11 Burst results for "Academy Of Chievements"

"academy achievements" Discussed on Buddhist Society of Western Australia

Buddhist Society of Western Australia

06:47 min | 2 months ago

"academy achievements" Discussed on Buddhist Society of Western Australia

"And when we when we want things to be other than they are we suffer. Of course we're out of step with reality and we need to check what what is it. I'm wanting this is actually a very good reflection. And or what. Am i trying to get rid of. That's also another former ponting so this very important part of the half because once we know in lives to what's causing the grief. We can do something about it. And there's a lovely story from adventure. Way he recounts the story of the mangy dog. This is a story that buddha todd actually to where the buddha noted that there was i am sexually jacker not dome really that was seen and it was would go under bush and then after a while get agitated and run on going into a cave and then come out of the cave lighter allen ron and then get up and run that would it couldn't stay still no matter what it did and the reason for that the mange the main had had this disease wherever it went it would not find relief so i don't charge. He related this as In his life he related when he was a young monk he was. He was discontent when he stayed in monasteries with monks and novices thought that they had a very critical mind thought they were sloppy. They didn't practice hard like himself comparing and even when he stayed on his new found this ten discontent came up. He wasn't happy with him so he wasn't happy with the villages. Were supporting him on the arms around and he realized he was like that dog with manage everywhere it goes at inches and it doesn't realize it's carrying it with with it with him with itself just as we don't realize often the like wanting things to be other than they are we carrying with with us and he said he did a reality check and saw they needed to let go and let things let people as they are and of course that then understanding and of course this is the whole point of duke. It really pushes us to say what's causing the problem. Wanting or craving is causing the problem and then to let go of that which is the third noble truth wanting things to be in particular way or wanted to get rid of things and of course the fourth novel truth is that they the path of practice how we get there and that's the whole normally for power. There is a lot more than i could mention but just to mention briefly that sorry putin in the his teaching on riot view he mentioned a whole list of things. The buddha doesn't doesn't explicitly mentioned. But when you think about it. It's the for instance. He mentioned that the nutriments that maintain our bodies and minds. We look at them. Look at the course for them. And if we look at the ending of that 'cause and the path to the ending of that 'cause that will bring us right that is right view so this is very unusual. And of course you mentioned wholesomeness the wholesome and the unwholesome as i mentioned before but he also mentioned each factor of dependent origination. This is aging and death birth. All of them can lead to understanding things as they truly are to the developing right view so in conclusion that time as i say olympics at the olympics. Let's go for gold. Let's go for ripe here. This is a very important thing. And it's not something to as i mentioned before to just to be an armchair right view person. That's not enough. We gotta practice. It used practice to develop at us. Perceptions us sealer the giving this part of practice and then also to develop these insights and these insights. We can develop not only on the cushion. Daily lives as i said that breakthrough to the path by reflecting old-age sickness death on separation from all the dear and delightful and under karema. These things can bring us to the understanding of the nature and also you can see do current allies to. I'd like to finish their and to ask if there are any questions in the live. Chat youtube live chat. There are questions our first question. How do we keep humble views and kindness for others when we achieve grit material success such as academy achievement and wealth. How do we keep our egos in check. It had we keep our and shake when. Of course you know when we We reflect on A nature we can see. I may not for ourselves. We can see in other people's lives that they have had great success or they've had great acclaim for their academic achievements and lay be completely the been completely reverse and i think everybody can think of some people that this has happened to that. Been incredibly widely climbed. They've been famous had been credibly wealthy and the complete opposite happened. You know this is the nature of impermanent of transients that. There's nothing reliable there so this is this keeps out ego in check in a very in a very real wide when we realize that that everything. That's the night you to arise we'll see and but this is more of a superficial level election so you can. You can think like that in terms of that will help put things in perspective but we'll help things in perspective so hard that helps reflecting on a nature when things are going. Well good band who knows. That's the wisdom you need isn't head. Who knows next question. How do i check if i have the right..

allen ron todd olympics bush putin youtube
"academy achievements" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

07:45 min | 6 months ago

"academy achievements" Discussed on What It Takes

"Historic day at Stormont after two years of talks and after a generation of bloodshed and decades of division after thirty brutal years of violence in Northern Ireland two men from opposing sides had the guts to talk and talk and talk some more they brought others into their talks and finally on Good Friday in nineteen ninety eight, a deal was signed bringing a promise of peace in end to the seemingly endless cycle of attack and retaliation between the Protestants. Loyal to Britain and the Catholics who favored unity with the rest of Ireland. The two men I'm talking about here were John Hume and David Trimble they were awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for their efforts. Later, that same year well, as you may have read, Mr Hume died earlier this month on August third twenty twenty. Since their interviews with both John Hume and David Trimble in the Academy of Achievements Remarkable Archive we WANNA revisit their story today a story of hope against the odds, a story of what can be accomplished by rather understated people who have a bedrock belief in justice and peace. This is what it takes I'm Alice Winkler. At. This child is gifted. And I heard that enough that I started to believe if you have the opportunity not a perfect opportunity and you don't take it, you may never have another it. All was so clear. It was just like the pick your started to form itself. There was new wing which ally to prevail over the truth darkness over light their life every day I wake up and decide. Today I'm going to love my life. Decide. Lab Isis if they're going to break a leg or it's when you go on that play, stay out of there, and then along companies differential experiences that you look for you don't plan for. The boy better not miss him. I think that all conflict when you look out. is about the same thing? By difference. Whether differences religion or nationality, or Ritz. Difference when you think of it as an accident burst. None of US chose to be born into any particular race religion or nationality. Therefore it's nothing we should fight about. This is peacemaker John Hume speaking to the academy, of achievement, in Dublin in two thousand. Several years ago in a poll conducted by Irish national television he was voted the greatest single person in the history of Ireland. John Hume was a longtime Irish, Catholic civil rights activist and an advocate of non-violence in the mold of Louis and Martin. Luther King. Junior. At the time of the peace talks, he was also the leader of Northern Ireland's moderate social democratic and Labour Party. David Trimble who will hear from in a few minutes is Protestant and he was leader of the Ulster Unionist Party loyal to Britain differences of the essence of humanity to people in this room. There's not to people in the whole word. And respect for difference therefore. Should be a fundamental principle that has brought right across the word. And of course. When You look at our conflict respect for difference is the first principle of our settlement but. Where you are on the side of the conflict lasted has been going on for three hundred years. But. The worst was last thirty. One, I two, five, hundred people lost their lives. On one fifty was maimed or injured. And that's so series of morals. If. You're too young to remember the troubles as the decades of fighting were called. Here are the broad strokes the Irish. Citizens of Northern Ireland generally Catholics saw the British citizens of Northern Ireland Generally Protestants as their oppressors, an occupying force that had denied their rights beaten down, jailed them without trial and sometimes killed them while they were trying to protest many of the Irish nationalists believed Northern Ireland to reunite with the rest of Ireland and they were willing to take up arms and die. For their cause, the British for their part saw the Irish fighters as terrorists out loss who blew up policemen, soldiers, political figures, and sometimes civilians. It was an impossible task to bring these entrenched sides to the peace table but John Hume and David Trimble weren't cowed by the impossible and they weren't cowed by the intense criticism they suffered or the risk to their careers and the threats on their lives hume talked about what motivated him over a cup of tea in. Dublin with journalists, Gail. For the academy achievement, it was four years after the historic peace agreement had been signed and was approved by Irish voters will I grew up in, of course. and. It was it was the worst example of Northern Ireland's discrimination. the of course, the unionist people wishing to protect their heritage. And their identity and every right to do that. In my opinion because heavy society. Has Diversity and respect for diversity is the central and essential but my thera approach was of course earlier. I called Afrikaner mindset the held all par in their own hands in order to protect themselves in order to ensure. That, the minority in northern iron, which was a Catholic population never became a majority and that widespread discrimination in housing and jobs, and in voting rights, and of course, the worst example of that was the city of Danny where I lived. Seventy. percent of the population of day was from the Catholic community largely nationals people who wanted Irish unity and of course, thirty percent where the Protestant community who unionist but they govern the city. And their system was known as Gerrymander divided the city into three electoral wards. And in one word, there was seventy percent of the people the Catholic population and they elected it. Representatives to the city council. And the other to other districts. which represent thirty percent of the population in each of those districts elected six members. So the unions always had twelve it. Again was ation total ghettoisation because they were in charge of public housing, the local council, and they deliberately located people. In a ghetto situation in order to ensure that the maintain control this meant that there was discrimination not only in housing, but in jobs and my father was unemployed, and of course, he was a very very. Intelligent man and well known as that because when I was a child growing up in our home. I. would be sitting at the table, my homework and my father would be sitting at the table. For. People would be coming in from the district and around the city for him to write their letters does he was a copperplate handwriting and the also knew the whole system.

John Hume Northern Ireland David Trimble Ireland Britain Dublin Ulster Unionist Party Alice Winkler Academy of Achievements Luther King US Labour Party Gerrymander Gail Danny Louis Martin
"academy achievements" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

05:26 min | 7 months ago

"academy achievements" Discussed on What It Takes

"Just going to hit you winning. So get ready. That's a Mondo. Christiaan Peres better known as the rapper and record producer pit bull, his signature yelp is his battlecry his call to party Miami, style and I promise you. That won't be the last time you hear it in this episode. You being. Being Being Talking. About Pit Bulls Music is rap reggae tone, Latin or pop. It's in Spanish. It's an English. It's often in both and whatever else it is. It's always danceable, but this upbeat hitmaker proudly calls himself a hustler, and he is a back story that makes his success all the more astonishing. I took the word impossible remix. Have you put an apostasy means `impossible? Okay and if everybody would take that and run with it just imagine giving that to everybody else. Why because it's impossible up here right now, but yet it is. I grew up in Miami in the eighties where I I saw my first form of entrepreneurship, and it was an amazing product got a lot of people hooked cocaine. Miami was the cocaine capital now was right in the middle of it, so I got a chance to see so many things from so many different perspectives. And these are all the negatives that were dealt in life. Okay me growing up that pretty much. That's all I knew when he came to the coke crack heroin that hit Miami hit a lot of neighborhoods out there. But I learned. To Hustle what it was, the flip what it is the make two to four, two, six, six to eight, sixteen, Sixteen, sixteen, thirty two. In that taught me how to deal with the music business. Because see the beautiful music business is. Half of them. Don't know music and half of them. Don't know business. Half of them have no business doing music and have have no business. Doing Business So I ask myself. What is this well? Thank God for what I go up watching and being able to grow up in so many different neighborhoods around so many different cultures that allow me to adapt to any environment. In set me up well for the music game and me being somebody like deny graduate high school. I went to about twenty five different schools. Not because I'm a troublemaker, I just always been around some trouble. which looks like it's a lot of trouble out there today. But. We have a couple of sayings that I live by and. I want to give you one of our sayings, which is Basle Code to be Lotta. Short steps along region I think a lot of us here. We related that in our journeys and our adventures on we've been through in life, the short steps and the long vision of Armando Christian Perez pit bull on this episode of what it takes from the academy achievement. I'm your host Alex Winkler at. This child is gifted. And I heard that enough that I started to believe if you have the opportunity, not a perfect opportunity, and you don't take it. You may never have another child. It all was so clear. It was just like the picture started to form itself. There was new win which alive could prevail over the truth darkness over light their life every day I. Wake up and decide. Today I'm going to love my life. Decide. If, they're going to break a leg or it's when you go to play. Stay out of there, and then along companies differential experiences that you don't look for you. Don't plan for. But boy, you better not miss him. One day when Armando, Perez was in highschool, he and some friends went out to watch pit bulls fight on way there. One of his friends called him a pit bull. The name stuck. All right so when I studied the dog. It's stereotypical the dog to be a fighter, but it's not a fight. It's actually very loving. Dog used to be babysitters, pit bulls, but their environment made them net. Environment made me. I'm a product of my environment. When they bite, they lock. They don't let go onto the handle their business. And there are just too stupid to lose. They don't know what it is. The loose doesn't even register mind losing now. I'm fighting to the death so when I check those boxes, and then the one out of all of them, that was irony at his finest is that they're outlawed in Dade County in Miami, three or fire. Some only pit bull in Miami. They can't five with papers. Gotten pit bull has taken on a couple of other nicknames during his twenty years and music one of them. Is Mr Three, oh, five after Miami's area code. That's also the name of his record label. Then there's MR worldwide a name. He embraced after he started having international hits..

Miami Armando Christian Perez Mr Three Christiaan Peres Mondo Dade County yelp producer cocaine Alex Winkler heroin
"academy achievements" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

07:44 min | 8 months ago

"academy achievements" Discussed on What It Takes

"On this episode to world, renowned writers tell us why they right and how they write. Shut himself up in a room for years on end to hone his craft to create a world if he uses secret. Is a starting point. He is whether he knows it or not. Putting a great fate in humanity. Literature requires if fate in humanity. My confidence comes from the belief that all human beings resemble one another that others carry won't like mine that they will therefore understand. All truly literature rises from this childish hopeful certainty that old people resemble one another. That is Orhan Pamuk Turkey's most celebrated novelist and winner of the two thousand six Nobel Prize in literature, and this is Carlos Fuentes a giant of Mexican letters and one of the people who launched the boom in Latin American fiction. Literature creates another reality. It gives us deeper image of ourselves. How many times reading a book? Don't we feel that? We're looking at a mirror that we are reflected in that mirror of the books and that we are starting to understand ourselves bunch better than we ever did before. Covering facets. Of Ourselves, we never before imagined. Where there that we're seen through a book, our own unrealized possibilities what we can do as individuals in society with ourselves, relation with our fellow men and women. That literature is giving us a broader space for our behavior. And setting out the possibility of new claims or personal and social new the Cyrus. These. Two writers grew up on different continents in entirely distinct cultures, but each became an inventive celebrated literary Lion, whose words transcend national borders, and each became a voice of conscience to his compatriots. They did not know each other well hardly at all, but at one moment their lives intersected in a profound way. Carlos Fuentes and Orhan Pamuk are the subject of today's episode of what it takes a podcast about passion, vision, perseverance, and today pros from the academy achievement. I'm Alice Winkler at. This child is gifted. And I heard that enough that I started to believe if you have the opportunity, not a perfect opportunity, and you don't take it. You may never have another child it all so clear. It was just like the picture started to form itself. There was new win which I could prevail over the truth darkness over light their life every day I, wake up and decide. Today I'm going to love my life. decide. If, they're going to break you leg, or it's when you're gonNA play, stay out of there, and then along comes companies differential experiences that you don't look for you. Don't plan for. The boy, you better, not miss him. I write because I can't do normal work like other people. I write because. I love sitting in a room all they writing. I write because I can only partake in life by changing it. Or. Hunt Palmach who is the author of snow, and my name is red, the White Castle and Istanbul along with many others began his talk at the Academy of Achievement Summit in two thousand, nineteen with a list of answers to the question. Why right here are a few more of them? I write because I love the smell of paper, pen and ink. I right because I am angry at all of you angry at everyone. I right because I'm afraid of being forgotten. I right to be ALLOM. Perhaps right? because. I have it childish. Leave in the immortality of libraries and in the way my books sit on the shelf. I right because it is exciting to turn all of lights, beauties enriches into words. I write because I wished to keep from the foreboding that there is a place I must go, but just isn't in a dream. I can't quite get there. I write because I believe in literature in the art of the novel more than I believe in anything else. Carlos Fuentes, who is especially well known for his books, the death of Artemio Cruz Ara and the old gringo summed up his answer to the question. Y right this way difficulties, tragedies disappointments in life, not so much. Reading and writing is with pleasure always is a great great paradise to read and write as paradise. Carlos, Fuentes and or hunt Pamuk long loved and admired one another's work, but they didn't know each other. Personally in two thousand five, when Palmer was facing a prison sentence in Turkey for speaking about the Armenian genocide and the slaughter of Kurds during an interview for days became one of his most vocal defenders, he helped organize a group of prominent international writers to speak out on politics behalf demanding in end to his persecution. Palmach was finally able to thank for days in person in two thousand nine at a book festival, they shared a meal and discussed their mutual admiration. Fuentes died in two thousand twelve at the age of eighty three. Connections between the writers continued at the Guadalajara International Book Fair a couple of years ago. Palmach received the Carlos Fuentes. Metal placed around his neck by point aces widow. The Academy of Achievement recorded interview with Carlos Fuentes in two thousand six, and with Orhan Pamuk in two thousand and nineteen, some similar themes emerged from these two conversations so I'll inter. We've them a bit here going back now to the dawn of their devotion to. To the written word, starting with Pamuk who was interviewed by journalist. Gail I can Tho my grandfather was a civil engineer. My father and uncle I was in a family of engineers assault of a black sheep. I want to to be a painter. I I was raised in a family where my uncle's will.

Carlos Fuentes Orhan Pamuk Orhan Pamuk Turkey Hunt Palmach Academy of Achievement Nobel Prize Guadalajara International Book Academy of Achievement Summit Alice Winkler assault Turkey Artemio Cruz Ara Gail Istanbul engineer White Castle Palmer
"academy achievements" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

10:39 min | 11 months ago

"academy achievements" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Okay that's what I'm doing tonight John Prine American country folk singer songwriter it was active as a composer hears is wiki recording artist and live performer from the early seventies until his death often known for his humorous style of country music that has elements of protest and social commentary born and raised in may would Illinois you know angel of Montgomery about that well Bonnie Raitt mated fame yeah I mean I reckon we played a little of that in the office this morning and and as you know there that was the non non figures in the singers the the the songwriters hall of fame I was looking at his awards here nominated for this one of that lifetime achievement award from the academy you get lifetime academy achievement award I presume he would be in some of those halls of fame as well widely cited as one of the most influential songwriters of his generation Prine was known for his humorous lyrics about life love and current events as well as serious songs and social commentaries no some of them recollecting melancholy tales from his life a member of the folk revival from Chicago discovered by Kris Kristofferson although Prine himself credited film reviewer Roger Ebert proviso East High School in may would late nineteen sixties prime was delivering mail he began to sing it open Mike evenings at fifth paragon Armitage Avenue in Chicago Prine was initially a spectator reluctant to perform but eventually did so in response to a you think you can do better comment made to him by another performer he got up on stage and he did Chicago sun times movie critic Roger Ebert heard him there and wrote the first review pry never received calling him a great songwriter he became a central figure in the Chicago folk revival including people like Steve Goodman and Michael Peter Smith and others nineteen ninety eight Brian was diagnosed with cancer the operation altered his vocal cords and added a gravelly tone to his voice in two thousand thirteen underwent surgery to remove cancer in his left long after the surgery a physical therapist put him through an unusual workout to build his stamina Prine was required to run up and down his house stairs grabbed his guitar while still out of breath and sing two songs six months later he was back on the road touring and singing again March nineteenth twenty twenty during the corona virus pandemic Prine's wife Fiona revealed she had tested positive for the covert nineteen and had been quarantined in their home apart from him he was hospitalized March twenty six that would be seven days later after experiencing symptoms himself he was intubated on the evening of March twenty eighth nine days after she was discovered to have the disease two nights after that Fiona tweeted that she had recovered but he now has pneumonia in both lungs and had also developed some peripheral issues that were being treated with medications he passed away April seventh twenty twenty the day we were supposed to come out of our homes in Chicago Illinois John Prine passed away no that's the thing too I'm thinking again of our conversation with ray Kaplan the attorney here in town financial relief dot com we do her commercials where she's always talking about how to get out of student debt to or minimize your payments legally in this new laws and rules in place right now but ray Kaplan's husband had the illness and had it bad I mean a hundred and four fever for a week I took the test but the results didn't come in for seven days so he's just sitting at home and they're pretty sure he's got it he has the symptoms and this thing is raging so what are you gonna do she's his wife it's the two of them at home so you got to try and take care of them how do you do that they segregated themselves he's a doctor so they have a lot of medical supplies and knowledge but eventually she started to come down with the symptoms too and you think well my god of course you're going to get it if you're living in a house with somebody but you can exactly abandon them either right so that's the conundrum for people it's the kind of part of a conversation I've been having with my dad the last couple of days my mom has been either in a hospital or rehabilitation facility since the day Kobe Bryant died remember that well that's my mom went in and just came out now my parents are anxious for us to come over and visit I said I'm not walk in your door they said were okay and you're okay I said I could touch something and it will devastate your household I cannot and it's really taken some of the reverse could Joling that we had when we were kids remember your parents used to tell you this is the way it's going to be I'm having to do that to my folks now but that's just the way it is yeah we don't see many people when we come to work anymore but we still are out that's what I said more than most other people are not just Chicago I went to the target for Cryin out loud maybe I haven't made that had it and got better maybe I have a right now I don't know if it's going to get worse they said well we'll keep some distance from you when you come in I said I'll touch your doorknob this will other people have come and gone I said I'm not coming in I'm not coming in so I think later today Steve I'm going to put a lawn chair in their yard right outside yeah yeah I mean it's if it stays like this my luck it'll be raining but I'm going to the the I think that's the only way for us to to manage this moment well you know when when you're inducted most on the next half hour right yes I really I really think my mom had it in January she had all the symptoms she had a cough that still lingers it was a dry cough she would have maybe I should be saying this but she would lose your breath yep and you know got treatment but not for it wasn't around and are diagnosed in night and I am one asked most about when the because there were earlier cases like that right absolutely and so why is it that it didn't take all of that and and it did in March maybe it just needed a critical mass I don't know but I'll tell you what the weirdest thing about this bug is the losing of taste and smell how is that not a sign and I know people that have had that and gone through that experience some of the symptoms including that and have never been tested never been treated nobody knows that except anecdotally their family and friends and and therefore are not in that count right Illinois thirteen thousand five hundred forty nine cases of H. is thirteen thousand five hundred fifty because I know somebody I'm pretty sure had it but weren't tested well they said all along that a lot of people are going to happen and have very much and not even know it writer have very mild symptoms so to play that number by two for crying at least well I've had shouldn't say that but right I know what we know deaths three hundred eighty in Illinois that is kind of a hard and moving count but cases thirteen thousand five hundred forty nine who knows who knows one of the questions I have for doctor most is one of the things that you do when you wear a mask if you touch your face less because you're just cognizant of you your face in your eyes your nose you gotta match their needs your hands come up you know I'm not going to touch so that's great I've been walking around with my hands in my pockets if you see me falling down the stairs are bumping into a wall it's because I don't have my feelers out but now I'm thinking there are times where I find myself scratching my cheek say I had the virus on my finger and I put it on my cheek but I haven't touched my eye nose or lips because I'm very cognizant of that right now so I'm imagining that that little tiny germs just sitting there and it doesn't have legs uber won't go there so maybe I need to be washing my face carefully when I get home to which I do about half the time the ridiculous kind of reflected their ER nope should number of mine I wonder if we should be washing our face as conscientiously as we've been doing our hands doctor most in Kenya sweated off your face like if you're out running and someone you know how people hack certain things out of their noses when they're on yeah I think I could have done that linger in the air yeah it's like what if you got one of those and you know you're sweating and I came I don't know there's just so many I think merry see now here's his I got to be in biology from idling Grosso's class in manuka high school back in the day she was a tough grader so I'm no doctor but I do know this that the virus is not contained or spread through your perspiration but like merry said you're spending your hack in your stuff coming out of your nose and then I come running through that fog of you or maybe my shoot touches the spot where you were and then when I take my shoe off I mean this sounds ridiculous but I also think it's real I know when I've been running lately I don't I don't spit when I run but you know a lot of the kind of guys do you know who also spits a lot in but there's a funny question the Chinese the Chinese culturally the Chinese are big spenders really you go to China you'll see spittle on the ground more than you will in other cities my estimated probability of axe that's the we haven't we haven't had thick ice all winter just so you know okay and I think you just might have crossed the thin ice part and remember I gotta be from idling Grosso at manuka Community High School analogy tough crater sixty seven percent no seventy two percent I'm looking at my producer ash elev look that up China spitting sidewalk free virus I don't think it was an uncommon social trend it's ten fifty seven well gosh it's time for some commercials in nineteen pandemic spread around the world doctors in Italy doctors in China and now doctors in New York have to make very difficult decisions who gets a ventilator who doesn't get a ventilator that crisis could be coming to Chicago and we'll talk to a medical ethicists will.

Illinois Montgomery Bonnie Raitt John Prine
"academy achievements" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

10:31 min | 1 year ago

"academy achievements" Discussed on What It Takes

"Amy Tan was almost forty years old when she published her first novel fall but that novel happened to be the joy luck club a massive bestseller that is thirty years later considered a classic only hoping best for you this wrong to hope no well. It hurts because every time you hope for something. I couldn't deliver it heart. That's a clip from the movie version of the book but here's Amy Tan herself to start us off speaking at the Academy of Achievement in nineteen ninety six about the unusual and traumatic path that landed her at the door of literary superstardom history is what uh we choose to remember and in that sense you can't change the past because you can go back and you can look at things differently away and I'd like to take you back to a time in my life when I was seventeen and I was about to leave home and I had two two very big goals per skull was to lead behind everything that I had been raised to believe a lot of which was Chinese and the second goal was to never see my mother again well. I failed those goals miserably. She certainly did as you probably know. If you've read the joy luck club and there's a good chance you have it's been required reading in many a high school and college Conglo Class. Amy Tan was one of the first writers to place Chinese American heritage in Generational conflict at the center of an American Erica novel and ask for her mother. Well we will soon get to the stories of what was that the root of Amy Tan's vow a vow she broke to end and their relationship coming up a candidate in deeply introspective. Amy Tan on this episode of what it takes a podcast about passion vision and perseverance from the Academy of Achievement. I'm Alice had a main this child this gift. It and I heard that enough that I started to believe if you have the opportunity not a perfect opportunity. I don't take it. You may never have another child it. It always so clear. It was just like the picture started to form itself. There was a new wing which ally could prevail over the truth darkness ooh light there every day. I wake up and decide today. I'm going to love my life. Decide Live live isis if they're gonNA break a leg or it's when you go on that play stay out of there and then long companies differential experiences that you don't look for you don't plan for Orange but boy. You better not miss. Amy Tan's parents were Chinese immigrants grants to the United States. She was born here in Oakland California. In nineteen fifty two by the time she finished high school she'd lived in twelve twelve different homes but that wasn't the biggest disruption of her childhood. By a long shot. I was raised in a home with very strong wrong. Beliefs two sets of contradictory beliefs in fact my father was an addition to be an electrical engineer Baptist minister and so he believed in things in such as miracles the goodness of God good beginning good and bad be getting bad and I tried to believe everything the thing that he believed as unquestioned truth my mother on the other hand had Chinese beliefs they were sort of Buddhist but not you're kind of tranquil Zen Buddhist kind of beliefs they were things that had to do with ghosts and ancestors and how things were fated to be a lot of those beliefs went flying out the window the year that my father and my brother were both with diagnosed with brain tumors and my mother suddenly brought all these beliefs out of the closet and she called upon geomancers to try to find out what was wrong with our house while I was out of balance she called in faith healers who spoke in tongues to try and cure my father brother she prayed to a painting of her her mother who committed suicide when she was nine years old and in spite of all these things that she tried in spite of the fact that she would never give up my my brother and then my father both died and I can't begin to describe to you what kind of pain and outrage line wait for you when you believe that the world Louis held together by the centrifugal force of faith than when all that faith begins to wobble and teeters into hopelessness and everything everything you believe goes flying into the bleakest parts of your soul that's when I decided that I would never believe never trust and faith never hope even before that pair of tragedies life in her home was a pressure cooker of parental expectation. You know I look back. I'm an adult now and I say only wanted the best for you parrots us but at the same time I try to remember and this is what I try to do as a writer. I try to remember what those emotions funds were like when I was younger and how they just didn't understand they just didn't know who I really was and they didn't know just how much the smallest amount of recognition what meant to me and how the smallest amount of criticism could undo me. My parents had very high expectations expectations. They expected me to get strays from the time I was in kindergarten. They're member. I was in kindergarten and it was a little girl who I. I didn't think it was a very good artist. I thought I did very careful house you know with the chimney and the windows and the trees and and she was more of an abstract artist and hers was very loose and you know. I didn't think it was very good but they decided to pin hers up in the principal's office so that was like getting the A A and my mother wanted to know why was it in my picture and that window and and I was very wounded in frighten you know why wasn't it in the window and I remember feeling that pressure from the time I was five years old. my mother had also a very difficult childhood herself having seen her mother kill ourselves so that she didn't always know how to be the nurturing nurturing mother that we all expect we should have I remember once one of my playmates from around the corner died probably of leukemia and my mother took me to this funeral and she showed me took me up to see Rachel Shola. I saw Rachel's hands clasped over her chest and her face was bloodless in her hands had were flat and and I was scared because is this was the little girl I used to play with and my mother leaned over to me and she said this is what happens when you don't listen to your mother and and that's what I grew up with now growing up in an American culture of course I also had other other models. You know these playmates who their parents were. Hey if they got a C- who cares you know great. That was great billy. Here's here's there's money to go out and get a candy bar well. If I came home with one B. I got scalded and so I grew up often thinking that I would never ever please my parents filmmaker IRV dress men who interviewed Amy Tan for the academy achievement asked her whether she believed the the conflicts with her parents were more generational or cultural her answer it depends their cultural if you were raised by culturally and in this day and age who's not I mean even if you're not your family is is of one culture you're around people of many different print cultures and so you see different cultural expectations going on all around you but I think the cultural ones can sometimes confuse the generational ones and I'll give you an example. You know like if my if my mother didn't want me to date boys out of fear that somehow I would lose myself to this boy. Dan ruined my life. I chalked up all of her fears to Chinese fears. Not Generational wants anything. That was unreasonable. I said Said was Chinese so I made the culture the scapegoat and that's unfortunate because it made me grow up wanting to deny that part of me that part of my family of myself a that anything that was Chinese about me made me feel ashamed made me want to bury that so that this what I felt was the stronger more independent American side could come out and I realize now that some of the stuff that happened to me was simply the uniqueness of my family. My mother mother had nothing to do with Chinese culture and some of it yes was rooted in some traditions of Chinese culture like the the use of fear and old families to to keep children under control but I think any mother worries.

Amy Tan Academy of Achievement Rachel Shola Oakland Conglo Class California Alice United States Orange Dan writer engineer billy leukemia principal Louis thirty years
"academy achievements" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

13:43 min | 1 year ago

"academy achievements" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"You who donate to this NPR station this is one a I'm Kimberly Adams of market place in for Josh with Johnson we're discussing the legacy and impact of the great American author and thinker Toni Morrison with Dana Williams chair of the English department at Howard University and Paula Giddings professor emerita of africana studies at Smith College we'd love to hear from you too did she affect your life also what you know about her works influence on writers you know today comment on our Facebook page tweet us at one eight or email us one a at W. A. immune dot org Jeff and Tom I emailed us my wife and I first read tar baby as Peace Corps volunteers in Kenya in the early nineteen eighties and we were hooked I've taught song of Solomon to students at Michigan State University sometimes when nearing the end of the Morrison book I would delay finishing because I didn't want the story to end Cindy emailed us the first time I read the book the bluest eyes when I was a freshman in high school back in nineteen ninety I cried because the young girl in the book was me I too struggle with feelings of being ugly because of my darker skin tone Tony spoke to the hearts of many young black girls who did and still struggle with how beauty is depicted even during these modern times Paula Giddings for those who don't know what are the characteristics that mark Morrison work can you sort of characterize her style and what made her work distinct well as everyone many people have talked about hell your call her language was but with Tony and I right now I'm talking also from the perspective of the person who writes history and Tony really cracked you know the sky opened for so many of us in terms of talking about the past because you talked about the past of from the inside out she had an interior I did you know when I listen to many of the comments of the people who are calling in and talking about Tony one thing that ties them us all together is that she made us feel something not just into in terms of intellectual aspects of our work which is extraordinary as well but she made us feel because she really wrote from the inside out and she really told us in so many words that you know we were we are the universe we don't have to be and no one else has to be in our story that when we tell our story in a particular way we're telling the American stored were telling a global story and so you can really divide I think literature and writing about black culture you know before Toni Morrison in after Toni Morrison because she was a tremendous guide for us and when I worked on my own history of African American women and my work done I had a sword among lions her writing was in my head even though was writing history because it required another kind of perspective and another kind of understanding and a kind of talking to ourselves not just talking trying to explain ourselves to others her work was also infused with magic and and superstition often leading to her being characterized in the camp of sort of like magical realism I did she embrace that yes she gave us something that was really I think very interesting and she gave us yeah he life of black people that reached a proportion of myth en masse and not not in terms of you know sometimes we think about myth as some kind of falsity your but she talked about myths as a venerated story as one that gives meaning to the world and she could she could Matt what will also I think was magical power writing is it does she she could talk about this national pass in this racial passing this cultural pass through characters through domestic situations through those these pots plots of hers of and that is that is was made us feel that was that injury already part of her as well that was just so extraordinary Dr Gittings you're also a typist for her first book the bluest eye I want to hear more about that story it later but can you just give us one more moment to think about why she had such a powerful impact on just about everyone she met again I think it's it's not that what she just made a C. of her work provided us with blood and bone and marrow and heart and that is rare I think still now and what was really important in revolutionary about her work and she talks about this she talked about this often was that she was not interested in the white gaze she was not interested in explaining anything to other people to white people she was not interested in and trying to think about that and to coax white people into understanding something about us and so it and this was X. this is extraordinarily important this is a seismic shift up here in our literature is not in our perceptions and so so she helped all of us not only writing in the different disciplines but also writing in and thinking about or in thinking about ourselves and who we are and how to define ourselves in this was very important Patrice art an advocate Maryland tweeted us Morrison informed and deeply and deepened my feminism as a white woman of privilege I needed to hear her stories they cut to the heart let's hear some of Morrison's own words about her entrance into the writers world here's a part of a speech she gave for her academy achievement award from the Canadian German I awards I had no reason and no encouragement to be a writer I didn't think about it until I was over thirty and I only thought about it then because there was something I wanted to read about and I couldn't find it I thought everything I needed to read all wanted to read had probably been written by somebody somewhere and at some point I discovered there was a silence absent it's a vacancy about somebody I knew intimately which was a young black female now there were books in which such a character appears she was always a joke an instrument of somebody's Kitty or to add comic relief most people know Toni Morrison as an author but before she was a recognized a brighter she was an editor she moved to New York after her divorce to work at Random House publishing as an editor transferring to New York City as a trade editor she served as an editor at Random House for nineteen years this was a very important role for Morrison Danno Williams what did that role look like and why is it so important to her story well it actually looks like everything from introducing new writers to the world to selecting the cover of that writers book to making determinations about where to market and how to market whether to have a book party or not consulting with the sales team about how to get that writers books on the shelves are in the front windows of bookshops because we tend to think about books and book sales only as we know them now but keep in mind major department stores were the major venues for selling books and independent bookstores and then there was also mail order or book of the month club so she did all the work from getting blurbs from writers for the back of their books to selecting the pictures to writing the copy for the flat I mean it really was just an incredible feat and really challenging to imagine how she was able to do all of that right herself at a certain point she certainly stop editing and writing full time but she really midwife to generation of writers and made possible like she I mean essentially I think she encourage writers so that she would have company that's one of the things that I found most remarkable about her anytime that we interacted with each other she was very clear that she wasn't an anomaly that she was an exemplary that there were other writers who were really remarkable writers as well and so I think she really tried to get some company for herself and for other writers and I don't think it's an understatement to suggest that African American literary studies as a standalone feel has a lot to do with the work that Morrison did at Random House where she published all Toni Cade Bambara Angela Davis Quincy troupe Henry do us I could go on I mean from fiction to pros Lucille Clifton June Jordan and then you know nontraditional books as well like a cookbook or the black book or real roads about train people and so on Paula Giddings use all this first hand as we mentioned earlier that you were the typist for Morrison's first novel of the bluest eye can you tell us about that experience and how you saw Morrison a sort of shepherding this generation of black authors do the process well I came to Random House right after graduating I'm Howard University a black editor by the name of Charles Harris recruited a number of us to come in the publishing which was trying to diverse diversified that in that period so I was in the of I met Tony at Random House when she came up to the trade division and I was in the secretarial pool along with a number of my friends of and one day Tony came to us and asked if we would type something for her of and we said sure and she said you know if you do it I promise you I will make you the best carried cake you have ever eaten re said shores absolutely absolutely a real a number of us lived in a small shot gun apartment on the Upper West Side in New York sure enough we type the pages of she sure she came to their our apartment as she brought this wonderful carrot cake and it still is the best care K. I have ever had and yeah and later on we were typing parts of retyping parts of the bluest die of it there so it was quite extraordinary to think about someone like Tony they're in publishing at that time and I'm so glad by the way I want just want to say how important day in his work is all on this I'm so glad she's working on this aspect of of Tony's career but if I might say Tony taught us how to because we were young pups you know who in publishing which could be pretty intimidating at the time but Tony the way she just walked in the world than she was older she was about she was in her late thirties early forties when I was just coming into publishing after after college and she was just fearless she was intimidated by no one she and she as she said in the film pieces that I am she said I wasn't intimidated by any of those white males there she says I was so much more interesting than they were and I wasn't afraid to show it and so we saw how she yes just in addition to the wonderful office that she brought in as Dana talked about just the way she handled herself and her whole perspective of life was quite was was was wonderful and really an important lesson for us and it's worth noting the publishing industry to this day is still about eighty five percent white and it was even less diverse when a Tony Morrison was coming up through the ranks let's hear another message from you front in our inbox highlighting one.

Kimberly Adams Josh Johnson NPR eighty five percent nineteen years one day
"academy achievements" Discussed on 1A

1A

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"academy achievements" Discussed on 1A

"There's news you need to know about the n._p._r. Politics podcast is there to tell you what happened. It's not to mention. We're hitting the road so you can meet all of the twenty twenty contenders appeal is gonna draw me completely crazy the politics podcast subscribe. This is one a. I'm kimberly. Adams of marketplace in for joshua johnson jeff and thomas emailed us my wife and i i read tar baby as peace corps volunteers tears in kenya in the early nineteen eighties and we were hooked. I've taught song of solomon to students at michigan state university. Sometimes when nearing the end of a morrison book i would delay finishing because i didn't want the story to end. Cindy emailed us the first time i read the book the bluest eye when i was a freshman in high school back in nineteen ninety. I cried because the young girl and the book was me. I two struggled with feelings of being ugly because of my darker skin tone tony spoke to the hearts of many young young black girls who did and still struggle with how beauty is depicted even during these modern times paula giddings for those that don't know what are the characteristics characteristics that mark a morrison work. Can you characterize her style and what made her work distinct. Well as everyone many people have talked talked about how lyrical her language was but with tony and i write and i'm talking from the perspective of person who writes history <hes> and tony really cracked the sky open for so many of us in terms of talking about the past and because you talked about the past <hes> from the inside out she had an interior. I'd you know when i listen to many of the comments of the people who are calling in and talking about tony one thing that ties them us all together is that she made us feel something not just into in terms of intellectual <hes> aspects of our work which is extraordinary as well but she made us feel because she really wrote from the inside out and she really told told us in so many words that you know we were. We are the universe we don't have to be. No one else has to be in our story that when we tell our story and a particular way retelling the american storytelling a global story and so you can really divide our think literature and <hes> writing about black culture you know before tony morrison <hes> and after tony morrison patrice art in accokeek maryland tweeted tweeted us morrison informed and deeply in deepened my feminism as a white woman of privilege. I needed to hear her stories. They cut to the heart. Let's hear here's some of morrison's own words about her entrance into the writers world. Here's a part of a speech. She gave for her academy achievement award from the canadian canadian gemini awards. I had no reason and no encouragement be a writer. I didn't think about it until i was over over thirty and i only thought about it then because there was something i wanted to read about and i couldn't find it. I thought everything i needed to read or wanted to read need had probably been written by somebody somewhere and at some point i discovered there was a silence <hes> absence a vacancy about somebody somebody i knew intimately which was young black female now there were books in with such character appeared but she was always a joke <hes> <hes> an instrument of somebody's pity or to add comic relief most people know tony morrison and.

tony morrison paula giddings solomon kenya Cindy joshua johnson writer michigan state university Adams maryland thomas jeff patrice art
"academy achievements" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

08:03 min | 2 years ago

"academy achievements" Discussed on What It Takes

"Was. I was confused because I had been so intensely involved in this thing called a warning came back United States. It was like, it wasn't going on nineteen sixty six and the only the vanity families were involved in the war where people had loved ones over there, and nobody else seemed too much even know or care that the war was going on. When I came back in nineteen seventy was different because now we are being blamed for the war. You know the military who were just doing their duty traffic's. I mean, kids that have been drafted in the military sent the war when they came back home, we're being blamed by the American people for the war. That's intolerable. I mean, that's terrible, and but but a match ration- process went came about in the American people because in the Gulf war you didn't run into that. I think they finally recognized that, hey, the members of the armed services over there are people just doing their duty. They're doing their duty because their country s them to then not the ones that caused the w-. War itself. And we got letters over there from people who would say, look, I may not agree with the with the decisions that put you there, but by golly, now that you're there, I'm support new. You've got my support. And then of course, when I got home, I've run into, I can't tell you how many thousands of Vietnam veterans come over and through their arms around me just say, thank you general, you know, you made it all right. You've been decayed at a, you know, it's amazing, but but somehow so many of them feel like. The they won in the Gulf war. And so that's good stuff. Country was practically high on victory parades at the end of operation Desert Storm as if they would bring absolution for the sins of the Vietnam era and general h Norman Schwarzkopf who himself was feted as a conquering hero made sure his fellow soldiers from the war twenty years earlier, reaped the benefit. He even mentioned them in his remarks to congress after returning from peration Desert Storm. So how did the mistakes at the Vietnam war influence general Schwarzkopf's battle plans in the Persian Gulf in nineteen Ninety-one a lot. I'm in both positive and negative. You know you somebody once said you learn more from negative leadership and he deposited by believe that I believe that very much. So I was bound determined that we weren't going to repeat some of the mistakes. We've made me at Phnom bound determined that if we were going to go to war, we're going to get it over with. We're, we're gonna use our full military might and I and I would say t- I'm very proud, very happy. That are that you know, our country that our administration, the president on down the secretary defense allowed us to do it that way. It's the right war is never the right thing to do, but if you have to fight a war, there is a right way to fight the war and that's the way that will minimize your casualties. Save the lives of the people are out there playing get it over with as fast as you can. It could hardly have been a faster war a six week air campaign to decimate Saddam Hussein's fighting capabilities, followed by a one hundred hour ground offensive. But for all the brilliant tactical plans, the flawless execution and the formidable drubbing Schwarzkopf said he had many doubts and plenty of fear. They just come with the job even when you're a general doubts make you plan for every contingency and fear provides cover. Listen, anybody who says they're not afraid in war is either a liar or they're crazy. Okay. And there's nothing wrong with fear. I mean, fear is good. Fear. We'll keep you alive and war. Fear, keep you live in business. Okay. Nothing wrong would be afraid at all. And everybody should understand that and fear tends to cause you to focus at tends to cause your rental to run. It tends to cause you do things that you, you know, perhaps to see things much much sharper perspective at that instant, what is bad is when you you, you allow that fear to turn into panic and you allow that fear to to petrified you to the point that you cannot perform, whatever do you have to do that thing that's wrong with fear. There's nothing wrong with being afraid and courage shoe. Courage is not not being afraid. True. Courage is being afraid and going ahead and doing your job. Anyhow, that's what courageous the interviewer wanted to know what general Schwartzkopf learned about leadership over the course of his life that he didn't know when he graduated from West Point. Oh, what do I know now about leadership that I didn't know when I graduate in west one. It's it's not a perfect world. Migratory much point. I saw things very much in shades of black and white. And I've come to understand that. And I, I also was I demanded a great deal of myself as young man and shades of black and white. I mean, you have to had to do everything right? You couldn't do anything wrong, and and that's not what life's all about. How can you not allow yourself mistakes? You're not giving yourself a freedom to fail because I don't believe in the word failure, you're giving yourself the latitude, learn. I've learned I've learned most things I know how to do well probably by screwed up the first time, but I guess the thing I've probably learned more knitting else's is self self-fulfilment. His is the most important payable being happy with what you do, feeling good about what you're doing is probably the great secret life. You don't measure person success by what they take out of life. You measure person success by what Leon. There's one other lesson he learned along the way in the years after West Point, he laid it out in Taki gave to students at the academy achievement in nineteen ninety one. Here's the part that many of them say they still remember decades later rule, thirteen. I had a great boss one time I was deputy and every time we'd go out of town as it walk out the door, it a rule thirteen. On a fact. One day I thought I'd better ask you about rule. Thirteen. Was. He's thirteen very simple, said one income and take charge. Not a bad rule. But believe me that is that is a is an overwhelming thought all of the great leaders I've ever known in my life. All of the great leaders of history of has had certain characteristic, and that is a characteristic that they were willing to take the responsibility. Thank back. You all to the to the planning the homecoming dance. Think back to the planning of the yearbook, your school. You know, there's hundreds of people literally that stand up and have brilliant ideas, and they are willing to voice those ideas and tell everybody exactly how things should happen, but it would come to the doing when it comes to the people who must make it happen. Not very many that step forward and say, I'll do it. So that's the first thing I tell you remember that leaders seek responsibility, and they take that responsibility because they are confident of their competence. You must be competent to be a leader, continue seeking competence competence for any role that you might take. Life that same boss. When I found out what rule thirteen was I went to one day and I said, you know, while you're going, there's probably going to be a lot of things come up and I need your guidance on what I should do. What should I do? What decision should I make while you're gone? He said, rule fourteen.

Norman Schwarzkopf Vietnam West Point United States Saddam Hussein Persian Gulf peration Desert Storm golly congress Schwartzkopf president Taki secretary one hundred hour twenty years six week One day one day
"academy achievements" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"academy achievements" Discussed on What It Takes

"I step that i take assessing patient is whether there is something there that the man's immediate conventional intervention you know i think the greatest sin that you can make in this field was the missed the diagnosis of a condition that for which conventional medicine works very well so that's the first thing is to rule that out if that's not present then you have a lot of latitude and experimenting with other methods but even if you use the conventional methods i think there are it is often worth supporting the body in ways that can reduce the toxicity of those methods or increase their efficacy doctor wyle argues that certainly relevant to many of the onus is we hear about constantly these days just recently in february of two thousand eighteen doctor wyle recorded a follow up conversation for the academy achievement and he talked about some of the most pressing health issues today with one of his own proteges victoria me's profess of medicine at the university of arizona and the executive director of wiles center for integrative medicine at the university you know we are at the moment crippled in this society by epidemics of lifestyle related diseases obesity hypertension diabetes a whole slew things and these are all rooted in in unwise choices of how to eat how to be physically active how to rest how to handle stress and i think you know we just absolutely failed as a society to find ways to encourage people to make better lifestyle choices and discourage them from making poor ones one in the lifestyle practices that we teach in integrative medicine has to do with the mind body connection and almost twenty years ago you were asked to debate dr arnold roman and he told you there was no evidence from my body medicine today we live with mindfulness everywhere and i'm wondering whether you believe it's fundamentally changing society dr roman was for a long time the chief of the new england journal of medicine he's no longer with us and he was very powerful force in american medicine and.

wyle executive director wiles center university of arizona dr arnold roman new england journal of medicin twenty years
"academy achievements" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"academy achievements" Discussed on What It Takes

"Once or twice a year we bring you an episode that gives you a feel for one of the amazing things that happens at an academy achievement summit people at the very peak of their fields whether prime minister's basketball coaches financiers country singers nobel prize winning scientists or writers stand before young delegates from around the world and inspire them by talking about what it takes to succeed and to make a difference in this world this is one of those episodes you'll hear end scott mama day talking about what the sacred means to him and wallace stagner talking about the meaning of belonging to a place we'll start with stagner who gave his address at the nineteen ninetyone academy of achievement summit in new york there's been much said said well about how to challenge the world and make it say on coll out to make a success and achieved things in the world and like to take it from another side for a moment the interior landscape rather than the challenge to the world once i heard somebody at a meeting like this ask john cheever while he wrote and he said to try to make sense of my life which is a very good answer the unexamined life as the lies greek said is not worth living especially for people of certified intelligence and gifts but you all are in regimes once dr a bunch of young writers in new england in advise them to be people upon whom nothing is lost.

prime minister nobel prize wallace stagner new york john cheever