18 Burst results for "Academy Of Sciences"

"academy sciences" Discussed on Can He Do That?

Can He Do That?

07:42 min | 7 months ago

"academy sciences" Discussed on Can He Do That?

"Or other conservative politicians? The trump administration is similar in many ways to the George W Bush administration. The George W Bush administration was also very aggressive in trying to control scientists trying to stack scientific. Panels with individuals who they thought held agendas that were similar to their own in other words, not drawing on the best scientific experts but trying on scientific experts who had shown an interest in being pro business or in George W Bush's case folks who were more socially conservative. So this is something that has certainly happened in the past, but I think that it is happening to a greater degree under the trump administration. And Philip notes, it's what is fueled. The previous partisan divides over climate science Republicans for the better part of a decade now has been as a party resistant to some of the science behind climate change in part because. So many of the industries that are responsible for some of the pollution turned to Republicans for their help in legislation and regulations in. In making it easier for them to do their energy and natural gas type work, and so the sort of anti climate science attitude has been pervasive in the Republican Party before trump but it seems to have been exacerbated during the trump presidency in part because the president has been so explicit about what he believes or or rather what he does not believe. Democrats by contrast have historically accepted climate change as a significant threat that's often meant regulations on industries and businesses which Republicans argue harms the economy and American workers. Despite trump's attitude towards science today, this administration is facing a real need for science and scientists specifically when it comes to developing a covid nineteen vaccine at unprecedented speed. The president continues to tout progress towards vaccine seemingly hanging some of his reelection bid on his ability to deliver one quickly. So has that scientific need tempered the administration's approach to D- staffing scientific organizations now that they need more scientists, are they reversing course? So to some extent. Yes. As the pandemic worsen, the trump administration has tried to play some catch up with respect to the status of science and his administration after an early period of ignoring scientists pleased to take over hundred seriously trump began whole public briefings on the topic reference that sometimes included public health experts like Dr Burks and Dr Fat Shape. And more important the trump administration launched the multibillion dollar operation warp speed, which is a public private partnership focused primarily on creating manufacturing and distributing covid vaccine by January twenty, twenty one trump even began to occasionally complement scientists in his public remarks, for example, one event said. Something like we have the best scientists in the world racing to develop a safe seen that will end this pandemic, and so this seems very different from the trump. I've described US where in this conversation given the public health disaster through trump has maybe realized how crucial scientists can be and is giving them a bit more credit. The said his interest in science at the moment is probably driven more by his. Reelection goals than improving public health. We've noticed that trump's praise for scientists turns to criticism if they expressed doubt that safe axiom can be made by the year's end and trump has pressured not only is FDA, but also drug companies CEOS to have vaccine available on a potentially unsafe timeline. So in the end that argue that this is not precise behavior, but rather further evidence of trump's constant Tennessee to politicize science. In other words to use it. Or to dismiss it when it suits his political purposes. Trump has embraced scientists in his support for a vaccine, but he's also repeatedly offered highly unlikely vaccine timelines and put pressure on federal regulators and pharmaceutical executives. Trump has touted unproven drugs and suggested questionable ways to treat covid nineteen and political appointees in the trump administration have even tried to change delay and prevent the release of CDC reports because they were viewed as undermining president trump's message that pandemic is under control I. Ask Liz, whether we've seen any areas where the trump administration has been good for Science So, we do see some advances the National Institutes of health their budget has actually increased. Thanks to Congress during the trump administration I know that there are certain efforts underway in some cases outside governments. That's kind of a backlash effect to the trump administration. So there's actually an effort going on between the National Academy Sciences and the National Science Foundation called Sean. So that stands for societal experts action network, and that is a really innovative new group that came about during the covert era that is basically trying to broker information between policymakers including policy makers at the state level and outside experts I think where we see Some advances actually is almost a backlash effect of experts who are so concerned about what's going on and are taken some initiatives sometimes within government often without and to hopefully those effects will yield benefits now and in the future. But at the end of the day, we really need to work on rebuilding the scientific capacity of our government. I think on the whole the trump administration has really hampered science within government, and that's not just my view over half of the members of the National Academy of Sciences have signed onto a letter that rebukes Donald Trump's denigration quote unquote denigration of scientific expertise. So there are lot of. Experts more broadly who think that he has unbalance. Really reduce the government scientific capacity. So where does this reduced government scientific capacity and an absence of shared reality about global pandemic? Where do all of these pieces leave the American People Philip says, it's contributing to the country's overall sense of polarization. The pandemic is interesting right? Because it's not a political issue necessarily and it's not something where there's like A. Red Side and a blue side to it. It's a virus that affects every American and all of our communities and it doesn't distinguish between Republicans, and Democrats in there's not sort of an ideological component here and yet trump has made it a partisan issue because of his rejection of the science and rejection of the expertise within the government, and you know that has put sort of a partisan political. Polarizing Lens on an issue that otherwise should be something that that all Americans have the same vantage point on and you have a sense of whether this is what trump voters want to see in a potential second term from the president, a continuation of this rejection specifically, climate science and this doubt cast on public health expertise is that what trump voters would expect or want in his second term? I think trump voters care about other issues much more for his second term they're motivated by his economic record and look he says and promises he will do for communities around the country in terms of jobs they're more motivated by this sort of general ethos of fighting against the machine against the establishment against the swamp in Washington, they're more motivated by what he has said about trying to. Restore a kind of nineteen fifties style, America, the climate science, and the pandemic scientists certainly part of.

Donald Trump George W Bush administration president George W Bush National Science Foundation National Academy of Sciences Republican Party National Institutes of health US Philip A. Red Side FDA Washington America Dr Burks National Academy Sciences
"academy sciences" Discussed on Le Show

Le Show

03:56 min | 1 year ago

"academy sciences" Discussed on Le Show

"The radiation picture was with developing by the hour every our you could see that this or that cell count in the blood test was plunging signaling very high radiation dose. The hospital staff kept reading the victims despite knowing about the radiation dose improvising some self protection that took face masks from the helicopter crews emergency kit. The condition of the three victims is now unknown and military team later carried out to camp decontamination work at the hospital. Now a team of researchers with the chinese academy sciences carrying out that assessment of possible safety issues tied to who'd nuke two point. Oh publishing the proceedings of the national academy of sciences the group paper describes the factors that led to the rise of the second nuclear era and hand safety concerns that need to be addressed now the new nuclear erez driven by less developed countries such as india china into some degree russia. They researchers suggest this new unexpected second nuclear era era is fraught with great risk. They mentioned russia risk. They note that despite efforts by the parties involved in implementing nuclear clear power plants in the first era major accidents occurred hello chernobyl they further note that recent history suggests that safety safely producing nuclear energy has still not been when fully realized in their paper they outline some of the safety issues involved with the second nuclear era unlike most advanced countries the new ones inst- suffer from poor infrastructure in the means for safely maintaining a complex nuclear plant the laws some of the countries developing nuc- now are less stringent and and there is more corruption and less political stability and there are differences in social values regarding risk and the need for safety practices such committee such countries do not have well established communications channels between those operating nuke facilities and the public at large side from that dr lincoln go right ahead when to crack reactors at a scottish nuclear power stations being given permission to reopen but only only for four months the u._k.'s office for nuclear regulation is allowing edna energy to restart reactor four which has an estimated two hundred nine cracks in its graphite core. The regulator has accepted the operators argument that it's safe to relax the limit for the permitted number of cracks. The operational allowance for cracks per reactor is being doubled from three hundred fifty to seven hundred dairy. We go ipso facto change. Oh presto the regular st the stress that after four months would again have to prove it was safe carrying on the reactor operation or they might have to raise the limit again and speaking of scotland and nuclear stuff. A scottish nuclear power plant has been affected by power linked to a lightning strike. That's right a power plant and has been affected by power cut. No there's nothing wrong with that. What you mean i i i will continue with my reading plant. Operators said a short lost power was experienced to the site near thir- so manager's confirmed distracted directly hit the nuclear power plant backup supplies also failed as a result of the incident prompting safety fears according according to the scotsman have to wear kilts when they write the news. I don't understand it meant that for about one hour there was no power for vital safety systems which monitor radio radiation and ventilation operator said say it with me now. There'd been no risk to people or the environment. The plant is in the process of being decommissioned and and the land being cleared up so the power cut stopped the decommissioning temporarily. That's <hes> that work will be completed between twenty thirty and twenty thirty thirty three so plan your visit.

russia national academy of sciences chinese academy sciences scotland india dr lincoln u._k. four months one hour
"academy sciences" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"academy sciences" Discussed on 710 WOR

"And your memory comes back, your memory becomes younger. Again, he alcohol with ally restores usefulness to your brain to an older bring. I started taking it about my mid fifties. When I started taking ubiquonol the ubiquonol keeps my heart young the alcohol with LA keeps my brain you. I like that. And it starts to work. It's very effective, and it starts to work very quickly. It starts to work very quickly. I found this older study when I was going through my notes. On Wednesday night starting to prepare for this program. From the annals of the New York academy sciences. It's a review of Al car and for physical and mental health and aging adults turning back the clock by restoring metabolism. Okay. As here's what they said. By the year two thousand and four there were already twenty one human clinical trials showing Alker improves memory and elderly people by two thousand and four. That's fifteen years ago fifteen years ago. There was already Twenty-one human clinical trial showing that Al Qar improve memory and the elderly or protected their brain health. There were already many reports that was good for nerve New York academy of science. Okay. So this is the university of Washington University of Washington, I believe is in Saint Louis. But also, Oregon Health and science university day performed a one year study and patients with Alzheimer's disease. They supplement the DEM would fish oils, and a LA they supplemented them would fish oils and at slowed functional decline at slowed cognitive decline. It's an journal of Alzheimer's disease. So let me tell you. When people have Alzheimer's. Have functional decline very rapidly. They forget the brush their teeth have trouble feeding themselves. They may have trouble dressing and the loss of memory happens out of very rapid pace over a year. A one year study just giving fish oils in LA, that's the amount of ALAN three tablets of alcohol with Alli slowed the loss of memory. So here's another one. This is department. The department of medical rehabilitation geriatrics and Hanover, Germany day, tested, the effects of a LA and Alzheimer's disease patients, they gave him six hundred milligrams a day. And their first day two studies, they gave patients with Alzheimer's disease. Did you ever getting to standard treatment they were getting into standard? Rush rows hummers. They added six hundred milligrams of ALANNA. Over a one-year to study at lead to a stabilization of cognitive function. And other words. They're testing their neuro psychological testing. Wasn't deteriorating. It would only deteriorate very rapidly over a year. So in a new study, they gave a LA to forty eight months. Okay. And a new study they gave people with early stage Alzheimer's a LA for four years a greatly slowed down the loss of memory. It's an journal neurotransmitter. Okay. Let's go to a break. Jerry Hickey invite health. We're talking about alcohol with LA for your memory, my memory, as far as people would Alzheimer's that's really up to the enroll just treat them..

LA Alzheimer's disease Alzheimer New York academy of science New York academy sciences Al Qar university of Washington Unive Alker Al Jerry Hickey Oregon Hanover Saint Louis Alli Germany ALAN fifteen years one year forty eight months four years
"academy sciences" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"academy sciences" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"You shake some ground the ground settles, but there's a lot of water inside. So is the ground settles water gets compressed pressure in the water goes off in the time of the earthquakes can't flow away back quickly, and you get a temporary quicksand. Really bad job of holding up buildings. Alaska. Governor Bill Walker declaring a disaster and receiving a promise of help from the White House, Texas Senator John Cornyn is announcing early he plans to seek reelection to a third term in the US Senate in twenty twenty who might run against him pedal, work has writer, I all if federal doesn't run now, you might see what Keno clearing chapter Rice University political analyst Mark Jones says all of that depends on which of those three does not run for president Julio uncon- stroz indicated hill at least researcher run aerobic already is perceived as the leading democratic presidential contender. Locally. The Albert Einstein's of tomorrow have been strutting their stuff today at the John Jay science and engineering academy science, fair six hundred students showing off their smarts three hundred teachers judging them, plenty at stake. In fact, a half million dollars in scholarships from Saint Mary's university and the university of the carnet word going to the winners and this is world aids day. For those living with the virus in the US. Things are looking up among people that received at least one medical visit in our program. Eighty six percent of them are Riley suppressed compared to about sixty percent of people that are diagnosed with HIV in in the United States. Dr Laura achiever says viral suppression of the virus has reached a record level in the US for those in the Ryan white HIV aids program..

Senator John Cornyn United States US Senate Julio uncon- stroz Governor Bill Walker Dr Laura achiever Albert Einstein Rice University Alaska John Jay White House Riley political analyst Saint Mary Mark Jones Texas researcher Ryan president writer
"academy sciences" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"academy sciences" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"You shake some gray on the ground settles, but there's a lot of water in size. So is the ground settles. Go water gets compressed pressure in the water goes up in the time of the earthquakes that can't flow way back quickly and you get a temporary quicksand. As a really bad job of holding buildings. Alaska. Governor Bill Walker declaring a disaster and receiving a promise of help from the White House, Texas Senator John Cornyn is announcing early he plans to seek reelection to a third term in the US Senate in twenty twenty who might run against him work has writer. I if federal doesn't run now, you might see Joaquim during Rice University political analyst Mark Jones says all of that depends on which of those three does not run for president Julio unconscious stroz indicated hill at least researcher run aerobic already is perceived as the leading democratic presidential contender. Locally. The Albert Einstein's of tomorrow have been strutting their stuff today at the John Jay science and engineering academy science, fair six hundred students showing off their smarts three hundred teachers judging them, plenty at stake. In fact, a half million dollars in scholarships from Saint Mary's university and the university of the carnet word going to the winners and this is world aids day. For those living with the virus in the US. Things are looking up among people that received at least one medical program. Eighty six percent of them are oppressed compared to about sixty percent of people that are diagnosed with HIV in in the United States. Dr Laura achiever says viral suppression of the virus has reached a record level in the US for those in the Ryan white HIV aids program. Breaking news on the hour at the half and anytime w dot com. Brought to you by comfort air engineering. I'm Morgan Montalvo NewsRadio twelve hundred w..

Senator John Cornyn United States US Senate Governor Bill Walker Albert Einstein Morgan Montalvo Dr Laura achiever Rice University Alaska Joaquim John Jay White House political analyst Saint Mary Mark Jones Texas stroz Julio researcher president
"academy sciences" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"academy sciences" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Some ground the ground cells, but there's a lot of water inside. So as the ground settles the water gets compressed pressure in the water goes off in the time of the earthquakes that can't flow away back quickly. You get a temporary quicksand really bad job of holding Bill. Alaska governor Bill Walker declaring a disaster and gotten a promise of help from the White House John Cornyn is announcing early he plans to seek reelection to a third term in the US Senate to represent Texas in twenty twenty so who would run against him. Federal work has writer, I refuse if federal doesn't run. Now, you might see what? Local during rush university political analyst Mark Jones says all all of that depends on which of those three is not running for president Julio on has indicated he will at least researcher running a rock already is a leading democratic presidential contender. Nasa has detected an antibiotic resistant bacteria strain in the space station. Nasa is keeping an eye on the bacteria in the international space station with a program called microbial observatory through the MO an antibiotic resistant bacteria has been discovered on the ISS toilet seat. Now says MO found that microgravity made bacterial strains more resistant to antibiotics known hazards to astronauts include radiation and low gravity, but now says becoming more concerned about bacteria both in the I s and in the astronauts guts NASA says more study is needed. We'll maybe one of these kids can develop a cure for that space station. Infected the Albert Einstein's tomorrow strutting their stuff today at the John Jay science and engineering academy science, fair six hundred students showing off their smarts three hundred teachers judging them. There's a lot at stake a half million dollars in scholarships at Saint Mary's encouraging word go to the winners this morning, NewsRadio twelve hundred W O A is annual elf..

Nasa John Cornyn Albert Einstein Bill Walker Mark Jones US Senate John Jay Alaska political analyst Saint Mary NewsRadio writer Texas White House Julio researcher president twelve hundred W million dollars
"academy sciences" Discussed on This Week in Science

This Week in Science

05:49 min | 2 years ago

"academy sciences" Discussed on This Week in Science

"It's going to be cheaper. It's become more efficient technology is overcoming the traditional mining and transport and refining operations. Well, I think part of the reason that infrastructure might get pushed forward is that companies want it, which is part of it. Right. Given. This is the loop. Right. So this is part of companies recognizing that resiliency in the market is about being carbon smart, if it's because it's cheaper that might be why that's kind of what this is talking about. So it's kind of circling around the same point here. And that is this article, we are this article is saying that it will be the smart business decision of the future to be more carbon-neutral period. I'm not saying that I'm saying that the only choice in the future will be carbon smart, and it will not be up to those who are using the energy at all. They'll just I mean that tomato will still come from Mexico, and it'll still be cheaper. But it will be on the come in here on a hydrogen fuel cell vehicle, and that's the only difference and to the actual end price of that tomato. It will still be the difference than it is now. Then you have to move on. But I would argue. Mexico could become the SUV our economic hide and America could be doing all the labor for Mexico. What you'd be an end? We were like we build a wall that we can get over there and get the good jobs like this could happen to but. Just I think there's a there's a there's a there's a hump to get over on all of these things where the for a split amount of time for whatever it is. It will cost slightly more to do the greener thing for whoever it is. That's that was yesterday. I don't think we're not for all things. We're not yet. It's coming, but that's still a fiscal decision that somebody somebody has to make volumes. It's cheaper regardless. I don't think it because. It can't be it won't immediately. There's always a hump where you're changing infrastructure where things are more expensive. Well, okay. So so to that point, you're right. And to that point I think if you're an established large international trucking company, you may not make that jump just yet. So there is a mechanism of reinvents Harmon intensive company, but I don't think that I think it's a dollar intensive company. And I think it's the dollar that drives it, and it's not going to have. I mean, you will have companies come out and tell you, hey, for the love of carbon reduction, we did this completely transformative thing where we have all electric big rigs from tesla. Okay. We do this for the carbon footprint that sounds great to the public. But they also realize we don't have to do oil changes. We don't have articles about. Marvan's as everything to do dollars. And that I'm saying that's going to that's going to be the thing that does is cheaper better more fish, whether you believe it or not you're saying the same thing that the article said, okay moving on mechanism Yeston. What did you bring? Oh, it's. I have. This is I should have been ready for this transition better. Because now the awkward. Joe Joe monkeys life for me. DNA of an extinct monkey called zero three six as been sequenced revealing that it was most closely related to South America's team monkeys. But this monkey this. This zero three is no ordinary DT monkey first of all it was not found in South America. But it is rare primate of the Caribbean. This the Yoho go stuff in the beginning. Destroy thought to have taken to the seas in search of adventure eleven million years ago, or maybe washed out to sea doing some sort of terrible storm remain such monkeys onto floating vegetation long enough to land in Jamaica. Then the interesting morphological auditees. This. I'm like any other monkey in the world zero three was a slow moving tweed tree dweller relatively few teeth. It had leg bones that made it look closer to rodents leg boats. Unusual parents made it difficult for scientists to work out where it came from what it was related to how it might have evolved. Plus it's extinct, so they have or some bones. They found in a cave in Jamaica. So research published recently in the proceedings National Academy sciences carried out by experts from international conservation charity. That's these logical society of London and London's natural history museum as well. As the American Museum of natural history in New York pretty much everybody..

Mexico South America Jamaica London Harmon intensive company American Museum of natural National Academy sciences Joe Joe Caribbean tesla New York Marvan Yoho America eleven million years
"academy sciences" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

03:04 min | 2 years ago

"academy sciences" Discussed on KTOK

"Appreciate it. Aspect? What was supposed to the reports that came out during the week that went viral was about climate change. And you might think climate change is reports on it coming out all the time, but this one specifically how to do with. How would affect the price of beer? So that made everybody's ears perk up, and they got very concerned right away because of global warming. It's going to hurt barley crops likely. Doubling the price of beer in the coming decades in Ireland. I think they might be the worst hit it's going to triple the price of beer, the it will affect Ireland and European countries. The most the US will not escape unscathed will see higher prices, and they say that people could even be drinking less beer because of all this stuff. So for more on the study, we turn to Denver Gano. He's a science reporter with BuzzFeed news, and we started by talking about what is in this new report. Well, this is really like a one in a series of reports trying to look at how climate change is going to hurt food. Production. I said I looked at a lot of grains, and they're finally getting the barley and the guys doing it said what am barley and beer. They kind of go together. So let's add an economic model for beer into this thing and see what happens with climate change. And the results are interesting in that what they decided looking at the analysis was that the extreme years 'cause don't happen every year under climate change are the ones that really make a difference. In terms of the price of beer or not much is going to be around the ears where you have extreme droughts and heat waves knocking out these sort of continental size areas at the same time where most of the barley is produced in the world. And they said they wanted to use barley specifically because it would show people kind of the real world effects of climate change because everybody drinks beer, where a lot of people drink beer. It would give them something more concrete to hold onto climate change. A lot of people that it doesn't affect me. Right. I don't care or something like that. But if you mess with their beer, then, you know, they're more likely to kind of believe it or want to make some change because of it, right? It's an international team from Chinese Academy sciences, then universities, and then UK and in the US. University. How -fornia and. Yeah, my sense is that they are. In fact, people who do like a beer we're wondering about this question. They said also that consumption could drop in some countries because the price would be getting to hide some of this barley is the same barley that we feed to livestock. They would have to use that barley for the livestock and not so much for beer production. So they're saying that a consumption would also go down as a result of this. It's kind of complicated economic model. But essentially what they're arguing is that Cadillac expensive. And so the farmers are going to feed the barley to the cattles to they'll lose them. And so there's going to be less barley to sell and the price where he's going to go up. And as a result, the price of beer goes up. And when the price goes up for something and the supply goes down people drink less of it in that sense. It's not too complicated. You know, I did talk to climate scientists said, yeah, sure. Of course, it will go up in those years must be the same thing for any other commodity the work. They did this coupling the climate model to the economic model for barley to the beer model sorta with new here with this. You're listening to the daily dive weekend addition, we'll be back with more with Denver Gano about how climate change is. Affecting beer.

reporter Denver Gano US Ireland cattles Chinese Academy sciences Cadillac UK
"academy sciences" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"academy sciences" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"It confidently shoot pointblank dot com. President Trump gave a lift to the deputy attorney general to Florida and may have had that long anticipated talk with rod Rosenstein weeks after the New York Times reported Rosenstein was so concerned about the president's ability to do the job that the twenty fifth amendment might need to be invoked Rosenstein decline denied the claim. And Bob Costantini has the follow up going to speak to the international association of chiefs of police, President Trump sat down on Air Force One to chat with the man who is overseeing the Muller Russia investigation. The White House says they did not discuss that at all. And Mr. Trump told the police leaders, it was only natural rod Rosenstein would be there on behalf of the Justice department. Thank you as well to our deputy attorney general rod Rosenstein for being here, flew down together. The press wants to know what did you talk about? But we had a very good talk. I will say it earlier at the White House. The president told reporters he is not going to fire Rosenstein Bob Costantini, Washington at a youth football game in Rockford over the weekend to coaches for Kelly met city team were arrested after a fight at a game or John Dempsey with more. Forty three year old Terence Morrison thirty nine year old devora Clark were both arrested. When a fight broke out between the coaches and parents of the calcium at city Thunderbirds youth football team and the Rockford renegades police say at one point Morris pulled out a gun and sent crowds of people running. No shots were fired. Both Clark and Morris are being held in the winnebago county jail. John Dempsey WLS AM, eight nine eight local leaders, and nonprofit groups are looking into turning the FOX river, and Illinois and Wisconsin into a federally designated water trail, the Aurora beacon news reports the King County is working with the FOX river, ecosystem partnership and other organizations pursuing the National Park Service. Nation. The groups of grant from the Wisconsin department of natural resources to draft maps about the water trail development. The move is also backed by environmental and economic development group says a way to attract more people to the river. The river runs from southeastern Wisconsin recall goes, western suburbs, and into the river near Ottawa. Karen Miller, a King County planner for the National Park Service water trail system program says officials hope to host forums on the water trail effort in two thousand nineteen and one of the winners of this year's Nobel prize in economics says he ignored to telephone calls. Paul Romer of New York University said he didn't answer the calls from the Swedish Royal Academy of sciences because he thought they were just spam robocalls Romer is a former professor at the university of Chicago and an alumnus of the school as well. He William north house of Yale University were announced winners of the more than one million dollar prize by the Royal Swedish Academy sciences for their studies on how to deal with pollution and climate change. And how to foster the innovation needed to tackle such problems? WLS traffic at five thirty three the.

rod Rosenstein President Trump Rosenstein Bob Costantini FOX river Wisconsin deputy attorney general White House Paul Romer president John Dempsey King County international association of c Swedish Royal Academy of scien Clark Morris New York Times Royal Swedish Academy sciences Muller Russia Rockford renegades Yale University
"academy sciences" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"academy sciences" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"The things I was reading in in a in science daily, a more more Rama. They were going to call it wrong. But what they call that long fin or that long. Needle like asteroid, comet whatever it was. Scientists were tracking it President Trump was aware of it. And after hearing about the remote possibility of this elongated object being an alien spacecraft. He started pushing harder for the establishment of the space force. After we were informed that the Pentagon was investigated threat assessment, but identified flying objects a meeting was called by the National Academy sciences committee on Astro biology science strategy for the search of life in the universe. The meeting was held at the university of California Irvine. This citing prompted a meeting this all of this prompted a meeting. Okay. And it was this meeting. It was it was where Jill Tarter the woman who was interested in a more and more and it and it's moving through space. She's one of the world's best known leaders in the search for extraterrestrial intelligence. She stated that SETI the search for extraterrestrial intelligence should change its name. And what tartar said she she explained that the search for extraterrestrial intelligence generates an incorrect. Perception of what scientists in this field of study, we're actually doing she said a more appropriate title for the field. She said would be the search for techno signatures or signs of technology created by intelligent alien civilizations. Now to me has been the secretly these scientists who scant space space singles Russian treachery civilizations may have some of the pawn something that may be a signal from an extraterrestrial technology rather than direct conversations between biological entities. Amoah sent a signal a more Moore was an alien spacecraft. They didn't tell us, but it was enough to prompt meetings. It was enough to get President Trump to consider the space force. It was enough to release the information about the threat assessment of UFO's. That one little sighting of his big one hundred foot long, whatever it was scientists.

tartar Trump President Jill Tarter university of California Irvin Pentagon National Academy sciences UFO Amoah Moore one hundred foot
"academy sciences" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"academy sciences" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Don't sexual harassment that's a topic we've been dealing with who's the last person they just got bounced the ceo which organization jen who was just bounced from major fortune five hundred company why because i love this because there was a consensual relation consensual sexual tryst if you will will over a course i think of months decades ago and they intel in the ceo of intel why because there was a frat fraternisation ban and they violated and he's out i mean the ceo of intel for stooping someone decades ago consensually man has it gotten crazy so obviously you have a whole bunch of people looking at what sexual harassment is in the workplace whose fault it is a major study just came out from the national academies science engineering medicine and stooping at work didn't know that you have that organization did you and looked at sexual harassment within organization and identified the strongest predictor of such behavior does it have to do with the harvey weinstein's of the world the matt lowers the bill cosby's who of course their their actions were grievous beyond agreement.

harassment ceo jen intel harvey weinstein bill cosby
"academy sciences" Discussed on Point of Inquiry

Point of Inquiry

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"academy sciences" Discussed on Point of Inquiry

"Though you're saying you already had good reason to believe that there was something special about it other than it just being very far away we'll absolutely in the eighties nineties we discovered is an atmosphere that is complex surface composition that it has a it's a double planet with a giant moon half its own size in the two thousands we discovered pluto has additional satellites that its surface markings are changing with time meaning that the things are moving around on the surface we had a pretty good inkling going in this would be something special it turned out to be something spectacular so when the kuyper belt became apparent knife than now correct me if i'm wrong but that was a fairly recent discovery of all the world's in the kuyper belt did it make pluto seem like just one object among a flurry of similar objects no quite the contrary promoted in the is the planetary science community in in fact tire national academies sciences ranked the exploration of auto as the number one priority for funding in planetary exploration for the two thousands so this isn't just my opinion is opinion of of the national academy of science you compared it to the mission to pluto you compared to like conquering mount everest so what was it then that called you to pluto specifically i mean you personally because i know from the book that you had been thinking about it for decades before this actually got started was there like a single scientific question that you wanted answered or was it something more about the romance of going to this place well it was both those things you know i'm a i'm an explorer at heart but i'm also a science scientists by a by training in profession in pluto is a whole package you know it was a seductive scientifically in what it offered us still learn about this new class of planets and in addition being the farthest world that had never been explored the very frontier of our solar system.

kuyper belt national academy of science mount everest
"academy sciences" Discussed on The Healthy Moms Podcast

The Healthy Moms Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"academy sciences" Discussed on The Healthy Moms Podcast

"All the questions in controversies that people have about nutrition i love that i cannot wait to read it and i love to talk a little bit about food politics too because i know you've done research here as well and i get a lot of comments from readers who essentially think that really the government has our best interests at heart and they're like no this is against the government's recommendations so how to our current food policies kind of support this confusion and this the system we have government the right head left hand's doing so they often making conflicting advice so a lot of our dietary policies are driven off of the dietary guidelines in there a little bit corrupt on the national academy sciences was mandated by congress to actually review how the guidelines were developed and they put a report out in i think this hock tober november which is online you can work it up type in national academy of sciences dietary guidelines and they basically when you sift through it all basically said look the committee members are in in cahoots with food industry they're getting paid by them they're not exactly independent sciencebased recommendations in the second they said was they ignored huge amounts of data on things that that contradict what their guidelines are for example on saturated fat they completely contradict themselves so it's very difficult for the average person to understand what to eat if even our own government is not providing science based guidelines the second thing is a lot of our policies are at odds with each other in one hand you know we tell people to cut back on sugar another hand where paying for commodities to be produced like corn syrup in we'd flour and soybean oil through our subsidies that are turned into junk food which then we pay for with food stamp programs which seven billion dollars worth is basically spent on soda that's twenty billion servings a year for the poor's that the government's paying for on the back end we're paying for medicare and medicaid so he literally tax payers pay three times to support the.

national academy sciences congress medicare national academy of sciences medicaid seven billion dollars one hand
"academy sciences" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"academy sciences" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Day wbz accuweather forecast with meteorologist dean devore is it april or is we still back in february these temperatures are not warming up anytime soon maybe a shower sponsor to this afternoon more prevalent as you go north and west of the city sunny breaks around the city more clouds and temperatures chilly this afternoon the high getting up to fifty down to thirty six tonight maybe in the evening shower along the coast tomorrow not as chilly breezy partly sunny fifty four and then cold and rainy on thursday back into the forties all day and we stay in the forties with a shower leftover friday we try to creep in the low fifties with some sun at times this weekend i'm accuweather meteorologist divorce wbz newsradio ten thirty right now in new bedford it's cloudy and forty eight degrees in hyannis we've got sunny and fifty in beverly cloudy and forty six and it looks like right now we've got cloudy skies and forty four in bedford in boston it is forty six and cloudy wbz news time eleven twenty five now time for the bloomberg green business report a new study says global warming you screwing up nature's intricately timed dinner hour making hungry critters in those on the menu show up at different times timing is everything in nature bees have to be around and flowers after bloom at the same time for pollination to work predators need to migrate at the same time as prey but a global study says warmer temperatures are interfering with that it looks at the timing of eightyeight independence species finding they are moving out of sync by about six days a decade it notes that some payers are actually moving closer together but in general the relative timing events between species is now on average off by about twenty one days changes in species timing are greater than they were before the nineteen eighty s migrating humming birds that have adapted for a specific flower for example now miss bloom seabirds used to rear their chicks when fish were most abundant not so anymore the study appears in the proceedings of the national academy sciences that's the bloomberg green business report i'm bob moon.

dean devore hyannis beverly cloudy bedford boston bob moon accuweather bloomberg forty eight degrees twenty one days six days
Trump suggesting China will 'take down' its trade barriers

All News, Traffic and Weather

01:54 min | 3 years ago

Trump suggesting China will 'take down' its trade barriers

"Day wbz accuweather forecast with meteorologist dean devore is it april or is we still back in february these temperatures are not warming up anytime soon maybe a shower sponsor to this afternoon more prevalent as you go north and west of the city sunny breaks around the city more clouds and temperatures chilly this afternoon the high getting up to fifty down to thirty six tonight maybe in the evening shower along the coast tomorrow not as chilly breezy partly sunny fifty four and then cold and rainy on thursday back into the forties all day and we stay in the forties with a shower leftover friday we try to creep in the low fifties with some sun at times this weekend i'm accuweather meteorologist divorce wbz newsradio ten thirty right now in new bedford it's cloudy and forty eight degrees in hyannis we've got sunny and fifty in beverly cloudy and forty six and it looks like right now we've got cloudy skies and forty four in bedford in boston it is forty six and cloudy wbz news time eleven twenty five now time for the bloomberg green business report a new study says global warming you screwing up nature's intricately timed dinner hour making hungry critters in those on the menu show up at different times timing is everything in nature bees have to be around and flowers after bloom at the same time for pollination to work predators need to migrate at the same time as prey but a global study says warmer temperatures are interfering with that it looks at the timing of eightyeight independence species finding they are moving out of sync by about six days a decade it notes that some payers are actually moving closer together but in general the relative timing events between species is now on average off by about twenty one days changes in species timing are greater than they were before the nineteen eighty s migrating humming birds that have adapted for a specific flower for example now miss bloom seabirds used to rear their chicks when fish were most abundant not so anymore the study appears in the proceedings of the national academy sciences that's the bloomberg green business report i'm bob moon.

Dean Devore Hyannis Beverly Cloudy Bedford Boston Bob Moon Accuweather Bloomberg Forty Eight Degrees Twenty One Days Six Days
"academy sciences" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

Invest Like the Best

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"academy sciences" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

"Malaysia then planet labs now planet planet is making satellites that look like loaves of bread and you launch them up into space we invest right before they did the first launch and then they did thirty one satellite sitting in the first launch now we've got about two hundred plus that are circulating there earth its largest constellation of earth imaging satellite in history and it's amazing so from this crazy idea in meta materials it leads to this company with bill gates which leads to an insight in a boardroom that sends us on a hunt to san francisco we fund the satellite guys and then we get the insight which exactly what you just said orbital insight which was an entrepreneur who said over time some of these images might become commodity and the real value is going to be doing the temporal analytical at analysis that you can say okay here's parking lots or here's the shadows cast on oil tankers as a proxy for their carryingcapacity or here's a caravan of trucks in china or are they going to a ghost town residential facility are they going to a productive chemical facility and that information was legal espionage that was valuable to corporations to governments her trousers and so we fund this guy jimmy crawford jimmy's amazing bill the ai for the morris rover brand google books went to climate corporate celta monsanto for billions so us and sequoia fund him bloomberg and will come in and none of that a priority was noble something that started literally reading scientific publication in proceedings the national academy science or science or nature that leads to bill gates that leads to planet labs at least orbital another example like that my partner chicane who is psychotically obsessed with cars i hate driving my wife we have a car she loves driving for me it's an anchor it's just the time right we talk about allocation of time in cash to spend attention on a road i cannot wait for yourself drug ha i mean this is the faster that it comes right the more time i have to read and talking of it so shahin is obsessed with cars and we're following all the stuff that's going on early in autonomous vehicles from gugel an uber and tesla and he finds these two guys and these two guys claim that they're gonna you know take on this market on we think the.

china Malaysia san francisco jimmy crawford morris rover google sequoia bloomberg partner shahin tesla
"academy sciences" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

Invest Like the Best

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"academy sciences" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

"Malaysia then planet labs now planet planet is making satellites that look like loaves of bread and you launch them up into space we invest right before they did the first launch and then they did thirty one satellite sitting in the first launch now we've got about two hundred plus that are circulating there earth its largest constellation of earth imaging satellite in history and it's amazing so from this crazy idea in meta materials it leads to this company with bill gates which leads to an insight in a boardroom that sends us on a hunt to san francisco we fund the satellite guys and then we get the insight which exactly what you just said orbital insight which was an entrepreneur who said over time some of these images might become commodity and the real value is going to be doing the temporal analytical at analysis that you can say okay here's parking lots or here's the shadows cast on oil tankers as a proxy for their carryingcapacity or here's a caravan of trucks in china or are they going to a ghost town residential facility are they going to a productive chemical facility and that information was legal espionage that was valuable to corporations to governments her trousers and so we fund this guy jimmy crawford jimmy's amazing bill the ai for the morris rover brand google books went to climate corporate celta monsanto for billions so us and sequoia fund him bloomberg and will come in and none of that a priority was noble something that started literally reading scientific publication in proceedings the national academy science or science or nature that leads to bill gates that leads to planet labs at least orbital another example like that my partner chicane who is psychotically obsessed with cars i hate driving my wife we have a car she loves driving for me it's an anchor it's just the time right we talk about allocation of time in cash to spend attention on a road i cannot wait for yourself drug ha i mean this is the faster that it comes right the more time i have to read and talking of it so shahin is obsessed with cars and we're following all the stuff that's going on early in autonomous vehicles from gugel an uber and tesla and he finds these two guys and these two guys claim that they're gonna you know take on this market on we think the.

china Malaysia san francisco jimmy crawford morris rover google sequoia bloomberg partner shahin tesla
"academy sciences" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"academy sciences" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Issues paul raised earlier a bad agent orange and the fact that agent orange along with unexploded ordinance our lasting legacy of the war one of the question errors ask devout what happened then and what people are doing today and i just want to mention again we know that there are thousands of veterans who suffered the after effects of having been exposed to agent orange dioxin and that the veterans administration compensates them we also now through the work that paul on i do with our vietnamese colleagues that there has been relatively little recognition if anything spanned to heal the wounds of wounds of war on the part of the vietnamese either to recognize that they suffer from these continuing illness the war or they can their land continues to explode with the unexploded ordinance even forgive me i know that these are this has gone on for generations now i mean onto the unted the different generations beyond those who were in vietnam at the time as far as the agent orange catastrophe it has and there are young adults who paul and i work with from the children of vietnam veterans health alliance who have organiz because they're dad's served in vietnam in these young people were born with birth defects as the reason all their father's exposure so and again just young know just quickly to talk about agent orange there are eighteen hours that the parents document hurry there are maybe three or four sentences about agent orange and there is a statement in there that after decades of study they still can't show the correlation between the thanks freight by agent orange and health effects and i just wanna remind the listeners that dares institute of medicine the national academies science there are thousands of studies that have been done that identify the deleterious health effects both on the people who is freight directly as well as on their children it's important for us to understand dan that we have responsibilities both to take care of our veterans who have fought in the wars as well to take care of those who we have harmed this legacy continues fifty years after the end and i would just suggest that burns and novik put an addition on their ten th episode that says yes we have this response civility and people still remain hurt and devastated with their.

vietnam dan novik paul institute of medicine eighteen hours fifty years