4 Burst results for "Academy Of Achievement"

"academy achievement" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

01:31 min | 4 months ago

"academy achievement" Discussed on What It Takes

"Keep them busy in other ways but when they do get the chance they say there's nothing like the feeling of the open ocean below and the endless stars up above. I'm alice winkler. And this is what it takes from the academy achievement. Yes the stars are remarkable. We we all have the star gazing out so we can really you know go out and find all the constellations because it's the sky has it's sometimes hard to see the constellations because there's just so many stories out there and there was one experience recently actually when we were on the amelia earhart expedition. We determined we were actually when the international space station was overhead of us. We were actually closer to people on the international space station than we were to any individual land so kind of put in that kind of scale into perspective of how far out we were and how removed we were on the planet It's you know you can be nothing but appreciative to to be not moment an have that an opportunity like that. It's amazing it's just very grateful. For how lucky i am. Make sure to check out our episode on. Sylvia earle one of the world's greatest marine scientists and david do belay one of the world's greatest underwater photographers what it takes his made possible with funding from catherine b reynolds foundation. Thanks to them. Thanks to you as always for listening..

alice winkler international space station david do belay Sylvia earle catherine b reynolds foundatio
"academy achievement" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:14 min | 4 months ago

"academy achievement" Discussed on How I Built This

"Good question. That's a really good question. It's a great question is free therapy. Thank you for asking me that god. That's such a good question. That's an interesting question but what fresh air interviews are really about are the interesting answers. Listen and subscribe to fresh air from whyy and npr. Welcome back to how i built this. I'm so it's around. Twenty twelve and robert is looking to get a job with this big player in private equity named bio unless he and just to kind of see. Robert's mind works bio accent. Come up with a really good start idea and write a business plan for it so robert and his friend worry. Come up with an idea for a real estate company. So then i go back to bio and i have like a ten page plan as hey by own the. Here's the plan. But what would you think plan. What do you think about me working for you. And he said well wound to the plan to create. The company has a bio. And did this. So that i can work for. You told me that as part of the interview process and then he ease as well as he gets a good idea. And i told him what i can't do it. I'm getting married in a couple of months. I'm going to have a kid. I can't afford to not have a really come. Is it how about this. I'll be your first investor. I'll give you five hundred thousand dollars and if you feel in a year ohio. Yeah so. I said wow what was the idea you had. I mean she wanted to do something in real estate. I get it. You're kind of brainstorming. And you figured it was going to be real estate healthcare but what. What was the problem that you were suggesting you could solve with real estate. The idea was that we would focus on rentals in new york. City are big big dream at a time when we are going to make the process of renton home. Wonderful for everyone. We're gonna make it an amazing customer experience in the way we would do that as we would hire neighbor it specialists pay them on salary non-commission and just to clarify the new york's is really weird market whereas when you rent a house unlike almost anywhere else in the united states you have to pay an agent like a commission you is the renter pay commission to an agent so you can rent an apartment which is super weird right like newark. Is this kind of outlier when it comes to that right. Yeah so. I didn't know that it was an outlier. The time the idea was no one liked any part of the process is too hard to find the home. It costs too much. And i sent out an email to everyone in my network and i said quick question for tech friend. If there was a problem that technology could solve. What would you want it to solve. And maybe it was my peer group but the number one thing was finding an apartment in new york all right so you you come up with this idea to instead of a commission based system you. Would you would employ real estate agents which you called neighbourhood neighbors specialists we call them neighboring special okay and they would be like friendly and they'd be on salary in the renter wouldn't have to pay as much in in fees they would pay a smaller fee. Basically that was the model. Exactly all right in this was called. He called compass. Urban compass right Urban time and you had a friend named oriole loan. And i guess he was he had done a of startups and tell me about him. He was the guy that you want to start this with. Who who's already so. I met re alone when i was a white house. Fellow at a conference called academy achievement. He had just sold his first company to google and we just sat next to each other and we really connected and i sent him holiday cards every year afterwards and we stayed in touch. And why did you. Why did you think he was partner to start this with. I guess presumably because he had experienced with startups and selling them. So i saw this guy who sold one company. Google another company twitter as this guy's a magician. I said i need to work with him. If i ever do anything. I know work with him. And he gave credibility to everything. We're doing on the tech side. I knew i could hire the business people but he would be higher. The technology people and when the technology say technology you thought this would be like an app or a website that kind of made it took the friction out of renting an apartment and we wanted to at the time. We didn't know anything very clear including about real estate in new. My mom was an agent. And i worked a little bit when i was younger. But we didn't understand the we real estate worked. We don't even know how the commission really was. You know anything lever to complete outsiders and the idea was just. Let's make things better. You launch this in In two thousand thirteen. Because i think you raised a raise a lot of money before you launch raising about eight million dollars which i think is credit to your connections at point and and all the experience you had. Presumably right yeah. We raised eight million dollars which was the largest seed financing round ear and raise it from three groups of people venture capital firms real estate investors nc. Great we could see that. Each group was bringing more credibility to the other so like the investors liked that the real estate developers were there because they made it feel like we knew doing the real estate developers like the technology investors were there because he felt like that men that we were going to actually be able to build the technology that will transform the industry. The bad thing was we had no clarity of what the single thing we were trying to do. Was you know we're going to hire really talented. People and make things better is what everyone is going in. Different directions better for some people meant bringing down price better for other people meant creating scheduling software. Better for other people meant Having really really nice neighbors bash list that are trained on customer service and we realize people they're looking to find an apartment then meets all their needs and the people that are best at doing that. I could see where agents who had been doing it for ten years. Not people that we hired from restaurants or hotels. They're really really nice and trying to train them to like meet someone on a corner and show them property and that was what your ideas that you would hire nice people not necessarily experienced agents. Exactly i would literally go to restaurants. Try to find the nicest waiters and ask him if they would become neighbors specialists. And i'd go the doorman and door woman at hotels. And it's a hey. Would you wanna be a neighbor specialist so you launch in two thousand thirteen having these neighborhoods specialists and you rent it. And and the renter comes in. And how long before you realize that. That's not working. That.

whyy robert new york npr renton newark Robert ohio google united states white house twitter
"academy achievement" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

10:39 min | 1 year ago

"academy achievement" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Okay that's what I'm doing tonight John Prine American country folk singer songwriter it was active as a composer hears is wiki recording artist and live performer from the early seventies until his death often known for his humorous style of country music that has elements of protest and social commentary born and raised in may would Illinois you know angel of Montgomery about that well Bonnie Raitt mated fame yeah I mean I reckon we played a little of that in the office this morning and and as you know there that was the non non figures in the singers the the the songwriters hall of fame I was looking at his awards here nominated for this one of that lifetime achievement award from the academy you get lifetime academy achievement award I presume he would be in some of those halls of fame as well widely cited as one of the most influential songwriters of his generation Prine was known for his humorous lyrics about life love and current events as well as serious songs and social commentaries no some of them recollecting melancholy tales from his life a member of the folk revival from Chicago discovered by Kris Kristofferson although Prine himself credited film reviewer Roger Ebert proviso East High School in may would late nineteen sixties prime was delivering mail he began to sing it open Mike evenings at fifth paragon Armitage Avenue in Chicago Prine was initially a spectator reluctant to perform but eventually did so in response to a you think you can do better comment made to him by another performer he got up on stage and he did Chicago sun times movie critic Roger Ebert heard him there and wrote the first review pry never received calling him a great songwriter he became a central figure in the Chicago folk revival including people like Steve Goodman and Michael Peter Smith and others nineteen ninety eight Brian was diagnosed with cancer the operation altered his vocal cords and added a gravelly tone to his voice in two thousand thirteen underwent surgery to remove cancer in his left long after the surgery a physical therapist put him through an unusual workout to build his stamina Prine was required to run up and down his house stairs grabbed his guitar while still out of breath and sing two songs six months later he was back on the road touring and singing again March nineteenth twenty twenty during the corona virus pandemic Prine's wife Fiona revealed she had tested positive for the covert nineteen and had been quarantined in their home apart from him he was hospitalized March twenty six that would be seven days later after experiencing symptoms himself he was intubated on the evening of March twenty eighth nine days after she was discovered to have the disease two nights after that Fiona tweeted that she had recovered but he now has pneumonia in both lungs and had also developed some peripheral issues that were being treated with medications he passed away April seventh twenty twenty the day we were supposed to come out of our homes in Chicago Illinois John Prine passed away no that's the thing too I'm thinking again of our conversation with ray Kaplan the attorney here in town financial relief dot com we do her commercials where she's always talking about how to get out of student debt to or minimize your payments legally in this new laws and rules in place right now but ray Kaplan's husband had the illness and had it bad I mean a hundred and four fever for a week I took the test but the results didn't come in for seven days so he's just sitting at home and they're pretty sure he's got it he has the symptoms and this thing is raging so what are you gonna do she's his wife it's the two of them at home so you got to try and take care of them how do you do that they segregated themselves he's a doctor so they have a lot of medical supplies and knowledge but eventually she started to come down with the symptoms too and you think well my god of course you're going to get it if you're living in a house with somebody but you can exactly abandon them either right so that's the conundrum for people it's the kind of part of a conversation I've been having with my dad the last couple of days my mom has been either in a hospital or rehabilitation facility since the day Kobe Bryant died remember that well that's my mom went in and just came out now my parents are anxious for us to come over and visit I said I'm not walk in your door they said were okay and you're okay I said I could touch something and it will devastate your household I cannot and it's really taken some of the reverse could Joling that we had when we were kids remember your parents used to tell you this is the way it's going to be I'm having to do that to my folks now but that's just the way it is yeah we don't see many people when we come to work anymore but we still are out that's what I said more than most other people are not just Chicago I went to the target for Cryin out loud maybe I haven't made that had it and got better maybe I have a right now I don't know if it's going to get worse they said well we'll keep some distance from you when you come in I said I'll touch your doorknob this will other people have come and gone I said I'm not coming in I'm not coming in so I think later today Steve I'm going to put a lawn chair in their yard right outside yeah yeah I mean it's if it stays like this my luck it'll be raining but I'm going to the the I think that's the only way for us to to manage this moment well you know when when you're inducted most on the next half hour right yes I really I really think my mom had it in January she had all the symptoms she had a cough that still lingers it was a dry cough she would have maybe I should be saying this but she would lose your breath yep and you know got treatment but not for it wasn't around and are diagnosed in night and I am one asked most about when the because there were earlier cases like that right absolutely and so why is it that it didn't take all of that and and it did in March maybe it just needed a critical mass I don't know but I'll tell you what the weirdest thing about this bug is the losing of taste and smell how is that not a sign and I know people that have had that and gone through that experience some of the symptoms including that and have never been tested never been treated nobody knows that except anecdotally their family and friends and and therefore are not in that count right Illinois thirteen thousand five hundred forty nine cases of H. is thirteen thousand five hundred fifty because I know somebody I'm pretty sure had it but weren't tested well they said all along that a lot of people are going to happen and have very much and not even know it writer have very mild symptoms so to play that number by two for crying at least well I've had shouldn't say that but right I know what we know deaths three hundred eighty in Illinois that is kind of a hard and moving count but cases thirteen thousand five hundred forty nine who knows who knows one of the questions I have for doctor most is one of the things that you do when you wear a mask if you touch your face less because you're just cognizant of you your face in your eyes your nose you gotta match their needs your hands come up you know I'm not going to touch so that's great I've been walking around with my hands in my pockets if you see me falling down the stairs are bumping into a wall it's because I don't have my feelers out but now I'm thinking there are times where I find myself scratching my cheek say I had the virus on my finger and I put it on my cheek but I haven't touched my eye nose or lips because I'm very cognizant of that right now so I'm imagining that that little tiny germs just sitting there and it doesn't have legs uber won't go there so maybe I need to be washing my face carefully when I get home to which I do about half the time the ridiculous kind of reflected their ER nope should number of mine I wonder if we should be washing our face as conscientiously as we've been doing our hands doctor most in Kenya sweated off your face like if you're out running and someone you know how people hack certain things out of their noses when they're on yeah I think I could have done that linger in the air yeah it's like what if you got one of those and you know you're sweating and I came I don't know there's just so many I think merry see now here's his I got to be in biology from idling Grosso's class in manuka high school back in the day she was a tough grader so I'm no doctor but I do know this that the virus is not contained or spread through your perspiration but like merry said you're spending your hack in your stuff coming out of your nose and then I come running through that fog of you or maybe my shoot touches the spot where you were and then when I take my shoe off I mean this sounds ridiculous but I also think it's real I know when I've been running lately I don't I don't spit when I run but you know a lot of the kind of guys do you know who also spits a lot in but there's a funny question the Chinese the Chinese culturally the Chinese are big spenders really you go to China you'll see spittle on the ground more than you will in other cities my estimated probability of axe that's the we haven't we haven't had thick ice all winter just so you know okay and I think you just might have crossed the thin ice part and remember I gotta be from idling Grosso at manuka Community High School analogy tough crater sixty seven percent no seventy two percent I'm looking at my producer ash elev look that up China spitting sidewalk free virus I don't think it was an uncommon social trend it's ten fifty seven well gosh it's time for some commercials in nineteen pandemic spread around the world doctors in Italy doctors in China and now doctors in New York have to make very difficult decisions who gets a ventilator who doesn't get a ventilator that crisis could be coming to Chicago and we'll talk to a medical ethicists will.

Illinois Montgomery Bonnie Raitt John Prine
"academy achievement" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

13:43 min | 2 years ago

"academy achievement" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"You who donate to this NPR station this is one a I'm Kimberly Adams of market place in for Josh with Johnson we're discussing the legacy and impact of the great American author and thinker Toni Morrison with Dana Williams chair of the English department at Howard University and Paula Giddings professor emerita of africana studies at Smith College we'd love to hear from you too did she affect your life also what you know about her works influence on writers you know today comment on our Facebook page tweet us at one eight or email us one a at W. A. immune dot org Jeff and Tom I emailed us my wife and I first read tar baby as Peace Corps volunteers in Kenya in the early nineteen eighties and we were hooked I've taught song of Solomon to students at Michigan State University sometimes when nearing the end of the Morrison book I would delay finishing because I didn't want the story to end Cindy emailed us the first time I read the book the bluest eyes when I was a freshman in high school back in nineteen ninety I cried because the young girl in the book was me I too struggle with feelings of being ugly because of my darker skin tone Tony spoke to the hearts of many young black girls who did and still struggle with how beauty is depicted even during these modern times Paula Giddings for those who don't know what are the characteristics that mark Morrison work can you sort of characterize her style and what made her work distinct well as everyone many people have talked about hell your call her language was but with Tony and I right now I'm talking also from the perspective of the person who writes history and Tony really cracked you know the sky opened for so many of us in terms of talking about the past because you talked about the past of from the inside out she had an interior I did you know when I listen to many of the comments of the people who are calling in and talking about Tony one thing that ties them us all together is that she made us feel something not just into in terms of intellectual aspects of our work which is extraordinary as well but she made us feel because she really wrote from the inside out and she really told us in so many words that you know we were we are the universe we don't have to be and no one else has to be in our story that when we tell our story in a particular way we're telling the American stored were telling a global story and so you can really divide I think literature and writing about black culture you know before Toni Morrison in after Toni Morrison because she was a tremendous guide for us and when I worked on my own history of African American women and my work done I had a sword among lions her writing was in my head even though was writing history because it required another kind of perspective and another kind of understanding and a kind of talking to ourselves not just talking trying to explain ourselves to others her work was also infused with magic and and superstition often leading to her being characterized in the camp of sort of like magical realism I did she embrace that yes she gave us something that was really I think very interesting and she gave us yeah he life of black people that reached a proportion of myth en masse and not not in terms of you know sometimes we think about myth as some kind of falsity your but she talked about myths as a venerated story as one that gives meaning to the world and she could she could Matt what will also I think was magical power writing is it does she she could talk about this national pass in this racial passing this cultural pass through characters through domestic situations through those these pots plots of hers of and that is that is was made us feel that was that injury already part of her as well that was just so extraordinary Dr Gittings you're also a typist for her first book the bluest eye I want to hear more about that story it later but can you just give us one more moment to think about why she had such a powerful impact on just about everyone she met again I think it's it's not that what she just made a C. of her work provided us with blood and bone and marrow and heart and that is rare I think still now and what was really important in revolutionary about her work and she talks about this she talked about this often was that she was not interested in the white gaze she was not interested in explaining anything to other people to white people she was not interested in and trying to think about that and to coax white people into understanding something about us and so it and this was X. this is extraordinarily important this is a seismic shift up here in our literature is not in our perceptions and so so she helped all of us not only writing in the different disciplines but also writing in and thinking about or in thinking about ourselves and who we are and how to define ourselves in this was very important Patrice art an advocate Maryland tweeted us Morrison informed and deeply and deepened my feminism as a white woman of privilege I needed to hear her stories they cut to the heart let's hear some of Morrison's own words about her entrance into the writers world here's a part of a speech she gave for her academy achievement award from the Canadian German I awards I had no reason and no encouragement to be a writer I didn't think about it until I was over thirty and I only thought about it then because there was something I wanted to read about and I couldn't find it I thought everything I needed to read all wanted to read had probably been written by somebody somewhere and at some point I discovered there was a silence absent it's a vacancy about somebody I knew intimately which was a young black female now there were books in which such a character appears she was always a joke an instrument of somebody's Kitty or to add comic relief most people know Toni Morrison as an author but before she was a recognized a brighter she was an editor she moved to New York after her divorce to work at Random House publishing as an editor transferring to New York City as a trade editor she served as an editor at Random House for nineteen years this was a very important role for Morrison Danno Williams what did that role look like and why is it so important to her story well it actually looks like everything from introducing new writers to the world to selecting the cover of that writers book to making determinations about where to market and how to market whether to have a book party or not consulting with the sales team about how to get that writers books on the shelves are in the front windows of bookshops because we tend to think about books and book sales only as we know them now but keep in mind major department stores were the major venues for selling books and independent bookstores and then there was also mail order or book of the month club so she did all the work from getting blurbs from writers for the back of their books to selecting the pictures to writing the copy for the flat I mean it really was just an incredible feat and really challenging to imagine how she was able to do all of that right herself at a certain point she certainly stop editing and writing full time but she really midwife to generation of writers and made possible like she I mean essentially I think she encourage writers so that she would have company that's one of the things that I found most remarkable about her anytime that we interacted with each other she was very clear that she wasn't an anomaly that she was an exemplary that there were other writers who were really remarkable writers as well and so I think she really tried to get some company for herself and for other writers and I don't think it's an understatement to suggest that African American literary studies as a standalone feel has a lot to do with the work that Morrison did at Random House where she published all Toni Cade Bambara Angela Davis Quincy troupe Henry do us I could go on I mean from fiction to pros Lucille Clifton June Jordan and then you know nontraditional books as well like a cookbook or the black book or real roads about train people and so on Paula Giddings use all this first hand as we mentioned earlier that you were the typist for Morrison's first novel of the bluest eye can you tell us about that experience and how you saw Morrison a sort of shepherding this generation of black authors do the process well I came to Random House right after graduating I'm Howard University a black editor by the name of Charles Harris recruited a number of us to come in the publishing which was trying to diverse diversified that in that period so I was in the of I met Tony at Random House when she came up to the trade division and I was in the secretarial pool along with a number of my friends of and one day Tony came to us and asked if we would type something for her of and we said sure and she said you know if you do it I promise you I will make you the best carried cake you have ever eaten re said shores absolutely absolutely a real a number of us lived in a small shot gun apartment on the Upper West Side in New York sure enough we type the pages of she sure she came to their our apartment as she brought this wonderful carrot cake and it still is the best care K. I have ever had and yeah and later on we were typing parts of retyping parts of the bluest die of it there so it was quite extraordinary to think about someone like Tony they're in publishing at that time and I'm so glad by the way I want just want to say how important day in his work is all on this I'm so glad she's working on this aspect of of Tony's career but if I might say Tony taught us how to because we were young pups you know who in publishing which could be pretty intimidating at the time but Tony the way she just walked in the world than she was older she was about she was in her late thirties early forties when I was just coming into publishing after after college and she was just fearless she was intimidated by no one she and she as she said in the film pieces that I am she said I wasn't intimidated by any of those white males there she says I was so much more interesting than they were and I wasn't afraid to show it and so we saw how she yes just in addition to the wonderful office that she brought in as Dana talked about just the way she handled herself and her whole perspective of life was quite was was was wonderful and really an important lesson for us and it's worth noting the publishing industry to this day is still about eighty five percent white and it was even less diverse when a Tony Morrison was coming up through the ranks let's hear another message from you front in our inbox highlighting one.

Kimberly Adams Josh Johnson NPR eighty five percent nineteen years one day