom boom, boom, boom boom, brattle it all off, and it was all right. I'm like that's pretty good. So. That's my. Lindsay. Adler story for the day. School Schoolteacher get schooled by Lindsey. Exactly. What what was your question? No was great. Did was a long question. So the differences between like replicating that that tackle physical experience in the workshops. And how that translate to the online world and inside of Zoom or whatever platform. Yeah. So I mean we tried to do as many things as we could to make interactive. We had parties we had small get togethers. We had instructors hosts like a small thing where okay. If you WANNA come and talk about infrared photography or whatever they would just do a small thing and the people would come to that and get to talk you know it's not hands on, but it's very just. One one to one or just a few to one you get to actually interact with them and their onscreen to. So they get this you know everyone sees each other it went pretty well. At the very beginning we have Bryant Peterson do our opening keynote presentation, which was fabulous. But when he did that presentation I'm almost afraid to say the story I'll say I'll said so. At the end of the presentation you know everyone's comment everyone everyone could ask questions in a everyone can get in there. We could bring a ten days on at any time like if we were right here on people were watching we bring them in and be like, Hey, what was your question? They could give it right there. But at the end of it, you know everyone was like that was amazing. That was great. Can't wait for the rest of the weekend and one personal is like I don't know it wasn't the best thing ever saw some kind of comment was like, oh, man. I. Can't believe that you would say that and to me it's like it would be what if we were in person like would you just stand up in the middle of the go I? Think it was that good. What do you guys think like? No no but so the next day I got on just like I am right now the next morning to kick the next next. Day off and I said, Hey, you know what this is we're here as a community You know welcome each other to help each other as much as we can, and you wouldn't say something like that in person and we're not GonNa do that here when we're at our events online and I got feedback afterward, one guys like I stood up in my chair I was clamping. Tell us. Yeah so I think the thing that was the biggest surprise was how? The energy that our team has still came across you still had some personal connections. But what was interesting for the attendees was that they could do a however they wanted they could be you know laying in their bed and just watch and not interacted all but the people that really wanted to interact they had ways to do that and really get in there and so that's what we're trying to foster when we do these types things. Yeah and that worries me too because you know we'll talk about this a little bit at the end you know I'm building this virtual conference that you and I are going to collaborate on. The one of the worries that I have is exactly what you said you know people people. Let's say they they. They grow a pair of whatever you know when when they're hidden behind their computer and the Internet. And they will say things like you said, they wouldn't ordinarily say to your face or in person in that worries me because the dirty little secret I think for a lot of online content creators we're human you know. An words hurt you know and if you say negative things does is not like, Hey, let me just send off this this. This hate-filled common, and then go eat a bag skills or whatever you know. It's like that actually goes to another human and impacts our day. I worry about that times at thousand or two thousand and three thousand or whatever. If if not that there'd be negative comments. But if you know there's a large contingent of trolls. Let's call him in there. How does that affect you like does that like did that one guy affect year the rest of your conference for you or was it after you made that little can't we all get along Spiel was Quashed after that. Well I mean it's a whole different thing when people are saying Chris Isaak. Take personally you know then so yeah. I go out of Chicago is Christmas very synonymous. Say that. I'm more just the custodian of the. Only. Thing. Sorry. My though so yeah, I just think that it's important with all the tools that you're gonNA have to use what this that that. Make It. So that people it's a personal thing that when they sign in their giving their real name, they're not just some random thing or they're not anonymous user logged in that that you know they they should have some. We should know who it is, and that's how we become part of the community together. So and most of the people, lots of the people that came to what are people have come to all of our things in the past and so. So they know how we run and. I kind of just like to think that. You know I try and always have a positive attitude filters down through my team that filters down to our instructors and there's a positive attitude. Everywhere we go and I think everyone picks up on that and some of the people had never been to our things when they first come in, they don't quite get that. But what's Nice is that so many of the people do and that really helps foster that. I'll tell other stupid story which is kind of like when I taught high school it's. Why am I telling all these things when I taught high school and I used to coach the Gulf team and so I was the golf coach so I'd get. Into my class they'd be like juniors and seniors like who's this guy or whatever you gotta be kidding me. Yeah. This is going to be terrible and I'd have one of my Gulf kids in the class and they'd be like Oh. No Mr Smith great coach Smith he's great and then the rest of the guys like okay. Cool. And it was like everyone's on board. So it's of the same thing you know what I mean like. Yeah you gotTa get a few people on your side and that helps everyone. You know I used to speaking of telling weird stories like that. So I used to as a kid I was into magic and sleight of hand and all that used to study at like reading these magic books and you know I learned one of the key techniques for like some magic tricks are having what they call a confederate in the crowd right? Someone who's right on the trick is someone who's in on the trick right. So how did you even mentally do that like okay hey, you in the middle. And then they just sort of play along with the gag to sell the rest of the audience and then everyone's entertained because it's all about entertainment. So yeah. Is Abbott inveterate there? To, let's let's leave the past in the past and moved to the future. So you're about to. Love. You've announced it yet but are you telling me what's coming up in the? We talk about Moab a little bit. But what's what's sort of the next step for the out of Chicago was called the franchise now? So. Yes. The in person things that we've got planned, they're still going to go they're going to be a little bit more hybrid. We're GonNa make sure that everyone's super-safe. But. Everyone in from the instructors to my team to all the attendees had such a positive experience with that I online conference, we're going to do a second one. But we're going to do a little different. We sent a survey out to all of our people asking you know, what did you really like and what could we do different to make it even better and the biggest thing that we got back was we want to go more in depth. Most of our classes were sixty to ninety minutes and it was like, okay this was kind of like the big keynote that they have given somewhere else or whatever and they did. It here which you know Kinda sidebar. That was really nice like if you didn't go to out of Oregon last year to see nick page talk all about how he does is amazing seascapes. Well, he did that presentation that out of Chicago live online and so everyone got to see that. But the feedback we got was we want to go more in depth we want to see all new content We want there to be even more interaction like we're talking about. And maybe time to shoot and get feedback on that and so that's kind of like. Well, how would you do that? It's online. So to do that, what we're GONNA do and it's going to be August twenty first through the twenty third that's the main conference weekend and we're GONNA we're going to pair up instructors so that two instructors are going to teach a big four hour block and really go in depth as a matter of fact, we're going to call it out of Chicago in depth and it's GonNa be. It's GonNa be all doing a deep dive on these things rather than just kind of you know this is kind of the basics really doing a deep dive and it's going to be all brand new unique content, and so the point is that those two instructors are going to work together and figure out how they work really really well together and. And make it awesome like that's cool Frederick. Is there like a person that you would work? Really well with you got to think about this we got have on, right would you be I would be honored to to come on? Yeah I think that's a really good idea to the the pairing piece of it because that's that's the nut right? That's the nugget that we're trying to crack, and that's that interactive piece of. That and how do you bring the interactivity and sort of hands on actually made myself a better photographer for having gone to that conference versus you know not to discount it but versus sitting and watching a powerpoint or keynote or even a screen share post processing demonstration you put the beginning of that in there I think that's brilliant. I'm excited and yes, live on or recorded on twitter I'm agreeing to come to Chicago. Good. Very. Good. I through the twenty third now people asking shoot also, and so the other thing we're going to do is we're going to give people some time after that, and then we're going to ask instructors to come back. Frederick doesn't know this and to do a quick image review. Afterwards. So go out and take those things you've learned, and then come back and those instructors are going to go over those images and say, yeah, this one, this is exactly what we were talking about. This really shows this this and this they're gonNa take like ten fifteen pictures from all of them that are submitted and then go you know these are a couple of things you could work on and make this even better and so so you're going. To have you're going to be able to learn something new, go out and try it near your home, and that's other thing is a lot of these things are all going to be about shooting you know not those grand landscapes not too many of us right now are going out to these places to get these awesome shots. But how can you get great shots just at your local forest preserve or your local botanic garden if it's all been and so So you go out and you do that you come back and you get. You get some feedback from from the instructors. So so that's how we're going to incorporate some shooting. We're kind of thinking about like what if you did the class and then we gave everyone three hours to shoot and then come back but it's like that's just a mad rush. So give some people some time and then come back and do feedback on it. That's the plan. Yeah. Do like scheduled feedback I. think that's great because a lot a lot of the conferences I've gone to. I call them the next generation conferences before the pandemic hit in all this the sea change. But like like, for example. Sue Bryson George SARANAC with the Portrait Masters Conference One. They had a whole area cordoned off the with instructors in there for portfolio reviews, and there were the cue to get into each one of those those instructors right? Because it's like the pinup demand to have people tell you. What's wrong or what's great about your work is there is palpable versus you know we're all working in these home. Office. Silos. And going out and shooting alone friends and family. They're always going to be gracious and like Oh that's great. You should make a career out of that but when it's a picture of your big toe or something, right Of, course, you need you need real feedback. That's great. Man That's that's great and you're doing it right right the whole the. Ask. You know the survey part of it, ask your base what they want, and then give it to them. Right period. That's that's the formula. Ask What would you buy if I was made this and then make it and then tell them you made it and boom. Article. Our goal even with. The in person ones has always been. You know let's make sure that when people come here that they're getting something, they couldn't just watch on Youtube. It's not just a bunch of presentations it's actually interactive. It's actually feedback on your work. It's actually shooting alongside these photographers and so that's kind of our challenges. How do you do that online? Through the screen that you would just watch youtube videos on, but we want to create something that's more than just you could watch it on Youtube and I. Think this is going to do it. I'm really excited about it. We've just started reaching out to instructors. And so we're really excited. We'll have landscape photographers will have some street photography we'll have flower and garden photographers. It's really meant for passionate enthusiasts. And there's a lot of pros that come to our thing too. But we're not teaching like wedding photography in the business of portrait's and how to do senior. We used to do some of that stuff with the out of Chicago Conference and it was like I'm not. I'm just not excited about that. So we don't do it. I kind of feel bad about that, and then it's like now we got the models and we got the makeup and we got all this and I was like Oh that's pain in the butt. So we don't do that. It's really for people that are just super excited they. They make photography a huge part of their life. It's a huge part of their creative life and we want to help do everything. We can to help them get the most out of that. I love that he were birds of a feather because. You, and I talked a little bit about the. Sort of foreshadowed it a little bit the. Photography Conference Center I'm putting together. Not a whole lot of detail on it to share right now there's a lot of detail all spreader can't tell all the secrets, but I can say that you and I are birds of. And that we're you know, this is a collaborative effort you know so. Be. You'll see out of Chicago and Christmas involved in this effort that I put together and I'm excited to do it because Leeann know like I said you or like you said, people don't want to sit through powerpoint people want interactivity people want a lot of the things that they can't get physical conferences and now it's sort of that nexus in time where people like you in. Hopefully me can can provide that and it's and I think both from a conference attendee standpoint. And the value that you could bring their as well as from a sponsorship standpoint you know, how do I get my brand in front of these people that are my customer base it just makes so much more sense to do it like you're doing it to do the virtual side of it and put them in front of those people, and then the last thing I'll say is targeting. Tacking away from the pro photographer segment, the wedding photographers the you know the the high highly paid new. York Studio for Tigers that's when you look at the pyramid, the pyramid the very tip is those people, the base and the mass of the weight of that pyramid are the amateurs in advanced amateurs that are doing amazing work but just need that encouragement and feedback and and all the stuff that you talked about doing. So yeah, I think you're exactly your train is exactly on the right track and it is going forward. and. It just really speaks to my heart. I feel the same way whether you're talking about golf and it's like I mean the most beautiful thing you could do is to be just a really good amateur Golfer. I'm not in it for the money I'm here because I love it and it makes me. Enjoy life and that's the same thing with photography and I think that. To me those are the the real photographers but those that's where it's really at is the people that do it because they love it not for somebody else and who wouldn't want that who wouldn't want to be able to go out and shoot exactly what you want to do and to be able to you know make a fulfilling life from that and yeah maybe then you gotta go back to work but. You know school schoolteacher Christmas knows that the definition Loosely of the word amateur is for the love of right. It's someone who does something not for the compensation for but just because they are compelled to do it because they love it, they're not getting paid for building a ship in the bottle with toothpicks. Doing it because they enjoy the heck out of doing that thing that's photography. And I remember going to some of those conferences whereas like okay I'm going to really figure out how I can make money shooting portraits maybe I'll do family portraits that'll be great and I went to a couple of I remember someone on a panel discussion pretty well known photographer going you know someone asking Oh what what do you like to shoot like when you go on vacation with your family and stuff like what do you like to shoot then and he's like Oh God. The last thing I'd want to do is bring my camera that would Oh, I got to get away from that and I can if I ever get to that point where I don't even want to do photography like I knew right. Then I'm like I just this maybe not the right path for me. Yeah. Yeah. That's that whole rich dad poor dad thing that that there's a book called rich. Dad Poor Dad I forget who writes a WHO wrote it But one of the things that I took away from that book in I think part of the book is based on that. It's the idea of the guy, the stereotypical guy or or or woman in the in their cubicle at work dreaming of their hobby they're their amateur thing right that they do after work they love doing it. Let's use that ship in the bottle think and then. Analogy, then they decide you know what I quit boss I'm going to go make an I'm going to make a living building ships in a bottle I figured out the Business Model I'm doing that, and then they don't realize all the other Kroft comes along with running a business and feeding your family and paying your mortgage and the pressure that comes from doing that being a professional ship in the bottle builder that and then they start hating building ships in the bottle, right? So the yeah. They start to resent in the end. You don't want to have happen with photography. You put a price tag out there. Now you gotTa do it. You can't just go grab the camera when you feel like blowing off steam, you gotta do it to feed the kids right? All right. It looks like the Gremlins have intervened in my conversation with Chris Smith. It looks like the power went out at his house. He's having some construction done on the house and. It looks like they may have Ted something they didn't have touched, and of course, dropped Chris of line. But I think we covered most of the topics I wanted to cover in that conversation. REMEMBER GO TO OUT OF CHICAGO DOT COM to get on the list and check out all the stuff that they're doing including this new conference that's coming up where he's pairing photographers together and building that whole out. Interactive. And feedback component that is going to be taking place August twenty first through twenty third twenty twenty. So go check that out. I will be speaking there as well. You saw him invite me. So, go check that out and we'll see. That's it. For this episode of this week. In photo I'm Frederik van Johnson was the next one.

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National Parks Trying To Get A Handle On E-Bikes

Environment: NPR

03:37 min | 1 year ago

National Parks Trying To Get A Handle On E-Bikes

"Get fast speeds even when everyone is online working to make WIFI simple easy awesome more at xfinity dot com restrictions apply this message comes from NPR sponsor xfinity some things are slow like a snail races other things are fast like Xfinity X. by for N._p._R. News I'm Marc Earhart the more juicy gives me as of now you can ride your bike in national parks across the country like models as cyclists who won a little extra boost continue to embrace them and it's that popularity that's pressuring National Parks to figure out whether to welcome or restrict them out of the different bicycle people that I trust and the resounding theme is it's inevitable quit fighting manufacturers are indeed racing to put out more and more e-bikes in national parks but he's against allowing them on mountain bike trails if someone lacks the physical prowess skill set to handle that providing the they're playing it safe for now we at this time don't have enough data to be able to answer the question isn't mountain bike different than a traditional mountain bike as far as impact on the trail or on resources bike shop owner Chad Mar and has no problem with people of any ability e-bikes electric assisted bicycles are popping up in many places including at national parks on roads and trails now some parts are struggling with how to regulate e he bikes on the rise even Chad Mart who doesn't want to see them on trails recognizes that he's fighting a losing battle eventually asked the opinion of Razer integrated into the bike frame and often hidden neatly away but start pedaling and you can feel the difference so the harder I pedal APP trails that aren't park roads where we think there should be more analysis at the impacts of these bicycles in Ohio Cuyahoga Valley National Park which sits between Cleveland and I'm an engine doesn't necessarily change those facts but Pete smock Ula who owns an e bike shop in Akron disagrees people who have different abilities will still there's Cuyahoga valley rolled out a draft policy allowing e bikes on roads and multi use paths but banned them outright on its mountain bike trails bark official Pamela Barnes said exp from member station W. K. 's you mark Erhardt reports it can be tough sometimes to tell an e bike apart from a regular road or mountain bike the motor and battery many parks were traditional bicycles are currently only allowed on park roads so in those situations adding electric bicycles there might not be a big concern for us like motor bikes were much heavier and that raises concerns speeds on a downhill with a heavier bike it potentially cause injury to the rider until the trailers Natalie Levin is with the National Parks Conservation Association but in a place like high hoge Golden Gate National Recreation Area Acadia National Park they look at a section of trail and go yeah I can do that or a can't ban or no ban mountain biker. Cody rider says e mountain bikes already on the trails anyway. I think it's a lot like cars you can also drive considerably over the speed limit to make it an unpleasant experience for everyone around you and unsafe for that matter to with the popularity rent there are miles of dedicated mountain bike trails and this trail here was not built with e bikes in mind Stephen Metzler heads the Cleveland Area Mountain Bike Association in says with the.

National Parks Cleveland Area Mountain Bike A hoge Golden Gate National Recr Ohio Cuyahoga Valley National National Parks Conservation As Chad Mar Chad Mart Marc Earhart Cuyahoga valley Cleveland NPR Akron Stephen Metzler Pamela Barnes Cody Razer official mark Erhardt Natalie Levin
Warm Regards - Data: Telling Human Stories

Warm Regards

47:24 min | 11 months ago

Warm Regards - Data: Telling Human Stories

"We started warm regards back in early twenty sixteen, because we wanted to create the conversations about climate change that we just weren't hearing. Messy, personal, heartfelt, honest, nuanced, even surprising. How does changed since then politically personally? The world feels so different. We feel different. The climate conversation went public in a big way to the point where there are now entire podcasts devoted to talking about how we talk about climate. Change. So, we took a break last year to think about our role in this growing ecosystem. We started planning around this idea of themed seasons. That would allow us to explore different aspects of climate change depth while still doing what we do best making climate change personal by focusing on what it means to live work and cope with the warming world. And for our theme. Permission I decided that we would start with data. We're to scientists after all. And so much has changed since we first started working on the season, a pandemic the Democratic primary. A Global Movement for black lives. All of these were unfolding while we were planning and recording the season. For some of my colleagues. It felt like climate took a back seat to the more immediate concerns of anti black racism and Covid nineteen. But in reality, none of those things can be separated from our discussions of climate change just like we can't talk about health, racial justice or politics without also recognizing that climate touches all them. It's a thread that changes the patterns of every fabric we've. So given all of this. It might seem strange to focus on data. We're trying to humanize climate change, so why on earth choose a theme centered on numbers, graphs and figures? It's because data are so much more than cold hard facts. They also tell very human stories. Every dot or line on a graph was collected or analyzed by someone. A person with hopes and dreams and fears for their future. The, stories we tell with data also have real consequences for people to people with heartbeats and medical bills and kids to Tuck in at night were faced. With choices that impact our planet and one another. We'll be talking about all of that. The season we'll spotlight the efforts of different people past and present who helped us to understand where we are and where we're heading, we'll talk about the ongoing efforts to fight a decades long disinformation campaign, and all the creative ways people have used the arts to transform climate, science and to climate action. We'll talk to some of the people charged with making decisions for their communities based on a graph. And whether we're headed towards an apocalypse. Or if we can use this moment to build a more equitable, just future. Welcome to warm regards. This is data. I'm Jacqueline Gill an ice, age, ecologist and associate professor at the University of Maine. I'm Romy Sean Ghani a plant ecologist from Don University in Nebraska. I think it would be really neat to start with just our own personal journeys as scientists remedium excited to talk to you a little bit about this, both because I think even though you I have now been recording together for a little bit, and you know we've known each other as colleagues and friends I'm kind of excited to get to know you a little bit better, and also for our listeners to get to know us better through this lens of why we decided to make a human centered podcast about climate change around something that at first glance seems really cold and calculating and very inhuman. So you know you Ramesh, like. Where did you come from like? You know you generate data yourself and you work within you teach with it, but at some point you made a conscious decision to follow this path, and not become like a pastry chef or I. Don't know a bus driver or any of the other things that you could. Do you know to me? One of the things that got me into ecology in general before I really had an understanding of climate change and the interaction between climate and ecology, and how organisms and ecosystems respond was I. I took this class in the Australian rainforest, and we were trying to understand reforestation of abandoned agricultural field in Australia, so we were running these little small scale experiments about what sort of. Of Treatments of the soil would be really good to help. Accelerate trees, recolonizing these pastures, and so we collected data, and what I found when collected that is, I just wanted more and I just wanted to ask the next question all right so I'm going to stop you because I have two more questions there. There's like two stories. They're crying that I. I want to trace back threads. Yeah, the first one I'M GONNA go in reverse temporal order. The first one is like what was the data you're collecting like? What were you actually out there? Measuring in this Australian rainforest? And what was it like doing that? Yeah, so we ran these little experiments where we planted little. Little tree, seedlings or little seeds excuse me of trees, and then we had treated the soil that we planted them in with a few different treatments, one being Straw and one being sort of pulp cardboard. This was when I was an undergraduate what we did. We measure germination rate, and we measured heights of those trees. You know those little tree seedlings, but even then even these two little pieces of data you know measuring the height measuring how long it took for them to germinate, I found myself wanting to ask the next question like what's going on below ground. Like how many routes are there? So? That was really one of the driving factors in helping me sort of become. Become engrossed in ecology become fascinated with ecology, and then when I started working on climate, change and carbon cycling in graduate school, which I know is a big jump in terms of time line. I still reflected back on that. Australian rainforest experiment because I was able to now think about that experiment in a very different framework. Like how much carbon were those trees storing? and which treatment is going to help? Suck up the most carbon when we restore those Australian forests. Okay, so how did you end up in a field course in Australia? In the first place, so I went to school in new. York City as an undergraduate and I was a bit of a lost premed. So I went into college premed. I was premed because I was good at science. So that's what I thought you did and you know it just wasn't something that was super. I found myself not wanting to play the game and the rat race of pulling a four point Oh wasn't really for me. I also wasn't pulling a four point Oh. That that sort of helped, but I took this course, because I just happened to see a poster for this field course on the wall when I was walking around one of my buildings, and honestly I took the class because I thought it might look good to talk about a study abroad experience in the Med school interview that I might have one day. Wow, so you were still I, was still in that kind of mind. Set Right. premed, sending you to like study abroad, and then you're like well. This is cool. Yeah, yeah, the premed stuff. Yeah, have cooler than the premed stuff. And then what was really great when I was in Australia, I grew up both my parents are physicians so a lot. The People that I interacted with were in the field of healthcare and I'm sure that had a significant impact on my choice to be premed so when I went to Australia, one of the professors who was teaching the field course was shrunken, and it was the first time that I had actually seen or at least. least consciously known of a scientist who was from the Indian subcontinent, because all the other Indian people that I had really interacted with were in the healthcare field, or most of them were in the healthcare field and I I. Don't think I realized it at the time I I see that now looking back how important that was for me to see this and interact with shrunken scientist because it gave me a tangible endpoint to say oh, that's a thing you can be I didn't realize ecology was a thing. You could be and to this day I pattern my teaching after Dr. Florentine. A- from Australia, but that's how I ended up. They're taking that class. I took it like I, said really to play the chess game, not really thinking ecology the thing I would or could be interested in well well, so so you revealed that you have to physician parents, and that you were on this premed track, and then things kind of took a left turn not quite as left as like theater or classical music or something well to them. was just as unclear as theater, so yeah, it was a pretty hard left turn. I was GONNA. Say you kind of anticipating where I'm going with this which is how did your parents feel about that? And how do your parents feel about you being a research professor I think yeah, they were great and supportive, but it took at the time some serious conversations. There were some heated conversations, because frankly they didn't know what ecology was. They didn't know what you could do with. This thing called ecology. Because they came over here in the early seventies with their medical degrees, and so they walked down that path, and that was the path that they knew that was the path that they had illuminated, and so for me to walk into I. WanNa. Do the thing called ecology? They were sort of again. They were supportive but hesitant. I would say almost looking back sort of understandably hesitant around. We don't know what this is. So how can we ensure that? He's walking down a good road because we don't know what this is so but no, they they were supportive I mean I moved out to Nebraska from new. York they were a little bit like where is Nebraska. What is that They have been nothing but supportive this manifest today when my mom is planting flowers and she'll call me for for gardening tips which I often just tell her say follow the instructions on the miracle. Grow Bag, but. That's how that interaction happened today. In that regard I wasn't I wasn't ostracized from the family. You know I. It would be weird to be like. Yeah, I'm the black sheep of the family with my PhD. It's funny. You said it'd be weird being the black sheep with a PhD 'cause I feel that way a lot in my family. Then I'm I'm sort of not the black sheep, but you know. I came from a blue collar background military family, my dad, my Stepdad were both in the navy. So you know for me, it was like. SMART kids they go on to be doctors or lawyers right and they go to Ivy League schools, and then go on to be doctors and lawyers, and they make a lot of money and that's. What's GONNA lift US up. All the way up until my senior year like that's where it was looking like it was going and. Although for me. I wasn't actually interested in being a doctor or a lawyer I pretty much wanted to be a professor and figured out. That was a job as a kid I just didn't know in what field although you know for a while, I wanted to do various things like. photojournalism I was really into theater for a really long time, which probably doesn't surprise anybody who knows me, but or history so it's just I. I'm very much one of those people who likes everything and for various reasons, ended up dropping out of high school, and then ended up going to a small liberal arts school that closed and then transferred to another small liberal arts school that first term, at College of the Atlantic which. Which is where I would end up getting my my Undergrad go blackflies I took three classes because they have these trimesters new take three classes at a time for ten weeks and I was like this. This is what's going to decide it. And I took philosophy course, a history, course and conservation biology, because that was like the one environmental science. He kind of course that that was on offer at the time, the conservation biology. Biology course really hooked me I'd always been really interested in the environment I grew up. We've talked about this on the show. I I grew up as like. Captain, Planet Generation child of the nineties, and it was kind of hard to to not be an environmentalist growing up at that time, and so so for me, it was. I was kind of trying to approach it from all these different angles of like. Why are we like? Like this, why do we do this or planet? It wasn't the environmental science that actually drew me I was I was interested in these deeper philosophical questions, but the conservation biology class really started challenging how I think about what it means to really protector conserve a planet in time of Global Change. And then I took an ecology class basically in Acadia National Park. Because that's where my was is often for folks who haven't been Mount Desert. I talk about it as like a poster child of glaciers. These rounded glacier polished mountaintops, and it's got these giant radic boulders perched on the edges of cliffs that were abandoned by the ice, and it's just hard not to look those landscapes, and in not see the imprint of of glaciers and sea level change, and there was this one moment when. We were on a field trip. It was just our lab actually wasn't even a field trip. It was just get in the van Gogh Lab. And my adviser took us up. This mountain called Gorham Mountain, and about two hundred and fifty up. There are these basically just see cliffs and seek. There's a sea cave, and if you, if you spend time on the Rocky Maine coastline, you see these landforms that are like pummeled and smoothed out by this constant ocean action. These waves like pounding against hockey coast. and. My adviser, who is also my instructor was like what is what is this? What do you see any kind of took us through this process? And we finally figured out these look like they were shaved by the ocean. While we're up here on this mountain. How how did this come to be like that? That was the moment when he revealed to us like well. The sea level here has been. been dropping, because the weight of the glaciers had pushed down the Earth's crust as the glaciers retreated. The Earth has been rebounding. So you know the top of Cadillac Mountain in Acadia gets a little bit higher every year, because even though the ice has been gone for thirteen thousand years. It's taken that long. It's sticking your thumb in a in a cake afresh, K, oven, and like it's slowly. If. You're lucky rebounds back right so so that's otherwise you don't do this at home because fingerprints in your cake, and that for me was like this moment of like that changed my life and I can't. It's like I tried to tell the story to people and they're just like ah okay. You're the eclipse cliff. That's that's cool, but for me. It was like. I had this moment of like wow, just standing here, and this was like in a flash like if I were in a movie that would be like when you see when your life flashes before your eyes, except it was the planet, and just a moment of everything I know or think I believe about the very rock under my feet is ally not a lie, but it's just one tiny piece of this story, and that's what hooked me. It was like change. Change happens all the time and changes really cool. And how do we approach conservation from this perspective of like dipping the ecosystem in bronze like Bronze Baby? Right but the things are changing, and there's a lot of resilience and dynamism that was completely left out of everything I'd been learning in conservation class, and that was the moment that I realized like this is what I WANNA do. I wanted like tell these stories right so Paleo Ecology Stories Yeah Kelly ecology stories like what has happened over the past. And how can that information help us understand changing planet today because we have all of his data all these all this information that we can draw on you know people. See it all the time like articles about climate, change or extinction, and there's a lot of existential hand. Like what are we going to do this never happened. It's unprecedented, but in a lot of ways it's not. We have a literal blueprint that the earth has left behind to tell us how to get through this and. Not only in terms of the ecosystems and the climate, but also the archaeological record in anthropology, and just how people have been resilient or not resilient, like the choices that we make and tying all of those things together not only allows me to do everything which is great because I as I said before I can't pick, but you know so I get to do A. A little bit of rocks, plants, a little bit of people a little bit of chemistry history, all of it, yeah, but also like this is information that we have from these natural experiments in the past, and that data means that we're not going into the future blind, and that to me is like that's the coolest job in the world. Yeah, yeah, no, absolutely. I have the coolest job in the world you know hey. I'll take I'll take. I'll take the second coolidge out in the world s them. told the story about how you could feel the history of that place. Right Flash before your eyes. How did that story for you? Show up in data. Like when did you that story in an excel spreadsheet to put it very in a very boring form to take all that dynamism and put it into an excel spreadsheet. A particular piece of data you know some Paleo climatological data that really advanced either your understanding of climate change on these long timescales, or that pushed you to want to know more about the current human driven climate change that we are currently experiencing was their particular piece of data that that sort of hit you in the head. You're like Oh my God now it clicks or now a really. Now I want to know even more. Yes. Malenkovich Oscillations so soon as I started thinking about glacial cycles and Climate Change. You know the question is well. Why do we have ice ages? Why are we in a warm period? What is going on and so? You can't really get very far down that line of inquiry without running into this guy. Malinkovich, he basically figured out hand calculated while in house arrest during the first world. War Pencil and paper he figured out the ways in which Earth's tilt an orbit, so different times were tilted closer to the sun and tilted further away. Away or orbit is more circular or more like an oval, which brings us closer to the center for the son like we have these regular cycles, all planetary bodies have them around the sons that they orbit so like our position relative to the sun is not fixed through time it goes through these cycles, and he did a bunch of math by hand to figure out how those changes would add up to influence. How much of the Sun's energy hits the Earth at any given moment right closer to the sun, a little bit more energy further away. Get a little less. North Pole tilted towards the Sun. Get more incoming solar energy. North, pole till tilted Norway. You get less right Brad. You're either if you're sitting close to the campfire feels warmer if your your seat is a little further back, you don't feel as hot exactly exactly and people had all this physical evidence of ice ages like I told you about Katie people. We're seeing things like this in the Alps and other places where they're like it, sure looks like glaciers were here, but what would have caused the earth clement who have been so cold in the past, and so people knew they had a geologic record, but they didn't understand what would cause it and. Malinkovich was like well. That's weird. Why haven't you guys figure this out yet? And he kind of comes from left field literally, and it's like well. I'm going to figure this out and he was like. You know there's not enough math statistics in our understanding of Earth's climate, and so he does his hand calculations and comes up with these wiggles these because that's all I do all day long as I make wiggles, and I look wiggles wiggles together of these time series. Of Change through time he stacks together these different cycles and says okay. This is the periodicity of ice ages. When we have less solar energy, we get cold when we have more. We come into a warm period, and what's really cool about that? Is that decades and decades later when the ferry first deep ice cores coming out of? That go back. You know a million years. They basically found from the rings in those ice cores that Malenkovich was right his hand calculations. You know basically on a Napkin from prison basically predicted the cycles of ice ages that we have and that are recorded in in glaciers, and so for me Here's the point I just thought this was incredibly cool. It's a cool story, but it's also cool. Because cool. Ha, HA, uh-huh! It's really neat. Because you know we have this baseline. We have the wiggles down. Up and down, those are the climate changes that our planet has had to go through right some things extinct something's have persisted like lots of cool information there. But then what we're doing now we're pushing the earth's climate out of the range of those wiggles if you imagine sort of wiggling up and down up and down up and down over two and a half million years. And now we're just kicking everything out of that natural range of those wiggles right right right putting today's warming in the context of over two million years of natural climate changes just really was like a punch in the gut because it was, it was not only really reaffirming that. Yes, this is US right. These natural climate changes are some of our best evidence. Evidence to help us understand that the world is warming because of our activity, but also it's like wow, we are. We're moving the planet further back in time, tens of millions of years back in time climatically and that that's a big fucking deal right and I think what's I think what's really amazing, not knowing things like the milankovitch cycles. Is that in my? My basic understanding, because we know that we can almost like subtract those out of the changes we see today, and if those were the key driver of climate change, see today, then subtracting those out of the equation. We shouldn't see any climate change today, but we we do in fact, see climate change today, because what we are doing with all the fossil fuel. Fuel burning that we're doing all the carbon dioxide. There were putting into the atmosphere all the other greenhouse gases layering so much on top of those wiggles that, of course the system is going to be on a new trajectory, and that's really without understanding Malinkovich cycles. We wouldn't be able to parse out what part is us. And what part is the wiggle? Yet and so that milankovitch cycle thing I didn't learn about the milankovitch cycle till fairly late in my climate change education, but similar to you. Once I learned about it. It was another puzzle piece that was like Oh. Yeah, and so because of this. That's even stronger evidence that we know that we are the drivers of this, because the natural wiggles wouldn't have historically led to what we are seeing today, so there's. There's gotta be something else in the system. That is driving what we see today I mean by some estimates some calculations. We should actually be drifting very very very slowly back towards another ice age are warm period right now should be over, and it's not only me not not within our lifetimes, or even within our great great great grandchildren's lifetimes, but like very slowly over takes about one hundred thousand nearest to hit. To, really reach the full conditions of of an ice age, but or glaciation, but Yeah, we're going the other way. So that is still the most profound piece of data that shapes my thinking about the earth, and as a scientist, and that's the earth story right because it's not just that the climate goes up and down up down up and down, but also like somehow all the trees like everything like any animal or plant that you saw today is an ice age survivor. It made it through those changes, and so that's the backdrop for so many other cool stories, and the other cool thing is like as a paleontologist because I. don't have a time machine. The only way for me to recreate those stories is the data we collect. Use these cool forensic tools, and that is the other awesome part of my job is that? We have to recreate these ecosystems and these climates from whatever crap got left behind by the ecosystem of pollen of would bits of air trapped in ice bubbles. What's not told love about that job? It's like I get to be a detective and a and a storyteller and a historian and a time traveler, but also you know you kind of get attached to the planet a little bit. When you as you know right like you, you can't do this work as a scientist without just having his deep appreciation for what the planet is capable of and what we're doing to it, so. I kind of want to flip this around to you now and and ask you the same question like. Did you have like a data moment? Let that just there was. was there a graph or some piece of information or a statistic or something? That just was like your gut. Punch or your call to action yes? Oh, so I did have a data gut punch where climate change really clicked for me and it was in graduate school, because when I started graduate school I was studying carbon cycling in grasslands, but I wasn't necessarily thinking about it from climate change perspective I I was basically asking. Where is the carbon? Where's it going, you know? How is it moving around an ecosystem? That's how I sort of walked into graduate school. You know thinking like I'm just gonNa sort of chase this carbon around an ecosystem and see where it ends up this carbon and it was also studying nitrogen cycling, so it's also it's sort of like an insane episode of Sesame Street, where I'm just running after these letters running around ecosystem and I was taking a class, and we read a paper where it was this little tiny half sentence at the top of. One of the columns of this paper, almost one of those sentences you might misread because half of at the bottom of one column and the other half is the top of the other might misread it, and that sentence talked about how we are able to know that the carbon dioxide that's in the atmosphere. Today is derived from fossil fuel burning by looking at. At, the isotopes or the versions of carbon that are in the atmosphere. My head basically exploded because up until that point I thought. Carbon is carbon is carbon. Had I heard isotopes absolutely? But where had I really heard of isotopes carbon fourteen dating, and that's something you do with dinosaur bone right to figure out. How old dinosaurs are wrong and I know? With my I could let that slide by incorrect. Yes, it was my bad understanding carbon isotopes. And, then, when I learned about this idea that we can see all of the carbon twelve, and look at how much carbon twelve is in the atmosphere and trace that back to the causal agent of our modern climate change. You know it's it's almost the exact opposite scale of the data that gave the Gut Punch right, so you were thinking about this data on this planetary scale and I got. Got, to the same end point by thinking about data on this atomic and molecular scale, because once, I understood that plants like to take up the lighter carbon, and those plants are the ones that become the oil and coal that we burn, and therefore we're just dumping a lot of super old carbon twelve into the atmosphere, and that's how we know it's us. It changed my perspective on climate change. Massively, because it was and I do that. Use this in my class all the time. Go back to your forensic analogy. I start off my climate change lecture with a crime scene and one of the pieces of evidence that we collected. This crime scene is well. We found fingerprints of the suspect that we arrested on the weapon, and I asked my students. How many of you would say that? That piece of evidence is really powerful in your understanding of this case and help you vote guilty or not guilty and the students for overwhelming year after year. All say Oh, yeah, it was definitely the fingerprint like that really pushed me over the. Edge cause I gave them sort of weak evidence against sort of evidence where there could be some some questions and so then I. Tell Them I say. What would it mean if I showed you the fingerprint of human activity in climate change? I Walk My students through the same process that I did when that hit me in the head. Essentially once I got that understanding of C twelve thirteen. How plants preferentially take up the lighter one? My students are able to predict what the data should be, and they accurately do it and then I say Yep that's what the data looks like right around eighteen fifty right around when we started fossil fuels, we see a lot more see twelve in the atmosphere because we are burning carbon. That plants took up a long long time ago and so that. That was really that data that that made climate change make sense, and then was after that that actually learned about Malenkovich cycles, and then another piece like Oh. Yeah, that feels too so for you is like it was really that human angle. Yeah, wow, that's us like. That's what makes climate real. Is this obvious signature of the Industrial Revolution of Human Beings? Just burning a lot of fossil fuels. That's what did it for you. Right and I remember in that moment. When I was reading that paper, my first thought was actually back to my parents I. Remember saying. Why am I reading this? In graduate school and other people aren't like wire. My parents, not reading this paper because I was made a I I and a half year, Grad student, so I wasn't very deep in my graduate education and so I really sort of asked myself if I gave this paper. Paper my parents, they'd be able to understand this. But why isn't that Eissa? Topic evidence out there more broadly in the world. Like why am I finding this piece of evidence buried in this paper somewhere? That thing clicked those those data clicked in my head and I thought right after that was. Why don't more people know about this isotopic ration- i? Tell that to my students. All the time and I like to be honest with my students. Say Look. This is the thing that did it for me. But here's all this other data and I'm going to lay out this whole menu of data for you and you're going to connect with certain pieces more than others, but here's all the overwhelming data that we have to know that it's us. This is Justin show. I'm the producer of armored guards. You've heard remission Jacqueline's data stories as part of this episode and now we'd like to hear yours. was there a moment when a particular graph changed? How thought about climate change? Maybe you're scientists with powerful story from the field or no elected official faced with planning for an uncertain future. Do you find yourself constantly checking the latest sea ice coverage or fielding endless questions from an anxious kid about Siberian wildfires. We want to hear from you. You can leave us a ninety second voicemail by calling five, eight, six, nine, three, zero, five, two, eight, six, or record yourself and email it to us at our warm regards at g mail DOT COM. Make sure to say who you are and where you're from, we'll be featuring these stories throughout the season. You you and I a scientists think about data, but we also recognize that. There's humanity behind each of those data points, so it's our job, and that's what we really want to do with this podcast, and with this season is tell the stories behind that data behind those wiggles right, and and you did it talking about Malenkovich right, you know literally you're talking about wiggles on a graph. But what was he doing? He was. Under House Arrest War. You know that is a human story. He got arrested on his honeymoon dude. He was like rested on his honey. Why wouldn't that just be in the story? Know and you're never gonNA. See that story just in the graph. While you and ideal in data, you and I swim in that you know you and I spend hours and hours in Microsoft Excel moving pieces of data around and spinning it like a Rubik's cube to try to understand it more completely. We, WANNA make sure with this season that? Our listeners understand. That the data tells us one thing, but we also have to look beyond that data to understand it really fully. We have to look beyond that data to understand the humanity behind it, and until we do both. We aren't going to be able to really tackle climate change. In all of its complexity, thinking about like the work that we do I work with mammoth poop and you know like. Stuff that that often doesn't feel very immediate and while I try to make these connections like my I, see the connections between the Ice Age and conservation today or understanding the climate of the past to to grapple with the future. Like a lot of people are just like well. You just study you study mammoth things that are extinct. You study these ecosystems that. Are Not like the ones that we have now raise you. Ramesh like you are actually dealing with solutions like you. Like your work with your students on bio, Char is actually grappling with ways for us to do better like ways forward like actual solutions for me working on solutions to climate change. I really think about it. You know oddly enough bio. Char is talked about it a solution to climate change and I mentioned this you know when I first came on the show talking about talking about bio char. What I really think about what I'm producing in. My lab is I'm producing the solution to climate change, not because I make bio char that I put in the soil, but I'm producing the solution to climate change because I'm producing the scientists who will actually fix it? Or the Group of scientists that will actually fix and. Bio Char is the way that I get them in the door for anybody that read about bio char there are. It is an imperfect solution as someone who loves it. I will be the first person to admit that it is a it is a far from perfect solution to climate change, but it is such an accessible solution to climate change that it is as my firm belief. And I, use the word belief there. It is my firm belief that it is a way to produce the scientists of the future or the scientists I should say of the future that are going to fix this challenge and tackle this challenge. So. That's why I work with Bio Char is produce new scientists, scientists, or do you think like I think? My first thought is producing this producing the next generation of scientists, but also producing the next generation of thinkers, maybe is a better way to put it. Who understand that there are solutions out there, and we have to think creatively about those solutions and so. If one of my students ends up going into the political realm if they walk into the political arena knowing. Where the carbon is going up and down, if they know the C Twelve C, thirteen thing that's great, then they are informed politician. They aren't. There are scientifically literate politician. So. That's what I really think about. In terms of in terms of tackling climate change, and in terms of solutions, and in terms of the data that that my students produce. Yeah, because. There are so many people and I get so many messages from. Active on twitter and you know, get interviewed by the press, or whatever and whenever that happens I. Get emails usually from young people very often from students who say. Is there. Appoint does anything I do. Matter Should I even have kids? Should I bother going to college? How can I help and more and more I feel like the messages that I get from from students and young people is not like Oh. How can I pitch in? I want to help a lot of it is like the increasing despair like what's the point? Can we do anything? Do we really have seven years before? Everything falls apart because so much of the message. That's getting out. There is at a topless people see some of these graphs or these model projections that are extreme scenarios and they think. That's it game over we. It's too late. There's nothing we can do and those people who see. who see a grammar see some data, and they their responses just to lose hope to despair and. Which is something else? We'll talk about later in the season, but you know a. how accurate are some of those assumptions are projections about like it's a yes. Things are bad, but they're not so bad that we can't do something about it like it's always going to be worth trying. It's all we can always do less harm, but also like how you motivate people to Action whether you know. We'll talk to activists we'll. We'll talk to people who research behavior and belief to get at this idea of. How do you reach people not only to inspire them with US information about our changing planet, but also like what is the information that's out there. That does actually move people to act like. How do you get people to do something with all this data? That isn't just despair as you were saying that this popped into my head. As we think about data. Is there a piece of data that you would need to see to know that we are succeeding at tackling climate change, or what would be the piece of data that you would need to see to say? Oh, we are turning the tide. You know we are winning the fight. That is such a good question because for such a long time. It has felt up until the last year or so. It's felt like the real barrier has been belief. You know the the figures about what percentage of Americans believe that the earth is warming due to human activity. Watching those numbers kind of just flat line. over time has been really challenging because it's felt like. We can't do anything about this problem if we can't get people to agree that. There's a problem the Yale climate, communication, project and other initiatives like that that are sort of tracking in real time. What Americans beliefs are about climate? And you know? Yes, this is going to be. We're going to have an American bias. In the show just because of the nature of Who we are and what we're doing, but watching the tide, turn and watching you know the so-called dismisses the people who are you know that the climate trolls like the people who are actively aggressively like the? It's not that just they don't care. They're not sure it's not the most important thing for them. They actively try to undermine her. Push back on the data about climate. Climate, change watching them their numbers dwindle has actually been really really motivational for me. Because it feels like what we're doing makes difference, and once you get by in, then you can have action, so that I feel like was was always the first step, and then it's like okay well what you know what data would would I need to see that we're taking the next? Next step, which is actually doing something about it right right? Seeing the youth climate protests. I mean things that just we could not have dreamed about seeing you know. Greta Berg, get up there and say listen to scientists. We demand action. That's really motivational to me, so it's like a moving window. Right so now what we need to see you know. We've seen lots of political changes. Changes, we've seen congressional districts flip. All of that is really heartening. Now what I want to see is I wanNA see the to start to fall. We need to see that curves start to decline. We need to see belief and acceptance translate to action, and that action needs to have an impact because my paleo person, I think over long timescales. I'm okay if it takes some time. You know I don't feel disheartened by the fact that we can't turn on a dime just since I started Grad School in two thousand and five to today I mean that's like I've been doing this for fifteen years which? Wow fifteen years already. But, it's also like that's you know. That's a tremendous amount of social change. Right in two thousand and five, we were talking about climate silence, and how nobody was having these conversations now in two thousand twenty artists and writers, and so many people are in are involved in the conversation. It's not just scientists saying. Please listen to us. Please listen to us. Here's more data. Here's more data. We know that like that doesn't work showing people the graphs over and over again like as hard as is for me to say that it didn't work, it may be worked for some people like James. Hansen was doing it in the eighties right like when I was still a little kid. Running around what we need to see next is like. Let's see the numbers start to fall. Let's see. See. Let's see greenhouse gas emissions start to decline as we're doing the things that we need to be doing right. I guess I was a wishy washy answer because I. I never gave you one specific set of data, but like yeah. I think that really highlights the complexity of climate change. Right is that it isn't going to be one piece of data. You know you and I highlighted how? These singular pieces of data had a profound impact on our understanding of climate and climate change, but what it did is it opened us up to this wide array this wide world of data, and they single piece of the data really opened the door to all the complexities of climb changing all the data. That's that there I don't think your answer was wishy washy at all, because I think progress and the data of that progress is GonNa be seen and measured on a variety of fronts, and it's going to be seen socially and politically right numbers of protests political districts voting. Voting turnout. All of these are data along with Co, two emissions and Co. two atmospheric concentration these are all data that are going to indicate that we are making progress on this front, the people five, hundred or a thousand years from now or even one hundred years from now they won't. They'll know what happened. First of all They'll know what worked and what didn't work, and whether it works soon enough but I just keep thinking of like the information that they'll have. They'll also know you know how many people died. Because of storm surges from sea, level, rise or You know how many people were displaced from their homes I mean there's a lot of other information that just that people have to grapple with in a very calculating way, because the people who are in positions of power who have to make decisions about communities like they have to think things through and balance a lot of concerns as rationally as possible, but at the same time like when you get to some of the numbers, it's just hard to remember that those numbers are about real people living breathing people who each had their own hopes and dreams and their own stories, and they'll just kind of get swallowed up in some of these statistics well, and that's what we're here to illuminate, right. Even scientists I always try to remind myself. that. There are you know like if I can do this? With a woolly mammoth foot right if I can remind myself that this was a real living breathing mammoth that felt the sun on its skin, and walked around, and felt hunger and thirst and joy and fear. If I can do that for a mammoth to be a better scientist I, also have to do that for. All of the human beings whose lives literally depend on us, getting this right. We have a responsibility to not lose sight of of all of that of everything. That's at stake knowing that no matter what we do, we're going to lose. People were going to species. We're going to lose cultures and languages, and like there's a lot at stake here. Right and I think understanding the data and. How it's collected and who collects it and all of those hidden stories are going to help us. Reduce those losses without that data those things would be. I think in much deeper trouble than they are with the data, and so those data really are in all of this data that we collect. They are sources of hope. At the end of the day like those numbers are how selves accountable there how we know what we've done where we are where we've been where we're going there the story that we. Are Writing Together. Warmer Guard is produced by Justin Shell. Joe, storm creates our transcripts and Catherine pint. Heart is our Social Media Maven. Music for this episode comes from Blue Dot sessions. You can find transcripts of this episode listened to previous episodes and find links to subscribe on the podcast platform of your choice on our brand. New website warm regards. PODCAST DOT COM. Also something that really helps more people learn about the show. If you leave a quick review especially on apple podcasts. We'd love to hear what you think about the show. You can reach us at our warm regards at gmail.com or find us on. Twitter at our warm regards. This season were also starting a Patriot so you can help make the show possible. The show is volunteer run, but some support would help us do more, and we would love to be able to pay our great team members just an Joe and Katherine for all of their hard work, so please consider supporting the show. You can go to Patriot dot com slash warmer guards, and we'll also have a link to it in the show notes and on our website. From all of us at warm regards. Thanks for letting us into your head.

scientist Australia Nebraska twitter Jacqueline Gill professor Malinkovich Justin Shell Covid Ramesh Tuck Romy Sean Ghani Cadillac Mountain York University of Maine Blue Dot
News in 4-minutes for March 22

Dailycast News

04:01 min | 3 months ago

News in 4-minutes for March 22

"This is news headlines in four minutes with alan edwards miami beach. Police fired pepper balls into crowds of partners and arrested at least a dozen people late. Saturday is the city took extraordinary measures to crack down on spring. Breakers who officials have said or out of control. The aggressive enforcement actions came just hours after miami beach man. A state of emergency instead. An eight pm curfew. Here's what some spring breakers said is needed because coq khurana seller out. I feel like a lot of the spring. Breakers are just not thinking about the future and what could possibly happen if they keep coming to miami for spring break so they shut down south beach and i live closer to fort lauderdale so when they shut down here. It will just like Flux of people coming down lauderdale and it just like since south beach is like the most popular one. They just trickle down to louder day on. That's my home. So i'm even more worried about fort lauderdale. I ran has made threats against four mcnair army post in the us capital and against armies vice chief of staff to senior us intelligence officials said kyle numerous reports communications intercepted by the national security agency in january showed that iran's revolutionary guard discussed mounting uss cole. Style attacks against the army post referring to the october two thousand suicide attack in which a small boat pulled up alongside the navy destroyer in the yemeni port of aden and exploded killing seventeen sailors the biden administration scrambling to manage a growing humanitarian political challenge at the us. Mexico border that threatens to overshadow its ambitious legislative agenda jaren mcdonald reports with the number of migrants surging administration officials say biden inherited an untenable situation that resulted from what they say was president. Donald trump's undermining and weakening of the immigration system biden told reporters sunday at the white house. That at some point he would go to the border and that he knows what is going on in the border facilities. This electorate non-drowsy for all your nonstop adventures. Join the million saying yes to allegra and for allergy relief with powerful decongestant find allegra d behind the pharmacy counter fees good frontier no hidden monthly fees for fifty nine nine thousand nine a month plus taxes and government. Charges corona virus is surging in india with the highest deaths and cases and several months as vaccine distribution legs and some states instituted lockdowns on sunday. India reported over forty three thousand infections the mo- since november overall the nation's third in the world with over eleven thousand cases behind united states which is over twenty nine thousand according to data gathered by john hopkins university. Lebanon secont meltdown. Interior of chaos pushing the army to the edge the lebanese army which has been playing a critical role in maintaining stability. Since the country's worst crisis broke out eighteen months ago is facing a growing challenge of surviving rapidly deteriorating economy resisting political pressures containing a looming security chaos and avoiding collapse to hikers were found dead near maine's acadia national park after falling from a the national park service said searchers discovered the bodies of a man each twenty eight and woman aged thirty on saturday after the appear to a fall in about one hundred feet from ice covered cliff vans during a hike on door mountain. No bands no cheer squads. No packed buildings filled with neutral fans suddenly throwing support behind a plucky double digit underdog hoping to pull off an upset yet despite the restrictions despite the lack of fans with venue capacity cap twenty two percent and despite teams being walled off from friends and family. The joy is still there. The fabric of march will always include upsets and big shots and they have come a plenty already. March madness is still here. And that's news headlines four minutes. I'm alan edwards.

alan edwards miami beach coq khurana south beach mcnair army fort lauderdale biden administration jaren mcdonald biden us allegra uss cole national security agency lauderdale aden army john hopkins university miami kyle lebanese army
6.25.20 National parks, Christian schools, and a fallen officer

The World and Everything In It

34:00 min | 1 year ago

6.25.20 National parks, Christian schools, and a fallen officer

"The world and everything in it is made possible by listeners like us. My Name's John Brooks an Eye Rene Brooks. We live in Ashville North Carolina a work at voice, jungle and I teach weekly Online Bible Studies. This month is world's June giving drive a hope. You'll join us in supporting world's brand of biblically sound journalism by visiting W. Nj dot org slash donate. We hope you enjoyed today's program. Good Morning National Parks. Are Welcoming visitors again and there are a lot of stir crazy. People include me in that group. Anxious to get out of doors work somewhere beautiful instead of crowded Davis California. Also today Catholic schools are closing at an alarming rate this year. We'll tell you how Protestant and evangelical schools are faring. Plus remembering a fallen officer. Good man I love play phone general. School. Kids learn to thank the speak to the police and don't be afraid of. It's Thursday June twenty fifth. This is the world and everything in it from listener supported World Radio I'm Megan Basham Nick Eicher Good Morning. Up. Next Kent Covington has today's news. Senate Democrats on Wednesday. Blocked a Republican Police Reform Bill Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said it never had a chance. This bill lost. because. It was woefully inadequate. It never would have passed. The parties do have some common ground on the issue, but for now the legislation is stalled with Democrats refusing to agree to open debate. GOP South Carolina. Senator Tim Scott would have only three black members of the Senate wrote the bill, he said Democrats would have been able to help shape it through amendments if you don't think we're right. Make bad. Don't walk away. The GOP's Justice Act would have created a national database of police use of force incidents, restricted use of show, colds and set up new training procedures and commissions to study race and law. Enforcement House Democrats are expected to vote on their police reform bill as early as today. The biggest sticking point between the two parties is qualified immunity for officers. Democrats want to make it easier to sue them and civil court over misconduct Republicans say immunity must remain to protect officers from frivolous lawsuits. A federal appeals court has ordered the dismissal of the criminal case against former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn, a panel of judges with the US Circuit Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia, made the ruling Wednesday the decision turned back efforts by a judge scrutinize the Justice Department's decision to drop the prosecution flint pleaded guilty and thousand seventeen to lying to the FBI, but the justice. Department dropped the case following revelations of misconduct within the bureau, and then a two to one ruling the appeals court said that settles it. President Trump congratulated Flynn on Wednesday. Horribly very bad people. These things start to come out. But what happened to General. Flynn should never happen again at our country. The decision is a significant win both for Flynn and the Justice Department cutting short. What could have been legal fight? And the ruling comes as House Democrats scrutinized leadership of Attorney General William Bar. They are critical of the Department of Justice handling of both the Flynn case and the case of trump ally. And February DOJ leadership overruled federal prosecutors in the stone case pushing for a lighter sentence errands, alinsky was one of four prosecutors who stepped down from that case after the DOJ overruled them, and he told the House Judiciary Committee on Wednesday, what I heard repeatedly was that this leniency was happening because of stones relationship to the president that the acting US attorney for the District of Columbia was received heavy pressure from the highest levels at the Department of. And that his instructions to us. We're based on political considerations. Stone was found guilty of charges including lying to Congress and witness tampering the prosecutors recommended seven to nine years in prison, but after top brass at the DOJ intervened, he got a sentence of just over three years. The House Judiciary Committee announced Wednesday that Attorney General Bar will testify before the panel next month. Oklahoma reported a record one day spike in the number of positive covid nineteen cases Wednesday with nearly five hundred new positive tests reported. That is the third time in the past week that the state reported record. One day increases several other states also said single day case records this week including Arizona Mississippi Nevada Texas and California were Governor Gavin. newsom said nearly thirteen hundred people. People are intensive care. So icy numbers are increasing in the state of California not at the rate of hospitalizations, but eh clip of about eighteen percent several states also broke hospitalization records, including North Carolina and Governor Roy. Cooper announced Wednesday that his state will halt further reopening plans for now today. I'm announcing that North Carolina, we'll pause and continue our safer at home face to. For another three weeks. The United States just recorded a one day total of nearly thirty five thousand new cases. That's just short of the nation's late April peak of thirty, six, thousand, four hundred. A Georgia grand jury has indicted the three suspects in the fatal shooting of an unarmed black man in February prosecutor, joy at homes, announced the grand jury indictment on Wednesday outside the Glenn County Georgia courthouse. This is another positive step another great step for finding justice for a mind for finding justice for this family and the community beyond Travis McMichael. Greg McMichael and William Brian. Brian Junior faced charges including felony murder, aggravated assault and false imprisonment, and the death of twenty five year old Ahmad Barberie Travis McMichael claims. He fired in self defense, and his attorney said his client will plead not guilty. The McMichael's say they confronted rb because they believed he matched the description of a burglary suspect Brian's attorney maintains that his client only witnessed the killing. Amid escalating tensions on the Korean Peninsula North Korea said Wednesday that it is holding off on further action against South Korea world's Kristen. Flavin has that story. If he is all North Korean state media announced that leader Kim Jong. Hoon has suspended military retaliation against South Korea last week. The North declared that relations with the South had fully ruptured. It also destroyed a diplomatic liaison office along the border that was used for talks between the two countries and threatened unspecific military action. Pyongyang has expressed anger over anti North Korean leaflets that activists have floated by balloon. Balloon across the border it is also sought to apply pressure on South Korea amid stalled nuclear talks with the United States analysts say North Korea after deliberately raising tensions for weeks, maybe pulling away just enough to make room for South Korean concessions in a separate statement, senior North Korean official, said the future of inter-korean relations would depend on the South's quote, attitude and actions reporting for world. I'm Kristen, Flan. Camp Covington straight ahead, staying safe while visiting the Great Outdoors Plus Cal Thomas previews the fall presidential campaign. This is the world and everything in it. It's the twenty fifth of June, twenty twenty to have you along for today's edition of the world and everything in it. Good Morning I'm Megan Basham and I'm Nick Eicher. Well. If you count today, we have six days remaining so I've done a little math ear where eighty percent of the way through our June giving drive and right about where we need to be in terms of progress toward the goal. Goal so we are grateful for that so now, are you in eighty percent full kind of Guy Nacre twenty percent empty kind of guy. That's a good way to put it so I'll go with I'm definitely eighty percent full, but keeping a wary eye on that twenty percent. Oh, so that's a cop out right settlement of a cop out, but now you said it, so I don't have to. But seriously I I'm really encouraged by all the support. That I'm seeing and I will confess that I hit that. Refresh button a little obsessively, but you know as a co host here I'm just humbled by the enthusiastic support of our program, and as you said Nick, it's, it's important to express gratitude in the moment instead of just when the campaigns over. Over meaning that those who've given deserve our thanks right now and not just when those final dollars come in, so I want to add my thanks to, and I will encourage you if you've not given yet. Please head over to W. N. G. Dot org slash donate, and you can take care that twenty percent pessimist in me, so we'd we'd be grateful. Will I up on the world and everything in it national parks and the summer of covid nineteen so far corona virus hotspots of mostly been concentrated in urban areas with dense populations, meaning that popular travel destinations like New York, city or Los. Angeles may not be so popular this year. Instead families may opt for more rural destinations where they can enjoy the great outdoors, and there's no better place to do that than our country's national parks, world reporter Sara Sh- Weinsberg spoke with park officials to find out what visitors can expect it national parks this summer. It's a quiet sunshine filled morning in Wyoming's Grand Teton National Park. Some early rising hikers are starting to fill a trail head parking lot. More and his sister are two of them. More lives near Sacramento California, he says after a couple months of lockdown there. He needed a break from the city, so he came to visit his sister in Wyoming. Why don't work somewhere beautiful instead of crowded? You, know Davis California. We like camping. And we decided to come to Grand Teton National Park and yellowstone, because there's probably proportionately fewer people more would-be wearing a mask in Sacramento, but he won't be doing that on his hike today. He isn't really worried about catching the virus here. I feel like it's less necessary because it's outside. Epidemiologists say the odds of catching the virus outside our low elements like wind and rain along with summers, warm temperatures and humidity all affect the viruses ability to infect people. One Chinese study looked at more than three hundred covid nineteen outbreaks in the country. Only, one was transmitted outdoors. Even then only two people were infected. With that in mind, some national parks began phased reopenings in May and June. In a statement, the National Park Service says it's advising parks to follow their states individual reopening timelines. Christie anesthesia is a public affairs specialist with Acadia National Park in Maine. It's one of the top ten most visited national parks in the country. I, think a lot of people are attracted to Acadia National Park because it has some amazing coastline that's very unique to Maine. Maine's reopening plan allowed state parks to open June first. So that's when Acadia decided to unlock its gates as well. The two most iconic things that people have access to it Acadia national park, which is the bro drive in carriage roads those. Are Open now, but what is still closed at Katya and in many other national parks are indoor spaces like visitor, centers, gift, shops, and eateries as well as places where people congregate like campgrounds. Anesthesia says she does recommend people at serious risk of Cova complications where a mask even on the trails if they're outdoors and they can't keep a six foot distance to the next person then we'd recommend a face covering capitol. Reef National Park in Utah has steep, red rock walls and canyons. It seen visitation surge over the last decade. Lori Rome is a park ranger there she says Moore. Visitors means more bathroom breaks, and that means staff will be doing more cleaning than ever this summer. The bathrooms are cleaned on the cycles that the CDC Centers for Disease Control are recommending so ours are cleaned two times a day and they're checked. Several Times throughout the day will close one stall for twenty four hours us the other stall and flip flop back and forth, capitol. Reef opened its visitor center earlier this month, but rangers put up plexiglas on the counters and wear masks. Nearby Bryce National Park is famous for its spiraled rock formations called, Hutus. Peter Dens more is the public information officer there he says the visitor center is open, but has capacity limits, and the park has adapted shuttles. Only twenty visitors are allowed on a bus. At any one time seats have been removed from the bus, so the create. More distance between groups. You've got plexiglass barriers there for the drivers and you. bryce is also encouraging people to prepay entrance fees online to avoid exchanging cash or credit cards. It has reopened one of its campsites dens Maher says Rangers are closely monitoring how people interact there? Dana Soa is the spokesperson for Great Smoky. Mountains National Park another top tenor with more than twelve million annual visitors will. The thing is the diverse city, so we have over about hundred and thirty different species of trees. Great Smoky is divided between Tennessee and north. Carolina North Carolina has had a slower reopening face, so the park is following those stricter guidelines. So far four of the parks nine campgrounds have reopened along with its visitor centers. The park is concerned about overcrowding, so it's posted a video to help educate people about how they can social distancing park. It really focused on How'd you shoes drills overlooks? That weren't crowded so that you could proactively you know plan to have a less congested hike or less congested experience. If a national parks campgrounds are closed or limited park, officials recommend booking at private campgrounds, outside national parks or freedom camping in national forests or on Bureau of land management lands. National Parks also often have towns nearby were you can visit restaurants and grocery stores? A Katie Cristiana stages says whatever parking may want to visit this summer. It's important to know before you go. People need to do their homework. With the Canon can-do reporting from World I'm Sarah Weinsberg in Grand Teton National Park. Additional support comes from poverty encountered Los Angeles more poverty encounter dot. Org Discount tickets with Promo Code. World. Coming up next on the world and everything in it. Private school closures, even those who have not lost jobs during the coronavirus lockdown are looking at the future, a little nervously and cutting back on spending for some those cutbacks include private school tuition. Declining enrollment has forced some schools to close handful our private independent schools, but the vast majority are religious ones. Catholic schools in particular are bearing the brunt of the trend world. Correspondent Laura reports. The National Catholic Educational Association estimates that about one hundred schools have folded in the last month, or so they expect that number could double before fall. Many of the closures caught families off guard Megan August four boys all attend Academy of Saint Therese it offers classes in pre k through grade eight in the cresskill borough, which lies just north of Newark New Jersey along scenic stretch of the Hudson River. We always know. The risk is there. But when you have a community that so tight and that really? Flourish with each other, and we take pride in our fundraising and things like that. Not only do not expect it to come to your school, but you don't clearly don't expect during a time like like we're into today. See, Theresa's one of nine elementaries and one high school closing their doors this year in Newark alone. Cardinal Joseph Tobin explained the decision in a heartfelt letter to families in the archdiocese. He said the seeds of the closures were already planted prior to the pandemic. He described the closures as an irreplaceable loss to the community. Those? Irreplaceable losses are impacting other cities as well just outside Harrisburg Pennsylvania Lebanon Catholic school lost more than one third of its K. twelve enrollment over the last five years. The historic school has operated in the diocese of Harrisburg since the mid eighteen hundreds Bishop Ronald Gainer spoke with local NBC affiliate W. G. A. L. About the closure lease. No, this was not an easy decision for your pastors. Pastors nor for me, especially in the light of all the challenges, all of us are facing, but with the national surge in pandemic related job losses. Many families simply can't afford Catholic school tuition anymore. The average cost for elementary grades runs about five thousand dollars a year, but Catholic highschool can cost eleven, thousand dollars, or more annually and parishes that normally subsidize tuition for low income students are. are now strapped for cash. Because stay at home orders cancelled weekly mass and interrupted tithing the Catholic school closings will displace thousands of students nationwide. That's raising concerns about where they will land in a school landscape, already rife with uncertainty, but many communities still have private school options. Lynn, Swann is the chief strategy and Innovation Officer for the Association of Christian. Schools, International. It's surveyed. It's twenty three hundred. Hundred US member schools in April in our survey We asked the number of question about enrollment in about Newton inquiries, because those are often very good indicators of sort of the the health of the school looking toward the next year. Certainly schools do use those indicator for project into the future and what we found is that for the majority of schools they're re-enroll. Numbers were holding steady. and. So that's good news. Swarner said that unlike the nation's Catholic schools, the Association's Protestant and Evangelical Schools reported only a handful of permanent closings, instead most are using the public health crisis to expand into virtual and hybrid instruction, while many public schools fumbled for weeks with the transition to distance learning, eighty percent of a CSI member schools missed fewer than five days of instruction. Some even picked up new students along the way as families grew tired of. Of waiting for their local schools to provide lessons or are looking at how to be nimble in light of the changing environment, you know others are looking at offering, completely online programs for the first time whether it be to domestic students in national, and they're also looking to say okay. We have this challenge. Not only do. We continue to be sustainable, but the potentially. How do we reach more? Stanley's that maybe haven't been able to Christian education before. Meanwhile friends and alumni are rallying around some of the closing Catholic schools, praying and asking school and Church leaders for a change of heart administrators at the award, winning Academy of Our Lady Peace in New Providence New Jersey petitioned the archdiocese of Newark to reconsider closing their school the more than twelve hundred signatures and nearly five hundred comments. They submitted proved persuasive church leaders eventually reversed their decision giving the community back. It's beloved school efforts on behalf of cresskill. Saint Therese, where Megan August's boys attend did not have the same success. Their community mounted a fundraising and petition effort as well, but the archdiocese said that in their case the decision was. Reporting for world I'm Laura Edgehill. All right, so file this one under your said than done. You've probably heard a thing or two about corona virus restrictions. Probably you gotta do them. They're important. Even theme parks are doing their part, but in Japan. They are going for the gold, an association of thirty amusement parks. There is trying to ban. This! Yet, NO SCREAMING STOP! Just like that. They are asking guests to keep their mouths closed while on roller coasters again easier said than done right here. We can just press the mute button, and that takes care of it, but these parks they have to enforce silence on one of the world's tallest roller coasters, three hundred eighteen feet, but WHO's counting and another one that delivers speeds up to one hundred twelve miles per hour, so enjoy yourself, but keep it to yourself. It's the world and everything and. Today is Thursday June, twenty, five, twenty twenty. Thank you for turning to world radio to help. Start Your Day Good Morning. I'm Nick Eicher and I Megan Basham coming next on the world and everything in it the death of a deputy. Last week, mourners laid to rest a longtime law enforcement officer in a small cemetery in South Mississippi. World correspondent Kim. Henderson appointed the graveside service and has our story. On June twelfth the same day, a Wendy's parking lot in Atlanta made the news a parking lot. Two states away got some attention as well though smaller scale, it was the site of a routine prisoner transport gone bad. Radio Dispatcher Crystal Scarborough took the call at the Simpson County Sheriff's department. Just advise man. Some fan fired their. Told me that she thought I'd had an officer down. And rolled them everything I had. That's what we're trying to. Simpson County Sheriff Paul. mullins heard the call and made it to the scene in about three minutes. Paramedics flu deputy James Blair to a hospital where he later died. And the sheriff turned his attention to coordinating. What would turn into an all night manhunt? Some three hundred officers from across the state came to assist was really crucial in this setting up a perimeter and with that many people. You can get a tight perimeter to know. We had to use the dogs helicopters. They FBI sent a plane. Then twenty four hours, authorities captured the shooting suspect in a heavily wooded area. Many of the same officers who helped during the manhunt, soon returned to pay their final respects to deputy Blair. He had a fifty year career in law enforcement. Blair and his wife were raising three of their great grandchildren. Something County as a funeral for a deputy James. Blair was held this morning. The funeral took place at ten thirty that Wednesday. It drew a record crowd at Tudor funeral home. Later, mourner started the long drive to deputy Blair's freshly dug grave for nearly eight miles along the route. People stood beside the road, waving flags wiping tears. Kids put their hands over their hearts. Jj Smith wrote his Harley Davidson Electra glide classic as part of the procession. He's a member of the Patriot guard riders an organization that seeks to promote respect for fallen American heroes. Anger. That this could happen to someone like that. To have. Really. Then, you see. What else is going on in the world and it draws all this attention. I listened to a local radio station coming up here. Mention of it the whole ride up here seventy one miles and no mention. John, Griffith is a duty Piper for the Meridian. Police Department. Here arrived early for the burial, burying bagpipes decked out in a Scottish kilt. riff plays at about fifty funerals a year. Following ones are special just like the military killed in action especially. Thankfully, there's not too many of those. He says ninety percent of the time the family wants him to close out the service with amazing grace now play one verse Standing Probably Fifty Feet from the gray side and then. Play one or two more verses walking off into the distance and letting the sound just fadeaway members of the highway patrol's honor guard were on site to. Kurban Stewart waited in the shade as long as he could before suiting up in his thick dress attire, complete with special hat and white gloves on normally. We're here probably about two hours prior that way, we can assess the area. and. run through what we're GONNA do and make sure we do our part right because it's not about us. It's about the the person that's being memorialized. While the Honor Guard practiced. They got updates on the funeral procession. At twelve forty-six officials blocked highway five eighty, three to southbound traffic. A wall of fire trucks with lights flashing formed a border at the eastern edge of the cemetery. To the south one of those them, Blue Line flags draped across the chain link fence. When the white arrived at twelve fifty eight family members, wearing black took their seats. The preacher told them that James. Blair did not live his life in vain. He spent it serving others. Spent shells clinked against a nearby tombstone. The governor moved in close to say something for only the widow to here. To honor, guard members stood at the end of the casket and folded the flag side to side side to side. Corner by corner by corner. Joe Andrews is a Canine Officer with the Simpson. County sheriff's department. He knew deputy Blair well. I love people in general. Is Goal Deputy? Kids learn to. Speak to the police. Don't be afraid of. Andrews has been in law enforcement for sixteen years with all the national criticism coming right as he was in the middle of a man hunt while he was coping with the death of a fellow officer. Did. He think about quitting It's not A. It's not a job passion. No, we don't do it for the and went on to it for the glory. We do it because. It's a Colin. The conclusion of the funeral was something known as an end of watch call. It's when a dispatcher issues. A final radio call to an officer. In Twenty Bob. Lehrer? Blair is. In one! Twelve. Thousand Forty, Although he was one man, he laid his life down for. The win. When for? The. Right Proverbs Twenty eight. World on Cam Henderson reporting from Roost Mississippi. Today is Thursday, June twenty fifth good morning. This is the world and everything in it from listener supported world radio. I'm Megan Basham and I'm nick. Her commentator Cal Thomas. Says our preview of the fall presidential campaign that he saw. Did Not encourage him. President Trump's returned to the campaign trail last weekend provided a great opportunity to speak words of healing to a divided nation. It's too bad. We got toxic stream. Instead his lengthy remarks were full of self justification, said salted with crude language. He called one person, a son of a blank and frequently used other crude words that would have gotten my mouth washed out with soap as a kid. Let's hear his Evangelical Supporters Defend that language I've heard all the explanations. It's who he is. His policies are more important. He's God's chosen instrument in his nearly two hours of talking president trump spend thirty minutes talking about his commencement address at West Point. He rightly called out some of the media claiming he appeared to be sick because of the way he held his water glass. He said he was. was trying to be careful, so water didn't spill on his expensive tie, which was silk, then he demonstrated how he slowly walked down a ramp after the address, because he said the bottom of his shoes and the ramp were slippery. How does any of this matter? I was embarrassed for him? And for his smaller than predicted audience, which worship the applauded, but I sensed a little less enthusiasm. Yes, many of those supposedly one million ticket requests were probably reluctant to show up because of nonstop media scare tactics about the corona virus, but another factor may have been the president's predictability. We've heard versions of this speech before. How many? Many more times. Must we hear about his jawboning bowing into lowering the price for two new presidential jets? Don't we already know about closing the borders to travelers from China and why the racial slur about the corona virus did he think that was cute? A president running for a second term stake out his vision for the next four years, other than a list of twenty five judges, from which he promises to choose for federal benches, including the Supreme Court. There was nothing about what he would accomplish. In a second term, political attacks are always part of any campaign, but this president makes it more about personality and less about policy. Policy differences with Democrats. He only made passing references to what a Biden administration would do. Even though there's plenty to critique president, trump should take a lesson from Ronald Reagan who frequently referred to Democrats as our friends on the other side, he never diminished their value, but instead argued why conservative ideas are better. The presidency is an honor and privilege that has been granted to only forty five men in our history with great privilege comes great responsibility. We're better than this. We deserve better than this. The president's speech doesn't make Joe Biden more appealing. His remarks were unappealing, unattractive, and for me in the future unwatchable on Cal Thomas. Well, we are expecting Supreme Court decisions later this morning tomorrow. Our Legal Affairs correspondent Mary Reichardt. We'll have analysis for you also tomorrow. Trevon wax on culture. Friday talking. Cancel culture and a review of a mainstream documentary on the journeys of the Apostle Paul, look at the strengths and the weaknesses and your listener feedback I'm Nick Eicher and I Megan Basham. The world and everything in it comes to you from world radio. World's mission is biblically objective journalism that. That informs, educates and inspires well. It's a home stretch of our June giving drive less than a week to go, so please visit w. n., G. Dot org slash donate today. We are very grateful for your support. Well, exodus tells us do not fear for God has come to test you that the fear of him may be before you that you may not sin. I hope you'll have a great rest of the day. We'll talk to you tomorrow.

National Parks Megan Basham officer James Blair Nick Eicher North Carolina president Justice Department Cal Thomas United States President Trump Michael Flynn Grand Teton National Park South Korea Kent Covington District of Columbia Newark GOP North Korea
No Spin News Audio Excerpt, October 12, 2020

Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis

11:47 min | 9 months ago

No Spin News Audio Excerpt, October 12, 2020

"Bill O'Reilly Here No. Spin News Monday October. Twelfth Two Thousand Twenty stand up for your country. You have a lot of interesting facts for you. Tonight on like most television news broadcasts, we like to give you facts or we don't have panels with eight people and Do that we just present information so you can make informed decisions and. Have discussions with people based on. Facts, right so. Twenty two days until we vote, that's a fact twenty, two days from now. Donald trump making a bit of a comeback I got hammered in that first debate. You know it's funny. The president runs around go I won the debate and everybody just goes. He got hammered not that Biden beat him. He beat himself trump himself. By the interruptions and Basic Bomb Bass presentation because when you do that and take it from me, Mr. Bombastic you're looking at Mr Bombastic right here when you do that. Whatever else you say people don't really here because they're watching you be boombastic now I use it for effect sometimes I don't do it much anymore. But when I was younger, I did it a lot. And I know that can be used for. Positive results, but it also can backfire and get you hit right in the head which is what president trump. Experience in the first debate. But he's making a comeback now small comeback. It's coming and I'M GONNA I'm GonNa Absolutely. Prove it to you. But that's not to say he's going to win. Because he's still behind. Now is I've explained to you in a pass or two types of polling the dishonest polls that the media operations pay for all right and if you believe them. The Old Cliche is the Brooklyn Bridge, which is in Arizona. But please don't. So you being misled, but the interim polling is paid for by the political parties themselves and what that polling does is it centers on counties. That have voted in the past for certain candidates that have a consistent record of voting Republican or Democrat. So the county is much easier. To evaluate than a whole state or a whole country. So the polling goes into maybe five six counties in say Ohio. Key State. and to see if there's a deviation out of the historical norm, I don't WanNa to pin hetty about this but you need to know what internal polling is art if the polling comes back well, it's the same it W-. was four years ago and they know that if you're going back to different. Than that sends a signal. So president, trump's coming up a little bit in the internal polling particularly in Arizona. Interesting Because that was going to Biden. Coming back a little bit. I don't know why until you why I can only tell you what the internal polling shows. Now, the Democrats are very happy with their internal polling in Minnesota. So. At one point after they were burning down Minneapolis the Republicans maybe we could win this state. Right. Now shifting into Mr Biden's orbit. Now I can give you that all right without violating anybody's confidence and or this and that, and I will do that over the next three weeks and concentrate on the internal poll. There are two pulling outfits that I follow personally because I know they're not misleading me Trafalgar. And Rasmussen. Okay Now. Rasmusen daily tracking poll today. Big Improvement for Donald, trump. Forty nine percent of likely voters now approve of the job the president's doing fifty disapprove you remember last we gave those numbers. That was not good for Donald Trump enclosed closed that gap. Saying how that happen? How did he close that gap over the weekend? Okay. Well had to do with Kobe. But I can't disassemble why. Don't know I'm working on it I don't know. So this is a good day for Donald Trump and Rasmussen's. Fifty job performance. That's a key. You are listening to a free excerpt from bill. O'Reilly dot com no spin news broadcasts where you can actually see me. We'll be right back after this message. Hey investors seeking steady cashflow ready to diversify. Have you considered a proven real estate investment fund. And our I A is grown to be one of the nation's leading specialists and offers ten percent annualized monthly pay-outs with bonuses targeted at Eighteen, twenty, one percent. That's right. You could receive steady ten percent return monthly payments with bonuses as it's Logan. Says they specialize in realty investing done right. You can even use your 401k or IRA to invest and are I as fifteen year track record in one point two, billion dollars in new construction development backs you. Learn how you can invest in his heart asset real estate cash flow fund today, and receive ten percent annualized monthly payout with bonuses. This is something savvy investors should researching consider. So please call now two, zero, one, two, one, zero, two, seven, two, seven, two, zero, one, two, one, zero, two, seven, two, seven, or visit and our. Dot Net. Spring Court hearing today I, think it was the most boring hearing. I've ever watched in any circumstance I mean I. I was going this is incredible. All the senators grandstanded. Okay. The Republicans Love Judge Barrett and Democrats hate her. But for our purposes here, I picked out to soundbites that I think we're particularly obnoxious. The first is from my pal. Comma Harris. Go. Every American must understand that with this nomination. Equal Justice under law is at stake. Are? Voting rights are at stake. Workers rights are at stake consume Mariah's are at stake right to save an legal abortion is at stake and holding corporations accountable is at stake. I know I'm frightened. I know I on. It's almost four years under Donald, trump I, and have any of my rights violated. I didn't have any my rights violated under Donald Trump none. Notice Corporation so who? They call it a dog whistle I hate that 'cause CNN invented it a dog whistle. That's an a socialist. Come in after his corporation, we're GONNA get him. Government is going to control the marketplace we get these corporations. Com Harris everyone I wrote a column honor. Entitled She is speaking I. Hope You read it on Bill O'Reilly, Dot Com that column actually amused me after I wrote it. was more amused after I wrote it than while I was writing it. I Cory Booker. We Love Corey the only Democratic Senator from New Jersey Go. We're here because in the middle of a deadly pandemic in the middle of an ongoing election, Senate Republicans have found a nominee in judge Barrett who they know will do what they couldn't do subvert the will of the American people and overturned the ACA Overturn Roe v Wade. Subvert the will of the American people everyone. Overturn. The affordable care. And Roe the away. Okay singlehandedly. As aiming conybeare that's going to. Back with a final thought about my trip to Maine in a moment. Support for this podcast comes from dropbox business teamwork your way there I was struggling to balance my professional life and making my son something healthy in my personal life, and then I realized my team and I can fix this. We're all pretty different with different working styles but that only makes us more productive. I work early in slides while Biz Dev assigned tasks and legal works late in hello sign all from one shared dropbox workspace try dropbox for your team dropbox dot com slash teams at work. All right. So I went up to Maine love. Maine love to England. To my jeans. And I went to bar harbor and. We had a great time whether it was fantastic. Bar. Harbor Maine. Acadia. National. Park was beautiful places on Earth makes you proud to be an American? To me like. Ten minutes to get that Macho poses there and everything like that. But shows some of the scenic pictures of you would. Fabulous time. Great lobster. The lobster was fantastic. and kind of roamed around. Down on a beach. All of that. Now I saw a lot of Biden. Harris signs there was some trump pen sons will more biden. Signs and I was tempted to just go up and knock on the door and say I'm here what's for supper? Everybody knew me by the way which is a good thing and we got a lot of laughs a lot of people. But I wanted to say to the people live in Maine and Maine is a state that values independence libertarian state you can carry in. Maine. Do you have any blanket idea what's going to happen to your individual rights. If Biden and Harris get elected I know they don't WanNa hear it. I know but name. Right which is. Tough place to live because it's cold beautiful place. But they're rugged independent folks up there as a few snowflakes in Portland but we were way north. I just want to. Deal with coming down the road, you might not like this Guy Stan. But boy oh boy, you're going to get hammered. By the central government in Washington expanding. Anyway, I recommend main. Anybody who wants a beautiful experience? It was terrific. All right. Enjoyed it. Main will go for Biden Harris the one northern electoral vote they split there we'll go to trump. I hope Susan Collins Wins Senator Schmid Gutsy call and bread kavanagh she deserves to win. I hope she does a good purse. Anyway. That's my story of the weekend and we'll see again a more.

Donald trump Mr Biden Biden Harris president Maine Bill O'Reilly Arizona Judge Barrett Roe Senator Mr Bombastic Mr. Bombastic Brooklyn Bridge Harbor Maine Minneapolis Portland Cory Booker Rasmussen Susan Collins Washington
What Climate Change Means For America's National Parks

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

48:26 min | Last week

What Climate Change Means For America's National Parks

"This is on point. I magnin chalker bardy. America's great naturalist. John muir wrote. Walk the sequoia woods at anytime of the year and you will say. They are the lowest on earth. This is what you hear when you walk through those very woods. In the sequoia and kings canyon national parks in california to parks the other attacked. An amazing range of habitats are mainly because of the great elevation of a park spans. Which is the largest elevation range of any park in the lower forty-eight christie brigham is head of resource management and science for the two parks from oak woodlands in the foothills climbing up to mix conifer all the way to alpine glaciers. Both parts are incredibly beautiful. Ninety eight percent wilderness. Very wild and with some of the largest oldest trees on the planet the parks giant sequoias live on a different timescale than us. The thick red roby bark that twists higher than twenty story building might have taken more than two thousand years to reach that high in comparison a fast metabolism human life span the duration of but a mere n tisch inhale and exhale to these magnificent giants but christie. Brigham says in that ecological blink of an eye. Human beings have transformed the sequoias world When people think about climate change they often think about something. Bad will happen a long time in the future. It's not the future it's here now. The state estimates five point eight million dead trees. Those trees are dead because of an interaction between a hundred years of fire suppression and climate change driven hotter grout. We've seen snow line advanced uphill hundred feet. We were seeing some birds nesting fourteen days early. We're seeing some of the oldest and most resilient trees on earth being killed by novel things and new kind of cedar bark beetle. That's been here forever but has never before been able to kill dances now because been interaction of drought stress and fire is able to kill. These trees were seeing changed. Fire behavior way. More severe vary on high flame lengths able to kill these trees that are very fire-resistant so we are observing these changes right now in real time this spring when i was finally able to after the snow melted hike out to more camp grove that was severely burned in the fire and see for myself the huge hulking blackened skeletons of these trees that were clearly over a thousand years old have been standing there for centuries withstood lots of previous fire so resilient so incredible and now we have generated a situation that's capable where fire is capable killing them. It's very heartbreaking. I think what we're seeing in so many places in it's true car to quance of inaction is clearly going to be so much worse you just lost ten percent of the world's giants players in a single wildfire because in part because of inaction because of our inability to do prescribed burning and mechanical thinning. I have two kids sixteen thirteen. And i think about them a lot. And i get letters. These heartbreaking letters from kids and young adults who visited the sequoias and hugged us acquire and were so moved by that and what their grandkids to be able to have that experience. And when you live with sequoias and think about their lifespan. Two thousand years you do get in that mindset of what do we need to do now to make sure these trees are here two thousand years from now and what does that. And that's a burden and an inspiration christy. Brigham is the head of resource management and science for sequoia and kings canyon national parks in california. Well let me turn now to patty glick. She is senior scientist for climate. Climate adaptation at the national wildlife federation patty. Welcome to the show. Thank you so much for having me. On and john clayton as well. He's author of natural rivals. Moore gifford pinchot. And the creation of america's public lands and wonder landscape yellowstone national park in the evolution of an american cultural icon. John welcome back to the show. Great to be here so patty let me ask you. You heard christi talk about this. Duality of Climate change creating both a burden and an inspiration on how she has to manage The sequoia and kings canyon national park's. How much is climate. Change creating that duality across the national park service. Well i wanna stay. Hearing from christie was really really powerful. It's certainly true National parks across the country. No doubt face some very difficult but important decisions about how to tackle the challenges posed by climate change. It's a it's a reality. That a lot of people are coming to grips with Just to share a little bit of over the last decade we at the national wildlife federation have been working with a coalition of federal resource management agencies including the national park service. Basically to help them figure out how to cope with the impacts of climate in their work. It's a practice known. As climate adaptation in the context of natural resource management. we often refer to it as climates smart conservation. But we've also been working. With agencies individually to help customize the guidance for their unique needs and the national park service has actually recognized have been concerned about the effects of climate change for a long time in fact the agency made the decision to move the historic lighthouse at north carolina's cape hatteras. National seashore more than twenty years ago because it was vulnerable to sea level rise erosion. But in you know. In recent years concerns definitely grown as parks is experienced worsening wildfires in hurricanes another extreme events in addition to some of that ongoing changes and that realization that climate change is having a significant impact on perk resources and assets is really compelled the agency. I think to find ways to reduce the risk. Just about all of its work and so the planning for a changing climate guidance that we help develop to help parks navigate. The considerable climate related challenges that they face across their whole range of activities from citing visitors centers and other infrastructure and protecting wildlife to Entering cultural and historic resources still are meaningful. Now just the one year. Actually so. If i just step in here for for a quick shower because we have the whole hour to really dive deep into this this idea here and i want to make it clear to listeners. At the reason why we're talking to you. Patty in particular today is because of what you just mentioned right. You're one of the leadoff authors of of relatively new national park service report as you mentioned called planning for a changing climate and it's this this notion that climate change has become so Ah unavoidable You cannot close your eyes to it anywhere and now the national park service itself is really from what i understand. This document is help trying to help. Provide this toolkit for how the nps should go about. Its core mission in in protecting america's most beautiful public lands. And that's what we want to talk about how climate change might be changing that mission. But if you could just hang on for a second here. John let me just turn back to you. Last time we had you on the show i had just gotten back from yellowstone and this time that we have you on the show i literally just got back a couple of weeks ago from zion and bryce canyon. I am an unabashed superfan of america's national parks here. But but can you talk to me a little bit about your first thoughts about how climate change might be shifting. What is popularly conceived of as the national park service's most sacred mission that preservation of these spectacular unique public land's these these landscapes often sort of represent the what we love about america. America's best idea in the words of of wallace stagner and ken burns and one hundred hundred and fifty years ago. We collectively decided to set aside. These lands to preserve the so that our grandkids could have the same experiences that we did in those places and so to think about losing them. It it feels a little bit. Like losing the best of america if they were to change due to climate or or other problems so i guess. The core question here is is in that word preservation. How did the national park service previously define or historically define preservation and is that still possible with climate change one of the interesting things about the period especially from the eighteen. Ninety s to the nineteen ten was that we had different values related to the environment and we set aside land for different purposes to to meet those different values. The parks were set aside for preservation to preserve these places untouched. The glory of nature a meanwhile the national forests were set aside under a philosophy of conservation. Let's conserve some of these resources for the future. Let's not cut down all of our trees today so that we will have some timber of tomorrow. Conservation implies management. We're going to choose which trees to cut which bally's too damn preservation implies that we can leave nature alone that humans are separate from nature and perhaps even worse than nature and nature will be able to figure these things out on its own and so i think what we're seeing here is is a crisis. In which roy. Nature may not be able to figure out climate Well when we comeback patty. We're gonna talk more about what's in this report that you helped co author for the national park service planning for a changing climate but as we head into the break. Let's listen to a moment to an early morning bird. Chorus from mineral king recorded at eight thousand ninety three feet in the sub. Alpine aeko zone of sequoia national park. Just on point kid support for this. Podcast comes from invent together. According to studies less than thirteen percent of all inventors who hold. Us patent are women black and hispanic college graduates patent at half the rate of their white counterparts but we can fix that by increasing participation in innovation and patenting by underrepresented groups. It would quadruple. The number of american inventors and increase annual gdp by almost one trillion dollars. Invent together is a coalition of organizations companies. Universities and concerned citizens committed to ensuring that everyone has the opportunity to invent and patent because the more diverse. The american patent system gets the stronger and more successful. our nation will become. What can you do to help. Divers inventors patent an unleash economic opportunity. Find out at invent together dot org learn more and take action today. This is on point. I'm meghna chakrabarti. And today we are talking about how. Climate change is having an impact on america's national parks so much so that recently the nps Put out a report called planning for a changing climate and it lays out a whole new management scheme and different kinds of decisions that the park service will have to make. As america's most precious public lands are changing very rapidly due to climate change. I'm joined today by patty glick. She senior scientists for climate adaptation at the national wildlife federation and. She's one of the lead author on this national park service report. She's been studying climate change for thirty years and she joins us from bend oregon. Shout out to my home state. Patty and also john clayton joins us as well. He's author of natural rivals. John muir gifford pinchot and the creation of america's public lands now. Let's listen to a moment to what's happening for example in of the most northern national parks in this country. And that's in. Denali national park and preserve in alaska. Dave shor kaur is the science and resources team leader at denali. One of the largest parks in the system six million acres and he says he's seeing climate change in a big way from frost is a really key driving feature of the landscape. Most of the northern two million acres of the park is by ice rich permafrost. And so just to tell you what that means is. Permafrost is ground that remains frozen for at least two years in a row. It's kind of like a frozen wetland where there's a lot of water content in the soil that's been frozen for millennia. In some cases this permafrost sign so the active layer that's the layer that melts and freezes. Seasonally is getting deeper. So we're we're getting more active layer and less permafrost and that has all sorts of implications and one of the implications. He gave us for. Example is the impact it might have on trumpeter swan habitat. There are a bunch of lakes out in the northwest corner of the park. Hundreds of little lakes and trumpeter swans are abundant out there in the summer and they rely on these lights. Many of these lakes are permafrost controlled role so what that means is that water is held in place because of the frozen ground that surrounds. It would be a big deal to lose a lot of that permafrost because it will cause many of those lakes to disappear and we've seen some of them disappear ready and dave kaur also told us that he is heartened though by the new national park service guidelines on climate change because they are providing a new framework for him to think about management in denali. It gives us a really good language to put on how we view our response to the changing climate. And there's a a mantra that's come out of that and it's called accept or resist and there are places where resisting is totally appropriate. And i think of sequoia and the fact that those trees were seedlings during the last ice age and the climate was really really different and their fundamental the park. So yeah let's resist because that's a key feature and in other places we just accept an observe and i think because of our large tax landscape and also that all of our species are here that have been here since before. Humans were even part of this landscape puts us more on the accept or adopt side of ninety creation. So that's dave shirk. Our science and resources team leader at denali. National park and preserve in alaska. Now patty glick i. I wonder if you could just tell us broadly. If in the the new guidance that you helped co author here the planning for a changing climate if the sort of big picture. Big picture shift here or reckoning as you've been quoted as saying is what john clayton was telling us earlier that the national park service now due to climate change has to move away from a pure preservation mission and to of more active management where the park service has to make more and more decisions every year about what to protect to conserve. What is the reckoning. That's going on here. Well i think. I think china's new making a very important point. I mean one thing. We do need to acknowledge that conservation goals values based and the park. Service's going to need to figure out not just what's achievable in terms of its adaptation strategies. But also what's acceptable But that said you know america's conservation vision as a whole has evolved over time you went from the initial idea of protecting pristine landscapes and to managing the into waters for hunting and fishing to the broader gold. Protecting biodiversity ethnic. Climate adaptation is a continuation of that evolution including within the park service. I think it represents an era of conservation in which we need to embrace decision making under uncertainty and accept the need for innovation and experimentation for example Some parks are considering Strategies to actually direct change You know there's a approach called managed relocation which essentially takes species That may no longer in their current or historical range because of a changing climate and actually move them to new areas. Hopefully so that they will remain there and it's somewhat controversial. It needs to be you know. The parks are definitely looking at the risks of any potential downsides but for some people it means the only hope of avoiding extinction well so this. This is a really interesting example right because my understanding was that overall historically the national park service viewed these particular lands as having kind of a pretty tight range of what was considered natural right and it sounds as if climate changes is pushing pushing those habitats out of that that natural historic that historical range. And that's the thing that the national park service has to be addressed urgently contend with now. Is that right. Well that is true. You know climate changes forcing as i've mentioned before a wreck announced what something really means to be. Natural sitter that to be a condition reflected by the absence of humans. And i think a really good example of this is how we consider shifts in the range of native species in response to climate change on their own In the southwest for example places like bandelier national monument new mexico seen extensive lost of pine and juniper woodlands doodoo extreme drought an insect outbreaks but on other public. Land's where where you know human caused. Climate change is actually contributing to an expansion of such woody vegetation into existing grassland sagebrush managers in those areas are confronted with the question of whether to resist that expansion by removing the plants that they can maintain the current habitat or whether that expansion is a quote unquote natural. Change that can be accepted or even facilitated clinton what do you think about that. Yeah absolutely there's there's a need for the perks to manage these These lamps it's you know. I think there's a romantic of misinterpretation when we we think about preservation assumption that The parks don't live in. The parks will naturally just stay the way they are eco-systems. Always change and in order to manage these spiritual experiences that we can have in great natural environments. We do need to do some management and the perk service. Frankly always has done some management so this is a logical next step. Well patio early very early. On in in this report it states that it may not be possible to safeguard park or all park resources right Or assets or values in their current form over the long term. I'm wondering if you could give us a couple more examples from other national parks about the rapid changes. They're seeing well it. You know it's interesting. I think one of the things that comes to a lot of people's minds is you know what's going to happen to the parks whose you know. Namesake features are at risk from a changing climate and we heard about the glaciers in glacier national park for example in early in the program and and you know there there may no longer have glaciers in in that park just within a few decades and joshua tree national park in california we're seeing hotter and drier conditions killing off those species in it in a kind of begs the question. What this mean for some parks legacy and we. We actually joke about this a little bit about whether we need to call the joshua tree national park. The park formerly known as joshua tree go. I'm just. I'm just kind of react from a very bittersweet mostly bitter sweet perspective. Indeed i mean in from a from a natural resource perspective in one of the things that the park service has long recognizes that ecosystems are dynamic and and do change and that there is a certain amount of adaptive capacity and in fact parks are actually starting to work with communities outside of their borders to help increase habitat connectivity. So that species that are able to move to track warm changing conditions able to do so. But i do think. The challenge is is particularly great for some parks that that have Historic buildings or are grounded on on cultural resources that that don't have that necessarily that inherit adaptive capacity and and they're you know. Unfortunately i do think that the decisions that parks are going to make are going to be a little bit more binary now. Let's fight as hard as we can to prevent the loss of these features But you know some point. Yeah we may have to accept some loss and nets it. It certainly a big challenge so idea point. Well taken on the the the parks that contain Culturally important culturally historic locations that perhaps can be more actively preserved but about the greater a number of acres millions of acres. That are that are natural. Lands i gotta ask you patty. I mean it again. Maybe i'm just falling prey to the romanticize ation that does happen with our parks. Because as i said. I just i don't know i feel like a different person whenever i visit them. But what what. It seems like this new guidance is suggesting. Is that as you're saying. It's not even suggesting it's providing a framework for how the national park service can make decisions to prioritize. Even if i can just put it bluntly on things to save and things soon not save species landscapes etc. You're talking about perhaps with the migration of species due to warming latitudes like whoa how to cope with that. This is all my way of building up to saying another option might have been to stay well. The park service should just continue its core mission and tried to do nothing right because the changes global right so why why try to come up with a framework on that deliberately introduces more human decision making and and the and those those very values that you were talking about well again. I do think that the the you know the park service Wants to Do everything it can to ensure that of the things that people know and love about our national parks You know will remain viable even if they they may look different from snapshots of the past. You know in one other thing. I think that is important That will not change about our national parks is. They're they're incredibly important. Role in public education and awareness and parks across. The country are working to help. People better understand the implications of climate change. And and i think doing so. They're actually helping to encourage people to be part of the solutions. And you know that not only includes some of the adaptation strategies that we that's the focus to the guidance but but also on strategies to minimize the impacts of climate change through efforts to limit greece greenhouse gas emissions and in fact parks across the country or or actually working to reduce their own carbon footprint as a result in in you know that that's a role that they're they're going to continue to play And it's very important. One john clinton. Let me turn back to you here because i still I think it's important to continue to weave into this conversation. Sort of the historic momentum that the national park service has because i'm reading with great interest patties report. She co authored. It and the suggestions in the guidance that it offers the modern day national park service about how to triage species and landscapes like the thinking that park managers will have to go through to decide which landscapes which species are are worth putting a lot of effort in to save or quote unquote preserve How to assess risks when relocating species again as petty pointed out that can be pretty controversial. and and things like that. And so i i just wonder in a sense. Is this actually just a an essential continuation of something. The park service always always has done even though we believed it had this core mission of of preserving these natural and kind of in an unchanging state in order to preserve natural lands. We need to use the best available science and when the park service was founded over one hundred years ago we didn't know much about wildlife science. We didn't know how to save species from going extinct and after great Advances in the science of ecology of the park service in nineteen sixty three asked starker leopold son of the famous thing decolonised l. leopold to write a report on how to implement ecosystem management in the parks of that report was a really well written and the land managers found it really useful. Which made it really influential in helping. Save while species. So when dave shirk our was earlier saying that the paddies report is is really useful to him in in implementing policies that was encouraged that. Maybe this report can be as valuable as as the leopold report. Wilson's well what do you think we tell. Quick minute to go before our expert here but Patty mentioned a really important word earlier. And that is values Do you think conflict or debate over. What the guiding values should be as these as human hands become more prevalent in in the management of the national park service. Do you think that they're going to be more conflict over those values john. There's always conflict over values. That's that's what politics is all about. We just need to make sure that it's informed by great science of like the work kind. You okay well Patty and i mean. Can you just talk with me for a couple of seconds more but what you meant about the bringing in those values into thinking about climate change in the park service. Well absolutely that. I think it's really important. We we did help. The park service spilled out the guidance but really was a collaborative effort among many people in the agency who bring their perspectives with from their various parks and are really well grounded and the challenges that they face i think it reflects the agency's vision for how it is can address climate change as part of its mission. And you know. I think that interpreting some of the changes helping people again understand what they mean is is an incredibly important will as we head into this next break here. You're hearing wolves howling in denali national park and preserve. We'll be right back. This is on point This is on point. I'm Party and today we are talking about how climate change is having an impact on america's most precious public lands and that is our national parks and the national park service recently came out with a report a new framework guidance for its managers on how to cope with climate change reports called planning for a changing climate. And we're joined today by one of the co authors of that report. Patty glick she senior scientists for climate adaptation at the national wildlife. Federation as well. john. Clayton is also with us. He's author of natural rivals. John muir gifford pinchot and the creation of america's publicly ends and wonder landscape yellowstone national park and the evolution of an american cultural icon and john and pat. If you can hang on here for justice second. I'd like to now bring into the conversation. Abraham miller rushing he senior science coordinator at acadia national park and he joins us from bar. Harbor maine dr miller rushing. Welcome thank you. thank you for having me on. So i think one of the The most sort of visible ways we're seeing in the impact of climate change in and in the national parks is through. What's happening to the forest. So can you tell us a little bit about how a katie is. Forests have changed over the past decade or two. Yeah yes so first of all. Acadia is tucked away. On the coast of maine we have a dominated by spruce fir forest oil forests and we have rocky coasts beautiful views and acadia is already a really different place than it was a hundred five years ago. We can see that through changes in our plants so about one out of every six of the native plant species that were here. A hundred years ago are no longer in the park. The bird community has changed. Ab still with us. We've lost species like oral chicken which used to breed in the park and that we have species from the south that are coming in things like turkey vultures and cardinals and we have bigger storms. Send just really for inches of rain that fell in about six hours and led to a lot of washouts out carry some of our historic carriage roads and other roads and unfortunately these things are becoming more frequent in the pace of change is really speeding up and presents. A lot of for how we manage these resources Yeah so so. The movement of basically common territories of certain certain species here. I'm hearing you described it. That's evident in acadia. I'm gonna keep my fingers crossed that your line holds up on us because there's some important insight that you would like to bring to to this hour and for example you've previously talked about Invasive species plant species that are really changing some of the forest. Acadian if you can hear me if you could tell us a story about Invasive brambles there yeah yes sorry about that yes so what we've been seeing is one of the things that were really concerned about is that we have to most of the forests here spruce fir so about forty percent of our trees red spruce At the southern edge of their range in. They're very drought intolerant. And so what we're concerned about. Is that over the next eighty years or so. We anticipate that those species the spruce trees are going to decline and disappear and so that leaves us with what comes next. After that and what. We're very concerned about. Is we have a lot of invasive species like buckthorn and other shrubs that are coming in on their own and we're concerned that they may come in and choke out the forest and prevent native species from coming in from the south which we would think would be the normal nate natural transition with climate. And so we're take thinking about. How do we manage that. So how do we keep these invasive species and doing lead the help those species from the south come up and So this is really really interesting. Let me ask you about the so. This is a perfect example of one of those kind of decisions that patty was talking about earlier that that managers in in almost every national park in this country are going to have to think through. So tell me how are you thinking through that because know the the big picture here is is the climate is changing. Those species are moving. The invasive are coming further and further north every year. i mean there's always do nothing about Or there's what as far as i understand. Acadia has done historically which is send teams out to sort of rip some of those invasive brambles out but is that even going to be adequate over the next decade or so yes i mean. That's our big question. An it comes back to something that you asked the christie mentioned in the opening about its acquaintance kings canyon. That inaction really is a decision and the inaction can lead to things that we think are unacceptable So here we think that inaction is gonna lead to invasive species choking out our forests and so what we're trying to do is really aggressively removed those invasive species by some time to be able to do the science about An investigate how can responsibly manage that transition to native species from the south. And so we're doing a lot of experiments to try to see how we can responsibly. Do that what species survive with species might be look like they've themselves Might even basically when they get here so we and and what techniques can we ears so. There's a lot of science that we're trying to do and we're trying to buy ourselves some time because we know that we're not going to be able to keep the basis at bay forever. How long have you worked at acadia. I've been here for eleven years. Eleven years okay. I understand that the pace of change there for certain species is so rapid that for an invasive insect for example has really attacked the red pine in acadia national park and according to one article i'm seeing here is that it could wipe or the red pine has virtually been wiped out in just six years. Yeah yes it. Our red pines about yes over the last six years of red pine scale which is invasive from east asia and arrived and really very quickly Killed all of the red pines in the park. And so there's there's really no red pines alive in the park anymore and this kind of an example of of the pace of change a lot of models show that species ranges will shift over times in our models are looking at eight years out but it could happen that the change happens very quickly so right now are spruce is doing great but it could happen that they declined very quickly Like over time spirit of six years like that. I'm resolved so i have to ask. I mean how does it feel to you. A walking through the pass and the forest of acadia national park over these eleven years and now over the past couple of you're seeing species get wiped out in the blink of an eye practically and and knowing that making the decisions that you were talking about are going to be an an ever more urgent Part of your job. I mean how does that feel having witnessed so much change so quickly. I mean there's definitely a sense of loss for sure. I grew up falling in love with national parks and natural areas and dermot conservation training. We were really taught about restoring things to historic conditions and now realized recognizing that that's impossible and the kids and grandkids are going to experience a different conditions Than what. I'm you know what i love about acadia But there's also a sense of agency and urgency. I think that The we have the ability to take actions and that we really need to take actions right now to make sure that our forests remain healthy and that that even if they look different so the postcards right now actually look about the same as they did one hundred years ago in one hundred years on the look they'll look very different and even though they look different we can still make sure that they're as healthy as possible. Well john patty. I appreciate your patience in in listening to abe talk about his work and the changes at acadia national park but patty. Let me turn back to you. What are you hearing In abs experiences. They're really thank you. I really appreciate Having your perspective there on the ground. And i think that no katya has been doing some incredibly innovative work and thinking about how to address the challenge. They're facing you know i. I think one thing that's particularly important about the park. Service's out and work on a whole that the agency. They've radley acknowledged that there are inherent uncertainties in climate change over time and and the potential for surprises like he mentioned the potential that they could have a rapid die off at ten. You know one thing. I think that Part planners and managers are being encouraged to consider multiple plausible future conditions from the best case scenarios to the worst case scenario to everything in between. Because hopefully that's going to help them. Identify management strategies. That may be robust no matter what changes may occur. well I'm also curious about again. If you could just take a minute to explain to us a little bit more detail some of the decisions that you're you're having to make our thinking about how to make regarding preservation of species that you were going to try to bring certain species into the park or or or not help me understand that a little bit. Yeah so Right now we're essentially following the framework that that the report that the patty worked on set out kind of deciding. Where do we resist change. So there are places in the park for example on we have some summits in coastal areas. That are likely provide refuge where we're climate conditions will change more slowly than others and we can protect those and try to preserve what's air right now and are other places where changes happening more rapidly and in those areas. We may May take more hands on. Directing approach Thinking about How how do we make sure that they don't become invasive species tickets and so we're setting up. We're working with partners. And i should say that all of this work is very key with partners like the national wildlife federation at the national level but also locally with scoot against tudor friends of acadia. All of this requires a lot of partners. But we're setting up experiments that allow us to were bringing in species in kind of raised beds and seeing how they grow alongside of our native species seeing how some of our small mammals Respond to You know to eating their seeds or other things. I'm trying to get an idea of how the ecosystem might play out if we were to move moved these species so we haven't made these management decisions but we're trying to do the science so that we're smart about it when we we do so the idea of bringing in species though i mean abe you you were quoted elsewhere saying that for example You know in your training to To to do this work for in the national park service in the past the training was essentially focused on keeping things like they were right that that preservation at a notion that we keep coming back to And you know folks weren't being trained on how to manage for change but it sounds like this. It's court managing for changes. The core of the work now the even just the notion of bringing in species into the park is completely different than preserving things as they were in the asked. Yeah absolutely and i think you know a big part of that is it comes back to these conversations about like values and things to We're having to one all the people in conservation field in the vast majority us have not been trained in how to do this and so we're learning on the job and we're having to really think about how our values shift to And we're having to read a lot of conversations like patti was mentioning earlier with our stakeholders in with local communities. About what are the things that we really value in. Want to keep the same. What are the things that were okay. Changing and change. And how do we want that. Change to play out And so it requires a lot of conversations and a lot of soul-searching a for Future the future of national parks to be we'll abraham miller rushing is the science coordinator at acadia. national park. Joined us today from bar harbor maine. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you petty glick. Now it's time to we just in a minute here. I want to talk about politics and policy and resources. Does the national park service in your view have the resources it needs to really to effectively do this new new and different kind of management of the land under its care. I certainly can't speak specifically to what their particular needs are. But i can't say more generally debt. Yes we are going to need make investments across the board here to to ensure that our federal agencies and our states and local communities have the resources necessary to in you know to invest in strategies that help keep both our natural world and our human communities protected and safe as as we face these changing climatic conditions and you know and i think that there is a good vision within the current administration to to help make that Come to fruition will. Patty glick is senior. Scientists for climate adaptation at the national wildlife federation and one of the lead authors on this really interesting and important national park service report called planning for a changing climate. Patty thank you so much for joining us today. You're a welcome. It's really my pleasure. So john clayton. We've got about a minute left here. And i keep coming back to this idea that now. What our values are going to strongly. Determine how america's national parks are more actively managed every year as time goes on because of climate change. And i just wonder if you could. I'm dying to know. I keep thinking about the founding of of our parks or the creation of the idea that these places should even be preserved. So i want to ask you. What do you think john muir would would ask us to do now. It's difficult to know what your would say today. Because he lived in a different era as the controversy over his racial views should remind us and of course he said many different things like any great prophet he can be interpreted in multiple ways. But i think what were really wanted at. The core was for us to acknowledge and celebrate. Some places are special in some places have These great spiritual values beyond the monetary values that we often assigned to them so to the extent that we can try to manage these places for those spiritual values. I think he would approve a quote from your book where you're talking about the part and parcel of the eternal conflict between right and wrong right right. And then he was just later in that same article he said what you wanted was commonsense management. And now we are dealing with common sense management of our national parks in an era of climate change. So john clayton author of natural rivals. Thank you so much for joining us today. What a pleasure as always thank you and by the way so many of natural sounds. You've heard this hour came to us from the national park service. We have a link to their recordings at on radio dot. Org i magnin tucker. This is on point.

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Three Minute Love Stories

Committed

11:39 min | 1 year ago

Three Minute Love Stories

"Sometimes these days along than Yoga class just isn't in the cards but maybe a cookie is pepperidge. Farm Milano believes you should make some time for yourself once in a while my idea of me. Time is a little bit different since I had the second baby instead of a yoga class. I'm maybe do a yoga pose just one downward dog at a time you know what I do have time for. I can eat a cookie a whole cookie eighty and eating that cookie feels like the best little piece of meantime. There is these days Milano. Cookies are the perfect treat to save her. During me time they have just the right amount of cookie and luxuriously rich chocolate. They're the type treat that you don't WanNa share not even with your kids or your husband. Remember to save something for yourself with Pepperidge Farm Milano. I Love Sports and I love my wife. I will destroy you. We haven't even started yet. If if you're the type of fan WHO LOVES TO DEBATE JORDAN LEBRON LAMBEAU versus soldier field or even the San Lot versus major league. You will love listening to our podcast. The greatest rea- some of our favorite comedian meeting friends and celebrities to come and constructively argue. Everything within the world of Sports with my competing in sports frenetic wife Megan Gaily my hilarious writer and comedian husbands. Cj Toilet lead on now so listen and follow the greatest iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to podcasts. Some of the best love stories come in small packages. That's why we asked you our listeners to send us voicemails of your own love stories. We'll be running a few of them before season four starts. They're short and sweet and all of with them even the ones that didn't make it to air because we got so many reminded us about the many ways that we can commit to one another so here are three many love stories. We used to tide you over until we launched season for April. We've got a dirty dog that led the love on a camping trip. A couple of learned to meet in the middle over the course of two decades and a middle school relationship that persevered against all odds enjoy in the summer of nineteen eighty-three family camping at Acadia. National Park Maine with a shy college friend and a dog. Drummer Asleep Cocker Spaniel. I was nursing a bruised ego after having been dumped by a sailor. I've been dating and I wasn't feeling very of men in general and specifically sailors after supper in bar. Harbor my friends my dog while I ordered an ice cream cone then. She went in for hers while Drummer and I people watched on the busy main street to rather attractive young men were. We're heading my way but I suspect that they were from the way they walked. They were calling the large naval ships moored in the harbor home. I turned away from them and stopped to offer. A lick of my co toned. My dog when I stood on the mend stopped before me. The Tall One twinkled at me and said Nice dog ever wash him. I was offended and defended my clean. Dogs honor the conversation took us. My friend grudgingly joined US and soon she was engaged chatting to the next thing. I knew we'd invited the guys drink a bottle of wine and watch at sunset from the chopper Cadillac. All five of US piled into my tiny two car. The tall went in front with me. My dog plots happily into his lap. He soon became again. Just knees. You wouldn't happen to be allergic to dogs. I asked turns out. He was on the mountaintop. We watched the sunset behind the harbour full of pleasure craft lobster boat and it'd be incongruous in Congress. USS Stark we shared a first kiss. He proposed marriage not tonight equipped but eight days later fantasy loping. I still have dogs. Make him sneeze. He's I also have dairy goats donkeys cats chickens and ducks together. We raised delightful daughter next year. We will celebrate blissful thirty six years of marriage we still hold hands who's never had a fight and we consider ourselves incredibly lucky to have over an ice cream eating spaniel how you doing. My name is Lawrence Room and this is my life story. My wife and I get almost twenty. Years are met in high school and not knowing. Exactly what type of people we were You know we fell in love by being just romantic people. We grew our well. I had a child outside of our relationship relationship and eventually we ended up getting married. Believe it or not that was only beginning because we realized that we had two totally different sexual tastes. But are I love story actually see us together with our our intimate. Life's Josh just because you know I have a high driving. She has the lowest and we ended up meeting in the middle to find things that we really like like going to. The opera for eating out is different foods which things I didn't know you know we we've seen it all We've we've done it all know what I love more than my wife's and I've I've neglected my job. I cussed out my bosses. My Wife's more important than anything and kiss my ass. You could split. I always wanted to share. Our love. Stories is so special for me and I hope somebody's able to finish initiative also learning about compromise you know because that is the most important part compromising and listening is the most important part that swear definition of our story. I in our relationship is is is built on is listening being compassionate and and and understanding that a compromise is about the person. I'm so. Thank you for listening. I'm always wanted to tell somebody that Hi My name is Elizabeth. Thank him and here is my three minute left. My husband and I met when we were in sixth and seventh grade. We went to the same middle school together. And Yeah I knew of him but didn't really get to know him and we were in high school when we joined The same activities and we were seeing each other every day and when we the the night that he you know he likes me was Asia where competition. He was the drummer our show choir and I was in the show choir and my mom. It was actually a volunteer at the events that we were at and she said that when she saw together she knew she was in trouble. Because you could just see the chemistry coming off of US and He was so talk funny. And so cute you know he's wearing aviator glasses and a banned t shirt and he just me of what Middle School High School. Girls think it's cute and it was from there. We just really haven't left each other side and We got married young. We got married when we were in nineteen twenty. They're still babies. We know that now. Um I'm but we felt invincible. And we've grown up together. We've changed into who we are and we're completely different people than we were when we got married but because we've done that growing together we've been able to stay together and You know we've been through all sorts of things Two months after we got married I went through a horrible impression and he had to help me get through that. I've been been there with him through mental health issues. I've been there when he needed them selves. If someone which leukemia we support each other through college and Grad school my husband's getting we'll be with his masters and I got my My master's a few years ago. We've been there through Don's life the that's the jobs that we love very much and the Infertility and the birth of our daughter has two and a half years of her life. We've we've been through it all together and You know there's there's not been any time where things have been one hundred percent perfect but it's our life and and these made it made it really really beautiful and even now I I've experiencing a major depression again and that's still not enough to take away from what we have and at the end of the day I can always remind myself that I have I and he has any and we know each other more than anybody else will ever know watched. And there's something really special beautiful about that that there's you know I've got friends that got family. But he's the one person knows the entire now and I feel safe I feel speaks because of that And even though I'm incredibly depressed right now he's my safety me and I can't describe it really Do you WANNA share your love story with us. Well I really hope the answer is a resounding yes. Well it's easy. You just call us it pick up the SCHMO phone and you leave an actual voice mail you can reach us at four zero four nine nine six one one seven three remember to let us know your email address. They try to keep it to three minutes or less season for will be here before you know it. I promise in the meantime you can binge committed on. I tunes the the iheartradio APP or wherever you get your podcasts. And if he loves US leaving review I love reviews almost as much as I love. Three minute love stories Taki piece in As the creators of clean beauty bare minerals is driven by purity in formulation and uncompromising performance. That's by their original foundation is made with only five clean mineral ingredients in fact all of their products are good for skin and cruelty. Free Start Upgrading to clean beauty routine. Today he's the foundation finder at bare minerals dot com to find your perfect match. First Time customers get fifteen percent off with code committed bare minerals. The the power of good rocker is podcast. Coming of age story about finding a home in rock music and learning to flourish in your own weird way. It's also a series of letters of advice to my younger self as she navigates. It's the pressures of adolescent seals social anxiety body issues relationships and discovers the transformative power of Music Jerry Walker comes to you from double. Elvis productions is created and hosted by me Chelsea and executive produced by Jack Brennan of disgrace. Land listened to dear young rocker on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts.

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The 12 Best Fall Destinations in the U.S. in 2019

Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast

47:55 min | 1 year ago

The 12 Best Fall Destinations in the U.S. in 2019

"So it's not just about the wine but the great restaurants I'm drawn up wine. The Extra Pekka peanuts travel podcast episode three double eight despite what many people think and despite what goes down here New Orleans Popular Bourbon Street was not named after the whiskey in fact it's named after the Bourbon Dynasty of France well. That's a little bit of Bummer in in today's episode. We're going to talk about a lot of amazing destinations even though we're just staying in the US but no matter where you're going whether you're going winging east coast west coast north south cool weather warm weather. It doesn't matter whether you're driving flying taking a train taking a bus. You're going to need a good piece of luggage and no matter where I go no matter what I'm doing. I'm always bring my Tortuga backpacks with me. You definitely definitely want a a good piece of luggage and for me. The one that's been my standby for the last five years are Tortuga backpacks. You check that out too. 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Do you know Hello Travel nerds and welcome to the extra pack peanuts travel podcast the show that teaches you how to travel more while spending less. I'm your host Travis Sherry and joining me. Today is someone who now that she's a mother of two. Whenever she has free time she says all I WANNA do is podcast in my free time well that and sleep my my wife on constant travel companion heather. I did say that I miss podcast and you know it took about a month and a half break and I'm ready to get back at it. I'm excited this. This is the first podcast for recordings. Hadley made her debut into the world about a month ago and I couldn't be more excited and she is sitting here with US Heather. We're sitting here with me but handley is sitting on the bed next to me in this little snot what snuggle me me organic pillow snuggle mirror pillow sh we thought she was sleeping but now our eyes are open open and she's watching us as we podcast so let's hope we can keep her at bay during the recording of the show and had perfect timing for you to come back on the show because today we're going to talk about our favorite fall destinations but we want to do something a little different. We've done best fall destinations over the last couple years not every year but over the last couple of years we've done this show once or twice but it was always anywhere in the world and this year we thought well now that we have to kids. I'm not GONNA say that. We are stuck at home. Could we certainly aren't we're going to tell you all about our travels and everything you know. You'RE GONNA learn how it is traveling with two kids as we do throughout the podcast as episodes come out but ought we certainly are looking at what might be easier or quicker or you know just more convenient for us so we decided to keep it all within the US today so our best fall destination inside the US. I guess it's pretty basic but fall is definitely. Maybe my favorite season tied with summer. They're both so me one of your top four seasons it. I can't tell if I like it more than summer knocks. I'm definitely a beach grow. Befall us to something exciting with the weather changing. It's cooling down the leaves change color. It's just an exciting time. It's like a the fresh start. I like it way more than spring. In fact spring is my least favorite season case. Anybody was wondering before but yeah. I'm really excited to you. Just talk about some cool destinations and I have been to a lot of the ones on my list so I'm excited to talk about what we experienced and then some new ones that I've never been into yeah. I think falls a super versatile season so it you know here. We live in Philadelphia. So if we're here we can go south and stay warm. We kind of keep summer going knowing we can go north at the beginning of fall if we want that. Crisp Ya'll it'd be nice to throw on a sweatshirt. We want to escape. Maybe the late summer heat here I just I really like it too as versus season because you can go and get that quote unquote fall weather of Chris cool clean air or if you're saying hangmen. I'm not ready for summer to end or hey were were late in the fall here and it's getting really cold out escape somewhere warm you could certainly do that all with in the US Asu even though we are in the confines of the US here. There's a lot of different places on my list. I'm trying to different climates different different reasons absolutely absolutely and for those things I have some warmer places and I have some cooler places so I'm of the things that's interesting to me before we get in this slowest though I think the dates of fall are weird. They seem weird to me so September twenty third through December twenty. Second is are the data fall. I get astrologically why this is happening with the equinoxes and things but had I feel like December twenty second. I mean you're in winter I after Thanksgiving that feels like winter to me and I feel like after August is over fall really starts in September. Am I wrong in in that assessment yeah like maybe I should be August to November instead but I mean I don't know September still really hot in Philadelphia. I mean we have some even ninety degree agree days here in September so I don't know it. Just it's always seemed to me when we're looking at fall and you said to me these. Will you know for goes until almost Christmas. Mike what no it doesn't it to then. I looked at you know yes. It does December twenty second so it was an odd thing. If anyone else feels that way tweet me is fall fall a little weird and the data they could just start earlier and earlier as well have redoing this list. I don't know your list. You don't mind those are usually the the rules when we do things and this time we are changing a little bit because not only were staying in the US but we are allowing ourselves to put on places that we have been an places that we want want to go so it's it's a mishmash of both right for you while while let's get into it then all right well. I'll start with my honorable mention and and I guess this could be actually on the list or higher on the list but I haven't been here so I can't really say that I would love it. I think I would love of it is a huge city in the US travel has been there before. Are you talking about Chicago. I am talking about Chicago right cool because this is I have two honorable mentions. This is Whoa you can hop on my honorable mention. I have never been to Chicago and obviously I've seen pictures. Traps been there. I've heard great things about it. It's beautiful. It's right on the lake. The city skyline is gorgeous and travers raves about it. I have yet to go there but I feel like like fall would be a really nice time to go. I don't WanNa go and winter. No thank you. I've heard stories about how freezing it is in the wind is so bitter right now. I'm not into that. I'm sure Summers Nice traveling in the summer before and you loved it think fall would be a nice little sweet spot to hit up Chicago as you mentioned I I went in June and it was absolutely perfect in summer so Chicago is one of those cities in the top season. US I WANNA return to I only did three days there. There's so much more to see a huge city. I got a good feel for it but really really wanted to go back so I put it on my list but then I thought it's it's a little it's probably a little better in the summer someone from Chicago. Let us know as bed in the summer better than the fall. I certainly don't want to be going late fall. If you're going in the flaw give me beginning of September September twenty second after following exactly so but I'm with you Chicago awesome place and definitely definitely a place that I would love to go one more honorable mention and you're gonNA love this half for the only reason this didn't make my list is because I wouldn't be. He has excited to travel there. 'cause we are there and that is. Philly and the Jersey shore so during fall. I just find that at Philadelphia itself. I mean when you're in Philadelphia. The leaves are changing. You can get out in the countryside where we are Chester County beautiful foliage and then only about an hour from philly you you can hit various parts of the Jersey shore where you're going Ocean City Cape May with going up north a little bit and the prices dropped so substantially after Labor Day so for example. There's a house our buddy rented if you would run it in August sixty six thousand sixty six hundred six thousand sixty six hundred dollars. It's a week during peak season. July and August you can get that same exact place for two thousand dollars right after Labor Day. So if you go mid-september anytime mid September to mid October you can also get lucky could be warm enough that you could swim so for me. Philly really shines in the fall. The temperatures starts to break a bit as you get knocked over and you can just have those perfect perfect fall days with the beach right there as well not any crowds specially forgo the weekdays like mid week October and there is no one there. You can have the beaches to yourself. You could still even swim if if you WANNA do that so Philly and the Jersey shore another. They're honorable mention if you if you don't live here that should be high on your list. It's just not GonNa make my list because you're damn here and we will be recording a Philadelphia. VR Destination Guide very soon because I think the last one we did our twenty fifth outdated so we're doing a new one. We've gotten some requests for that so that'll be coming coming up areas. The difference in that city in four years is insane. Philadelphia has changed dramatically and is so much more fun so many restaurants stuff like that okay onto the top twelve six. I've got six. I don't know your list. You don't know my list you start us. What is your numbers. Are Actual List my number six. You know I am a New England girl. I'm an east coast girl. I have to start my list off with somewhere in New England that is Burlington Vermont to orders Berman in general but Burlington we have been to we were not there for very long. We were actually there in the summer but being right on the lake there. I think it would be gorgeous. We're just to rent a house on the water and there's awesome breweries in Burlington. You can also hop over to some of the other breweries stories that are pretty famous within about an hour to two hour drive from Burlington Lake loss and there's I mean you you guys Vermont. There's a lot of choice a lot of good burris and and Berlin itself has some really cute restaurants an amazing Bagel shop. We got bagels at a pizza place. I mean just really cool spot well. We will be heading hopefully to Burlington for at least a day in the mid October this year. We are going to do a New England road trip. We're actually going to go up to Canada a bit on Lake Ontario for a few days and then head over through Burlington hopefully into other parts of New England New Hampshire so we are going to get to live that life hopefully Burlington. I was hoping that you put that on your list. There are few that I wanted put on our list. They thought maybe you did so. I could sneak sneak them in Burlington Vermont Awesome Little Town my number six for staying up in that part of the country so it makes sense a place. I have never been that you have been in Acadia National Park. I almost put this on my list. I almost did it's hike ticket up there. Where you can fly actually I have never flown. I've only ever driven in there so flying would probably be the number one choice unless you want to do epic east coastal road trip yeah. I I am super excited to Acadia idea we for whatever reason have a bunch of friends who've gone the Acadian the last month or so is tagged trending. I guess Acadia National Park trending after all these years now mm-hmm we did. I didn't awesome podcast James Kaiser's. If you want to listen to that on guidebook writing he grew up right on the doorstep of Katie Natural Barcodes averse guidebook he wrote so he has a ton of information. I I start poking through that and got even more excited to visit Acadia and he says that the best time to go is beginning of October Tober for fall foliage so that would be a perfect time you go end of September beginning October. The crowds aren't there the temperature still really nice. It's not getting too cold and you get the fall foliage so acadia national park number six. I'M GONNA throw in a little spurt of that. If I'M GONNA Katya three hours north of Portland Portland Orleans on my list all right so don't for me don't put Spurs on okay. You picked Acadia stand firm. You don't throw other ones in. I just meant maybe why into Portland spend a few days to Acadia. I Dunno it's actually on my list. It's my very next one so we can just jump on any talk about that my number five Portland main. We have been here multiple times. It is such a cool little city. I'm going to call it a city. It's been there. One of you only been once. I've live in a few times and you know growing up going to New Hampshire and from I was born there. I'm not from there but I was born. There lots of my family is there so we hit up Maine New Hampshire Vermont. A Lot Portland has changed so much in the past. I don't know ten fifteen years is kind Lula hipster city. It's right on the coast which makes it so enticing beautiful. The Portland Lighthouse is stunning beautiful photographed after all the time. That's a great thing to see when you're up there. It also has cool breweries great restaurants cute. Little shops artists seen some of the best to Lotto. We've ever had believe it or not ESCO so it's just it's an awesome little place to go and like trump said if you want to do kind of a main road trip you could fly into Portland and then drive to Acadia just see some of the coastline main is so striking with its rocky cliffs and definitely I think think follows an amazing time to go summer is cool too but it gets very crowded up there in the summer so going and fall to see the foliage in being on the coast ooh romantic about that whole thing having a cup of clam chowder in getting lots of seafood. It's just I love it so much. I think I do prefer her. New England in the fall a little bit over the summer simply for the less amount of tourists there you go to some of those beach towns in in the summer and it gets crazy crowded and for me someone who likes to swim waters not even out warm some thinking why the from not really enjoying swimming here. Let me just come back in the fall when it's a little more mellow so yeah. Portland Maine as you can tell how there's been pregnant quite a bit over the last couple of years really on this burry free-kick so give her Burlington Giver Portland Maine Some Great Breweries scattered amongst those two areas and then of course just even in between so I mean if you WanNa do a brewery tour two weeks up in New England you could be going every day and you still wouldn't hit all the places that you can just say. I'm a little bit excited for our road trip. A benefactor gave me all the brewery my number five speaking of breweries. This is not New England but we're staying bid towards the East. Don't worry we'll spread out. Can can you guess what town slash city. I listen. We're talking East Coast. We're talking Asheville. North Carolina almost put Ashu on my list. Yes and I think the reason that Ashley is in higher on my list is just because we have been there which which makes it we know we love it if it's on our list list and we've been to an internal list you know it's amazing because usually I think for us have a new place holds a little bit of sway. You get a little more excited dreaming of a new place place that you haven't been so if if you've been no place and you'll love it this much you want to go back then that says a lot and we've been to actual twice. We have great bruce great food. Blue Ridge Parkway would be phenomenal in the fall if you drive that again talking about the fall foliage and just a changing of the seasons that's one of the best place in the country to to see the changing seasons hyphen closer sports all right on Ashworth doorstep so you have this town super accessible town. You can walk most of the places you've got a ton of breweries. We have a podcast are actual destination diary which documents all our favourite place in Nashville so definitely go listen to that if you're interested in Nashville or or if you've gone to Asheville and you and you WanNa reminisce but it's incredible that you have all that nature right on the doorstep of this town that then punches well above its weight when it comes to food beer fun stuff to do for so many galleries and amazing local artists in Asheville. It just really hits all the boxes for a great you know typical quintessential fall destination you know you can just walk around with the foliage prop into the galleries in in stores and then have a beer and a good meal one of the things. I tried to do when I was ranking this list and trying to figure out what made the cut in what didn't one of my criteria's how how excited would I be if someone we knew said I'm going here. Like how hard would I try to go there myself and Asheville. We have a friend a friend. Vanessa Asu was talking about going to Asheville this fall and as soon as she said that both you and I are you there. Yeah we'll go. We'll go. We'll get in the car. We'll go doesn't matter. It's like nine the nine hour our drive an hour drive with two kids but we were super excited so that tells you everything you need to know about Ashra. We are excited to head back. There and it's absolutely phenomenal in the fall. My number four is going South Way Way South and for me. I would choose to go here. This is New Orleans Louisiana. We've been there before the so on my list. It's Nice I was shocked. I was going to get this and you wouldn't even New Orleans anyway for me. I would choose to go in the later. Peter Fall time you know when it's definitely cooling down there some of these places in the South I would not particularly enjoy going to in the summer because it's extra humid and hot and you know it's just I think nicer to go in spring or fall so new Orleans is one of those places. Obviously it's super find people go there at a party but traveling I win before we had kids and I'm not saying that we didn't party but mostly we ate partying was hitting happy hour getting getting a drink or two which gave you a nice little fun time and then just eating all the food that we possibly go wandering around the streets. I mean it is a perfect wandering during town whether you're in the garden district whether you're obviously down in the oldest store or call district with your by the river. I mean it doesn't matter where you are. If you're wandering wandering you're having fun. As long as you're in a safe neighborhood. Yes and there are so many good restaurants because it's a very heavily touristed town. There's a lot of Michelin rated needed restaurants just famous James Beard Award winner restaurants including one of our favorites that we went to Shah where we had the best meal of the year during my best favorite dessert ever and all these things but there are so many restaurants I mean we couldn't even hit them. All we were there for almost a week. We were there for five days so it's just a great great foodie destination and also beautiful with that southern charm and his great shopping and I mean yeah there's Bourbon Street which is kind of like I think a little overrated didn't contend the well. It's for Sarah and that is that is not us. It's especially not as kids now but there's lots of amazing things used to do in New Orleans. I mean I might drink one handgrenade. If I'm going to I gotTa get through the day somehow right one hangar day lots of sugar a lot to alcohol. That'd be good to go but what I I'm with. You and it's number two so I'm just GonNa hit it now and then we can when we get to you know we can run run past it but I am with you that new. New Orleans is just an incredible city that we need to spend more time in. I've been twice wonder party for a Bachelor Party then like you mentioned we went back and had more of a quote unquote. Adult adult time by the fall is fantastic. Spring is fantastic as well but fall is nice as you were mentioning because I would go here November of ember so we start. Let's say Oh December is fall according to the world according to the moon and the cycles and all that I yeah this would be perfect. You know early December when you're starting to already get sick of the cold weather here. Maybe it's GonNa Snow Boom. Let's book a flight down in New Orleans. The boys grow a t-shirt. Maybe maybe a little bit of a a sweat shirt on our nose jazz branch. We can go to shy again. Probably the best happy are is of any city I've ever been to in the US. I mean what's cool about. New Orleans is that they have so many upscale restaurants but most of those places that are really expensive at night or somewhat expensive have great happy hour. We're lunch steel or lunch deals a set menu for UH. What is it twenty five to thirty dollars instead of seventy five dollars that all the boxes and then if you're going in the fall one thing you can also do that. You wouldn't be able to do any other time of the year in the spring or anything. The saints are in town. Okay I mean they love the saints as a Home Football Game Jim was we went for Bachelor Party and the saints playing that next day on Sunday so it was Saturday night. Everyone was out in about having a good time and we got invited to a tailgate. I thought Oh man I've tailgated in Philly. PHILLY's great for tailgating. Oh my gosh let me tell you the saints fans do do it right. This trailer was like forty foot long like ten zero Terry Upscale Terry you got invited to. I wasn't even sure if we were you know the guys drink and we all come to our tailgate my buddy. I'm like well. We probably will you go yeah. Just tell them you're with us and with thing we're never going to get in and we we did and they recognized us again and it was a super guitar. Stadium is very cool. It's new obviously they rebuilt it after the hurricane and so even just driving into the city you can see it and it's a cool thing yes so that's a benefit of the fall. If you're GonNa go then you know nice versus. Maybe the spring which which also has fantastic weather way to sell it as a fall destination Orleans number two really big for New Orleans. All right number three for me is a place that we have been number four number four was was New Orleans. Oh we have to get your mind backup cut-back backup my number four I am. I'm sorry guys I'm staying on the still I will be at all surprised which the bunches inches stuff around you know. I'm really big on ordering it. The correct way and this one was hired and then I moved it so had I thought about it. Maybe I would have went to another part of the country but regardless. This is mine number. Four is the Hudson River valley. I almost put this on my list to you because we've never really done it and I've always wanted to do. It always seems so kind kind of romantic to me being on the river and there's like the art scene. Well go ahead you can talk about. We've been talking a lot about this recently because it is something something that's feasible for us to throw the kids in the car and go you know depending on where we're going a three and a half hour to up to six hour journey depending where you're going doing the Hudson River valley but we've been talking quite a bit about going here. I've done a lot of research including there is a church in this town Kamal Hudson by it's gorgeous white steeple beautiful old church. It doesn't have plumbing or any or electric or anything set up but it looks fantastic. basically you just want to go on a real estate scouting no okay so. I have spent a tiny. I spent one afternoon in the town called beacon not even one one afternoon one three hour block. I went to Hudson Valley Brewing Company on my way back from Connecticut wit and I were there went that that was a cute little town. Apparently that is kind of the hotspot for people leaving New York City because it's easy to get on a train so that's the I guess intro into the Hudson River valley valley more or less. If you're coming from the south cool little town superfund super cute work your way up we could stay in Malden on Hudson if we by that church. Oh my goodness stock is they're super artsy folksy town and then of course the town of Hudson I think is the other beacon in Hudson are kind of the ones that Dr Not really as hidden of hidden gems anymore. I've gotten pretty popular but for good reason cruiser beautiful quaint towns on the river and yeah I'm and just to some big cities like New York but yeah I think the Hudson River valley is a cool spot. We should definitely kind of make it a destination in the fall. Well maybe next year because this year as we said we are heading a little further up north yeah. I think that's a great a great number number three for you. Now we're at number three for now. We're actually at number three so we have been here before and I have number three as Denver Slash Breckenridge wait. Are you spurring spurring facing so if it's under two hours from the place then it's then it's a slash but if it's over for two hours disperse sure sure you we make our own roles you make the rule of law you. You can't fly into Breckenridge okay so if you're going to Colorado and you're you're not driving there. You have to go to Denver okay so there's no other option to get to Breckenridge. You have to fly to Denver. You could fly to some of the other little airport ninety. Five percent of people were flying. Yes Denver is a great destination for fall. You can usually find cheap tickets to denver any time because there are so many flights in and out of that airport so that makes it a great reason to go remember one of our Interfax from way back when the Denver Airport is is actually larger in land area than the whole island of Manhattan. It's crazy. It is a very odd airport in of itself. If there's all these conspiracy theories about government operations underground Denver airport which is kind of funny and you could research that if but not the main reason to go to Denver though Colorado is in beautiful state. It's even more beautiful I think in the fall than it is in any other season. I mean winters cool. You got the skiing but it's so cold and so unless yes you're just GonNa Ski Every Single Day. Fall is where it's at for for me. We went to Breckenridge. We did a house it there. I don't know I think it was five years ago now and we were were there. August into September gorgeous. It was absolutely return. Donning the Aspen is turning yellow just so striking with all of the evergreens that are there in Breckenridge and the aspens were so bright and the color were so noticeable that I began to question whether it's actually like I know I'm colorblind but I'm seeing says five dollars. Is this what normal people in everyday life maybe and the thing with with fall is that if you wanna a hike if you want to do outdoor stuff other than skiing. This is the best time to go in my opinion because some can still be really hot. You know it's very dry in Colorado Colorado but it's still a little hot so I think that falls awesome. WE'VE BEEN TO DENVER. We were there last September for our location in the experience and it was awesome. I'm being there in Denver. There's so many good restaurants now there's great breweries or some really hipster areas like the Rhino district. We saw a a concert at red rocks which was honestly one of the most transformative amazing experiences ever. It was like an appearance sobol to the note is that they stop. It's you know if you don't know what red rocks is. It's an outdoor concert venue in an outdoor amphitheater yeah in the Not Canyon but amongst the rock and so when it gets to call and in the way that gets to implement. They stopped the contractor. I think we went to the last one or one of the last show of the year which was is beginning of October so just be aware if you're going in November like you're not gonna go to red rocks. Could it's close because it's going to be freezing. Possibly Oh you know well. Maybe we're talking early early fall to Denver so it ain't like skiing to one thing to mention because you know the ski ski seasons will start end of November beginning of December so you get that too like if you not that you're going to go somewhere for a full season but it would be cool to go out to Denver from. Let's say late. September all the way through December like you would have you would have two very different experience digital nomad and you could just be wherever you want that visually independent offended yeah. If you're location independent you could do three months out there and we'll be perfect as you'd get the fall the foliage change and then you can go right on into skiing so I think Denver Denver and Breckenridge but we spend the most amount of time there and we like it a lot town the all the little mountain towns around. They're going driving through the rockies. It's it's just it's just awesome. One of the benefits of Denver you hit on is the fact that there are so many cool places around it whether we're talking about bigger places that are known like boulder or or Brac or I mean obviously you can get out to vail and stuff like that or just some of the smaller tiny mountain. They're just so much to see and do around there. I think Colorado so in that area is maybe my favorite four season area of the country like if you had to tell me hey you're not able to travel much and you you have to spend four seasons somewhere that might be it for me because we have been out there every single season and I like it every single time but I think you're right. That fall might be absolute pinnacle in less. You're going for specific reason like like skiing or or mountain biking or something like that what you might do in the summer so oh man surprising. I did not think Denver would be on your list because I'm usually the one like you know older and boulders my favorite but I do like Denver and I liked. The mountain towns a little more than I loved Barack the most. We've spent the most time there and I that town. Would it may get a little too small town. If you live there I I don't know but I we spent a month month and a half there once and talk about could happy hours that really perhaps yards all right my number three. Hey you said I make the rules. We make the rules so I am going to give you a few spurs. 'cause they're not really that close but someone might might be able to tell me why. I'm giving you these three places together Oxford Mississippi Tuscaloosa Alabama and Athens Georgia Zsa. Why am I if you guys know that means that you're probably a college football fan so for me one of my dreams tailgating at an SEC game and and go to the SEC game. I don't know what SEC South Eastern Conference. I don't know people might not know yeah. I know you put me on this box. I'm like seven to knows probably a people could argue but definitely college. Football lives was in the south in my opinion yes up here. People Love Penn State and Michigan Ohio State. I get it okay but we also have a lot of good pro teams that people really get behind in my mind college football is the SEC and the fact that I've somehow never been to an SEC game. I I don't know why can happen. Make it happen so I gave you these three places because if I was going to go to an SEC game either want to go and I'll work backwards. Athens Georgia talking specifically the fall Athens Georgia Georgia. That's where the University of Georgia's at cool beautiful and it's a cool town. We've never and also I've heard it's a great town Tuscaloosa Alabama. We've actually been to and we've been to Alabama stadium. Hmm We went on a road trip to New Orleans. We did so. I would be going there. Just because Alabama is such an amazing football team. I am a Florida gator fan through and through grew up a Florida gator fan because of my grandparents so you know I would go to any game but what I love probably my number one out of these three would be to go to Oxford. Mississippi and you're probably like wait a second why Oxford Mississippi you just talked about Georgia Great Football Team Alabama Great Football Team Ole Miss.. Not so grateful football team but it's supposed to be the best tailgating experience in the US in the grove at Ole miss and I did some deep diving here. I was like all right Florida. Florida only plays Ole miss like once every five or six years alert alert and it's only at old miss you know once every ten years or so and they're playing Ole miss in Oxford Mississippi Twenty twenty so he may be able to make tailgating at grove a happening but I mean so here's also I love football. I want this experience but even if you weren't super into football a cat you you would go because this expanse is beyond. Don't super care about the football but I'm just thinking that mid November you go down you get one of those little bit warmer days. Iraq and short so you're coming from Philadelphia where you haven't worn shorts in in a month or two unless you my dad and your then you wear insurance everyday he's retired. He can do what he wants. But you get one of those warmer days you throw on short you throw in a Hoodie and you just sit there outside. Drink a beer hang out. You get that little bit of feeling of summer again almost almost summer so that's that's one number three all right. That's what you want next year. Oxford Mississippi better put it out in calendar for twenty minutes Bersell Miss tailgating at the growth. I can't wait right number. Two on my list is a place. I have been wanting to go for quite a few years and I don't know why we haven't made it a priority. I think that we definitely should twenty who he didn't even think about it. Why minor mainland you remind felon deal. I was a little bit of a go anytime to Hawaii but now my number number two is Charleston South Carolina so as Travis said who I didn't so I did. I knew I was getting this one for free basically basically as Travis said about Colorado being a place where he would want to live. I've never even been to Charleston. I feel like it's a place that I would move my family to if we didn't have so much family outside of Philadelphia because it's on the ocean it's right there beautiful city right smack DAB by the beach which she's a place you can go to a lot more than you can in New Jersey or New England because it's way too cold to the seasons are much longer obviously summers a lot hotter but it's going to be humid as any for fall. I think it's a great destination because it's the weather's a lot nicer nicer you can again probably still wear shorts or a light sweater and you can see all these beautiful things with southern charm. There's amazing plantations wins and gardens to visit just walking around Charleston seeing all of the beautiful architecture the different districts the harbor walking along the battery and you know eating at the amazing restaurants. It's just such a home run for me. I am dying to go to Charleston. So if any of you out there have been you know. Send US your recommendations because we're definitely getting there. I think in the next year our buddy sailing oh lives in Charleston. That was a great episode one of my favorites of the early L. E. E. Papa John's thirty or forty. You guys can go listen to that. I'm with you. Charleston has been at the top of my wanting to go list for for. US domestic mastic destinations for a long long long time and we kind of have to go just so we can do Charleston Verse Savannah throwdown showdown. Yeah because those are always people always battling which is better. I've been to spend a ton of times and never been to Charleston if Charleston is as good or better than savannah. Oh Man I'm with you. I mean maybe we ended up moving. I'm just saying I would I think I think it'd be a bit muggy for us in the summer but that's fine. Let me travel here. We go here. Come up see family in Pennsylvania New England the little babies crying which means my number two was New Orleans. We already talked about that so we're going to roll right into your number one and fall of twenty ninety number one United States. It's fall destination of two thousand nine hundred ninety tongue. It's Napa Sonoma yeah. I just want to go to the wine country. I we've been to NAPA but before once it was for the day I I love wine. I'm not pregnant. I want to go to now. It's also gorgeous there. I mean it's I think that the fall would be beautiful time to go because again. It's not so hot. It's not freezing. When WE WENT TO NAPA. We actually went in January. It was called and it I mean it was fine but it wasn't as beautiful because everything was kind of just brown but I think going in the fall you you get all the way over to snow my so. You can even be on the coast. It's just a beautiful area. There's also really good breweries like the what's the one brewery Russian river is over there and snow so much to so it's not just about the wine but the great restaurants the blood just got the wine yeah yeah. I just have been dying to go back. There and you know spend some time yeah. I my number one. I told you I'd finally make it away. From this pull of these. I guess New Orleans was away from there but now I'm going all the way not all the way but but the furthest away okay we're going. I'm staying okay now. You're area kind of caveats here. Santa Fe New Mexico. Also we have wanted to go. I think Santa Fe's been up on the list with Charleston for both of us. We've wanted to go here for a while top destination in the US that we haven't been to and so I just had to make sure that fall was okay right. I yea well. What do you do when you when you don't know that much about an area but you WANNA go there. You Google and I found something that just proved to me that it's okay time to go. US News says come the weather is much cooler in the town's a little less busy visiting during the fall will also allow you to partake in some of the areas vibrant festivals for last this. This is the best time to visit Santa. Fe thank you. US News so I was like all right awesome temperature range from about seventy Fahrenheit down to forty at night so you to have yeah the Cool Night Yan the Nice enjoyable days you also do have as they mentioned some festivals including one that I specifically go to. I think the one that most people if they talked about New Mexico they know of this festival and that is the huge balloon festival in Albuquerque. I know it's a I slash worrisome per depending on how long it takes to get there is it to drive in between those cities now. You're GONNA put me. I think it's about an hour and I think it's less hours so it might be a slash so it might be able to count balloon festivals in Albuquerque in October definitely one of those things that is super neat to see one of the cost festivals in the US throughout the year people travel from all over to go to so that would be perfect yacht Santa. Fe spent some time down Albuquerque Balloon Festival Santa Fe also as their Santa Fe wine in and Chili Festival and the Santa Fe to that so yeah. We just wanted to go there for a while. Explore this new neither of US have been in New Mexico at all and yeah just seems like a city that hits everything that we like a great foodie culture a good beer culture obviously some really striking geographic and topography and stuff that were of course not used to hear East Coast lots to explore you have albuquerque he down there so. I'm just excited to go somewhere. That's a part of the country that we really haven't spent much time in and so for me. Santa Fe my number one destination in the fall yeah ninety and I knew it was going to be on your list. I was pretty sure so I didn't put it on my list but yeah definitely really WanNa get there just seems like an exciting very different place ace from where we live in the US and that's such that's the coolest one of the coolest things to me about being in the US is that you can have so many many different landscapes in experiences in one huge country so that's why we decided to do the destination just in the US for fall this year because there's so many in cool places and as you mentioned fall really does highlight a lot of the country you know if you say already going summer some places for US personally selene might be too muggy like. I don't really want to go that far south in the summer winter. I don't WanNa go that far north here you almost do have the whole attitude of the US depending on what you want which is a pretty neat thing and a very versatile season so let us know what are your top destinations in fall in the US. Ask Let us know tweet us at pack of peanuts of course and they we should say like if you have recommendations for any of the places we meant yeah absolutely and you know we don't have have very many places in the Midwest we haven't really done the midwest of the United States yet and so we have a lot of listeners in the mid West. People are always telling us ask you. GotTa come here. You've got to come there so let us know if they're a great spots in the fall because we are going to be making our travel is for twenty twenty in the next month or two so oh we could be visiting your town and if anyone wants to tailgate it to grow. Ole Miss with me during the Florida Game I the schedules not been released. They just say they are playing there in twenty twenty and let me know guys thank you so much for all the sport again love the tweets keep them coming especially when we do episodes like this where some of these destinations we know a lot about and and you can find our destination diaries for Ashville for New Orleans for places like that of course but some of them. We don't know that much about and that's why this list fund because we did both some that were excited to go to. We don't know a lot and some that we know a lot about so. Let us know some your recommendations for those places and of course let us know your recommendations overall because I love to see where other people are going where they wanna go and if we can help you give you some recommendations for those places that would be awesome as well so keep those tweets coming at packing peanuts. It's of course you've been super active on Instagram as well so at extra pack of peanuts now on Instagram. Yes keep following. Keep sending US messages. Keep responding always super fun to engage with you there. Thank the support has always for making us. The number one rated travel all podcast on apple podcast. This is our first show with the new baby heather actually during the show. You guys can't see this swaddled. Donald the baby up so now. The baby is swaddled wrap up. She was right next to the microphone. Not happy lying on the bed. She wanted to be extra sure closed and any of you out there who have children or going to have children having a Swat a raft. That's not necessarily say what we swallowed her up but it's it's actually the solid baby wrap. It's amazing. He put the baby in there and they instantly suffering yeah baby the whole time while they go had. He's very versed. I guess you guys for listening. We appreciate thanks for the support and until next time happy free travels beyond me on your uh-huh in Ohio

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Bonus Episode! Traveling Eats With Matt: The Maine Course

Parklandia

25:25 min | 1 year ago

Bonus Episode! Traveling Eats With Matt: The Maine Course

"Hi there I'm Zach Braff. Donald face on we're real life best friends. We met playing fake life. Best Friends Turk and J D on the Sitcom scrubs twenty years later. We've decided to Rewatch the series one episode of the time and put our memories into a podcast. You can listen to it home. We're going to get all our special guests friends like Sarah Chalk. John C McGinley. Neil Flynn Judy. Reyes show Creator Bill. Lawrence Editors Writers and even prompt masters would tell us about what inspired the series and how we became a family. You can listen to the podcast. Fake Doctors Real Friends with Zach and Donald on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. And wherever you get your podcasts to you believe in ghosts do you believe that the spirits of those long gone still linger on this earthly plane. Do you believe in evil. So powerful that it can consume those apparitions and twist them into abominations of their former selves. T believe in ghosts. I didn't until I moved into lighthouse. Lighthouse Premieres April twenty. I listen to lighthouse on the iheartradio APP on Apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcast. Hi I'm math am Brad. This is park land in a production of iheartradio. We sold our LOPS IN. Chicago moved into an RV. Our time in country fulltime exploring America's national parks with our dog Fin. We're excited to bring you another bonus. Episode of traveling eats with Matt. Yes special place in my heart for this. Because again I get to live vicariously through your most of the time but in these situations now we get to travel together and do it together and eat all these amazing things together. Yes and excited is an understatement. Because this week is very nostalgic. It's about main a state that AH grew up visiting frequently. I grew up in New Hampshire. So mean was right in our backyard. I would go to the the beaches there all the time I would road trip there in the summers and these are some of the most. I mean some of the most iconic American flavors in dishes. You'll find here. And they're wonderful things like blueberries and lobster and what pies and shellfish of all sorts and so much more and and for me was just coming into the NEWBIE. I've never been to Maine I get to explore it through their food and their national parks. And I'm just loving it because I get Again reap the rewards. Yeah so we have two different perspectives here. Right and fresh fresh fresh lobster yes and we really took full advantage so I wanna back in I talk about my mind nostalgia with means so I grew up like New Hampshire's coastline is really minimal. And not all that great but main is right there so we would always just drive over. Took like an hour to get to main and we'd go to beaches like Old Beach York beach in Wells Beach and a whole lineup of others and I just remember not only swimming and going on like the boardwalk and stuff like that but just the foods that came with like feasting on lobster whether it's lobster rolls or just like whole lobsters that you you know rip apart and yeah right and then things like blueberry pancakes and Blueberry Pie of course with all the whip cream and Whoopi pies which I grew up like swallowed by proximity are wealthy pies. Assuming that they're abundant everywhere and they're not the tricky thing about it About growing up. You're like I just think that this is everywhere. Yeah it'd be able to get it anywhere and it's just not it. It's so hard. That's the hard part about travelling. You don't get any normal seat but you get these experiences. It's a win. Lose win. Win Win Win Win Win. Well it does make me appreciate them or I guess like. I fully took for granted growing up now when I am in Maine. I am super excited. And it's like I'm experiencing them for the first time all over again which is a great thing so we would also as a kid and I actually did this. This past year tail but a- tradition was road. Tripping up from New Hampshire ought to Prince Edward Island in Canada and that means obviously driving right through Maine for several hours love it. Yeah and spend like one week every summer and confederate island but one of my favorite memories from that row chap was we would always stop at this restaurant slash truckstop called dies arts in Bangor. They actually have a few locations in man. It's like a little mini restaurants slash truck stop chain. But it's shockingly good food for being like an truckstop. It's this like these rich homie recipes in this really comforting warm dining space with all the main things like blueberry French toast in then lobster and like baked pasta dishes in sandwiches and huge chocolate while pies with marshmallow filling cute. They're cute. They look like cakes. They come in a variety of sizes. But they you know. They look at layer cakes more so than just go. Let's go let's just fly there for this cause your the way you described it. I need to have this experience. You've yet to share this experience with me. I know I wanted to go back to when we were you and I were there this fall but kind of ran There's a lot to eat man. I can't can't cram it all into one lynch I guess but this is something so that was nostalgia. All that's all and get but I actually learned something new and exciting about main cooking mean like recipe traditions. So my dad's girlfriend gail is from Maine. She actually has like dual heritage or dual citizenship between candidate. Because she's from northern Maine. Which is acadian culture like French? Acadian culture which is a whole like in a world in realm in and of itself especially foodwise and I learned from her all about these dishes called ploys P. L. A. Y. E. S. and. They're these thin buckwheat pancakes basically they look kind of like crepes or like a real like a flattened. English muffin more. So how I describe them and their real simple. They're made with buckwheat flour flour baking powder in water traditionally makes thin Crepe Lake Batter. And then you prepare them on greased iron griddles and doesn't to cook the batter so thin and they're so thin so they're done when they start to bubble and get a little bit of Golden Brown underneath and then they're served traditional the whole variety of things they can be Denton Chicken stews chicken soups or served with maple syrup or even peanut butter but the most traditional thing in Acadian culture is something called Creighton and that is a savory like ground pork pate made with onions and spices blended into it like cinnamon nutmeg all spice ginger. And it's nice and thick hearty aromatic spread that you serve and eat with poise. So you have like a little bit of spicy and fragrant like a little bit of sweet ninety s from the pancakes. I'm having here where I just want to leave this room. And go onto a plane and go wherever you describing. 'cause like I just WANNA TRAVEL WANNA travel there. I want to eat it and then I wanNA come back So if you can give me we'll pick this up. I mean I want to explore this region because I have never been time in the Acadian Person Maine which is like the far northern along the Canada border. And you can't find it like I never saw ploys or Khotan like along the coast by any means. I'd never even heard of them. But you can find them in restaurants that like Long Lake Sporting Club and dollies and here in this part of the country. They're just us with everything they're us kind of in place of Brad Ploy and you can do a lot with them but I'm so I'm so so interested that I'm Mike. Oh man has so much already. Didn't know there's this whole like subculture that I am just learning. It's more than just lobster right so but getting back to the coast which is kind of my main thing you know. It's like my heartfelt memories and everything that I crave all the time was like Portland is the main city the biggest city in Maine and what are incredible foods. Foods in that city has no yeah. It's amazing you and I were there summit recently because my brother got married just outside of Portland just a couple of months in the past from the time of this recording so we were there in the fall. Beautiful then to be in Maine. And we're able to get more of a recent taste or re for me like revisiting some of those flavors and you experiencing for the first time and some of the highlights. I think were. There's this bakery. They're this famous Baker in Portland called fat cats bakery and it's this rustic little shop super fragrant. Like you start to you. Get this waft of like a Pie. Crust Aroma singer approaching the door. And then you just get invalid with it. Feels like you're in like this little cottage kitchen. I feel so. Yeah just thinking about it really. And they have things all sorts of goodies but like Blueberry Pie and Bourbon pecan Pie in seasonal things like new England bog. Pie which is wild. Main blueberries cranberries with Oh crumble and some flags of bittersweet chocolate as well sounds great. I've not how I'm like. My mouth is filling with saliva. They also have layer cakes and cupcakes. And of course what pies. They're known for what pies I think in particular in rightfully so because they are wonderful they have the classic which is two chocolate cakes with marshmallow buttercream filling and then they do seasonal things like in the summer. They have lemon Zucchini whoopie pies with blueberry filling. They also have pumpkin pies in the fall with maple failing love so great. I'm like tearing up And then my favorite like coffee shop which is somewhat of a doesn't really do justice because it's really a full-fledged incredible bakery it's called tandem coffee and bakery and we have a couple of locations but the one that I love the most is housed in a former gas station which is just the coolest thing yes looks really cool. It's fun to go there and hang out but they're pastry assortment is mind blowing. The amount of products are able to create and innovate with. Because these are these are not traditional stuff you see just at every commonplace cafe. They have things like cornmeal cake with berries and RICOTTA and squash cakes with brown butter cheese and chocolate. Her shot a cream pie. Cornyn Red Chili Scones Lovin. The biscuits armies to just you can get the biscuit by itself and that's great but they also serve it with butter basically. It's like they give it so much better. That's basically a biscuit butter sandwich. Which I'M GONNA yeah. I feel like I need a moment. Just just give me a couple of minutes to bleriot again trying to get you read. Gosh sorry. There was a a caterer at Brian Witness Wedding. And that was okay. Yeah amazing food. Their wedding was just about Whitney great job on that wedding. It was the perfect wedding That's not just because I was your Dane Minister or about with Matt was the best man you know the best best man but they had one of the most acclaimed restaurants in Portland like do catering in this place called even tied Oyster Company. Their their main restaurants right downtown Portland and totally worthwhile because obviously mean in coastal Maine is very well regarded for its seafood. Not just lobster in lobster rolls which they have plenty of that here. They are known for their brown butter lobster rolls in particular but even tied as a ton with some of the best oysters. You'll probably ever slurp in your life. Yes as well as like little neck clams and crab claws clam Chowder New England style. Of course the only style worth mentioning Lobster stew and then if you want oysters in cooked for you can get Friday. Stir buns as well. And then I think a fun option would be to bring a group go to even tied and then do one of the family style lobster bakes. And that comes with a Cornucopia by with whole Maine lobster steamer clams mussels potatoes. Salt pork knock worst in steamed ones? That's a lot to take just not fair. You should not fair had it so it is from that aspect but I that I want it right now right and I'm way too far away to get you know. I know it's hard but it's just one of those places that you absolutely have to go to. It's very destination worthy and then swinging back in the direction of sweeter things and also on the of Brian. Whitney's amazing wedding. They had donuts from this place called Holy Doughnut like instead of a wedding cake. They had this tears. Stack of donuts and holy donate is a local institution. Some of the best doughnuts I've ever tasted in my life and I'm not just saying that because I just remember laid out the donuts. Everyone was dancing so they didn't even get to like cut their donut other cakes that aspect and So they boxed them all up you know and then they put him back in the kitchen and I remember like later into the the wedding party like sneaking into the kitchen just he donuts and like I literally fed with me because she didn't want to touch it because he was still in her wedding dress. Sure I you know was stunning. Donate Tamimi Horse but the cool thing about holy donut is how they make their Dow and stuff and they incorporate main potatoes into their taoist mashed potatoes. And I've I mean how perfect how incredible and it adds a really great texture. Its they're soft I remember these so soft and fluffy and lights even though the flavors kind of sound heavier than they are and they're all top like the most vibrant glazed is in frostings and their eye candy and then also literal candy for your mouth because they're so good good donut and talk about my old fashioned doughnuts in Chicago but you know these donuts might have kicked the rear. I mean the heart heart to top especially when they come in flavors like maple in Blueberry glaze and Chai pomegranate and then they also do in addition to like main potato doughnut. Sweet potato doughnuts and then they come and play with ginger so yeah I would eat potatoes like with everything pretty much where I Just eat nothing but sweet potatoes and every form. You're listening to park land from iheartradio plus world where everyone is confined to their homes. Society begins its largest watched to date in the Hallowed Library of Hulu or perhaps on a shelf of DVD's you haven't looked at in a decade is a show that perfectly encapsulates life in the early arts and launched a friendship that would inspire millions. Hi I'm Zach Braff and I'm Donald Phase on in two thousand one. We start in scrubs a Sitcom that revealed a glimpse of what it was like to survive medical internship as Turk and J D. We explored Geilo nearly twenty years later. A lot has changed. We're not superman. But we're still best friends given a mandatory lockdown. There's no better time to relive the series that brought us together in the first place. And we're doing it with them. Podcast right people. We're going to bring friends and crew members and fellow cast members and writers. And and guess what we're going to even invite some of you to call into the podcast and ask all the questions you want the entire sacred. Heart's staff join us for fake doctors real friends on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. And wherever you get your podcasts Portland also has a really great bar scene to which we're kind of starting to write how in and one of the biggest surprises there that I that we discovered was this adorable little cocktail bar called Joe box and the name itself is just the cutest thing ever. This was really interesting. I've never seen a core like this like a lot of vintage knickknacks soaring ceiling like bright pink color and purples it. The whole luck was very pro. It looks like Prom. Vintage crop vintage prompt but like not tacky really enough like normally of our for like a prom theme. It'd be uncomfortable bizarre. But this was this worked. Hips teary funke's hipster vintage prom and there's two floors. There was like the main bar area with the tall sailing. And there's you upstairs to a lofted area which was so cool which is great When we went there ruined their at the wedding party there was like probably thirty people that all met up here over the bar and we go upstairs and you know this people on their dates and things like that and then all of a sudden you just see them. Start to leave. Because they're like what is going on and more and more family members get up there and then I remember the last group leaving and we all just kind of looked at each other and started cheering because because we took it over which was wrong and but it was funny to us and really we do feel sorry for everyone who had to leave Because we were just weird and family ask environment return great basically if National Lampoon's like Christmas Vancouver took over The upper floor of this place but yeah yeah it was a fun time and the cocktails are really good very they tended to be really strong but like so flavorful and really interesting combinations as well and right now and when we were there they had things like the fall fashion which is barely edged. Jen ancho Chili Core Apple cider Syrup in Orange Bidders love to like a spicy happily version of an old fashioned and then the age of discovery which has absent Raspberry liqueur. Also by all spies liquor lemon juice and Campari like very robust flavors. I've never seen I've never had like absence. Aquavit in Campari together for instance. But it all works. They do really bold things here and the results are really exciting and great. I Love Maine fell in love with Portland. And if it didn't get cold. Probably try to move there but yeah I'm trying to stay away from Colon Yeah and then if you continued up the coast as you shed because Acadia. National Park is up the coast. There's this lovely little. Seaside town called bar harbour and that's the entry town to Acadia and it's this island towns small city with tons and tons of great independent restaurants and cafes coffee shops bars all of that and unsurprisingly seafood. Is The star here at all of these so much like we didn't get too much time here really sad I would love to. I mean this is the place that it would be kind of buckled down and like hang out for a few days and just Katya back up when it's not cold and like forty degrees good option. Yeah because a lot of the restaurants here are seasonal to which makes sense because it does get so cold and tourism drops off because a lot of Acadia is not accessible in the winter. So you have a lot of like lobster centric restaurants like Stevens lobster pound and Eden lobster and a bunch of others that'll close for. They'll take legal winter break. You know which is nice. Oh Yeah and then there. Was that one coffee shop. Independent Was so great You know because when we are there was forty degrees. It was perfect but they had like sandwiches and other like bakery items and Perfect perfect Little Coffee Shop reminded me of Central Park in friend. Yeah not as like fancy like not advanced. You know there's not like a lounge chair there but it definitely had that like you know the owners. They're you know or you know the main people are there and they're not like trying to be something they're just trying to do. Great Quality Food and coffee. It was really yeah. I HAD BLUEBERRY COFFEE CAKE. Morris again blueberry everything everywhere and I'm all about it and then yeah. Barbers has died with these. Really Nice cosy place like the Chart Room. Just like the best. Like kind of quintessential nautical vibes. It feels like you're in a sailor's I duNno. Shop or something like the Holla ship with like salmon and Macadamia crested halibut. Main like main crabcakes. And then the thirsty whale lively more rustic POB Bob's roles and chowder. And this is where the lobster bisque. I don't think so. No no I remember that lobster says you can get lobster. Bisque almost anywhere. You probably the best roles. But I love a good solid lobster bisque like I forget how much I love it until I go to somewhere like Maine and get some beautiful lobster bisque. Yeah well this is the place to eat and go lobster. Crazy Bar Harbour. Portland the coast. We I mean we have a lot to explore here. I'm still very good a northern Maine and just go back to all of this and I think the beautiful thing here is like showing. That Maine is a lot. More than just lobsters and blueberries. Yeah it is. It's what it's ploys it's diverse outer it's new it's Inventing things in its trying things differently. Just a beautiful place to go and explore all these magnificent foods. I seriously cannot wait to go back but I'm leaving now because I'm hungry. Same you've been listening to park land. A show about national parks park land dates and production of iheartradio created by Makara. Wak Brad Care. Wack and Christopher has Yoda's produced and edited by Mike. John's our executive producer is Christopher. Has He Otis R. Researcher. It's Jesulin shields goes out to Gabrielle Collins Crystal Waters and the rest of the park landy accrue and hey listeners. If you're enjoying the show leave us a review on Apple podcasts? It helps other people like you find our show. You can keep up with us on social media as well check photos from our travels on Instagram Park Linnea pod and join in on the conversation and our facebook group. Parkland Rangers from our podcast. My heart radio visit iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Wherever you listen to your favorite shows and as always thank you for listening. Hey Everyone Jake Brennan from the award. Winning music and true crime podcast. This graceland I wanNa tell you about a special bonus episode released on Joe Exotic. The gun toting mullet wearing poly-amorous subject of the hit Netflix series. Tiger King Joe is more than just an eccentric. Conman could sing and as a singer. Joe's voice belie the tortured everyman experience. Some of the best country crooners hinting at a deep trauma resulting from unspeakable loss and violence. Most of which was for the most part left on the cutting room floor of the popular Netflix series. It is on full display in this episode of disgrace land. So if you binged every episode of Tiger King in need just a little more joe exotic and your life make sure to listen a disgrace. Land on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts. I'm Dani Shapiro host of the hit. Podcast family secrets. I just launched a new podcast called the way we live now. Our lives have been disrupted interrupted but that does not mean that we can't reach one another in ways that are both powerful an intimate. I'll talk with people across the great human tapestry. What's life like for you today? We'll be reminded that we're not alone. Was into the way we live now on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts.

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Ep. 31 Joel Holland of Harvest Hosts

Beyond the Wheel

46:38 min | 1 year ago

Ep. 31 Joel Holland of Harvest Hosts

"This episode is brought to you by battle born batteries the best name and the RV Marine Industry these lithium batteries are designed and assembled in the USA backed by a ten. Your warranty the best solution for your battery anxiety. So go check them. OUT AT PADERBORN BATTERIES DOT com attack you are listening to be on the wheel a podcast about the people ideas that drive the RV community for. Hey everyone in today's guests Joel Holland. The owner of Harvests House is a successful entrepreneur if I read his bio from his linked in. You'd be truly amazed by the projects he has been involved in in the accolades he has received in the discussion. We cover a lot of information about harvest hosts including how how he acquired it. Even when it wasn't for sale besides harvest host. We talk about camping and his pieces of advice on entrepreneurship. All right. Let's get into the conversation with Joel Joel. And thank you for joining us on the show today. We usually like to start out with the gas S. just kind of introducing themselves and being able to give a little bit of back history on them. You are involved in a ridiculous amount of stuff so we are going to give you extra time and if you wanna whatever you feel comfortable sharing with us right now or more than welcome to listen appreciate you guys have me on. I always love talking about are being. So that's definitely what I'm most excited about these days. I you know it's been about four or five. Gets down six years that my wife and I fell into the RV RV lifestyle and we did it kind of impulsivity we were living in Washington DC. Area I was running a video technology company. They are one of the things you're kind of looting to. I'd built this company and Great Company. About one hundred people had built a great product but in in the process I was burning out and really getting tired of being being stuck in a cubicle. I wasn't didn't have the passion to show up to work every day like I had originally and one day my wife and I said you know. Let's try the great American road trip. Now we've talked about for so long. There's so many cool things in North America. We haven't seen. Why don't we just do it? And we did we. We actually to win out and start a renting an. RV took a trip the fact that we didn't hate the trip after that piece of junk rental was like a pretty telling sign and so he came home and went to the RV dealership in Manassas Virginia and bought a fifth wheel. kind of like very impulsively and our goal. Is You L.. Let's hit the road. Let's travel the country until we get bored or tell we we hated and those six years ago so you you know. We were both amazed at how much we loved our being. And I'm preaching to the choir to the listeners here but you can understand that that sense of freedom you get when wake up in the morning and get to choose your path for the day. It's pretty unrivaled. You know. It's it's an amazing thing. I never get tired of it. So that was what transitioned Russian does out of DC. We ended up moving. We read through all the lower forty eight ended up loving Colorado and moved our home based Avail Vail Colorado keep our nearby and we travel about half the year in the RV and of course run harvest hosts. Which is the company that I'm really passionate about today? And I think I really for a long time but yeah harvest hosts it. You know. It's a membership club for our viewers and the idea is to take that freedom we all feel and continue attenuate beyond the campground and onto farms. wineries breeze distilleries golf courses and we now have over twelve hundred locations in the harvest hosts network where members can stay for free if there are member of harvest hosts so it's it's a really fun time and it all comes back to we just really love the RV lifestyle style. So it's a great fit. I didn't I didn't realize that it was that large. I didn't know that you had that many locations. Wh How many locations was it when you acquired it yes so so we bought the business business in two thousand eighteen about a year and a half ago there were six hundred locations And so we we've doubled the number of locations and we're currently adding about two a day hoping hoping to actually increase that we're we've hired a team up. We are now four people working on customer service and host recruitment or about to hire a new person to head up specifically specifically host recruited because there are tens of thousands of incredible pieces of land and small businesses all around this country and and in Canada and Mexico. Were we also have hosts. There's no shortage of great places for our viewers to visit and the goal is for us to find businesses. That are looking for extra business. We are members support the businesses they stay with and so I think that's yeah that's our goal is to keep growing that hosts network because that's what really makes the program special. You you know going back to your introduction. It's very similar to mine because I was actually living in Manassas Virginia when we got the travel. Oh Bug and We actually went down to Florida and bought our RV. But I know the exact dealership. You're talking about Manassas that something about the crowd in Washington DC area that makes you start dreaming about being able to get out in the country a little bit So that that's pretty cool to hear here that we're very very similar story except I wasn't running a big video production company. Nobody know that traffic. I'm talking about and that you know the we love the DC area we just we could not handle congestion anymore and and I think some people are okay with that we just like open spaces cases and I think that again. That's why we love our being ray like you drive you feel so free. We were not feeling free sitting in that traffic every day getting to work. It was kind of soul crushing It's actually amazing when you start to travel across the country brain. I've noticed this too. You'll you'll hit an area where everything is dense people on top of each other and you go a little further maybe twenty miles out and all of a sudden everything opens up. And you don't see anything around you for a long time and you hit another section and everybody's kind of dense but those areas in between are areas that Sabrina I have never seen until we moved into our traveled. We never saw that. That was just something that we saw in a movie every once our or a TV show. We couldn't believe just how much space there is out there. That's open and available and just absolutely stunning. That's right and has an veer as you're describing this this I can feel the sensations so when I'm driving through Kansas or New Mexico or Texas where it's like wide open I feel like melted into my seat. I'm just so relaxed. Blacks and then I get to a big city population center and I'm tight like I'm sitting up straight cores. Really tight feeling like a gym trainer. Be a happy. They like. Tighten your core while I'm Su- protect your cities and I hate it and then you get back to his open spaces in authors. Yeah it's a huge difference. So what what made did you. I'm curious about your acquisition of harvests. Were you purposely looking for a business in the RV industry or did it just kind of fall into your lap. No it was It was purposeful and in the way it played out was interesting. So we left the DC area RV through the lower forty-eight move to Colorado. All this was overcome a three year period and at first year was phenomenal. I felt so free free. I was just having fun every day as a little kid. No guilt no remorse. Everything's awesome year two. I started feeling a little bit of drift like okay every day. I play but if feels the little undeserved like you like I miss working because at least then when I played felt I felt the contrast and so in year two started thinking. Okay what could I do next. I'm not trying to retire yet. I Love I love working so I started thinking about what to do next. Yeah I that was fun. Six months in. I was starting to get stressed out thinking. Wow I don't know what I'm GONNA do next. I think I was making a mistake. A lot of entrepreneurs or people who want want to be entrepreneurs make is like creating lists of industries that were big in like places to make money and I was focusing too much on the end product of. What's what's a business business? I can make no work backwards. Ultimately I it's like chasing love ultimately stopped. I just stopped looking and I said okay. What do I enjoy joy like? What are the things that I'm really passionate about are being topped the list and so then the question was well? That's interesting. Is there a way that I could do something in the RV the world. What do I find really interesting there? And that's actually how I came across harvest hosts was I L- we love traveling. We Love Campgrounds are fine. And sometimes we WANNA BOONDOCK WE WANNA be truly in a unique setting and situation and we started seeing all these farms and wineries and thinking like Kantar of your stay here and that was how we found harvest realized Don and Kim the original founders had the same thought process and it actually put together this really great network so when when I found him I you know we joined join the program we started using harvests hosts turned out it was it was just as awesome as it looked which is rare and I simply reached out to the founders and I said Hey guys this is super out of left field unsolicited. But would you have any interest in selling failing business here on retiring and allowing us to kind of come in and bring some of my technology expertise into play. You know improve the website improve the APP hire some additional police to grow the network and really take the sink to the next level and and that was how it got started and at first to their credit they. We're not interested in selling they said No. Why would we sell this? Enjoy the business and it took about three months of getting to know them and convincing them that we were genuinely unle passionate our viewers who were not in this just to make money by any means we are looking for something that we loved that we can help share with more people and that was a year and a half ago. Yeah that's that's pretty cool I am I was. I was interested to to hear if it was for sale. And you came upon upon it or it turns out that it wasn't for sale. You actually convinced them to sell it to you. So that's that's pretty cool. That's right yeah well. I don't I know when you when you guys met your lives. Originally were they Do they approach. You already. Just approach them. Oh my stories crazy I love. We can get enough time. I I find that I find that. Sometimes you have to put in the effort to really go get what you want that it rarely ever just falls into your lap. Yeah Yeah No. That's a great story. You answer these questions a little too. Well drill that as is your as you're talking. I'm coming up with questions and then your next line is answering the question. I just thought that you're you're throw me off my game. Aim The you guys started using Parviz hosts before well maybe not before you had the idea purchasing but you I tried it out yourself before you approach them with the idea purchasing it from them you wanted. You wanted to see what it was like. I think that's a really cool idea. Instead of I don't know maybe just approaching the person at I think that was a good way to gain their trust and for them to know that. Hey these guys must be really serious. If they're enjoying what we have and they WANNA take it and and build upon it yet and I wanted to be a genuine. I wanted to genuinely love the program if I was going to actually take it and and you know do what we're doing today which is like proselytize about at great. I only like running businesses that I personally use myself like I would never sell a product that I didn't personally believe in So using harvest hosts was very important way before I would make any sort of offer to buy the company but I think it was also important to showdown and Kim that look I I I not only know about your program. I know it thoroughly. I use your program and and not like that level of genuine interest was important so when you first tried it out and started in when when you purchase it from them. Did they have an APP or was it website. Only they had a they they kind of it was. It was kind of one of these APPs that was more of an I frame that pulled a website into it so it was there but not super functional and so that was kind of the first thing that I was excited about no surprise the majority of our traffic is using harvest through a phone or a mobile device. Yeah and YEP happened so improving. That experience was the first goal so we rebuilt the APP. We're actually in the process. We're now in monthly five of doing a version two point. Oh the APP and it is awesome and so I didn't want to. I did WANNA rush getting the first version out just so we can have a really good usable product. This next version. That's coming out is a game changer. And it makes booking finding contacting it makes everything super super super clean and easy but this is the first company of run. That's truly mobile. I and it's a whole different way of thinking you know because I grew up on the desktop right so I always designed for desktop and code for desktop Sort of think phone on. I is different but understandable in this kind of business when you're using the APP maybe the current APP or the newer APP. How can you kind of walk us through? Would how short of notice could you book site. If you're traveling. Would you be able to book in the same day. Yes yes so I would say the the only requirement and we try to make it really clear is just always call ahead you know or contact head. Sometimes it's by email or text but typically it's a phone call always call ahead to make sure the host it has room. You can do that early. Some people do that a week early few days early. I took the day before just because that's what I'm planning my next day. But there's there's nothing wrong with calling a day of you knows your flexible Ray. There's a good chance you call and they say sorry your sponsor all taken tonight. That said I've almost never had that happen. And we you know we we. Surprisingly with as many members we have as many hosts we have there are there are some chokepoints sway. Like if you're if you're going somewhere in Florida in the winter time right there are some understandable like chokepoints but typically. I'm the only person out of harvest hosts when I go sometimes. Sometimes there's another year another member to you know it's a big country. I've never used the APP. I've always done it on the desktop because I love the website so much which I've never. I don't even have the APP downloaded on my phone. Yeah well you know I so. I'll be honest right now if I were to choose a I prefer the desktop because has the desktop experience is really really good. What the APP does not currently have that it will have the next version? Is the route planning feature so right now on. The APP opened up. You can see all the hosts on on the map you can zoom in your fingers no repopulate you can choose a state or a or just hit your Gio and I'll show you what's around you so that's is useful but what I like about the desktop is that is. ADP route planning already to beat a CD. Right you can build an entire itinerary and then use the selector to say look for hosts that are less than twenty miles off the highway. Show you everything from like for us. We're going veiled Texas to Austin and I was able to. Let's see all the hosts that are along our route and that's great. You're really clean way to find him. How does the program work for our viewers that are traveling and how? How does it work for hosts I know you said there's over twelve hundred locations There's an APP and a website. But how does it. Actually if you could briefly describe how it actually works for just the. RV`er that's interested in staying at places in also for places that are interested Zidan hosting. What's the process for them? Yes all star the hosts because I think that the hosts are they truly are the backbone of our program up without the host. We have nothing. Nothing what I usually say when I reach out to new potential host. Is You know number one. Do you have room for our viewers to spend one night with you are in that. And that's all we ask for our members. Can I spend one night with you In return for supporting your business buying your products your winds produce. So do you have room for them. And do you have a product that they can purchase because that reciprocity is very important to our members aren't expecting something for nothing. What we what we tell all are members is you know? Take a percentage of the money. You're saving from a traditional campground. That's probably fifty sixty seventy bucks. Take Part of that and give it back to the hoax. You know that way everybody wins the host cell's product. That's great for them. The member gets a really unique experience which is great for them and keeps the program going which is great for us opinion for everybody So we we have these twelve hundred hosts many of them hundreds of them have been with us for many years. You're going on nine years for some of with them and it's because it typically works really. Well I would say your hosts might see an extra hundred or two hundred customers. A year from the program depending on where they are and that can translate into tens of thousands of dollars in extra revenue and we. We have run. The numbers and conservatively are are members. Collectively are spending millions of dollars every year with our hosts and so and I love that I mean I think. That's what's exciting is. I love small town. America America Loves Small Business America. And there's a place for big box stores but it's nice to sometimes support the small business and I think that's what our members are doing so long story short is a host. It's a great way to share your products with a new audience. Our viewers are are really enthusiastic audience. They're polite audience in general right and our members known joined that they follow the code of conduct and that code of conduct. Is You know essentially this leave no trace concept. They're we're GONNA come to your property. They're going to have their own self contained vehicle so they don't need electricity. They don't need water. They don't need sewer everything they come with. They're gonNA leave with. Hopefully maybe a couple of your products and they're going to be courteous and they're going to be on. I always say pretend like you're visiting your grandmother right. You wouldn't show up your your grandmother's farm and trash it. You'RE GONNA leave it better than you found it and that's the mentality of our members which is great. Is there a limit for the membership of how many stays they can do a year or are they allowed. I mean could they pick a different harvest host location every day of the year. Yeah no there's no limit it truly unlimited and it's interesting I. I did a survey about a year ago asking members how often they use the program and as you can imagine. It's all over the map you know. Sometimes some members use it away a few times a year we had a couple of outliers people who are using it hundreds of times a year. And that's great. I mean like as long as you're being a good guest you're not overstaying you're welcome you're supporting the host. Yeah you'll get after. It gets a lot of fun that that's my second question when you said overstaying you're welcome. Is there a limit does it vary I guess from host to host of how long you can stay on. The property is at a one night limit tonight or whatever whatever you the agreement is yes so so we tip. So the stated rule is twenty four hour. Visit one night. Now if you get to know the host invites you to stay longer. Of course that's between the member and the host but we also ask our members not to expect that and not to really ask that unless they're invited you on the reason is we have a a lot of members who are trying to go stay at these locations and these are not campgrounds and so the hosts are they love having visitors. Stay for a day and then move on. So it doesn't is it become. A campground is just visitors So yeah one night is Kinda the stated stay you always get to know the host. But that's what we say. We stayed at a place through harvest. Host a winery in California. I won't say the name just because everybody will try flock thereafter. I tell the story but we pulled the in and it was a husband and wife that own this winery and the wife was a on a European trip and he was the only one back at the winery managing the tastings and and all that stuff and so we pulled in shortly before closing time and he came out out to skip parked in said. You know when you're when you're settled income on inside and so we went inside and we did it a tasting then. He opened up like five bottles of wine and he said I gotta go run some errands. You guys hang out in here. What the cat and Now that I've opened these bottles of wine I can't use them tomorrow so we gotta they drink so like the experience that we've had almost every harvest house is the owners are really gracious us and welcoming when people come stay with them and and they really appreciate just I mean. We sat out until like midnight and talk to the sky just about the wind business and why he started and you know all that stuff. So I've I've found that at distilleries wineries anywhere we've stayed with harvests. How's it seems like the people are the owners of the properties are very welcoming and just WANNA share not only their product but also their story story with people so I I don't know if you what the vetting process is but it seems like they're all very you know the same aim kind of the same mentality when you go stay at a harvest host? Yeah it's it's really it's it's great to hear you say that and I we also did a survey of her hosts and we ask some of the number of questions but one of them was. Why do you enjoy being in Harris host program and it was fascinating was the number? One answer had nothing what they do with money. The number one answer was we enjoy meeting New People making new friends And and they enjoy our members. The number to answer was we enjoy sharing our story rain sharing our products. And it's just what you said like. They've put a lot of themselves into these wineries and their labors of love. Right these farms farm's labors of love. And so they love sharing it and then the third thing was additional revenue. But I thought that was great. It was like you know it. It you know number one number two had nothing to with money. They're just genuinely great people who enjoy sharing what they're working on and so for the vetting process. We rely pretty heavily on our members and each month in our member newsletter. We call for hosts suggestions. And we've had I mean the last four or five months over eight hundred food recommendations from members. That's pretty great because that's like one step vetting right there. It means one of our members has actually been to this place. Thought it'd be a good fit for the program and we go from there To try to recruit them so that I think that's why we've had such good luck Is that we rely on our members to tell us who they think would be a good fit fit. Once they're in the program drawl. What does what does it take to stay in the program? Or what does it take to get kicked out of a program. I guess they're rating system or some way that you can manage what's going on. Yes so we do have so and this is another great way to find locations whether using the APP or the website you will pull up the host profile profile page and typically you'll see ratings reviews and photos and that's and that's how I kind of liked to find. I'll look through the photos and kind of get a feel for what it's GonNa be like. Stay there you'll look through their reviews and that's how you get a feel for hospitality and what they experienced so we have thousands thousands and thousands and thousands of reviews and we look through each one of them individually and its verification there are planes new host in could be very UN flat surface. That was hard to park in non enough turnaround space. Maybe issues like in a rare occasion. We've had like you know a brewery and a city or more of an urban area or member. said they didn't feel safe. And we you know we take that very seriously and so it's rare that will kick a host out of the program but if we have complaints from members we do do it from time to time but again very very rarely but but this again is where we rely on our members we look at every piece of feedback that comes in and if someone says. They don't feel safe or they were treated. Well we take that seriously on the flip side if a host tells us that a member was not behaving well or or discourteous. We will also kick kick them out of the program and so it goes both ways. I'm glad to hear that everything's being monitored on both sides and that does not just the host side but the people using the program as what really good so it looks like like you're saying about just talking about the reviews and The sort of the conduct of hosts and of of the themselves. It looks like a lot of your marketing. Seems to come from affiliates and word of mouth so we know some other companies that have had rapid growth in the RV industry through this same marketing model in the current times. Do you think that one of the best marketing strategies ogies out there or was that done by design or did it just happen. Organically no was done by design. And I think it's a tremendous way way to market a product especially if your product is a community based product and so the first thing that I did when I when I took over was to you go out and see where people were talking about harvest hosts and what I found was that there are a lot of youtubers who created these. Great videos has showcasing their experiences experiences using the program and they are actually sending a lot of traffic our way sign ups and they were getting no credit for it so I put into place in affiliate program through Called Referral Candy that automatically tracks All of the referrals but it also does something kind of cool. ooh that allows allows the refer to give discount to their friends and so as a harvest. affiliate you can give a friend a fifteen percent cent discount. And then you'll actually earn fifteen dollars. Won't someone signs but I like that because in everyone's getting something right the the it's earned fifteen dollars but they're not taking advantage of their friends they're also giving a dentist count and for proxy generally believe so so I immediately reached out to all these different youtubers and I said hey you you guys have done such nice things for us and you're getting nothing for it. I feel bad simply using the link. And you'll make some money and Annual Bill to give a discount and so that's kind of how the program started and we now have a lot of great affiliates and almost hate using the term affiliate. They're all members race. Affiliate programs is not open to nonmembers. We we allow our members to recruit an and kind of tell others about the rim. WanNa make sure that everyone. WHO's talking about the program is actually using the program and not simply just trying to make money from it? I think that's awesome that it you do have to be a member in order to be an affiliate because that really does speak volumes for the program itself Yes yes and again. It goes back to the community element you know the RV community is a pretty big community. It's a very close community and authenticity is very important. And so that's why making sure blur actually using the program before they're trying to talk about the program or sell the program. It's it's important thing I'd recommend others take into consideration going back to something you said earlier about out and I'm glad you didn't phrase it this way because sometimes in social media you'll see people say harvest hosts is a great way to stay somewhere for free and it's actually not free. You're like you said sort of transferring. A certain percentage of what you'd spend on a campground to a local business or a farm or a winery distillery. Golf Course Museum whatever it is and so I have this term called them shop. RV local and so local RV businesses. And I include harvest hosts in that when I talk about shopping. RV local so really. You're kind of staying within the RV community. When you're spending money at these harvests? But I I give a lot of presentations nations At rv shows and at different RV conferences. And that's one thing. We always emphasize people is harvest has is a great program to you get to meet interesting. People learn about businesses learn about various products. But it's definitely not a free program you you're expected to like you said using the code of conduct to patronize that establishment. That you're staying at so I'm I'm just glad lab at you. You said it the way the way that you did that. It's I don't think it was ever meant to be free. It was meant for the experience. I think more than the the cost Yale. It's and so that word experience. I think that is the number one thing we try to promote for the program. It's not a free place to stay It's a great way to get a new unique experience in every stays in experience. But it's definitely not free because you're expected to support the host that you visit. which very natural thing to do right? I don't think show up. You know and not WanNa give back a little bit. Yeah and that were free as they. It's a challenging word. We have actually been and stripping it out of more and more of a market Because we don't want to chase the types of people who are expecting a free program definitely not what the says it we left. I have to use the word occasionally because the most confusing park to a new person is how much do I have to pay to stay every night and and so it's our way of explaining what's free to stay. Hey but in return you support the host and so that It's tricky but you're absolutely right. This is about the experience this is not about finding a free place a steak stay. Stay while parking. Lots of great. You're just not going to get the same experience. No it's not a great experience. Now there I was on on what shouldn't because some people say Walmart's perfectly. It's funny I I will say that. Say in an interview a few months ago I sat stay. Asked me your who's your competition. Who consider competition? Are you competing with good Sam. Koa answers now like I I. Don't I love campgrounds. We are complement to campgrounds. You need to have campgrounds to get your hook US plug into power our our use that hot water and then you go boondock at harvest hosts and you go back to the campgrounds and so we're we work really well together. I consider competition competition the Walmart parking lot. I don't think anyone should ever have to stay Walmart. Parking lot or cracker rail parking lot. They can go state a winery instead and anything. That's it's common but but it was really funny made there's always haters and a couple of people wrote back and they're like how dare you defy a Walmart and then I just want to clarify Walmart Walmart. I buy them. I buy everything Walmart. That is my one stop shopping on the euro. It's wonderful I just preferred a winery and I will debate debate with anybody who thinks it won't Perkins. Yeah that's a that's a great. That's a great way to put it because it really is a compliment into the campgrounds. I mean we've stayed at wineries distilleries. We stayed at a museum that was a harvest host member and and it's great to stay there but it's also great to stay at a campground sometimes. So they really that. There really aren't competing with each other because there's different reasons for staying at each absolutely true earlier. I think you had mentioned that. You're hiring a small small team to go out and look at new locations to be picked up that I understand correctly. Yes you sure did and your vision of everything. How many more locations would you like to Z.? Say within the next couple of you have an end goal as far as locations. Yes great question so I think the first thing I first thing I would say is has quality is very important so we really for us and it makes sense but it's quality over quantity so the goal is not to add thousands of locations just for the sake of having thousand house locations however I would like to add thousands of locations right back because I think there are. There are thousands of truly high quality quality Small Businesses museums farms breweries. I mean they're everywhere in this country. They're just perfect for the program. That's what I focus on. Above of all health Is Host Recruiting Membership Cruising Kinda falls in place when you have a great network right like when we have the coolest places to go friends. Tell other friend And they come into the program so sells itself when we do a good job of having Nice curated network of hosts so we've twelve hundred now. We're adding a couple of new day. I think there's room to increase that pace. I try not to be too structured and setting numerical because has in that can force bad quality. If I'm just trying to hit numbers but I will say you know. We added a few hundred hosts this year. I love to add. Maybe six hundred next sure right like I just loved keep adding great places to stay. I like the quality answer. I like that. You're you're focused on equality that's awesome. I agree we need. More places are barriers. Stay too because the industry is growing more and more people are being and it's becoming even more acceptable people that I think didn't even think about are being five years ago are now looking at are being like that sound. That's a great idea. Why didn't we start this sooner? And people people at our in Armenian or saying the same thing but we wish I wish I started are being sooner than I did only been arguing for three years. I wish I started five years ago right. So it's definitely growing and growing on. Both sides writes. This is why it's cool. We have my my parents generation. Retiring getting these. That's always been the case and it makes sense but we've we've young people now eight people who are leaving the sticks and bricks and instead grabbing new homes. They can take on the road and we're seeing at and horace hosts membership growth wrote the both sides in the young twenty to thirty segment as well as the fifty s and sixty. You know sixty segment and I like that. Because I don't think you know I think there used to be a box and say it's this age group you know this but it's not true anymore are becoming all shapes and sizes there travelers in everyone's a traveler right like you don't think about you. Don't say only this group likes to travel. Everybody likes to travel and it's just recently people have come to understand that road trips are awesome and a lot of cool stuff to see that you can access in an RV and not necessarily by air. Oh Yeah you meant a lot with flights flights. It's a completely different. I personally do not like flying For several reasons but one of the main reasons is that on somebody's Bosseaux also schedule love the RV life. For the fact that I'm deciding when when the the archer is and I'm not packing anything or having it scanned or and where I go. I have everything that I own with I. I think it's fantastic that way. He has fantastic not to mention air. Travel is becoming exceedingly expensive time. Tumbler complete it's GonNa be expensive and it's getting less comfortable. It's I don't know maybe I'm just holder bigger or heavier but I swear to seats are smaller than they've ever been. Your yeah flight is a flight. Where somehow you weren't treated with disdain? It's not exactly so switching switching gears a little bit Joel you also write a column for INC magazine every month. Is it every month it depends. Yeah it's it's it just depends. I used to write three month now. It's occasionally but but I think you're right so yeah I love ran the column. I did actually actually. I did a video interview series for awhile. Interviewed one hundred fifty really interesting people. I just love asking what makes them tick so changes aware or that ends up so as part of that. I think you've interviewed a lot of entrepreneurs unlike you just said a lot of interesting people. Can you give us. Maybe maybe the top two or three things you've learned either from those interviews or from your personal experience on being successful as an entrepreneur nor yes an start by saying I've interviewed really really interesting people. Elon Musk David. Illumine the founder of Jet Blue Brock Obama Obama hundreds of interesting people. Arnold Schwarzenegger all different Industries Steve Forbes Journalism. Just all over the map and the most common thing everyone says one way or not is the Nike slogan. Just doing and in another way. It's lot of entrepreneurs or potential entrepreneurs have ideas that are actually really good ideas but they over think it and they sit there and thinking thinking thinking thinking they just never took action and when you think too much you get paralysis from over analysis and eventually you convince yourself. There's a reason no one's business. It's dumb idea. Well that's ridiculous. I mean Ilan was trying to put the first like Shuttle and space in the first time a shuttle would be reused. What a dump? Khan upped everybody then any minute he just did it and they got the mazing. So if he'd over thought he wouldn't adult SPACEX and this is just common in every single interview had just doing an and it sounds contrived but the reality is. There's always a good reason not to start something. You can always always find a reason. I'm waiting for the next paycheck. I'm too busy. I have a young family. Whatever it is? There's always not to do it so just find a reason to to it and start in the second one for all the most successful people that I've interviewed. They have nothing in common. which they're doing something they really love? And it's they're not doing it for me as a byproduct of their success. But they're genuinely passionate about it. And I've learned that Super Important Morton because if you're not doing something that you love you'll burn out like you can only spend so much time with somebody you don't enjoy but I'll use harvest services an example pull the last year and a half. I haven't felt like I had to work a more than a day and that day was between taxes like every every other day. Just Fun Fun like a I. I'm talking to people like you is talking about something. I enjoy recruiting. Great hosts to try and joy. It's all fun and so yet do something love and then and the third thing is before he started with any sort of project define what success looks like. I made the mistake in my first business of I knew I wanted to to run a business. I wanted to be not all I wanted to do. I started business in an area that I loved so we got that was video action. Shooting video loved it but I never stopped to ask myself what ultimate success looked like and because of that every year I just kept growing bigger and bigger and bigger raised as money raised. More money hired people hired more people and no one had ended. I said what's that like. How do you win the game? Now what's happening is I was super stressed out because growing is really hard to do after a while. It's like folding a piece in Peace Bay path over and over again and I buy your fifth fold. It's really hard. With harvests of doing it. Totally differently I started before about the business I said. What am I trying to do with this list? While the answer was I want to create a lifestyle business. I WanNa do something that I'm passionate about of. Never going to sit down and create a pro forma income statement. Never we're GONNA try to guess at what my growth next year is going to be. I don't care I just want to run this business. Well I WANNA take this and make it available more people so enjoy it. I have man. I'll tell you what it's been a year and a half of really enjoying life and so I wish I had this mentality. The first time I built a business wish I'd stopped to like figure out what I wanted to get out of it so just to recap in whatever you're doing a life just ask yourself what are you trying to get out of it and then design the project to fit those goals. Look one of my goals. Last winter was to ski Utah and I would wake up in the morning. I go ski for hours. I did seventy three days and then I would work at work in the evening. I work in the mornings but I didn't work as much as it could have. I could've worked a lot. Harder probably brought a lot more members and a lot more hosts but but that was the goal. The goal is to have a really great winter while making sure her so still program so I was GonNa ask if that would transfer to people that are you're living in traveling full time in the RV. But I don't even need to ask you because it does your. We absolutely does so here. Here's the prime. Example Noah. Last September took a nice trip across the country New England and going to Acadia National Park had never been there before I was in the. RV super excited well. There's a really busy busy time viewer for harvest hosts and I was feeling guilty. Like should I be working today. Maybe just work today tomorrow. We'll go hiking but I stopped myself in in kind of remember Heyman like the reason I'm doing. This is because I want to be able to drive to Acadia National Park and get up and go hiking not because I want to sit in. RV Work all day. And so I didn't allow myself to feel guilty about it and I went hiking. Had some amazing to the precipice trail was awesome and I came back at night and I got some work done instead of watching a movie right. There's a lot more time in every day and then we give credit to cut out a little bit of TV here. And then I can enjoy. Enjoy more you know activities so one more question for you since you used to rent a video business. There's a facebook ad that's running For harvest hosts right now in. It's a great looks like a drone shot coming into an RV parked on a farm. Did you shoot that video I did. Yeah yes I am so when I travel I always have my drone with me and I love I just love shooting at the drone video. All video up there some compilations of of Shot that I've taken typically when I'm at the hosts Although I do when I I see a really cool member video on Amaral swear I'll usually ask the. Hey can I give you some free membership in exchange for puffiness into one of my videos but I really enjoy creating those. It's fun. Yeah that's a great one. I I enjoy watching it every time it comes up. I'll all sit in. Sit and let them at run so I can see it well Joel. I think that's all our questions. Is there anything that you'd like to add a conversation before Sean and I let you go now this has been fun guys. I you've got me all fired up I'm I'm ready to jump in the RV. Hopefully this snowstorm chills out for anyone listening. If you're if you know someone who could be a great host for the program. Please tell him to go to Harvard. DOT COM. Click on the TAB. The this has four for hosts. It's a good description of what it's like to be a host. We have some testimonials. And then there's a short form of infill out to get more information there's never any cost host obviously a no obligation. Either your hosts can try it out if it's awesome. Stay in the program. If it's not a good fit for by no means going to try keep keep anybody in there. And if you're if you haven't us harvest yet we loved having the program only requirement. Is You have a self contained. RV with the bathroom side cooking facilities inside and some sort of water water catch and it goes back to that. Leave a trace sensible you know this is boon talking on. Don't expect the host provide facilities and RV Steward or great. Yeah it was a it was a real honor to get to get to talk to you. We know you have a wealth of experience as an entrepreneur. So to get your take doc on on some of these topics that we've covered and to hear how and why you got into harvest hosts I. I'm really excited about it too. I am I think you're an interesting person to chat with and hopefully we can do it again some time and go into some more detail about some of the other projects you worked on time. Let me know and I'll be here. I never get tired of this topic. Thank you guys I appreciate it. We WanNA thank Joe for coming on the show and chatting adding with us about how he acquired harvest and turned it into what it is today. 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