35 Burst results for "Academia"

Creating Smart Cities With Data Science

DataFramed

02:09 min | 3 d ago

Creating Smart Cities With Data Science

"I'm in great to have you on the show. A dallas my pleasure. Thank you so much needed to be a part of this conversation. Really looking forward to this discussion. I am excited to talk to you. About data science and government agencies the importance of data drills how to leverage data for better disaster response But before it can you tell me a bit about your background in how you got into the data space yes I think the way. I would talk about how i got into the data science faces to sort of give you a sense of sort of my journey as a computer. Scientists undergraduate master's doctorate degrees in computer science and engineering. Until i really started off as a computer scientist and i was at engineered a motorola for long period of time and then i moved into academia Dr moved into. Academia narrowly focused on sort of bioinformatics domain at johns hopkins. And then from there. I moved into the federal government where i focused on tech and policy. And and really it was the larger concept of Technology all facets but Because it was a political appointees obama administration in newborn administration really focused on this relatively new concepts specifically for the federal government of big data and data a concepts and big data technology. And that's why. I really began to cut my teeth in data science face really thinking. About how big data can be used in the federal government space right so i spent a lot of time. Working with agencies on big data did concepts big data technologies investing in cloud computing on and so forth and then i got the opportunity of a lifetime to become the chief officer for the city of new york. I mean that's where. I really jumped into the deep end with both feet and grew sort of my ability to use the to often complex problems specifically in an urban context for me in a science was never conceptual. I didn't learn it in academia. It was always understanding from the applied. Expecting

Federal Government Obama Administration Newborn Administration Dallas Johns Hopkins Motorola New York Academia
The Giant Leaps in Language Technology and Who's Left Behind

TED Talks Daily

02:11 min | 3 weeks ago

The Giant Leaps in Language Technology and Who's Left Behind

"I'm a linguist by training and a technologist by profession. I have worked in academia in startups in small companies and multinationals for over two decades doing researching and building language technology systems. My dream is to see technology. Work across the language barrier as a researcher at microsoft research. Labs india. I work in the field of after language technology and a speech technology. And i worry about. How can we make technology accessible to people across the board irrespective of language that they speak so natural language processing artificial intelligence speech technology. These are very big. Was there buzzwords right now. Everybody's talking about what exactly is an lp or natural language processing so very simple term. This is the part of computer science engineering that makes machines process understand and generate natural language. Which is the language that humans speak when you are interacting with a bought trying to book your tickets or flight tickets when you are speaking to a voice based digital assistant in your phone. It's natural language processing that underpins the entire technology. That makes that work. But how does this work. How does nlp work in a very very basic way. It's about data so a huge amount of data. How actually humans use language is then processed by certain algorithms and techniques that make the machines learn the patterns of natural language of humans. Right these days another buzzword that you hear a lot about this deep neural networks and these are the advanced techniques that underpin a lot of the stuff that happens right now and i will not go into the details of how that works with thing that you really have to understand and keep in mind. Is that all of. This requires a humongous amount of data

Academia Microsoft India
Interview With Arnaub Chatterjee, Senior Vice President At Acorn AI

Outcomes Rocket

02:16 min | Last month

Interview With Arnaub Chatterjee, Senior Vice President At Acorn AI

"Thanks so much for joining us. Yeah thanks for the opportunity. Great to be with you. Yes so talk to us a little bit about about you or not. What is it about health care that inspires you to stay focused on the field shirt. So i guess if i start off on a personal note i would say that medicine and health care are very much embedded in my in my dna. I come from a line of physicians that spans multiple generations and grew up with these stories of different patient encounters. Different clinical settings. So everyone my grandfather. My father my sister. My brother-in-law are all either physician or health services. Researchers are both could imagine that are thanksgiving discussion. They're pretty much heated. You know conversation over the state of health policy. Today you know type of my family. I had the opportunity to see across the healthcare system in in various roles over the last ten twelve years now and and kind of had a bite in in consulting in pharma in the government space in academia and. I think the thing that that keeps me going is that have been fortunate to be part of you. Know what. I what. I call these. The health dare movement and be they're gonna pivotal changes or sort of tectonic shifts in our healthcare system. I'm gonna happen within the last decade and kind of fundamentally transform the industry but also kind of thinking about how the healthcare system as a whole as evolving so some of the stuff that you you mentioned in my bio whether it was working on the affordable care act which was such a you know important piece of legislation or being part of of some of these larger data and technology movements even through the lens of the government big things that happened over the last several years and then more recently you know when i was at merck I had a chance to better understand what's commonly called. now it's real world data. Which is everything happening. Outside of data and clinical trials. And could that tie into improving economics research within that company. And i guess my most recent inflate of experiences are really pushing towards. How do you to move the needle in pharma research and development. And how do you better understand. Where data science and technology intersect with that changing space. So the the totality of everything. If you think about how interconnected the system is having those experiences. I have kind of shaped You know my my thinking now and really to where we are today. So that's been fun intents and kind of an inspirational experience to date for me. And i'm excited to continue development.

Pharma Academia Merck
"academia" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

06:38 min | Last month

"academia" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Really want to share. Maybe what if if you have seen changes between when you went through grad school or university and what you see happening today in terms of you know being a woman being a woman of color being being non binary woman of color. Can you talk a little a little bit about the good things that you're seeing happening and how they compared to maybe some experiences that you've had. Yeah yeah so so i. I did identify as women for most. I've always identified as gender queer. But like i've i've occupied women's spaces and had that experience for most of a career and i. It's it's a tough question so it's changed and it hasn't changed. There are definitely. I've seen a lot more top down. I've seen a lot more Administration and kind of structural changes that go in positions. The committee Just this focus on evaluating truly evaluating. How faculties students are are engaging in participating in diversity in in most importantly inclusive efforts which is a cultural shift Not just numerical ship. So i've seen a lot more of that and that's really great. I think it's feel personally. It might just be where. I am in my career and the kind of accolades. I have behind me at this point. But i feel much more comfortable speaking out when something is not okay than i did before I feel like even. If i was an i often am the only black person in the room and somebody says something and no pun intended off color. I feel like if i were to stand up and say something. My white colleagues would be in support rate. That's something that. I think certainly didn't happen to grad school for so that's nice. I like to see that. But then there's also i think we haven't quite had the collective realization about how much has to change War to to actually make a truly inclusive environment And so in that frame. There's kind of like at the individual level at at like the bottom up like who however we rallying to really care about that that's still lacking again because i think we frankly just don't sit down and have the practice of thinking about what the future is. What's it gonna look like. What's what's the classroom physically going to look like. what's lecture actually going to contain. How all of these things. It really sit down and quantify so much scientists as thinkers. But we're not sitting down to quantify what that actually what's it gonna look like. What the end result. How do we actually predict. There's no practice of that And so it's kind of like this. Big hand wavy gray mass. We're like yeah. We're making it better but you. You can't actually make it better if you don't have a goal in mind and so there we really need to see that progress still feels like we need to have some inclusiveness you x. specialist user experience versus to kind of model. What it's going to actually feel like for the for the users war in this case the the students. Yeah question are there. You've you've had to clearly from what you're saying deal with some some some difficulties some exclusion in or you know in your in your path. But were their strategies. Were there things you did or poor people in your path that that were helpful and that you can You know the yeah. They were helpful with that. And are there. Is there some advice for someone who's now at this institution or even in this group sometimes. It's just there's group dynamics writers group culture that is those somehow not so accepting and and that's that's difficult. Is there some advice you can give based on your experience of overcoming these obstacles and coming out stronger after yeah and my advice is echoed by research have a support group has abort group has support group having support group. Have people you can go and go back to your base code. Go back to that natural language. Drop your guard you know. Be yourself be really comfortable. You gotta have those the especially as any sort of minorities especially as intersectional a have your support group for intersectional people. I will acknowledge it. Super hard like for me. For example. Black spaces aren't always queer friendly spaces. Queer friendly spaces aren't always black friendly spaces as really hard thing to navigate. Still even if you're not fully relaxed even if you can't find a black. We are space for example at combination. Even those little bits that you get steps to single person even it goes so far There was one fellow who i think about as mentor. I can't i know his name is added. can't remember his last name but he was a new faculty. he was working in molecular biology at u. Dub i was in bio so we were in the same hallway and i would see him in the hallway. We kinda wave at each other walking by and then when he pulled me aside we just started chatting and anytime i saw him. We would just like stop in the hallway and chat for two or three minutes. Maybe we got a coffee and it was just this idea. It really created this sense of of of culture for meaning academia of what. I really nurtured a thing i needed. And it set the precedent right. Like here's someone. When i see someone frequently you're part of my community. I should have relationship with you to some degree and so in that that. That's someone that i think about a lot. That's a it's a behavior. I think about a lot. How can i bring that forward And i think things like that are also really important like looking at how people give you the cultural needs. Meet your cultural needs and how you can help that with some. Bring that to somebody else.

david Colorado Chaz colorado Mendez chaz today atlas institute cu boulder single parent papa peachy each Latino latino Twenty four seven steam Black dr z. denver fort collins one half
Building a More Diverse and Inclusive Academia With Shaz Zamore

Papa Phd Podcast

06:38 min | Last month

Building a More Diverse and Inclusive Academia With Shaz Zamore

"Really want to share. Maybe what if if you have seen changes between when you went through grad school or university and what you see happening today in terms of you know being a woman being a woman of color being being non binary woman of color. Can you talk a little a little bit about the good things that you're seeing happening and how they compared to maybe some experiences that you've had. Yeah yeah so so i. I did identify as women for most. I've always identified as gender queer. But like i've i've occupied women's spaces and had that experience for most of a career and i. It's it's a tough question so it's changed and it hasn't changed. There are definitely. I've seen a lot more top down. I've seen a lot more Administration and kind of structural changes that go in positions. The committee Just this focus on evaluating truly evaluating. How faculties students are are engaging in participating in diversity in in most importantly inclusive efforts which is a cultural shift Not just numerical ship. So i've seen a lot more of that and that's really great. I think it's feel personally. It might just be where. I am in my career and the kind of accolades. I have behind me at this point. But i feel much more comfortable speaking out when something is not okay than i did before I feel like even. If i was an i often am the only black person in the room and somebody says something and no pun intended off color. I feel like if i were to stand up and say something. My white colleagues would be in support rate. That's something that. I think certainly didn't happen to grad school for so that's nice. I like to see that. But then there's also i think we haven't quite had the collective realization about how much has to change War to to actually make a truly inclusive environment And so in that frame. There's kind of like at the individual level at at like the bottom up like who however we rallying to really care about that that's still lacking again because i think we frankly just don't sit down and have the practice of thinking about what the future is. What's it gonna look like. What's what's the classroom physically going to look like. what's lecture actually going to contain. How all of these things. It really sit down and quantify so much scientists as thinkers. But we're not sitting down to quantify what that actually what's it gonna look like. What the end result. How do we actually predict. There's no practice of that And so it's kind of like this. Big hand wavy gray mass. We're like yeah. We're making it better but you. You can't actually make it better if you don't have a goal in mind and so there we really need to see that progress still feels like we need to have some inclusiveness you x. specialist user experience versus to kind of model. What it's going to actually feel like for the for the users war in this case the the students. Yeah question are there. You've you've had to clearly from what you're saying deal with some some some difficulties some exclusion in or you know in your in your path. But were their strategies. Were there things you did or poor people in your path that that were helpful and that you can You know the yeah. They were helpful with that. And are there. Is there some advice for someone who's now at this institution or even in this group sometimes. It's just there's group dynamics writers group culture that is those somehow not so accepting and and that's that's difficult. Is there some advice you can give based on your experience of overcoming these obstacles and coming out stronger after yeah and my advice is echoed by research have a support group has abort group has support group having support group. Have people you can go and go back to your base code. Go back to that natural language. Drop your guard you know. Be yourself be really comfortable. You gotta have those the especially as any sort of minorities especially as intersectional a have your support group for intersectional people. I will acknowledge it. Super hard like for me. For example. Black spaces aren't always queer friendly spaces. Queer friendly spaces aren't always black friendly spaces as really hard thing to navigate. Still even if you're not fully relaxed even if you can't find a black. We are space for example at combination. Even those little bits that you get steps to single person even it goes so far There was one fellow who i think about as mentor. I can't i know his name is added. can't remember his last name but he was a new faculty. he was working in molecular biology at u. Dub i was in bio so we were in the same hallway and i would see him in the hallway. We kinda wave at each other walking by and then when he pulled me aside we just started chatting and anytime i saw him. We would just like stop in the hallway and chat for two or three minutes. Maybe we got a coffee and it was just this idea. It really created this sense of of of culture for meaning academia of what. I really nurtured a thing i needed. And it set the precedent right. Like here's someone. When i see someone frequently you're part of my community. I should have relationship with you to some degree and so in that that. That's someone that i think about a lot. That's a it's a behavior. I think about a lot. How can i bring that forward And i think things like that are also really important like looking at how people give you the cultural needs. Meet your cultural needs and how you can help that with some. Bring that to somebody else.

Grad School Or University
Cognitive Neuroscience in the Classroom with Dr Louise Allen Walker

Emma & Tom's PGCE Podcast

04:10 min | Last month

Cognitive Neuroscience in the Classroom with Dr Louise Allen Walker

"Welcome back everyone. To marin. Tom talk teaching. I am pleased to say that we are joined remotely today by another guest. A new guest to the podcast. So i'd like to extend a very warm. Welcome to dr louise allen walker. Welcome our great. Thanks very much. Thank you feel like on the radio. You kind of our. I'd like to see you. Yeah it's it's not the magic of live radio maybe one day. We'll we'll do that. Put the fear of god into our guest. St louis from the residents used the first place to start is that maybe you could tell listeners about your background and education. You actually work with us which probably say that off the bat. You're one of our colleagues although we haven't seen you in person in some months now it's been a long time a really highs so tell us about you. You'll patterns education and academia and the programs that you work on cardiff met absolutely so my specialist area is cognitive neuroscience On i did my phd at benghazi novosti on a it looked at this topic. So i use brain stimulation to look at predictive language function in an area of the brain. The everyone sort of thought did mussa planning but actually it. It really plays a predictive role in a bunch of different processes. and then what. I was doing my phd. I lecture alongside at bangor. And then once i finished my phd. I came here and that was just david three years ago and here i work on to program so i work on the undergraduate education psychology and special educational needs program and then also work. And i'm the program director for the msc psychology and education Which is bps credited on on. Both of those programs presumably teach topics around cognitive psychology near science cognitive neuroscience and research methods as well. So this is interesting for us because you know we. We hearing tombs like cognitive science new science things like that being thrown around in debates around teaching and you know how we how we teach effectively and it can be a little bit intimidating subdued tend to like to use that as a kind of way of saying i'm right and you're wrong so let's let's get right down to counter basics here. Can you explain to us what we actually mean before. We start getting into some of the really fun debates. What do we actually mean by cognitive neuroscience. Okay so in. When psychologists talk about commissions. Let's break out time down cognitive neuroscientists when when you think about cognition firstly. What we're thinking about is mental processes really so cognitive psychology and the study of cognition predates most while many of the sort of common biological measures. So back when we couldn't put someone in an scanner we would look at them mental processes as best. We could using behavioral measures on what i mean by mental processes. A things like for example learning memory. Attention problem solving all these of internal processes that that happened inside all minds and cognitive psychology. Obviously try to understand those processes as best as possible on on would trion model how they felt those processes worked so of step by step. What happens in you know. Just something simple like when you perceive an image. What are the steps that occur in that process and cognitive neuroscience is the study of the underlying biological and brain related processes that underpin those mental processes so. I saw joining together to fields. If he like

Dr Louise Allen Walker Mussa Msc Psychology And Education W Marin Benghazi St Louis Cardiff TOM Bangor David
Mental Health And Matcha Lattes With Dr. Vania Manipod

The WoMed

05:46 min | 2 months ago

Mental Health And Matcha Lattes With Dr. Vania Manipod

"Hi mana pod. Welcome to the wo- med. I'm so excited to have you here. And it's almost international women's day and it will be actually when this episode airs. I'm really excited for that. But i guess off the bat. How are you going to celebrate. I am going to actively participate in the campaign. i love the theme. i think it's hashtag. Choose to challenge. Oh okay yeah. I saw that on the website. Say oh every year i try and think what can i do to promote that day. And the ball is to encourage women and men to kind of like post different ways they plan to challenge and call out gender bias and inequality when they see it and in my opinion it's also kind of trying to find ways that we could each try and figure out you know look within also because i know competition among women is pretty common also to kind of think about if there's times that prevent us from trying to promote other women's accomplishments like what is going on within us to overcome bat. 'cause we're stronger together so got to figure that out we really are and you know it's something that i've i've struggled with two. You know i've felt threatened before about different women. You know coming into this space and starting podcast cinema. Why am i so threatened like there's room provinces totally goes against what. I'm trying to do here. So no like just changing that within myself to has been really cool growth wise and just to try and make space for other women right but i will say it's. It's kind of a struggle. At least you know with while that. I've been dealing within my damned especially during the whole election stuff like that is if i don't like someone else's views and they happen to be a woman. I get attacked with well. I thought you supported all women. And it's like that. That's not what does not what it means again. You cannot like what someone stands for and you can be vocal about that right exactly. You're not you're not alone on this actually something that i've done the work on even therapy to kind of figure out. Why why do i get so down. If i see someone who's doing more women who is doing more than me right right. No that kinda some. If we're going to elevate others that's just we gotta do the work right to figure that out right. I will also say this is. Sometimes i get on tangents. But i saw that. You're fellow macho lover. I am too i have. I make my own macho every single day. And what's your favorite milk to put in a macho a lot. Today i love that question. I i i love like the plant milk so much better. They are and i don't get the stomach aches so i like oatmeal but also combine it sometimes with cashew academia. Okay i might have to try that. I've combined oaten coconut before. And let's really lovely. Yes i do that. sometimes too. It's nice to mix it up every now and that is but i feel like they give you like this even better. Nuttier lynn creamier. Just oh it's so good it's just really good. Yeah i love that. You're a macho lover. So can i ask one question. Yeah i will leave it. 'cause i can go on tangents on macho also yeah. What is your favorite macho powder. The tea shop. That i was getting my macho from got demolished in the tornado. And i haven't been able to get it in over a year. So i will like there on. What's the brand of it. I found it on amazon. It's a little white ten ceremony or so many. there's so many but ones that i hate. It's like i think it's like this sunpower brand or something. It was like it was like almost a yellow. This is not like green tea. This tastes like dirt. Guess this is so funny and for all of you. This mental health related because macho. has some benefits on lessening anxiety compared to coffee. So it's relevant it does. It makes me so calm. And i never fully understood have never been a coffee drinker. I never understood what drove people in the mornings. Feel like. don't talk to me until i've had my coffee. You know or like when they just take that first sip like oh it's so delicious because it's never been delicious to me. I hate like anything coffee. Flavored colusa mocha ice cream. Like tearma sue. I don't like it. Because i don't like the flavor but once once the macho hits my lips and i'm like okay. This must be what it's like. 'cause this it oh calming it is coming and i have to admit though right before the podcast. I did drink espresso. That's fine. i don't usually you joel. Kiviranta jolt and boost. Because it's monday. It is a monday. I had to ask myself this morning too because when my friends like yeah i start my new job on monday and i was like it's monday. Why are you talking to me right trying to get over that monday type monday blues trying to make it not so much of a thing but it's hard it is it is.

Oaten Lynn Creamier Tearma Sue Amazon Joel
Thousands of Microsoft Customers May Have Been Victims of Hack Tied to China

Start Here

01:45 min | 2 months ago

Thousands of Microsoft Customers May Have Been Victims of Hack Tied to China

"Over the last several months tens of thousands of computers have been hit by a series of acts in the last few days. The pace is escalating microsoft. Says that chinese hackers have been targeting. It's email server software using newly discovered bug that can on january sixth. The one most americans were paying attention to the insurrection at the capitol security experts. Say that's when the attacks began they were targeting holes in microsoft's exchange servers the service used by millions and millions of customers including huge important businesses. And at first those big groups appear to be the chief targets infectious disease researchers universities defense contractors law firms once microsoft figured it out they patch the bugs but this is where it gets even scarier. We are concerned that there are large number of victims and are working with our partners to understand the scope of this so companies with huge it departments obviously the immediately installed these patches but lots of other groups have been less attentive. They still haven't will in a final flurry. The hackers have quickly begun prodding thousands and thousands of clients on one of the most widely used email server systems in the world. This includes local governments. Police departments credit unions doctors offices school districts. Basically if your company did not update its servers last week. These hackers very well could have had the keys to your email. Everyone running these servers government private sector academia needs to act now to patch them the well-known group krebs on security says. The good news is this has nothing to do with that. Big solar winds. Hack a while back. That was by russians microsoft. This is the chinese. China denies this but the bad news is this is probably even more widespread at one point. This weekend wired reported that the victimless was growing by thousands every hour.

Microsoft Krebs China
How to Design your own Token System

Insureblocks

05:56 min | 2 months ago

How to Design your own Token System

"In this week's podcast. We will discuss how to design your own token system. And i'm very pleased to welcome back. Sherman version gear founder of token kitchen and author of token economy. Sherman come back to inch blocks for our listeners. Who haven't listened to our previous podcast. Could you please give them a quick introduction on yourself. yeah. I think you did a good job so i am token kitchen and i wrote a book called token economy and were given intrude into the web. Three and it's the game changing aspects socioeconomic aspects of the web three and its token is educations and I before that. I found that the blockchain helping berlin where we did a Years ago blockchain education in community building. I then went on to create a cryptic economics research institute at the university of economics. Where we're doing some applied research on the intersection of Startups and academia and I recently started token kitchen which is basically a continuation of the activities of the last year but Under a new brand Because we're now focusing not on blockchain or the web three but more on the token applications brilliant radar. Thank you for that. So as you remember from podcast. Nearly well about a year ago. The first question we always ask our guests is what is blockchain. And how does it work however when you answered this time. I'm curious to know how your definition of blockchain has evolved since our first podcast. i don't think it has evolved. i. I'm not sure how i answered last night but pretty much probably the. I'm going to answer this time. It's not about blockchain blockchain really it's an important backbone of this new generation internet which many referred to as the web three and does Blockchain is be important backbone because it's basically a blockchain network is a collectively maintained public infrastructure that where people are incentivized to keep the letter up-to-date in trustful manner and it is the backbone of this web three because it allows us to Collectively settled data transactions whether it's value transactions or other data flows On a tr- sherrod public infrastructure. That any everyone can trust instead of having you know. Private client server infrastructure where data is managed on stored behind the walled gardens of a server that belongs to a specific institution or private entity. While a few years ago. We were talking a lot about blockchain. Really the interesting thing is not blockchain. Blockchain brought us back in revolution in order to really have a decentralized web or web. Three win need other protocols The interesting application is the token right is end. The tokens are the killer. Applications of kind of the web three very similar to what websites were to the early internet in the nineteen nineties when the worldwide web came up. Great great so. I'll in our previous podcast entitled token economy. I i think it will be useful to revisit. You know what is a token. And whether different types of tokens if you could perhaps give a high level overview of that will be great place. yeah so basically I think when most people wouldn't probably even use the word token but probably cryptocurrencies. So we've talked on. Cryptocurrencies crypto assets but cryptocurrencies encrypted assets. Are specific types of tokens right. So a token can represent him money whether it's state issued money like people refer to that cbc but also a virtual currencies that were created in the web. Three which are referred to as cryptocurrencies tokens can also represent any type of asset such as a commodities But also physical assets Kind of Ah fundable assets like like art. Real estate We can really token is any virtual or real asset can be token nice than have a digital representative that is easily traded. But this is only one specific type of token tokens that are transferable from person to person. But there are also tokens. There are tied to our kind of identity identity of a person machine or an institution. These are personal. Data for example can You know were credentials certificates Token is managed by wallets so we don't need to create a new identities systems on every new service re register for so. We don't only have the tokens that we can treat that are transferable Will don't have you know that that we were. We can create market around these assets. They represent what we also have. A credential tokens that are tied to our identity or that have limited transfer abilities such as the flight tickets. You might be able to tickets can be tokenist. You might be able to transfer them Under specific conditions. But they're generally tied to your identity

Sherman University Of Economics Blockchain Blockchain Blockchain Berlin CBC
Faketinas

Locatora Radio

05:02 min | 2 months ago

Faketinas

"Get started with. I think this person or this story broke during the summer. it's kinda hard to tell now with the pandemic. what time is like but one other prominent ones that i remember seeing that wino- was flooding. Our timeline was the story of jessica. Craig aka or formerly known as jess la. Barletta cringe already awesome early known formerly known best. I'm about that. Let's get started. Let's talk about her. Yes so this woman has allegedly and apparently apparently been taking on different like black and afro sport identities throughout her life. She's an a professor or was a professor and academic where george washington university and university teaching. You know black studies are afrikaner studies and publishing books but at some point she were shifting from being in a north african to being african american and then being afro latin next sand after boaty gua was i think the final landing place for her her official forum her final warm so jessica. Krog just aka justifiable maleta hers combination of black fishing and being a fake tina at the same time and She got called out basically rightfully so rightfully so by a group of professors who are after latina's who had issues with her they were witness to or on the receiving end of like aggression from her and like prejudice and bad behavior while she was masquerading as after let nine different contexts. Apparently being super like belligerent towards black women in my on cool and really I think overcompensating and so trying to be an ex sorted extreme caricature of like this south bronx like her. Allegedly her mother was like a drug addicts prostitutes like this narrative that should created about herself so black women in the academy you know began talking about these different experiences and came forward and said This is not right. Yeah she was definitely performing like whoa kness being extreme radical like it was very performative. She was a published academic author and she also received a ton of accolades rice. She received she was a finalist. For the twenty twenty frederick douglass prize book prize presented by yale's gilder lehrman center the study of slavery resistance and abolition. She also was nominated or a finalist for the twenty thousand nine. Harriet tubman book prize and just received a ton of accolades has really been propelled or was propelled forward and questionably hired because of not solely for her identity. But because of the work she was doing and also the way. She positioned herself as offer latino or body gua and it's very cringe to think about all of the opportunities she stole from actual author. Latinas boras caribbean women. That are doing if not the same work or better work you know. And so it's that was probably one of the first ones that we saw. And then i think it kind of just opened up the floodgates for a lot of others than i don't know about you ma. But in my chicano studies department at uc santa barbara. There were a couple of fake denies that i will not name. They were not. They weren't anyone that i took like. I didn't take any classes with them but they were around. People talked about them. People knew like this person is very white claims this this cheek. Ghana mohican identity. You know is wide. Skin blue is performing she gun. You know some kind of ghana identity wearing that. I had because with the free that carlo ecstatic the whole thing right and it's like you like i they weren't. They were my peers. I was a student right. But i have friends that were graduate students. And they would tell me about these. Things happen. And in their cohort or in their in their seminars. And so you know. I think if if you've been in academia right. I haven't been to grad school. But i was an undergrad but i've i've definitely seen the fake tina's around so they definitely exists and i think this one opened the floodgates for a ton of

Craig Aka Jess La Boaty Gua Krog Jessica Barletta Yale's Gilder Lehrman Center George Washington University South Bronx Tina Latinas Boras Frederick Douglass Harriet Tubman Ghana Caribbean Santa Barbara Carlo Academia
How 2,000 Years Of Monetary History Led Us To Bitcoin, With Nik Bhatia

The Breakdown with NLW

06:02 min | 2 months ago

How 2,000 Years Of Monetary History Led Us To Bitcoin, With Nik Bhatia

"All right nick. Welcome to the breakdown. How you doing. I'm doing great. Thank you so much for having me. This should be superfund so as we were just discussing following your writing forever. I loved seeing it. Come together in kind of the the full length form In what i wanted to do today is actually kind of go back through history. And i think what layered money does so well is it gives people the context understand this rather than kind of just being like. Here's why bitcoin is awesome. Bitcoin is amazing. Let's actually dig into the history of money that got us here. And so what. I thought would be really fun. Today is actually walk. The listeners through some of that history of money starting way back at the beginning But before that. I guess like start with defining the kind of the central term here the central concept of layered money since the name of the book. It's obviously a really important concept. What is layered money. Actually meet layered. Money is a new framework. And so what i did was i took this idea of assets and liabilities and in our monetary system the way that the way that the system works is that financial institutions have assets and liabilities. They have relationships with each other and through these relationships come. Monetary instruments and monitoring instruments. Because they are within these relationships between financial institutions there is a natural hierarchy there and so the hierarchy of monetary instruments is not something that is common commonly discussed at term. So my goal with layered money was to bring that to the forefront in instead of talking about liabilities talking about a pyramid of money in which there is a hierarchy and at top of the pyramid are certain financial instruments or commodities and certain financial institutions. Right below them using those assets as the base for a whole monetary system and so the idea for layer money actually came directly from a paper in academia called the inherent hierarchy of money by a economics. Professor merlin. And what he wrote was fat. Money is inherently hierarchy go and he provided this academic framework for this and he had a three layered system gold government currency and deposits so a three layer system and i found that paper so fascinating in. So what i did was. I actually tried to trace the roots of that paper. That paper didn't have a historical context. It was about the hierarchy of sheets in the financial system. What i did with layered money is. I tried to trace the roots of that paper and i ended up starting the story about eight hundred years ago in renaissance florence To describe how. I saw this evolution occurred so i wanna get into florence but you actually start the book even farther back. You kind of pull the earliest experiments with coinage kind of set it in historical context. So let's talk about in the sort of ad era. I guess those early experiments with money with coinage What were the important kind of steps on the journey to get to where we get in that in that kind of renaissance that early period. What were the important parts of the earliest phases that you're looking at. So the transition between gold and gold coins is what identified as the first important transition so before gold coins gold was used golden. Silver were used as mediums of exchange. But it was in the form of non standardized fars jewelry etc these days gold and silver items but not necessarily uniform in their measure in weight. So the coin. The coin did was it. Changed this idea that we can to measure or gold and silver. Every time we transacted with each other. Because now the coin that i that you recognized you have acquired that i recognize. I know how much your coin as you know how much mike ways and so we can change We can exchange a lot quicker than if we didn't have the coin so that was very important advance in that happened for the first time. Several hundred years before a renaissance florence in actually in ancient libya which is in modern day turkey so after the after we start getting gold coins then we actually see the greek in the roman empire's us coins To admit coins and to use these coins in order to expand their empires and exert their influence over their subjects and what we saw the roman empire was really example devaluation so this idea that a government can come in mint coin but then the next year put less gold. Silver in the coin and progressively keep cheapening the currency But tried to really get away with this idea that the currency that the issue this year is the same as the currency that they issued ten years ago which had twice as much silver or golden and so the manipulation of currency at through government started to happen as well Along the signed before we get into the rasul's

Professor Merlin Bitcoin Nick Libya Mike United States Rasul
The Creation Of The Magnificent Makers

Short Wave

07:38 min | 2 months ago

The Creation Of The Magnificent Makers

"The griffis the author of the magnificent makers children's book series in the main characters violet and pablo are transported to an alternate world with awesome lab. We're talking robots cool bugs an anti gravity chamber there. They have to make their way through a maze by solving science based problems. Each challenge has three levels and they have one hundred and twenty maker minutes to make it through the maze. Otherwise they don't get the chance to come back. I didn't realize they didn't get the chance to come back. That's high state. Yeah yeah and these kids love science so they they have so much fun on these adventures but they have to be able to finish them in time if they wanna come back. Each book explores a different topic. There's one on brain biology one on sound. The one i liked best is about ecosystems in years one of my favorite parts of the magnificent makers as the reader you solve puzzles and riddles right alongside the characters and in each book. There's instructions on how to build something in that building or making was really important to the n. so science basically has two parts right kind of intellectual part where you're learning and you're thinking but then it has this very hands on part which is the doing so whether you're a biologist or an engineer or physicist you're usually making something like research is literally do and so. I felt that it was really important to kind of combine those two with these books right. They have you know kind of the sacks that the kids learn but then these activities that encourage the doing part of science as well. Yeah well. I think the way that science is taught in early. Education is often this memorization of facts. Stuff that other people have learned you know. And and you and i both know that sciences process set of rules to observe intestine problem solve. So was that really important to you in in the book. Yes definitely and it also shows kids you know. Just how fun science is. I think my favorite part of science is the doing being in the lab. Tinkering doing my experiments. You know seeing that positive result. It's just. There's really not something that i can compare it to in terms of that. Something that gives me that boost of adrenaline that science adrenaline talk about. So which character do you feel like you identify with the most. I'm gonna have to save violet. Foreshore little bit more of a daredevil. She's a little bit more of a kind of you know i'm going to do this. Nothing's going to stop me. You know pablo is a little bit more on the pragmatic side. He's a little bit more. Maybe i wouldn't say necessarily cautious but just you know he's the one that's always looking at his watch making sure that people are on time and making sure that you know that such a pablo making sure that they're getting through the maze. On-time environment is to reckless. But she's just a little bit more a little bit more carefree. And if i'm being perfectly honest with myself i definitely have a lot of pablo to right. That's what keeps me orderly. You know an organized you know. But i think my core and my essence has more of that like sco for it. Do it kind of side. Which is maybe how. I got into writing these books in the end right right sure. Well you know i noticed. So violent is a black girl who loves science and dreams of running her own lab one day. You're a neuroscientist as well as an author. And i'm wondering if in some ways this book was kind of like a little bit of a love letter to a younger you mo- currently most definitely not just a younger me. It's really a love letter to all kids who didn't necessarily see themselves in science rolls when they were growing up when they thought of a scientist they didn't picture someone who looked like them or came from where they came from or who had a unique feature that that's not what they were taught a scientist was and it's one hundred percent a love letter to my younger self as well as a love letter to. You know all the kids out there who just wanna do science and don't want to be told that they can't. Yeah i mean. I have to imagine it felt like good for the soul to write a children's book about kids of color who not only are engaged in science. But they're like really good at it cashing. Yes exactly because there's these concepts of what a scientist looks like in who is kind of naturally good at science. I think and someone you know who just kind of what they're born to do and that often does not include you know black and brown kids. I think black and brown kids are taught that we're strong where tough we can overcome. You know hardship which is which are all true things but we're also curious we're also creative. We're also excited about learning how the world works around us. You know and i wanted to really highlight that and i want to mention to that. I don't focus at least at this point in the series a lot on the kids races. I want that to just be a given you know. I don't want that necessarily that to be the topic of conversation per se. I just want them to be them to be care. Free to be out there doing love science and this. Isn't you know just for young kids of color to see. I think this is also important for white children to see the fact that there are kids of color who are also just carefree and doing science. I think representation matters for everyone. You know. it's not just important for young kids of color to see themselves. I think is important for all kids to see young kids of color you know doing science and kick him but at it. Y- yeah so. I kinda wanna talk a little bit about you in this process a little bit because you know when i was academia. There was definitely a hesitancy around putting a ton of time into outreach. Doing things that weren't quote real science. Were you worried at all. About what your peers might think of us spending time writing these books. Yes i mean yes and no. I've done outreach at museums with local libraries. And i've never felt pushback against those kind of activities but this is a little bit different because you know there. Are you know authors. Who are one hundred percent authors right and i am not a one hundred percent author. I'm also an active researcher. And so i was a little bit worried that it would be interpreted as me. You know just kind of taking on a new career and putting science on the back burner. And that's not what i aim to do. You know. I guess. That's the violet in me. I do both you know. I'm still going to be an active researcher. And i'm going to pursue these books actively because i think that they're both important you know as a black woman in science who is an academic science. I don't wanna leave this position. There aren't enough of us.

Pablo Griffis
What To Do When a Patient Feels Worse on an Antidepressant

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

01:34 min | 2 months ago

What To Do When a Patient Feels Worse on an Antidepressant

"When a patient says they feel worse on an antidepressant. The first thing to do is to rule out physical side effects like nausea fatigue and insomnia one to pay attention to is academia as patients might have difficulty describing this inner sense of restlessness which is more often associated with anti psychotics but academia can occur on antidepressants as well particularly serota. Energetic ones and agatha can cause anxiety insomnia even suicide -ality so it might be the reason that they're mood is worse on an antidepressant dot in how concert energetic antidepressants calls academia. I thought it was caused. By dopamine blockade it is thought that the inhibitory effects of serotonin have indirect effects on the dopamine system and that it can lead to dopamine antagonism there in the stratum another side effect. that's related to academia. You might see on sarah. Synergetic antidepressants is restless. Legs syndrome which is almost like academia night. If that happens you could add gabba. Penton or pramod. Pack saul both of which treat restless legs in academia and both of which have psychiatric benefits gabba. Penton helps sleep an anxiety and promo pack saul helps depression but another option would be the switch to be appropriate wellbutrin in a randomized controlled. Trial bupropion treated restless leg syndrome. Even when it was dosed in the morning perhaps through its dopaminergic

Nausea Fatigue Serota Insomnia Legs Syndrome Penton Pramod Sarah Academia Depression
What To Do When a Patient Gets Worse on an Antidepressant

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

01:34 min | 2 months ago

What To Do When a Patient Gets Worse on an Antidepressant

"When a patient says they feel worse on an antidepressant. The first thing to do is to rule out physical side effects like nausea fatigue and insomnia one to pay attention to is academia as patients might have difficulty describing this inner sense of restlessness which is more often associated with anti psychotics but academia can occur on antidepressants as well particularly serota. Energetic ones and agatha can cause anxiety insomnia even suicide -ality so it might be the reason that they're mood is worse on an antidepressant dot in how concert energetic antidepressants calls academia. I thought it was caused. By dopamine blockade it is thought that the inhibitory effects of serotonin have indirect effects on the dopamine system and that it can lead to dopamine antagonism there in the stratum another side effect. that's related to academia. You might see on sarah. Synergetic antidepressants is restless. Legs syndrome which is almost like academia night. If that happens you could add gabba. Penton or pramod. Pack saul both of which treat restless legs in academia and both of which have psychiatric benefits gabba. Penton helps sleep an anxiety and promo pack saul helps depression but another option would be the switch to be appropriate wellbutrin in a randomized controlled. Trial bupropion treated restless leg syndrome. Even when it was dosed in the morning perhaps

Nausea Fatigue Serota Insomnia Legs Syndrome Penton Pramod Sarah Academia Depression
How the Virtual Office Could Replace the Physical One

WSJ Tech News Briefing

09:27 min | 3 months ago

How the Virtual Office Could Replace the Physical One

"It's another monday in the world of remote work depending on. When you're listening to this you might be going up for another day of sitting in front of your computer in your zoom sweater. Trying to get stuff done by video conference. We're of course familiar with the challenges of remote work already. Big recalls can be awkward and inefficient in. Its part to replace the serendipity of running into someone in the break room but lately some new services have been trying to solve those issues with virtual office. Spaces are columnist. Christopher mims visited one himself and he joins me now to talk about what he saw. Hey christopher thanks for being here. Thank you for having me. So you've visited the virtual offices of id corporate. They were using space through a service called gather. Can you talk about what that experience like. I visited a number of corporate offices in my time so it was strange to visit of virtual office reminded me of real world ones. Which are you know. Kind of whimsical lake airbnb. They have all their conference rooms. Which are modeled after various apartments on airbnb so being in a virtual office where there were desks and conference rooms and you know stage for people to give talks and a cafeteria and a bar and the office is actually in a castle and there's a beach it was really funny. How even though. I'm walking around with my avatar. I felt in some sense. Like i was there. And maybe that's you know decades of playing video games. But i also think that there is a lot to be said for the way that video games. They're designed over. Decades has been refined to really tap into innate abilities that we have so for example in our brains we have place cells which are physical analogues. It's an individual neuron lights up when you go to a place and you can see this on the brain of a rat when it's traveling through maze for example or if you talk to people who win the annual world memory championship a lot of them. What called memory palaces. You imagine a house and you walk through and you place the object. You wanna memories in the house that works so well because we have this huge section of our brain which is devoted to place and geography and navigating in three dimensional space. We just don't use it with our existing interfaces communicating remotely. So when i went into a virtual tutti office and started walking around the thing that really struck me was like oh my god. I'm using more of brain and it feels more natural so when i'm in a virtual h. A hosted on for example gather. It's very easy. I just use my arrow keys. And i'm moving in two dimensions link in legend zelda and at the same time they have incorporated sort of the minimum requirements for communicating in that space as we would in a real one and one of the spatial audio of my avatar is next somebody else's avatar. We can talk freely in these little bubbles just like we went through video chat you know if we walk away from each other the sound fades and dies complete so you can create these clusters of conversation or you can walk up to somebody in the hallway and have chat with them. That's private or you go into a room. Only people in the room can hear each other. So this allows you know based on my interviews with the people who are working in this these types of spaces this kind of more spontaneous collaboration link. We're used to in an office at the same time because you can make yourself more or less available you can turn off your camera. You can say i'm away. You're not tethered to your desk. As he would be in a physical space going to this office it just it really struck me how quickly i was able to interview a lot of people just by walking up to them and that just doesn't work with the friction of you know. Zoom call words like. Oh where's the link. Okay here logging in. I'm waiting for you to log in. is everybody here. Oh you're muted just all of that. Extra friction really gets in the way of spontaneous communication. I think and gather is one of a number of companies offering similar services. Just how widespread are these types of platforms and how are companies using them. There are a lot of companies using them. I mean one of the biggest ones which is called remo remote dot co. they're used a lot for events. They told me that they have multiple hundreds of thousands of monthly active users. Spatial chat claims similar figures. You know they have people using them. From every big chunk of money you could imagine plus boeing and a bunch of other fortune five hundred companies. Not all of which are paying members because of course they all have a freemium tier so it is. Nasa sent hundreds of thousands of monthly active users. But if you're having a few big events that could only be a few dozens or hundreds of individual companies but has impressed me that the biggest ones by just traffic are bootstrapped. And they're like look. We already making revenue. We don't need investment because we are just were able to pay our server bills from people signing up that is of course a very powerful signal that something is sticky. And it's working if you can get to revenue if you can go from nothing to a product that is making money in nine months. That's a very compelling space generally sounds like a lot of users and how all these companies using these types of platforms. It sounds like it might just be more about special events than it is about you know putting in your full nine to five from the virtual office. I think rate now. The initial use case for most companies and organizations is events because partly that allows them to dip their toe. It's low commitment. I mean if you're going to have a holiday party. In one of these people have to adapt their work style to spend a couple of hours walking around some virtual space so companies using it to work in. I think are in the minority. I've also heard interesting. Use cases lake people holding scientific meetings. And the they build out this big hall. And then everybody's standing in front of their scientific poster and anybody who's ever been to a science meeting or a medical meeting knows that that is the central ritual for disseminating new data and information also just like meeting people in your field and it's the science fair for adults but it's really important in in academia so it's been interesting that so many universities and other institutions seem to be using it for those kind of events others are using it for parties summer using it just to replace what people the old the stuff that we all used to go to in convention centers. Where you'd go to a talk but the real substance of it is having coffee or drink with somebody over chris. I can put on my cynical hat for a second. During the pandemic i feel like workers are struggling with zoom fatigue and with the sort of always on mentality that comes with being full remote. These services seem to require more presents out of employees and and that seems like a potential challenge. I think as with zoom as with slack where we were promised. This is the future. Remember where it can then once you once you're kind of forced to use like really high doses of these things you really run into their limitations and you get zoom fatigue or slack on or whatever you wanna call it. I think that the same could be true for these on the other hand. I think that there is the potential for them to be the next evolution. That makes it a little bit more. Sustainable i remote work experts. I talked to cautioned against companies saying. Oh this tool is gonna solve our problem for us at base. I think the real challenge with remote work is companies need to establish a bunch of new norms in some ways. Very different from what we are used to in an in person office where norms can be established by as moses have to be more deliberate and you know whether or not you're using a virtual each q. Being forced to everyone share what they're working on in some kind of document that can be accessed a synchronous all those little nuances of what it takes to make a really functional. Remote workforce work. That doesn't go away. The tool doesn't solve for that automatically. But maybe it makes it a little bit easier so it sounds like you think this is something that might be here to stay as we move into at least a more heavily remote workforce in the future absolutely. I also think that ultimately we're building toward kind of a more complete fusion of the internet and real life through the mediums like augmented reality in some ways. I think we're laying the tracks now for that so the more we get used to collaborating remotely through all these tools the more natural it will seem to toggle between what we're doing in the real world what we're doing on the internet via other things like our glasses are vr. Headsets are ever more mobile. Devices are risk based whatever aren't. That's our tech columnist. Christopher mims thanks so much for joining me. Thank you for having me.

Christopher Mims Remo Remote Dot Co Christopher Boeing Nasa Academia Chris
"academia" Discussed on The Better

The Better

04:58 min | 4 months ago

"academia" Discussed on The Better

"Translators to our patients and if we are stuck in a in an environment or kind of like a mode of thought a motive being were not willing to or where we might be you know superficially are on the on the surface where we say. We're willing to try new things to apply new evidence as they as it comes out but we have these cognitive biases that are preventing us from doing this. We could potentially be doing a real disservice. Who are our patients our clients that are relying on us. Not just for us to touch them and feel better in the sense of physical therapy or chiropractors or something like that but really we could be doing them into service from giving them the knowledge and the skills that they need that they would benefit from to take charge of their own healthcare because ultimately what we want is to empower patients to become drivers in their own healthcare And i love the zach. And i were able to kind of have that conversation around the metrics that we use for pain and how we objectively quantify our clinical impact. And how even though that it might be quote unquote clinically significant for the patient. It a six or eight really doesn't make much difference. They're still in pain right. So i think i mentioned it before but i purchased a physical therapy clinic here in my home state in back of the tail. End of twenty twenty. This episode. I think is going to air and twenty twenty one but early parts of twenty twenty one and part of what really really excited me about getting back into private practice. I've been a consultant for years have been in academia. I've been really removed from direct hands on clinical work and part of. What really got me excited about buying this practice. Being able to be in a position again to affect patients lies in a in a real way is is this idea of empowering patients to become drivers in their own healthcare..

academia
Sarah Alcorn on her podcast "Ivy League Murders"

Too Many Podcasts!

03:37 min | 4 months ago

Sarah Alcorn on her podcast "Ivy League Murders"

"Of cambridge. And it's a super liberal bastion and growing up. I think part of part of what motivated us to do this. We really grew up in with harvard in our backyard. You know harvard square was our hangout places teens and so but i think for a lot of people the ivy league. Is you know as exotic as a place like hawaii. So that's part of the reason why we put this together was to to our whole premises. Basically got somebody really intellectually intelligent but emotionally not so much and so we see that time and time again and not everybody went to i. D league at some of the victims are actually from the ivy league is also. We're really trying to explore crimes. Crimes academia crimes of crimes. We always think of privilege is being this bubble where things like that can't happen. So that's what we're looking into and we're trying to just take true crime to next level and put a little bit philosophy or history or literature in there too because it is ib leak. And that's our niche actually with the ivy league murders. Hey it's the same kind of mystique as white people so fascinated with celebrities. They wanna know what happens when they're not in front of the camera. We all these scandals people are drawn to it in with an ivy league schools at. You might see these captains of industry or tech giants or whatever. They may turn out to be. You know what's what's going on. When they're out of the hollow they're not immune from human frailties which are know mental illness and drugs and alcohol an obsession and love and sax and money and greed. And all those all the things that motivate people to to make the ultimately bad decision of murdering somebody else. Did you think that some of the people who have that kind of education just will say the killer obviously that they thought that there was some sort of an entitlement. We find that quite a lot. In in fact some of the subjects that we look at a for example thinking of dr grindr which is one of our episodes absolutely brilliant doctor and he perpetrated a ridiculous crime sloppiest crime in you know so it does go into my theory that some people could be. They can be very intelligent in certain categories and then just suck Committing crimes. Do think. There's a lot of like entitlement or hubris or whatever you wanna call it where they think like. I'm so much smarter than everybody in these blue collar. Cops will never be a the solve this crime and it's like dude. You know the you did a terrible job on the crime. Sorry you know varied sloppy. That's one thing. We like to look at There is there's a famous writer. Dominic dunn really was fascinated with crime in privilege and is a great quote. and i'm paraphrasing. Can't remember the exact quote but that people are more interested in seeing kings fall than peasants. Basically in that the kind of you know serfs or whatever the phrase is that he says. I just think it applies to this as well because i think the presumption is when you go to an ivy league. Everything's perfect after that right. You make six figures year. Everything's taking care of van.

Ivy League Harvard Square Cambridge Harvard Dr Grindr Hawaii Dominic Dunn
"academia" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

05:27 min | 4 months ago

"academia" Discussed on Revision Path

"Now would you say your family kind of cultivated within you in terms of what you would end up doing with your life. Whether certain aspects they tried to push you towards or anything like that. Oh yeah i think so. Academia was a big part of it. I come from a culture where you know we were really the first my parents that was the first generation of folks going to college in my family and so because of that. They had an expectation that we would go to college. We didn't really come from a military family. Although we had some military in our family but the expectation was clear. Like you had eighteen. And you're either going to college going into the military or you're you're going to bag groceries at the local store and it was like. Wow okay so you know. It wasn't like so much pressure as much as it was just like an expectation because we've sacrificed. We did these things for you to to encourage you to go to school to try to get you in the best neighborhood we could and you you need to go to school you to go get your education. You need to get a job. A need to keep a job for as long as you can and earn earn earn. That was the push i would say. Sometimes you know that was the attitude. Nothing wrong with that. But that was sort of the the expectation for for many of us in including myself. Where i grew up. Yeah i know that feeling all too. Well i mean this was i think for me. It was and that's to completely make this all about comparisons or anything. But i know what you mean about that sort of push to make sure that what you're going into college for something that's going to be lucrative right less about. Yeah it's less about. Oh this is what i really liked to do or this passionate is..

Academia
Interview With Micah Larsen, Hilarious University Marketing Professor and Mom

Fancy Free Podcast

05:21 min | 5 months ago

Interview With Micah Larsen, Hilarious University Marketing Professor and Mom

"Thank you so much for being with me today. Thank you for having me joanne. Absolutely fill in the blanks. What did i miss about who you are and what you do. Oh boy. I am a montana toddler. Mama which means that. I spent my time outside. Four seasons of the year chasing my one year old around right now league us. My background is in social science. So i'm actually a trained social scientists in published research on persuasion so that was kind of made. I love if you will. I married my husband. Eric works medicine. And so this has been a very interesting time Yes australian co bed. I'm sure you can imagine for all of time spent apart. We have a one year old wilder. Tell me about how you came to be part time professor. Yes i went into academia. Because i love people in their brains since i came out of the womb. My parents would say that. I asked why about everything. Why why would you now. I understand as a mom myself. So i found that social science was the key to why people do what they do and i fell in love with the idea of studying people's brains and how we form relationships in dot world of communication research. There's as little tiny nisha research called social influence or persuasion. And so it's basically the science of how we get people to say yes to things and within that i researched health communication so basically how we get people to say yes to wear seatbelts or donate their organs or in my case have safe sex so like use a condom and that was a really interesting topic to study. Oh my gosh. that's so fascinating. Yeah i think. I missed my calling. I listened to several podcasts. That are along this line hidden. Brain and invisibly leah and i like revisionist history with malcolm. Glad well even. Though i know that he's more of an observer at he's not as much of a scientist but i just find anybody who thinks about humans and what they do and how their brains work in a different way or a unique and new way. I'm so fascinated with i. I just can't even get enough of it. So i love eating this. Yeah you hit. The nail on the had hidden brain is exactly my realm of study. I love it. And i actually wrote a blog post about one of his episodes about tunnel vision. I almost felt like it unlocked. A part of my understanding about other people that was missing about how people can make such terrible decisions because they're under duress and there's a whole episode. I think actually unsafe sex. And you're rational decision making in your thought process when you're sitting in your office chair. Drinking a cup of coffee talking to a girl felt like well. Of course. I would never put myself in harm's way but then when you're under the influence of infatuation and the moment somehow suddenly our brains make different types of decisions but that that episode about tunnel vision. There's so much more there. I think he just kind of grays. The tip of the iceberg on why people make unexpected unpredicted decisions and why people kinda dig themselves into a deeper when all of the outside observers are going wait. Why don't you just stop doing this and start doing this. But because they're already in that whole they just can't you know yacht. We get super married to our convictions. In so our brains are really uncomfortable with information that goes against our beliefs so we end up seeking out and believing information that even if it's not really good information as long as support previously held beliefs. We just roll with it. I haven't heard the tunnel vision episode but that sounds exactly like the type of research that was doing which kind of explains like people who believe that cohen is a really scary disease will contain to believe that more and more staunchly. Yeah they will reject data to the contrary they will collect data to the consistent. Exactly that is exactly the same thing we do with politics and so many things all right. Well let's do rapid fire questions. If you had to describe yourself in one word. What would it be bold awesome. What is your number. I'm in achiever. Which i think is a three with an individualist swing so achiever in midwest yes okay. So three wing four. Fold your baby. I love it. What is something unexpected. That has changed about you in the past few years so i became a mother which wasn't unexpected. Because i didn't know if. I wanted to have children but i became a mother in a very unexpected way which i'm sure we'll talk about. Yeah gosh. I can't wait to hear more about that. Wow becoming a mother is like the earth shattering and paradigm shifting. I opening and exhausting. What's the scariest thing you've ever done for fun moved to africa. Wow you did it for fun. And when was that twelve years ago. I was in college. Amazing and africa is a continent. Where were you in africa. Yes i was in ghana which is like no armpit carnival area of the west coast. So we're kind of curves.

Nisha Joanne Wilder Montana Eric Malcolm Cohen Midwest Africa Ghana West Coast
As vaccination begins, how can we convince hesitant Canadians to take the shot?

The Big Story

05:24 min | 5 months ago

As vaccination begins, how can we convince hesitant Canadians to take the shot?

"Sabina for miller is a clinical pharmacologist. She runs the pillar foundation for health. Care which helps to fund among other things. The delana school of public health institute for pandemics aloe subpoena old. Thank you for having the you're welcome. I think it's a really important conversation that we need to have today because people need to be armed with ways to convince people who were vaccine hesitant. Yes i completely agree and i think fat what really needs various as the fact that antibiotics are not this one big bucket their spectrum. You obviously have the ones that are completely untouchable. And nothing you say. Do really work to To address their fears. You know for instance. Was that child when you're the died of tetanus recently needed months in the hospital for recovery and barely made it but the parents still refuse the second dose of de tap these are these are really hard to reach and addressing their fears. Will frankly deplete you. But then there's also that other bucket the ones who are on the fence and these are people who are just constantly bombarded but fear based messaging the type of messaging that really affects them subconsciously. Very often there are new parents. They're worried about keeping their children save. They're fearful they're stuck in this analysis paralysis or getting this conflicting information from various sides. And they just don't know who to believe. I think addressing the fears that this subset of the vaccine hesitant folks have will be so critical in ensuring that there is a strong uptake off any of the vaccines that are currently in development and put. Where have you found a vaccine hesitant people congregate what are those groups and discussions like. Can you just describe the communities where where you see this happening. So are and so for me. I actually was exposed to these communities very recently. It was in two thousand seventeen when i had my son and parenting was whole new phenomenon. And so i joined all of these mom groups on facebook and that is really where for the very first time. I came across all of this vaccine. Misinformation and other scientific disinformation as well as a lot of sensational provocative content. That was being shared. So i started getting more involved with a lot of these. Evidence based type thing is given my background in science as well as some of the vaccine on fence groups these are large groups on on facebook they have upwards of fifty to one hundred thousand people in each of these groups and of course you have some of those that have been very hardcore antics groups but you also have several of the ones that are people who are just on the fence and just want more information and they just don't know how to navigate all the information that's coming to them and he went on on mom groups. I can tell you that. I moderate a very large evidence base parenting group and we have this questionnaire criteria to join our group and one of them is you know what is their stance on vaccines that i can tell you one in three people who are wanting to join our evidence space group Tells us they're hesitant about vaccines and they want more information and they're just not sure so it's a lot more pervasive than you know. Anyone actually thinks that the this this subgroup is as someone with your background in science and pharmacology. What was your reaction when you started joining these groups and found out how widespread that is. I was shocked. I have to say. I was absolutely shocked. I lived in this really nice echo chamber of science people. You know i. I worked in academia. I worked in by attack all the people of my friends my circle for all science space folks. We've never actually you know even remotely consider it. That vaccine hesitancy are antibiotics would be anything but a small cult group like that is what we thought was the case and and for me to to actually exposed to this being stope. I'd spread was a complete shock to my system. Which is why i realized look i have the background. I have the knowledge. This really is public service. Like this is something that people who are in. The scientists need to be advocating for we need to increasing the voice of science and take more space especially in in social media. Where for the most part public health messaging hasn't really been effective in coming across. And there's this huge dearth of information information that really needs to be addressed this massive gap and is really when i started Focusing and i remember when i joined these groups it'd be half an hour day. I would try to answer some questions and then after a while my husband basically said this is a full time job. You're spending hours and hours you know and it would be anything from addressing simple questions to actually writing documents to synthesize all be very complicated information out there too easy to understand like little packets of information and and that's really how i got started in this.

Pillar Foundation For Health Delana School Of Public Health Sabina Tetanus Miller Paralysis Facebook Academia
How We Study Alzheimer's and Potential Treatments

Healthcare Triage Podcast

04:44 min | 6 months ago

How We Study Alzheimer's and Potential Treatments

"We have two guests today. the first is alan pal quits. He is the senior research professor of medicine and president and ceo of the indiana biosciences research institute. Also joining us is bruce lamb. He is director of stark neuroscience institute. Welcome both of you. Thank you so we usually like to start off by asking people how they got to the position that they're in like how does one become a senior research professor of medicine allen and what is president and ceo of the indiana biosciences research institute. So if you could tell us a bit about what you do and how you got here so thank you very much earned so I think my experience has been somewhat atypical. In terms of coming into academia. I spent twenty eight years at the leeann. Company started off as a bench level. Scientists of medicinal chemist and eventually in my last eleven years woods the vice president discovery chemistry research and technologies where oversaw small molecule drug discovery across all the areas of therapeutic interests that lily so this was a very rich experience and and after being there for quite some time. I had the opportunity to make an early retirement at the end of two thousand seventeen. And i was thinking about my next steps and i had developed long relationship with a not shaker. Who the rhinos. The key leader here at a school of medicine and asked me to come over and help with the position. Health initiative than any perspective that i could provide in and input in you know things kind of transpired in i came over as a professor of medicine and eventually met bruce and you know a lot about our work together here in the past year and really create some great synergies and then as i spent some time that you another opportunity came up in in the community and this lousy indiana bioscience research institute which is an organization that really had a ton of blossomed out of a vision to really create additional note of innovative research and capabilities. That would draw the community together and diorite been around for about five or six years. And now i'm there to really help create additional bridges and create new scientific directions that really elevate The the sciences here in the mid west. And hopefully beyond great and bruce sort of what what has been your experience. How did you get to hear. Thanks a lot erin. So i'm a phd level basic scientist by training. I was at johns hopkins At case western. Reserve university. In cleveland clinic in doing science research into alzheimer's disease actually for my entire career and then I saw this unity to come to indiana in early. Two thousand sixteen to lead out this translational neuroscience research institute Stark neurosciences research institute. And it's a really unique Place that brings together. Clinicians basic scientists translational People now drug discovery as well sort of brings everybody together into one location to really do innovative and interdisciplinary research. So we wanted to talk today about alzheimer's disease. So i'd really like to start by just for our listeners. What is alzheimer's disease. Yeah so alzheimer's. Disease is obviously a brain disease And it was first described. And i think the history is important because it sort of still sort of how we've sort of you. The disease was described by a bavarian neuropathologist us alzheimer in early nineteen hundreds And he had a patient who had dementia sort of loss of memory She had paranoia clinical features that she had and then when she died Being a neuro pathologist he looked in her brain did standard stains at the time and described this unique brain pathology which still even today sort of defines the disease and that was primarily that there were two primary major neuro-pathological hallmarks that he observed in the brain tissue one where these amyloid Sort of the sticky substances which were aggregating in the brain and the other words what we currently today called neurofibrillary tangles which is another Brain pathology and even today it still sort of those two primary brain pathologies that are pathan demonic for alzheimer's disease. However i will say that as we've gotten into the modern age and in our began to understand the complexities reprieve that alzheimer's disease is a is a complex set of probably multiple disorders which are very related to one. Another but actually. There's probably not one set of alzheimer's disease out

Indiana Biosciences Research I Alan Pal Bruce Lamb Stark Neuroscience Institute Alzheimer's Disease Indiana Bioscience Research In Reserve University Bruce Translational Neuroscience Res Allen Johns Hopkins Erin Brain Disease Cleveland Indiana Paranoia Dementia
"academia" Discussed on Grounds

Grounds

06:38 min | 8 months ago

"academia" Discussed on Grounds

"Make a protest in one place, download the free anchor. GO TO ANCHOR DOT FM to get started. Last week on grounds. I don't like Donald, trump. Because, it's never liked me. Smooth yet bitter. The arrogance of its existence fills me with all the warmth of winter icicles interracial relationships, the racial divide on black community. Thing. You've read this Horse Shit. Maybe we should invite him for guys night. Sitting have a talk with her brother. I'd be I think he feels like because we didn't immediately take aside that were against I don't ever want him to feel that way. Oh, I can't wait to meet POPs. He's GonNa love. You. Bob, I never met a black woman he didn't like. But they're asking for help from other countries. Now, I'm almost glad this is happening at the end of semester, right at least Vegas to China's level right now we'll already be at all. Seriously guys I'm GonNa need you to buy some masks and gloves next episode of grounds. Does it scare you A little but I also think it would be cool everything down and we got to stay at home together. You do Yup, because I like spinach family. I do too. I am not I had a running with a colleague yesterday and I am still trying to get over it will chair of your department graciously agreed to allow me to inform you the committee is very pleased with the progress toward full tenure. My Dad is in the hospital solvency come. Browns. Show what we know right now said it's spreading rapidly it's already in Europe and they think there have already been cases in the US but they weren't calling it Kobe and it spreads through droplets right so basically talking to someone or if someone is infected costs into their hand and touches something that you touch. I saw an article talking about how this has been president animals for a long time now. They have vaccines Ford in cows. Young, but the strain is different. In will work on us. The other thing is that it mutates at such a high rate shuts down the body. So. If someone already has health problems, it can take them fast. What are the symptoms? Shortness of breath cough fever. But. We don't know if you can be a symptomatic and infect others. We also don't have science it know how long you can be a carrier before you become symptomatic. Saying that best guesses fourteen days this is so scary. Are we going to have to shut down? This is going to be a shit show. Do, they have testing ready yet China does. They're working with other countries who are just seeing cases to get testing protocol setup. Right now it's all reactionary. Morning everyone. Wo Okay Bre? I am not. A running with a colleague yesterday and I am still trying to get over it. What happened. We were discussing the academic validity of hip hop which I thought we agreed on then I questioned about an article he had just gotten published. That was sloppy academic work. He retaliated with a remark about how I wasn't smart enough to criticize his book. Why aren't you? My God you're educated at Oxford Berkeley for Christ's sake. According to him. I was a diversity higher and therefore not on his academic level. That's bullshit who was this. Professor. Davis. I know him. He's got a real chip on his shoulder. He thinks because he studies black music he can't be racist how he absolutely proved that yesterday. Then of course I started questioning my own. How The Way I've chosen to go about studying this music is a track that most scholars do however given my connection to African influences rhythms and subject matter opposition to that I would have a new perspective a more valuable than intricate evaluation. How has his comment changed your view as we know no matter are subject. They think it's me such instead of research. I chose my track based on my interests but. Maybe I should have chosen differently quasi while I understand your thought process here and the end of the day you have to do the work that you want to do the amount of time we spend doing our research demands that we'd be interested in it. As, long as it's academically rigorous and means something to you. Fuck I, think. That's what I've always told myself however, I can't help but wonder if I chose this path of study primarily because it would be easier for me to get tenure. It's similar work. It's. Something they have reference to understand how would you change it? I don't know. I've been I'm not interrupting. You am I at all just grading the last of the papers for the semester I could use a break just got the feedback from my third year ago better than I expected. You expected it to go badly. I suppose I forgot for a moment that none of them saw my involvement in the protests. So when looking at a book proposal comparing religious writings in the Ostrom Mir Gospel manuscript to the top two manuscripts I expected pushback. Wow, that's a really cool book idea I've never heard of Ostra. Mir. Yeah part of a huge fan of the Nov, Garad. Codex. That was found in two thousand and it should be really interesting comparing the evolution of language they were written in and why they were written. So you should be happy. I guess I'm waiting for the other shoe to drop. We all feel that way. I just got finished with my fourth year review and I'm waiting to hear. Do you think there might be some fallout from the students accusations there better not be or someone's getting the Hanson off the rightfully. So boyfriend and I have already talked about him..

China Donald Ostrom Mir Gospel Bob Vegas Europe US Oxford Berkeley Garad president Hanson Kobe Davis Professor Ostra
"academia" Discussed on Night Call

Night Call

03:16 min | 10 months ago

"academia" Discussed on Night Call

"Yeah, I. I can't I I. Don't know I don't i. don't know any new bands like I've I've just realize. The last ten years has been total media. Shut down for me. I haven't watched single TV show I think I watched one season killing eve, and then I watched the first true detective it. He said, but that's about it. Dropping out a society. I just listened to us until like delake country Joe McDonald and walk around Berkeley talked to. Talk to old hippies and get in traffic altercation with them. That's what happens when you move to Berkeley. been six months and I can kind of feel it. got in a fight with at a traffic circle here with an old hippy guy and he got out of his car, and it was like as like Oh. This is GONNA be the rest of my life. You know and then one day I'm going to be him and there's going to be like a forty year old dad and I'm GonNa. Yell at him like you don't know how to drive around the circle. Back to creek. Do We have another question although molly I don't know where this came from. What's the product from miles? Brown another member of the dark. This question is if Mariah Janet and beyond say had to perform under bubble circumstances. Who would win? Beyond say I feel he's not even a question. Does not. Listen Mariah can no longer give vocals. We love her down. Okay, not shame the Queen, but she's older, and she's the what was her brand was hitting. Those high whistle notes the range for that anymore and her dancing is limited to allow. The Phantom would be like really hyped it. It's just not going to be like. Literally crushed. COACHELLA which I feel like every artist has had stab at has done. A nobody had these set performance or the ability to make an entire Docu series movie out of their performance in their. WHO's other artists? They want us to check channel Janet. Oh God love Janet Janet's still got moves though if you were feeling an astrologer period. Kiss. Album questions. Don't you have to assume that this is them at their peak though? Saying. Here's what I'm going to say about. All of that though is that. I feel like we're all making the false assumption that just because somebody is like super. The healthiest strongest person doesn't mean you know I. Think like Jay said sometimes like people that seem superhuman have specific health challenges. On the fact that they're like performing so much, you know like beyond say is like our age and when I saw her perform live for a very long time. I was super impressed, but I was also like that is like an incredibly difficult type of stamina to maintain all time and I think even someone who seems a superhuman as beyond say could still be struck down by Cove Ed. We're in who would do the best show with Kuroda black. Infected with corona viral. Author. Performance in the bubble, or is it the best performance with Co Vid? I'M.

Mariah Janet Janet Janet Joe McDonald Berkeley Cove Ed Kuroda molly Brown Berkeley. Jay
"academia" Discussed on Night Call

Night Call

08:40 min | 10 months ago

"academia" Discussed on Night Call

"Welcome back tonight, call. We're GONNA talk just briefly about some unsolved mysteries. The show unsolved mysteries that I made task. Watch loved it and. An unsolved tiktok mystery that's been brought to our attention. Here's the ninety mail from sourly. Hey night call as the official conspiracy theory podcast I had to share this one on Howie Mandel that just recently circus on tiktok Howie Mandel has been posting some weird videos online, and while some of it reads awkward out of touch boomer humor. Another Tiktok user brought attention to some of the disturbing circumstantial details embedded in his recent videos so basically somebody formed a conspiracy theory about the Howie Mandel videos on. Can we read on a little bit about this? Because go on a we are not on Tiktok and maybe you're not either so this is we will. We will give you a link if you are on, Tiktok but or if you want to check it out, but to us this was this was a strange missive from another land. The email goes on the thing that caught me. WAS THAT IN ONE? One of his videos. There are a few tiny numbers written in the brim of his hat in the video, the users claims this says one three two dash zero and means armed intruder, which I can't find any evidence of however according to Wikipedia, one three two means armed robbery in Quebec, and how he is Canadian, though he's not Quebec was, but some have also noted that since Tiktok front facing cameras create. Create a mirror image how he would have intentionally had to write these numbers backwards in his hat in order for it to be legible on camera, also the caption of this videos, eight fourteen twenty joke being that he wants to restart twenty twenty and declared a New Year on that date, but someone figured out that when converted to the Alphabet, eight equals H, fourteen equals, and twenty equals t which gives us. US H. N. T. which could mean hostage negotiation team. He also apparently posted a video of him, flushing a note in a bottle down a toilet to the music of message in a bottle by police, sending an SOS to the world, so is Howie Mandel being held against his will. Well. Probably not I feel like we have to tell Zimmer's that everybody has always responded the same way to Howie Mandel. which is to be like white? What Hung? Why he blows up a silicon glove on his head. His main bet. I mean if someone's going to like, give us a distracting thing I'm sure. Let it be Howie Mandel well. There's been a lot of conspiracies like this and we were talking about the tick tock conspiracy teens last time, but there's a lot of stuff like this now where people are like, it can just zoom in far. Enough I'll be able to solve this mystery from home and reading things in people's behavior and body language. That maybe isn't there. But but writing on the inside writing on the hat brim is strange. It's strange, but there's been a bunch of these recently, where somebody is like this person's being held hostage, and then that person who has to come forward and be like I'm not being held hostage like with the wayfair cabinets thing, and then they people are still like that's just what somebody who's being held. Hostage would say it seems like it would actually make you insane. It did happen to you, but I was also reminded that conspiracies like this are not native to the Internet that maybe the first one is. The Paul is dead conspiracy. The backhand in the I I. Mean You're right? You're right I. sure that was one, but I think they are a tale as old as time really. I think the thing is like when people all decide to believe something, then it's like if you contradict it makes them. More makes them feel like true believers. Yeah, it's like. Against us, but we know that Howie Mandel is being kept a what if What if what if he is? What if he needs help the? He's posting a lot on Tiktok. Yes, seven point eight million followers. Why am I not yeah I? Don't know I like was banned. Everyone's whereas they hate, but they're constantly selling out. Tourists there could be millions of those bands. NICKELBACK is the one I'm specifically thinking of. If you look at the video that the emailer was talking about his hat says do not disturb. It's a white hat. He's wearing a white shirt. I don't think writing under the bill cap is so unusual, but writing it backwards for the camera would be listen. I'm zooming in as much as I can try Pasi a couple of times I am. Not sure how you can. Be Positive, those are the right numbers. It's very tiny stuff He's a prop comedian. The yeah I mean if you wanted to get seven point eight million followers, or whatever a good way to do, it would be to start a conspiracy that you were being held hostage so that people. Like US became like well Howie. Mandel gotTA keep an eye on him. Yes, probably good publicity for the Howie Mandel brand now Zuma's. Mandel is ultimately works for Howie Mandel unless somebody tries to rescue. But I feel like people do this to about the Brittany instagram videos, and in that case I feel like something is going on Oh. Yeah, you know, and there's a lot of people being like wear something yellow. If you're being held hostage and then she'll wear something yellow. Speaking of unsolved mysteries we watched some of the unsolved mysteries reboot on net flicks. So. Good I see you. Have you seen it? I did and I love it. It's great because it s something on twitter today. That Molly Lake do it was just the fact that like at the end of each one didn't solve. Today's. Cases, that have not yet been solved and yet every I'm like how though it was no I also love the like format of the show which was like. If you watched it back in the day, like occasionally, there's a very serious epsom where you're like Oh my God. We need to rally as a nation and figure this out, but then there would be like these very weird off on. You're like aliens. I don't think so thankful. Seen Spirit and energy throughout this series and I really liked. Yeah episode five. Well, which was my favorite? Thing, my brother told me to watch it. He was like you gotTa. Watch this episode about this Berkshires. Alien Sighting Let me just tell you guys that this? So in nineteen sixty nine, they're a Ufo came and abducted several residents of towns in the Berkshires, going from Sheffield Lennox Great Barrington. All of those are in Massachusetts, believe it all went down to maybe new Canaan. Connecticut this is I lived there. I lived there and I. Never heard anybody talking about this. Though apparently it is Massachusetts Lore. Well when we read communion, which takes place in upstate New York, and is it about an alien abduction? We talked a lot about how the the environment of upstate New York could really make. You feel like you're having a UFO -xperience great. BARRINGTON's cosmopolitan compared to a lot of the surrounding towns. Great Barrington was the first place that I ever had macrobiotic food. Bizarrely. There was a man who opened a place that was like Satana and Sushi Yameen My parents met in the Berkshires so I immediately was like mom and dad. Where were you? Name it in Nineteen sixty-nine. They had not which on to think about, but my mom did spend summers in the berkshires around that time, but she had not heard anything about this. Was not familiar. I was like watched the episode. It's a great cast of characters. including Tom. Reid, who you may recall from ancient aliens I certainly thought I. Did Recall Him Formation Alien, so I checked and he was on it It's a very. It's a very beautiful episode. A lot of drone shots of forests and lakes, and like people like beautiful silver, haired people kind of walking around with a cane about that day that night in the woods. Area also because nobody dies, so nobody dies or gets hurt if they did get hurt, they don't really remember it, but they do..

Howie Mandel Tiktok Hostage US Howie Mandel. Howie official New York BARRINGTON twitter wayfair Great Barrington Satana Quebec Zimmer Massachusetts Molly Lake
"academia" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

Talk Python To Me

06:03 min | 1 year ago

"academia" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

"It's it's amazing. Wow very cool as yet so I started a think hyphen when I was a second jazz in Undergrad so my first year. I was using Matlab and my second year. I was introduced to hyphen so as I was studying. Mass so degree mass and I just found low So yeah since then just been using Parson. Oh Yeah it was your very good and I also was working on in math for a long time and it's fun world that I gotta say. I like programming better. Kelly how about you yes. I went to university to Study Physics. And then after a few months. I realized that physics A maximum statistics degree type got the statistics by grinds have come from are so. I think I must have lung are by my third or fourth year. Undergrad and then from that Then decided to go into a masters page scene statistics. I saw a strong our grants and just recently. I guess I'm trying to learn python very beginner level. I mean knew each other through like Pie. Daytime Armand Chest. I guess it's worth mentioning that you'll come from the same town Manchester in the UK. So you you could actually see each other at meet ups and Whatnot Right. Not just necessarily online in the days. Yeah that's super cool. Yeah we'll only mentioned now but we're not all none of us from Manchester. Didn't think. Nah and you know I mean. We'll get into later in the show a little bit. Maybe but the idea of getting together and seen each other right now is kind of you could be on the other side of the world. It's it's still time so yeah well I guess I hear a little bit of your story and how you got into these these various areas. But what got you interested in? Sort of computational side of of computers and programming and whatnot. I mean Kayleigh going in reverse order. I guess so if you're not into physics and you want to switch into math like when I was in math it was pen paper. Chuck Chuck Board right like let there be a theorem. I it did end up doing a bunch of cool like visualization work and stuff near the end but it definitely didn't start out that way it started out with. Okay we've got you know seven axioms in a corollary and our now from right right. So what got you going down that pass. It's I think the reason I changed from physics to maths was I think really like the practical lectures a team that has been taught basis. I'm more interested in the practical sites. I think first year physics when I went to your neighbors very basic can very boring in I remember. I always like to the same lab that we had where we just had to swing a pendulum in Iraq. I'm sure that some trust some people just really didn't tell so then moved into maths and Statistics. I just had this really great. Should I in statistics in first year was so enthusiastic about data which I think that sort of helped seeing someone else Santa Fe statistics Agree that was going to do. I think that like my third two full. Four year undergrads in Scotland. So I think in between the summer of my third and fourth year and then internship at Lancaster Ended a really good doctor. Clean and Senator Orrin statistics operational research and that was really interesting. It sounds like an eight week program where you given stats project. Today they give you an insight into Dr Lancaster is so often geared towards giving an insight to distance but in industry so that gave is a really practical. So if you start data so I decide like a lot of massive. Is like just different like features? Spacey's enjoy Abstracts I can't really like bring my mind visualizing I like to see if they incite since he plots. Visualizations I think having some kind of concrete project like that just it completely changes how you experience it right. Yeah definitely itself you can then see like action insight sneaking see the point is. I feel like going down. A MORE. Theoretical masters efficacy. Offer me any like what's actually going to be the point of this at the end you know. It's a little bit how I felt as well like I felt like it was okay now at some point you just start solving these abstract problems for the sake of well. They've solved them up here. So the next logical problem someone's got assault to keep pushing it but it's like well. I'm not really sure what this is. Contributing back to the world like compared to so so many other things that you could do for example like healthcare or something that was that was sort of my thought as well as lean. How so when I get my degree maths? I did Pumas so that was even more abstract but I cry enjoy it. I've really enjoyed it and it's only so after my degree. I didn't know what to do so I want to get into condensate at the time I was thinking about big day telling me like that so I had the accusation with my family project. Supervisor as a mention his name means Two Games add up to James Berridge so we had. We had a conversation about what I want to do after Brady talk told me about getting Jane Accountancy Firm and he said he considered about doing teach team. So I will have been getting on my God and I did say yes as you say because of really enjoy really enjoyed doing magic green maps especially my I loved it. I really enjoyed it so I did say yes. So in two thousand fifteen. I went back to the same university state so the University of Portsmouth and I did my Bonnet Nama. Phd was not live. Max so that was applicable.

Manchester Study Physics Chuck Chuck Board University of Portsmouth Kelly Armand Chest Senator Orrin Kayleigh Supervisor Jane Accountancy Firm Dr Lancaster UK James Berridge Iraq Brady assault Phd Spacey Scotland
"academia" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

16:49 min | 1 year ago

"academia" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

"Julia Gillard. And this is a podcast of one's own. I'm offended by the lack of women in positions of leadership and the way those that make it a traitor die. I helped lead the Global Institute. Women's leadership at King's College London headquartered in Virginia Woolf Building in nineteen twenty nine. Virginia say she aspired for women authors to have the space to write in a room of one's own here. I want women leaders too. Have A podcast once. Today's Mary Beard Cambridge Professor Leaving National Treasuring Britain and the world's most famous classicist. Mary what he's a classic. That's a very good question Julia. You might say it. Somebody who studies every aspect of the culture of Ancient Greece and Rome? And that's true up to a point but the definition has always been a bit contested. It's never quite certain. How far ancient Greece and Rome with thought to spread? Is this what you might say? The study of white men in the Mediterranean basin or is it a much wider study of a people every possible color enough Mississippi stretching from the Sahara through to Syria under Scotland. That debate is is ongoing. Every good subject of debate about what it's about and Closys is no different from that so it's ancient is Greece and Rome but then what you mean by Greece and Rome. Well that's still up for grabs. Insert dissertation here. Mary had a young go fall in love with the classics in that way with Grayson Room. While I don't think I ever fell in love with them really. I find them extremely interesting. I'm very pleased to spend a whole career researching the Greeks and Romans but I don't like them very much and I think somebody said we'd like to go back there. You know answered absolutely not you know. It's a day return. I can have and just have a peak. I'm afraid like all kids really. If first of all you get interested in what you're good at and I was good at kind of a bit of a nerd. Ish Control Freak and so let him was great for me because I still am additional federal now so you know when you get to get good marks you can. Yes neoprene yourself a bit and you this what I want to do. I think there are other reasons personal reasons for me. I was an only child growing up in quite a prim. English country town and I did get very interested in the archaeological aspects of Greece and Rome. When in fact there were Roman villas being excavated all around her lived and going out to camp on a Roman excavation with other late. Teenagers was the puffy excuse to get away from moment to be doing something that they thought was really serious intellectual. Merit GonNA excavation. Oh and you can imagine what happened in the evenings and I think that kind of bonded me in socially to the idea that studying ancient world could be fun. A good way to find yourself as a classicist. I think you selling it to people. Let's great looking back on your childhood. Your background what was the first point that you said to yourself It's different to be a girl and a boy or perhaps people treat US differently. I'm ashamed to say really that I didn't really notice that in practice till I got to university. This seems ought I was very keen when I was a teenager on feminism. I read my gym angry at all. This stuff assume that feminism was an important idea but I thought it was all kind of in theory really And that's partly because I was an all girl school which was quite old fashioned in its way but it one of the things that were kind of absolutely at the center of the school was that we've been could do anything any subject banker do so when my friends want to do physics or I wanted to do lodged in Greek. There wasn't anybody there. Single wouldn't you prefer home economics? So throughout that formative period. I just thought that women could do anything that man it hadn't twigged it really and it was when I went to Cambridge so much as I really do love Cambridge. That was when I realized they were actually put in the world including those who studied and taught at the university I was at. He's somehow thought that women were good but I know that good. I remember vividly a guy who I'm still friends with coming into my student room. It was pretty messy. I'm picking up one of my written essays from the floor and it'd be marked by my teacher and it said at the very good this first class mock exams. He looked at music. You get to. I thought the only reason you're saying that you have no clue the only reason you don't think that's what women get And did you challenge him on that in the moment or did you think about it later or think about the best? We d one line a lighter and we she delivered the latter but as you can see our remember. It forty plus years on aspect. He's forgotten it and I've never reminded him. It was in some ways. They're lightbulb moment that there were people people really liked and these were kind of crusty old conservative dolphins in the backwater of some almonds college. This was in my friends so that was when I thought right now but I was a women's coalition. I don't want to say I'm still at the same women's college because I have left and come back but that was a bit like my school and very very insistent on supporting women aspirations in women's careers and in a way cushioned you from the real world of everyday sexism now I still feel very uncertain about whether it was a good idea to being cushioned from that or whether actually let me launch myself I was confident enough before I had to fayssal all the crap that you get from men mostly men in the every day. Yeah huge debates about all female education almost irresolvable but obviously in your own life. That cushioning did help you deal with these incidents of sexism. When they first came to you did I mean I can't imagine ever if you were inventing education all over again the idea that you'd start dividing it by sex. The educate girls separately from blokes would see Matt. If we were free play and we could start will over but in a world like this. Sometimes women altogether giving each other support can be quite useful. Helped me you want said. I actually can't understand what it would be to be a woman without being feminist. What did you mean by that us with exactly what it says in justice simply I mean I think that the one thing that makes me really cringe slightly is when you hear and sometimes do here even amongst your own female students. Well 'cause I'm paying for women's rights and everything but but I'm not feminists that fries. I'm not a feminist. I've heard that a lot. I'm not a feminist body. Usually try to take on. Feminism is a very broad church and there's very many different versions of it happily there all but somehow the idea that you can reel off load of things that are absolutely fundamental to feminism about women's equality or equality of Opportunity. And then say over feminist. I just think it's silly. And why do you think the word has ended up? I mean it's been in and out of fashion overtime but there certainly have been times when it had such a negative connotation that people would do the but what built that around the world. Feminism in your view. Well if I was being utterly honest I'd say in a male fear really that when confronted with not just individual spark women that they could all might not take seriously but a movement would actually said look guys thing things go to change and a lot of the things that you think of an associate as being the habitat and lot and fate of women are not natural at all you know that was quite hard to take were nice they are and sometimes hugely progressive radical liberal etcetera. For centuries men with the beneficiaries of female subjection is putting a bit high. But that's what we ultimately mean and in a way. It's not surprising that when people were faced with their privileges as men. Being to some extent undermined undermined. They go cross one of the easiest ways to get. Cross was not real women you know. They're wearing dungarees. Remember that any feminists whereas Dunga arena. Thank Heavens deeply deeply unattractive home and inconvenient when you wanted to go to the bathroom so we were objecting to all the ways that women's traditional fashion inconvenient and we llamas with dungarees balking men were responding with ridicule rather effective recruiter. Turned out to those who seem to be taking away their privileges which they come us on a basic fact about revolutions and there has been some extent a quiet revolution women's opportunities but you know it's a liberal myth that revolutions have no leases. We don't have revolutions where everybody wins. And then with looseness and nothing they were and I hope that in the long run you could say. But maybe everybody's a gain in the immediate confrontation it feels like you're loser and so the word gets all of that baggage. I'm going to remind you that. Of course he spent some time here at King's College London claim of the Global Institute for Women's leadership. I think my colleagues at King's would not be happy unless I reminded you of that but you studied a PhD at Cambridge. You came here for a time. You went back to Cambridge in nineteen eighty four as the only female lecturer in the Classics Faculty had that field. Or have I got the history. Wrong your mistrial. When I instantly went back to Cambridge there were two other women. They either retired or left within a year of me going back so for about five years. I was the only female let the classics faculty in Cambridge. Look felt very different from being at King's I would say this is not just to appeal to the king's audience my career a my views on life and teaching would have been completely different if I hadn't had a time teaching in an institution that was extremely good but very different from the way that Cambridge was configured. And it's partly very different in terms of gender and also is in the middle of a big city not a small fun town and it was not even if me about how university could be different. Okay was awarded. You go back to Cambridge. Well I don't know but I did and there's some there is something really difficult on something you have to look at quite carefully about women who operate successfully within all male institutions and. I'm conscious that there will be some people working as one woman with twenty eight men and that kind of even the upmarket blackish notice that you get in a department teaching classics. I can see that there are some women who would be very disheartened by that. It would just seem a constant struggle and for me. It didn't really theoretically I disapprove done. Everything I possibly could to get more women in and we've been successful in that but I think there were. There were two things that really made a difference to me. Partly Camrys is a complicated institution and my faculty people who taught classics. They were men but in my college I went back to Newnham word menas undergraduate and that was all women and so in some ways. I had the best of all worlds. I wasn't just sitting with a load of blogs all my working life and I think perhaps that is crucial. I'm very conscious that I'd go to lunch with the other women. You would talk differently there and it was. You could say oh no. I have forgotten the children's ballet shoes and you tried saying that in front of a group of men are meeting. They look at us. If you're you that what you're talking about every woman around the table sort of knew what that meant but I. I suspect that the combination having been a Cambridge undergraduate and having been the net kings and then going back I did have the confidence to call them out. Sometimes in it was so when after meeting we would always discover that when we had tea and coffee who was carrying the cups away it would be me and the female secretary. I did actually say hey guys. This isn't women's work you know that was quite. It's trivial it's every day it doesn't change the world but it gives you a kind of sense that you're engaging constructively with them and their reaction to that be ops. I didn't even realize that. And now you've pointed at or wash my in cap or was their reaction really. She's picking this silliness. Do we have to listen to it? Now we've got a woman ear in the faculty to me. Of course it was. Oh my goodness wash my cup. Heaven knows what they said in the men's Lou. Afterwards you know go. Did you have to what you cup sort of suspicious? If you saw the rushing together publicized. I did used to challenge where they fix things in the little warm place in the faculty I couldn't go. That's where they made the real decision. Now of course at this time you not only juggling your career but you've got to young children. You had your children very close together and you decided out of that experience you could have been writing books and papers on Romans Greeks the definition of Roman grace. Whatever but you instead sat and wrote the Good Working Mothers Guard. We advice on topics about like the best way to hand express amongst many others. I mean what made you decide when you presumably? Were under a lot of academic pressure to publish in your field of expertise to write that book. And how did you manage? It all? Sounds awful isn't it is. It sounds pretty driven and I imagine it was pretty driven looking back. I would say that I made some quite good calculate decisions that if you have very young children and you have some childcare help. That's in the central part of this. You do actually get a surprising amount of time to yourself. But it's never consistent fifteen minutes here twenty minutes there it will be. That doesn't sound like much for luxury. When you describe. I tell you what it's impossible to do when you have kind of broken up notice of your timetable willingly. Very happy life breaking up with the kids..

Cambridge Greece Rome Mary King's College London Mary Beard Cambridge Professor Julia Gillard Ancient Greece Virginia Good Working Mothers Guard Global Institute Romans Virginia Woolf Building Britain Classics Faculty Global Institute for Women King Sahara Grayson Room
"academia" Discussed on Linear Digressions

Linear Digressions

13:58 min | 1 year ago

"academia" Discussed on Linear Digressions

"But it's it's not that well defined data science assign my first editorial was trying to sink about. How do we friend that hosting data science? But most importantly what I realized realized in my colleagues he realized that they're just not essential sort of forum of platform full people where all relate to that there are signs is but we don't have a commonplace to communicate with each other. I mean we. Statistics published pretty much instead of journal. We may have occasion impoverishing. Computer Science has joined much in the journal and vice versa. But it's not just these two communities committed obviously play incredibly important role in size but there are a lot more out there in the philosophers. Talk about the philosophy of data size and information scientist Opposition research people. They contributed tremendously to all the optimization. And then you even have you know physicist in on quantum computing. Your office people. And then I couldn't using of a central place that we can actually communicate with each other to talk about how we contributed from different perspective. So then I thought up by. Why don't we take advantage of Harvard? Does have a brand name in this review series. We have a Harvard Business Review which is very popular magazine and the industrial leader is finished leaders. And then we have All the law review which is a serious legal scholar said of Journal so I saw the vital. Why don't we do both of those things this ambition? which thank you for joining as a part of the team as pleasure because once we started thinking about? I realized that we can do more than just a outreach to the industry and Odd reach to August two to talk to that that sort of research side wearing university. There's another big parliament at which is education. So that's why we decide to do that. Really sort of a trail. We will all Polish deep and research articles these articles with Greek letters. And then we'll we'll publish articles are really to to the general public in general Tillerson's community and as well as education articles on. How how do we put together? Effective there are signs curriculums to serve different group of students and and audience. There's so that's the big idea cool and so I think if I can paraphrase a little bit of that interest call out a particular thread one of the things we talked about Out and that you said here is that one of the goals you have is that this is not an endeavor that has a single audience. This isn't just for academics. This isn't just for industry folks but one thing that I think is really interesting. And I'm wondering if this has been a challenge for you as you've gotten started or perhaps not is that like you said. Data Science is is not something that is particularly crisply defined right now everyone has their own working definition and perhaps for better and maybe occasionally for worst you know maybe be with how what will happen with this journals starts become a little bit more crisply defined. So did you have any challenge in this first article or in the first few articles else when you're trying to communicate to authors contributors now. I know that you think that you're a physicist. I know that you think that you are a philosopher or so on and so on but actually you have something to say to speak to the data science community and here is the way that you can speak about it so that many people outside of you're field proper get benefit from the things that you're thinking about Oh actually Let me say that the you know very critical way that the the central mission of House on review is ready to help define the shape what they decide says and condition mission and the way we approach it as as you know we recruit scholars and experts from all walks of their signs. And including yourself so we we want our reach the industry to the government to US obviously the the science community itself as well as everybody else so we have this awesome motor. We called it everything that science and data science for everyone so now because of that when we invite articles like the one thing I made it very clear. I told everyone that There's no style page limitation all this and the only thing we care deeply about Tuesday's by one is the the quality of the article the quote adequate to match whatever the future. You're eating okay. But the second part is directly related to to what you sad add that having said so we want to be engaging though on the riding quality had to be really good. Hawaii is to help you to communicate due to the rest of the people were interesting in Dennis. Data has been a sink a lot of articles which are would like perspective. Goes this big pictures. And most people rights very well. We you know we. Every article was through rigorous peer reviews and the reviews usually because we reviews. have no what we want so they basically will be off. Say Oh you should have given looping action giving this this and that now There will be articles. We do publish. I would say twenty five percent because our that kind of very technical which we have Greek gladys it is and does an actor for all them? We basically say you know you always should arrive regardless data so you know how technically article and you should always write an introduction of a page of to summarize what we call the media friendly summary. So that's the idea of if to help to communicate now moving forward. I'm talking to some students where I mentioned to you before that Were were thinking about organizing Student competitions these articles are published online technical ones where we get students to read it at a wide like the kind of summarize that has generally vehicle not understandable to the general public. I saw that will be a great way. itself is a pedagogical training for the students. Because it's not easy to read other people and you know you know to to summarize well and so that's a part of the efforts efforts world we'll be making and so I want to mention that the Issues the digital versions entirely open access free online by anyone just Google whatever the problem and we'll yeah we'll put a link on actions Google this on you you will find so anyone can check out see the whether this is an edible or not and though the platform overuse from MIT press called pop pop. And it's designed Zayn to anyone can make comments there that as I've used silent signing And so we would love to mafia backs on say. Well you know this is this is a need to be more planning to whatever it is. So We'd love to get feedback. Yeah no I love. That idea of getting started started and then kind of seeing. That's something that we I come from the start up world right. We're always trying to figure out. What are they were building a product? What is our product? Need to be so that idea of collecting acting the feedback and iterating on it as something. That is very close to my heart. Are there any things that you are in the vein of the conversation that we've had so far that you want to make sure that we cover the show I want to mention that Just for people who are not familiar with the Journal yet where we have full. Parts of each issue. Basically covers the perspective -plication education and research. Right we have a more fancy name online. You can check but the full part but the one thing I want to emphasize is that we are also rolling out these columns and so we have two columns currently the is there when you call the dining data that is meant to be immediate oriel. Many topics No falling off. But it's edited by David Hand and Very appreciated in addition as well as a great writer so we had the first issues what is the motto and the second issue is on the big picture of the data linkage the data. Yeah and so. The issue is going to have one. Data visualization modest and continues. It will have all these topics will be to the computer science. Whatever is relevant for data for data science the second column already already in the first issue is the CO edited by two historian of Science? So this is a man to be talking. About a history of data assigns. Many people would be very interested in the first issue. Had the article by Stephanie. Dick who is a great historian of science and her first I issue. The article was on the history of activity intelligences. The second one. I hope that Many people will be interesting. Is is is by by Christopher Philip from CMU another historian of signs. A Co editor of this column and his writing about the his trip baseball statistic so these two columns or the in place then as you know that we have four more to come out. That's what I hear. Yeah including one got you thank you for being a Co editor for that would just targeted for the industry. If you guys have settled on on we're getting much right after this to figure it out title yet being my co editor here. Yes and I want to mention that the history of science column has a green name coming from these. Two Co editors is called a mining the past and a sort of a due to that we actually have a column called the minding the future uh-huh and that one will be targeted to students from primary elementary schools to like in a high schools. And and it's it will be sync I should probably will be January. And then you know another due to your industry column there will be one aimed. For the policymakers and that one is actually co edited. A by a Nancy pulled off Who is achieved shows the United States and So that's two then. There will be another one coming out as sank. The will be in January. Now what is really targeted the general public and has a very coup. ooh column title is called her recreations in randomness and the first one Hopefully will be something on. They were signs and Oscar. So it sounds like you spend about as much time thinking about clever titles for some this artery of clever titles are coming. How was your co editor? Alex I asked two of US dreamed up a lot of things and of course many of them that the recreations in randomness was really the editor of Martin Tuchman. So he's basically trying to create these columns basically the idea I as I said. We tried to make sure that anyone when pick up the issues. Oh there's something that I can relate to. I have interesting so so far we create some six calls Great end just as an aside aside yet. I'm very excited to get to work with Alex on this. I think it's going to be a lot of fun and I think The Industry the industry call in particular is a an interesting one to me. I mean in part because I Because I work there obviously but it's also presents with a very different set of challenges than I think some of the academic stuff so trying to get all of that into the mixes as the challenge but as the fun too. I got my pleasure. Thank you for having me so without. I wanted to to wrap up with. Just thank thank you again for taking the time to talk with me. It's been really great so everybody. Who's listening to this? Who here's something in there? That sounds interesting to them and that they should check out. which is it's all of you? should go to. You can go to LINEAR DIGRESSION.

Journal editor US physicist Harvard Business Review Google Harvard scientist Tillerson Alex I Hawaii baseball Zayn Oscar Stephanie Dick David Hand Christopher Philip
"academia" Discussed on Talking Kotlin

Talking Kotlin

13:43 min | 1 year ago

"academia" Discussed on Talking Kotlin

"With uh springing Kotlin native where you Oh have just a compiler and you have some coat and you can write some code and run it On the command line with a compiler. Obviously then you'll use idea whatever what does make the barrier of entry easier to teach people programming as opposed to I having them jump over over that you know the the bar of the JVM and the virtual machine and all of these things. What are your thoughts around that I I don't have any experience with clean native been following the development. Never used it well. Yeah the the students need to install Jedi K.. But well they because they can use the embedded educated comes from the ID to to due to be able to run the it but they still need the ID distill are doing a consolidation in the beginning. I'm not a chore. That improvement would be Significant I think that using rebels eventually starting with web-based based Ripples it's it's a good thing because it allows us allows them to very easily trying to in writing expressions and debilitating expressions but I don't. I'm not convinced that using hotly native will be significant improvement on on the first course. But what's your opinion poll. I was mostly agree with you. I was just saying I was going wing procedures just this for example when initially we started to use Scotland the cones. Okay the the fact that there are Cohen's online On breaking that in breaking down that barrier or of entering the ECO system in addition to the fact that got there there is cotton native. We are seeing much effort. A great deal of effort going to that from jet rains it give it increase our confidence. The fact that cotton is becoming multiplatform increases. Our confidence that we can in fact to this risk because it is a risk end and for the most part I we must align that we also agreed that Java scrip- It is a great contended that that means that we are also considering the use of javascript. Web Bob from the one from the since the first semester currently the the immediate Kosovo action is to bring coughing semester to use it for in programming on one end mostly because we have high confidence that this will work the great because of the efforts that are going around onto it by a jeff brains in particular multiplatform uncoupling native ended up The existence of of the environments or tools such as a raffle and a replica is a big deal for us because we need students to have immediate feedback they try something and see the result immediately in that is a major point for us and actually it is a downside in Java. We don't ever great rebel or example such as the Cohen's at least not to my knowledge. I know that there is Jay Shell. But I'm not a fan of it. I must confess. So Yeah Cotton native contributes attribute to to this because but mostly because of the confidence that That's a fair point. I mean a lot of people have used that argument of I don't I don't need to know the JVM in all of this to its to stop programming. But yet I mean yes if you download the tool it it has an embedded one that you can use the replicas you say and the co-owns sounds cool. The last topic I want to discuss a little bit. Is that Both of you. I think were mentioning that you are involved in in the car and see courses while right so yes where is where are you with cotton in on this because obviously you know that you know we do The whole routines and stone and see how what what are you using right now to teach Garnsey. Well we we start with the basic softgen currency and synchronization and we use Java and Jvm and we use and we spend a couple of weeks Talking about the basic synchronization primitives that we in Java as well as teaching the students to create their own primitives using Monitors and walks and conditions But stealing synchronous world and then in the second off of course we move into an asynchronous world old and then in there we use allback based development in Java and then we switch to C. Sharp and use a sink away mostly for a synchronous programming but we'd the recent well not so recent election of Carotenes also we the popularization of reactive models. It's it's it's in our bland's to consider introducing Does subject as well in in the context of these Concurrent current programming namely carotenes. I think that Carotenes are a great asynchronous programming model. They don't solve concur Assi a completely but they are a big step towards A synchronous programming ramming I I. I used to joke that when when when I started working more in Java in the JVM dist the the the the main thing that I missed from HR WASN'T CINCO White. It was the main thing and it it was lacking in the JVM and now we'd carotenes and also with project loomed at Oracle is working. I think that we are going to have also very interesting asynchronous story in the JVM so we currently don't teach carotenes but it's dead would definitely in in our plans because it's not only the curtains model but also the the structure at cken currency. They seem very ah sought out and also They provide the students with a good framework radim work of reasoning on these things. I wanted to add something if you if you allow me. For example a the bedroom was mostly talking about a course a mandatory course which is a a concurrent programming third year Mandatory course but for example again here we can play rounding our elective courses. The mobile device programming course that accuses android as the subject in the current semester. We are playing to stock using carotenes. Yes because we write our code and Katelyn end because coatings are there so we're going to try it at although this although the can currency is not our main concern in enjoyed in actually every real world platform currencies. Just they're in Andhra. Treat for instance we have a concurrent model based on message passing insole of the issue shoot about synchrony and therefore according seem to be like what we need to express a synchronous A computations and conclusions are continuations in appropriate Threat so we are going to give it a try D. Semester for the for Stein In in discourse you selected course. It's good thing that you brought that up. Because that's where I was kind of heading right because I mean if if you WANNA keep Bob. If you're saying that you're influenced being influenced by the way you want to try and get the divide. The people that leave ready. You know it's very that android development is committed. Pretty much to carotenes right now so we're already using Jeff Beck and whatnot so we are up to date with what is wholesome. It do you think overall the experience has been good would have you. Would you want something different or is there something that was missing. That would have made it easier for you in in all of this process of adopting Kotlin. Well honestly it's been great. I'm sorry seems it seems it seems it's awkward but it's it has been great. I I live reality where I had to use Java Avenue in the real world android application and I suffered physical things and now I'm happy that's great too. I don't know why you're saying it seems almost like an advertising. Yeah I'm sorry okay one of you pedals. Please say something Say something negative I will I will I will. I'm not directly directly involved in preparing coddling for The for programming One on one but one of the things that that is lacking king is a good introduction book. That doesn't assume that the person or the student or any notes already knows Java of a or already knows object oriented programming so ditching the first concepts for someone that doesn't know any Programming at all using clean. It's something that we at least I didn't found a good Material so can I. Can I give you some good news. There is or have you looked at Atomic Kotlin. I've looked at it. It seems to be still working in. It's going to be finished very very soon because my colleagues is actually working on it And is going to be finished very very soon and that really does assume I mean does a lot of content there already but it's It it kind of it does assume that you don't know programming. Let Alone Java I'm looking at the layout and yeah it seems like soaked. Yeah so check that out. If you have any feedback she'll be happy to hear it. So but yes but it is also true that a lot of our documentation is heavily biased towards the Java developer. And you know you probably saw just recently I I. I wrote a blog post with a collection of forces and material for people that are coming from dot net that don't Know Java in the JVM and how to get started it but this is something we are working on right but it takes time to kind of quote unquote clean up od. Java is Java. Is I just made that up. Steve the Java is our documentation but but the thing is that we can complete the job. Is it either because people that our job developers that arc coming to Cartland they also want to say okay. So what is the equivalent of this in Java. Or how do I do this with Java right we've got aww cater to everyone essentially. Yes great cool. What has been wonderful having you all? Thank you for taking the time to come on. It's the for me as I said. It's really exciting to see Kotlin being adopted in academia because I I truly believe in in Cartland could be that far S- language where we teach people how to do programming So so it's great to hear that you've had success with it and I hope that would the introduction of the first year course it will even be better. Thanks for having US thank you thank you take. Thank you.

Kotlin Carotenes Cohen Jeff Beck Cartland Atomic Kotlin Jay Shell Scotland Garnsey Oracle Kosovo Katelyn Assi
"academia" Discussed on FoodStuff

FoodStuff

06:54 min | 1 year ago

"academia" Discussed on FoodStuff

"You and we're back with listener. The hard shelled crabs hard sale to crack shaking my head at you. I don't know why by the record state. Oh Gosh Okay all right Cecilia wrote I lived in France for the academic year. Nineteen sixty defied sixty six when my father was there on Sabbatical I was fourteen to fifteen. I went to a French. We say which was really hard. It was entirely in French except for my English class which was not emerge in English but just regular learn English from a teacher who spoke mostly French. I don't think she liked me and I did not get all top marks in the class but but it was my best class I have a story about that but it's totally not food related. We all ate lunch at school in what they call the canteen we filed in by groups a set time I ate was seven other kids in my class one of whom knew some English and was willing to translate for me we ate sat at our assigned table and the room had six to table so held forty eight to sixty students on Mondays. We were given eight clean Cotton Napkins. We each had a plastic envelope with a letter on it. I think mine was J after Cherie Eight. We put the Napkin in the envelope and stack them at the end of the table. Where would find them the next day and the rest of the week of course we had a three course meal every we day? Oh my gosh a starter entree which was very simple. One of the fewer remember with sardines another was radishes. There was always bread but no butter unless we had thirteen or radishes. That's probably why you remember. The main course was a meat and veg course than desert which was again simple might be a fruit sweet movsar pudding or petite suite tweet. That was my favorite. There were no choices how you ate it or you did it. I don't remember many kids not eating their meals are school meals didn't include clued salad and those days the French only eight salad after the main course and the salad never contained any chunks just lettuce the word Salahuddin French can be translated either I either to the lettuce or salad and you toss it just before serving as your listener previous listener who wrote in about this said one day. My parents invited the family of one of the girls in my grade to dinner. This family lived just down the road from us. I think it was the parents and one or two of the kids they had a large family. They weren't wealthy. The improbably didn't get invited out to eat much especially not to the home of an American scientist when it came to the salad course my mother handed the freshly tossed salad to the mother as custom trump to start the serving with a female guest the lady started to serve herself but her daughter elbowed her and said onto her breath no say prophetic gay so her mother very embarrassed serving yourself self instead toss a salad again then handed it back to my mother. This completely confused my mother and this is the only part of that meal that I remember I gather other from this that it was customary to let the guest of honor tossed salad that way everyone knows it was freshly tossed and why the word tire fatty gay it would be used for that. I don't know maybe he wants to salvage tossed. It is tired my husband. My husband and I have a small house in Normandy France so we now spend eight to for ten weeks a year in France. We actually don't eat out much but when we do I notice that the French don't normally eat salads after the meal like they used to or at least not in restaurants and they now have what they called Salon Compassi which means a salad with other things in it of course there are sal swabs are Caesar but also many others they served as a lunch meal normally but are listed above the main course so maybe some people eat salads as an entree like we do. The ones I've ordered are too big to be an entree. I had one recently called Salat normand which included three or four cheeses Turkey strips boiled eggs pecans M Mayo and that brings me too Mayo. I like mandates but my husband doesn't so my kids didn't grow up with it. My son hates it. I mean he thinks it is actually evil. In Nineteen Nineteen eighty-eight we were going to spend a sabbatical in the Netherlands and we bought a VW Jetta which we parked up in Luxembourg. We drove to Belgium for first night. We didn't know that it was the night of a twenty four. We're our rotary area. It took a while to find a hotel that had a room available that night the street below our hotel room was noisy. We are tired enough that we slept anyway anyway. In the morning. We packed up and went down to a brand new dark blue car sitting on the top of the car. It was a huge load of freight with Mayo Yuck. We did the best we could to get the May off the top of the car but it left a stain. It remained on the car for years. My son was very upset. He was eight. Oh Oh formative Mayo memories shrew. That'd be very upsetting. Yeah I saw a waste of Fritz right look so and he looks very personally upset right now. Oh Gosh oh that clears it up so much I couldn't quite figure out why like composed salads. We're such a big differentiated category from Salads French and so oh thank you yes thank you so much much cash Taylor wrote I was listening to the show on cod and was waiting for you to mention this fact because it seems right up your alley to my shock there was no mention of the war between in Ireland and the UK over Cod Alwar about cau- okay okay not really war but there were some militarized disputes roots and one person died it was an accident over the fishing rights in the waters around I slow my goodness because of the rise in popularity overfishing chips the waters around the UK had been overfished of cod forcing the fishermen to venture further and further towards Iceland this caused Icelandic fishermen to become more and more upset and therefore war the even more impressive thing is that there was more than one card war the first took place in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight the second in nineteen seventy seventy to end the third in nineteen seventy five they ended with fishing treaties where the UK was allowed to catch one hundred and fifty thousand tons of fish and Iceland increased its territorial waters to fifty miles around the island. There is a stuff you missed in history class show on the cod wars as well the cod wars. Oh Gosh that's great yeah definitely definitely go search stuff. You missed in history cod wars. I'm sure I I want to L. More about that. Now I do too. I do too fish and chips man. Yeah also cod gosh. That was a fun episode. That was a fun one. Thanks to both of them for writing in if you would like to write to us you can email is hello at save pot dot com. We're also in social media. You can.

France UK Mayo Yuck Iceland Mayo Cherie Eight Cecilia Cod Alwar Salon Compassi scientist Belgium Normandy France Fritz Netherlands Luxembourg Taylor Ireland fifty thousand tons ten weeks
"academia" Discussed on FoodStuff

FoodStuff

13:57 min | 1 year ago

"academia" Discussed on FoodStuff

"Lee until recent modern times a majority of our Macadamia um you nuts at least in the US specifically have come from Hawaii and they are big souvenir slash. Welcome gift thing from Hawaii it would be a sound logical leap to think they originated from Hawaii but alas the Macadamia nut did not originate in Hawaii. No they originated in Australia northeastern northeastern Australia to be exact probably millions of years ago yeah like like late Cretaceous what up Daham recent research suggests that most or all or all of Hawaii's macadamia nuts came from a small crop of trees or maybe just just one tree and Queensland Australia. That's how small the gene pool is which is a risk when it comes to disease and things like that. Australia has a bit a bit more diversity when it comes to their trees seventy percent of macadamia nuts are believed to come from a single tree in Australia who yeah yeah and that's because graphs from that single tree and then it's daughter trees were used to propagate these huge populations this is the original method of cloning being before we had Dolly the sheep and all that stuff oh. I haven't thought about Dolly the sheep in a long time that's a throwback. She's always they're always waiting waiting for the right opportunity to be into the macadamia nut podcast. Obviously I might be I might have sheep on the brain another thing aside from in coffee that was recommended to to farm alongside your Macadamia tree crop. was cheap to help clear the ground cover and stuff. Oh I've never played those games where you build a little settlement for yourself but I feel like this. These are the the blocks like she needs. She yeah yeah so so daughter sheep involved Sarah their sheep involved in settlers all their fields with sheep in them but everyone refers to them as sheep okay Yup Anita replay that game night Oh yeah yes okay Australian aborigines snacked on academia nuts which they called kindle boom boom Berra Jindal and Paul during the winter months they were a delicacy at the time and because of that they were used a ceremonial gifts between tribes and traded between tribes women would collect the nuts and bags take them back to their feasting grounds and crack them using a technique involving flat stone with an indent placed. Were you put the nuts okay yeah and then another stone used to deliver a blow that would force it open yeah they were eaten raw or roasted bidders spices aces of the nut were ground up into a paste and then washed with cold water before consumed they use the oil face and body paint and Yeah Macadamia me as seemed to have been a forged rather than cultivated food. there was a legend about the origin of the names of the Macadamia nuts from a retelling from. I'm the senior elder of the Bucella tribe Frazier Island Olga Miller and we're gonNA condensing a bit but here we go a long time ago in the dream time when the Messenger God left the mountain but Powell agreed to watch the mountain it was a long journey and unbeknownst about Paul his friend. The jewel lizard had hitched a ride with him. Kepala arrived the mountain. The Lizard jumped out to Paul surprise. He asked the Lizard. Why have you come in the Lizard responded at didn't want you to be alone all a one day? When Paul was walking shift in his foot away from food and water the Jewel Lizard asked the Rock Wallaby what I do and they decided? We've gotta get him some water water however they found they couldn't reach water so the Rock wallaby found a kangaroo to help they gave the water to Paul then they decided to get him food with the help of the Cockatoo the cockatoos collected seeds and spread them all over the mountain so Paul would have food and yes macadamia cheese Daimyo sees then the jewel izard and rock wallaby asked the Cockatoo help them gather leaves for a fire. The cockatoo collected leaves from the Macadamia trees and they started to fire people on the islands all the smoke and sent help for but Paul once rescued the people named the nuts but Paul's nuts and the lizard was called Paul's Lizard and the mountain but Paul's Mountain Yeah Yeah lovely friendship working together yeah British colonists discovered the macadamia nut in eighteen fifty seven in Queensland Australia although Alan Cunningham sometimes gets credit for finding them before that in eighteen twenty eight and German explorer or German army deserter depending on the source Ludwig leichhardt recorded one in eighteen forty three and delivered a sample to Melbourne which is still on display at the national herbarium. Whatever the case the director the Botany Gardens in Brisbane Walter Hill found one used advice to open it and planted the seed okay allegedly that tree is still producing macadamia nuts? The first known cultivated a macadamia tree dated back to eighteen fifty eight. Yeah it's still alive and producing that's wild his It's amazing amazing at the time Walter. Hill's travel buddy was the so-called father of Australian Botany and then the royal botanist and Melbourne Baron Ferdinand Nand von Mueller according to legend he named the tree after a friend of his John mcadam. Unfortunately mcadam who was a physician Shen and a member of the Philosophical Institute Victoria died unexpectedly on his way to New Zealand before he could try the nut bearing his name the seat I I guess by the way he was on his way to provide his chemical expertise in a murder trial involving player who passed injury. Yes yes also according to legend Walter Hill observed boy eating the nuts with no ill-effects eighteen fifty eight and believed it to be the first case of a non indigenous person eating one was he like testing to see his poison on this innocent show. Was He like Hey Chin you try this. Don't you want to try this thing. Some stories say it was a young associate. Hill asked to help him crack them and hill himself believed that they report but the associate didn't know that an eight them before he could say anything and he claimed that they were delicious and hills You're not dead so that's great all right well yes in eighteen sixties. The aboriginal elder of the Logan River clan King Jackie directed his tribe collect and trade at Macadamia nuts with traders. The first known orchard in Australia's planted in eighteen ninety with two hundred and fifty trees from there the hybrids grown from sees and grafting was frequently employed these grafting techniques and the invention of mechanized processing allowed for the commercial the production of Macadamia nuts for the very first time the dude behind those grafting techniques norm Gerber is frequently referred to as the father of Australia's Macadamia Nut Industry Tree Australian botanist Joseph Maiden wrote in eighteen hundred nine it is well worth extensive cultivation for the nets are always eagerly bought all right well there you go yeah stepping back a bit to eighteen eighty. One William Purvis planted the first magnetron on Hawaii's big island about a decade later are a Jordan planted some macadamia trees on Oahu the trees that researchers think is the ancestor of most of Hawaii's trees and the net quickly became popular snack among businessmen who came to why to profit off sugar plantations also allegedly one of his first trees still produces nuts and yeah these two trees were of these same species Macadamia intricate foliage in one thousand nine ten to supplement. The coffee on Hawaii's Kona coast the Hawaiian agricultural experiment station that H. A. E. S. recommended growing macadamia trees in the area that h a es was established. I developed new crops for the state. Why academia nuts companies Ernest van tassell planted his first commercial trees in nineteen twenty one he ran into some some trouble in the beginning but had it sorted out by nineteen thirty four when he started processing nets and yeah these early plantings resulted in cultivars that were developed for for commercial plantation growth again propagated by grafting the reporting on successful grafting 1937 edition of Science helped facilitate tate mass production and following years the H. A? Es tested a bunch of different macadamia nut clones and different locations throughout Hawaii a decade after true that report the H. A. ES announced the development of a tree that produce higher-quality nuts in larger quantities. It took about another decade before the big hitter industries on the Hawaiian islands the so called Big Five companies. It took them a bit to notice the Macadamia Nut. The owners of Dole Pineapple Company planted planted an orchard in nineteen forty six going on to supply the product for the Mountain Loa Macadamia Nut Corporation. This company's first commercial crop was processed in nineteen eighteen fifty six eventually see Brewing Co.. Ltd bought out the owners of Dole's orchard in Nineteen Seventy six castle and Cooke debuted a new brand Royal Hawaiian and nine hundred fifty three and this brand gets a lot of the credit. When it comes to bringing the Macadamia nut into the mainstream on the mainland U s later Hershey would by Mount Loa in two thousand and four and then another brand called Hawaiian host bought them in two thousand fifteen Hoy and host host is a confectionery? That's been operating as such since nineteen twenty seven and is apparently the world leader in chocolate covered macadamia nuts according to them so they are located in Honolulu which is cool for a while the Macadamia nut was known as the Hawaiian nut in the US anyway. That's it's how much we associated with. Why the first purpose built processing center opened near Brisbane in nineteen sixty four and and skipping ahead today geneticists are looking into the much more diverse populations of Macadamia trees that grow natively in Australia hoping to find properties in them that can help the cultivated varietals be more efficient and disease resistant? it's a little rough going because ninety percent of the wild populations operations are currently growing on private property's so what with climate change and cultural change these researchers are hoping to reach out to those landowners and talk conservation conservation yeah and Macadamia are being investigated for another reason those superstrong shells for biometrics attics so biometrics if you haven't heard of this concept okay a generally followed law of nature is that living I'm beings get the business of living done as cheaply as possible in terms of energy needed to do a thing right you know like that thing might be something like protecting itself with a hard shell and often the ways that humans have developed to to do similar things is really really energetically expensive like read wasteful by comparison to these things in nature so in fields of biometrics researchers looked systems in nature for inspiration for better engineering and technological techniques and so this one team out of mit few institutes in Germany used a bunch of really cool imaging technology including scanning electron micra graphs to study macadamia shells they found six distinct layers surrounding the seed each made up of these bundles the fibers that react just a little differently under stress which is what makes cracking the shells so difficult so cool yeah coming to materials Oriole's near you. Maybe I don't know hopefully I haven't followed up with them to see what they're doing with it. Maybe we should yeah it'd be we will. Hey absolutely yeah why not why not indeed we need to be a force to be reckon within this industry macadamia biometrics medic's industry specifically. I agree completely. I'm very clumsy. I could benefit from this so it was Ramsey a coworker of bars other day. I said I had fallen in Dunstall. Oh yeah fell broke all this beer. Oh yeah well. This was a year ago. I'm over it but uh he he paused and he said you know I was GonNa hold back but you just clumsy just clumsy and I was like it's true after cigarette goat it for me sugar coat the truth well good. It is a speaking of CO workers. I just remembered that one of the gifts that I in fact brought back from Awas who was ajar of Macadamia nuts because they have them in all of these goofy flavors and there was one that was spam flavored. Oh and I was like our Co.. Oh worker Ben Baldwin knee to have this because it's just terrible enough that I think he'll consuming. I believe you're absolutely correct. You're absolutely correct and also I love that that exist yeah. That's about what we have to say about Macadamia nuts it is I am. We do have a little bit more for you but first we've got one more quick break for word from.

Hawaii Mountain Loa Macadamia Nut Cor Paul Australia Walter Hill Macadamia US Queensland Australia Dolly Lee Ben Baldwin Logan River Kepala William Purvis Ludwig leichhardt John mcadam Honolulu director Olga Miller Alan Cunningham
"academia" Discussed on FoodStuff

FoodStuff

02:18 min | 1 year ago

"academia" Discussed on FoodStuff

"The Australian Macadamia nut industry generates one hundred million in dollars a year and prices do fluctuate but they are generally more expensive than other nuts and demand is outpacing supply right now which contributes to that expense health food trends emphasizing good fat diets in China and the US are partially driving this on the plus side Australia at least industry experts say that the higher costs the consumers are going to the farmers so that's cool yeah totally amateur macadamia tree will grow about fifty pounds of nuts per year and there are all kinds of uses covered in chocolate one in cookies Macadamia oil. They're typically sold shelled roasted and salted when impressed for their oil for use in personal care products or foods on the leftover solids are often used for animal feed and the shells are used in things like mulch or as a would substitute in coffee roasting. That's particularly useful by the way because Macadamia and coffee like just about the same environmental conditions so they can be grown connects to one another. The shells are also sometimes used as a fuel source in the machines used for Macadamia nut harvesting had auto cannibalism the Kit Kat. Oh if you don't know what I mean you'll find her. Get of The shells are also sometimes used as a substitute on their ground up and uses a substitute for the sand in sandblasting yeah yeah lots of things going for it. The trees are sometimes grown for ornamental purposes and captive hyacinth Macaws frequently get fed macadamia nuts since they we're one of the few creatures that can crack them but they are toxic to dogs. Don't give them two dogs. No nope yet. Macadamia shows are strong like up to five times as a strong as other nuts their size and like shell thickness so one tough nut. Oh my Gosh I apologize what I don't apologize for is the history were about to share. Es but first we're going to share a quick break for word from our sponsor..

Macadamia Australia US China fifty pounds
"academia" Discussed on FoodStuff

FoodStuff

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"academia" Discussed on FoodStuff

"Doughnuts are kind of easy to over snack on so watch your portion sizes or chop them up Adam to a sweet or savory dishes for little crunchy kick of those nutrients research in the early. Two thousands is indicated that switching out less healthy snacks and toppings with Macadamia can help people reduce their bad. LDL cholesterol levels though just great salt the studies were supported by Hershey which at the time owned Mount Loa macadamia nut processing confectionary et Cetera era right yes so it doesn't necessarily mean that it was bad researched as something to keep in mind absolutely when it comes to numbers speaking of things to keep in mind at one time ninety percent of the world's Macadamia nuts came from Hawaii actually got really confused because a lot of people there a lot of articles where people were claiming this country makes the most sense country makes the most at one time ninety percent okay came from white due to pests and weather Hawaiian Macadamia nut production dropped to a twenty six year low in two thousand eight the price of harvesting them was so oh hi farmers let the nuts drop and wrought oh yeah demand has led to other countries to start growing macadamia nuts as well New Zealand Mexico Toco Guatemala Brazil Costa Rica South Africa Israel Kenya Zimbabwe anti us with other parts of the US mainland us with California and Florida producing the most outside of Hawaii Australia produces an annual forty thousand metric tons of shell nuts and globally one hundred thousand metric tonnes are produced Hawaii's Manoa mcilveen core is the world's largest manufacturer of Macadamia nuts today with ten thousand acres planted on Akanik soil the most expensive hybrid it is New Zealand's Beaumont which doesn't drop its Macadamia as making them costly to harvest.

New Zealand Mexico Toco Guatem Hawaii Adam Hawaii Australia Mount Loa New Zealand Zimbabwe US Beaumont California Akanik Florida ninety percent forty thousand metric tons ten thousand acres twenty six year
"academia" Discussed on STEMSpeak

STEMSpeak

06:41 min | 2 years ago

"academia" Discussed on STEMSpeak

"I don't know why does this in my head meant. It was a company that there's something in wine. It's either a protein. I guess it's a protein but there's some something that helps you. Stay young look younger fuel healthy. They'd say to drink one glass of wine a day and an a company had identified what that was and they were trying to determine whether or not it could it in a nutraceutical nutritional supplement or as an F._D._a.. Approved of drug and of the case was they they give you some information you were supposed to try to the ground which would route was better for them and why so like campaign ain't like another marketing candidate business strategy and approach how you want to. What's Your Business Model for this going way to monetize some something that you discovered l.? K. All right so <hes> on your facebook page I also saw that you had a lot of invited speakers from I'm like different companies I think and they talk about their jobs in how they contribute their to their company. How did you kind of <unk> <unk> create this kind of network accidentally? I went to one network event that networking event <unk> like ten to fifteen people and you just talk about what you do. They do most of it. Ninety ninety percent of it is just it's it's. There's no love respond on value in it but there's like one person that you'll find that you kind of connect you. Then you learn more about what they do and thankfully I had. We were running this consulting clubs. I thought why don't you just coming to the club and tell us what you do. Share a bed and that it really <hes> I guess we we were still trying to figure out what we were doing. So that we started kind of you know he's Krizan has to forget something self. I remember there was one person that was in tried to like what we learn so he would read books and and figure out what was what was our education padded another personnel responsible for business development so you will use lots of her talking to people in in trying to find that love so some cases that we can do for free and remember that the business development person of he actually to the the restaurant academia Sinica to see if they would want us to help do some consulting again and to improve their business. It was like run by the old couple was somebody because old Saudis couple. They didn't know anything about insulting your weather. These young kids were trying to do they also do you know if the other members of the team are still into consulting or if the Academy A- Or uh you mentioned is sandy yeah the one I just talked about with the restaurant thing he he became a professor of so so the Consulting Club actually split off into a company and where we are actually getting paid to do <hes> consulting cases and and the people well I think for the company ugly seventy percent were different than the ones that were the clubs so we met New People and those I think they were really talented. End of after are are kind of pilot company broke up and they went on to do other consulting type of business. One is a private equity trading for <unk> assets assets L.. Another one is a medical science liaison. Another one is like a market analyst supposedly they went onto to more serious business. Is this kind of a limited of her pouts. Yeah I was about to ask that it seemed like entrepreneurship pilot project right so no. I think you knew more than you thought. You knew. It was really a learning in an adapting adapting kind of integration pluses up yeah I think so you found that sweet spot like you integrated your a strategy and decision making in problem solving that you launch from academy and you're actually put it into use in solving actual industry problems right so the transition seems like a really good rational decision right so <hes> if somebody's interested in doing in something like this now here in Academy Sinica at least <hes> what would be the first baby steps that they should be going to Oh baby steps I would reach out due to <hes> is a woman I think her name is Sophia but she's in the incubation center. Every year. Jiji be host this this tour that incubation center member it's for you know smaller companies that need somewhere to grow but the the the woman that runs it. I think your name is via she she has I think she would be good to talk to you because she has these internship opportunities while you can do you did learn more about how to apply some of those scientific questions to <hes> business and look for market opportunity so I think that'll help with the transition that might lights up from a purely research to to win about like how Larry generate commercial value and can be applied to industry okay so that's all the questions I have and that is a wrap on episode six of the Hope Kevin's story give you an idea of what life is is beyond the ivory tower and it also gave you some food for thought about what you could do after you finish your over the course of the next few months Huntsville feature.

professor Consulting Club facebook Academy Sinica Sophia academia Sinica Krizan Kevin analyst Larry Huntsville Ninety ninety percent seventy percent
"academia" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"academia" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Proactive intelligence community support Good afternoon thank you all for joining us I want to start by briefly, mentioning on Tuesday hosted the first national cybersecurity summit this brought together government and academia discuss opportunities to join forces to counter threats to our nation's. Critical infrastructure I want. To thank all of those who joined us from, academia government and the private sector all participated. And those you signed up to concrete actions to confront cybersecurity challenges across every critical infrastructure sector from energy to financial services to transportation to communication and so many others a single attack can have widespread and cascading consequences I look forward to working with the nation's leading minds in the digital realm as we stand up the national. Risk management center but it's not just risk to our prosperity privacy and infrastructure we have to worry about and that's why we're here today our democracy itself is in the crosshairs free and fair elections are the cornerstone of our democracy and it has become, clear that they are the target of our adversaries who seek is. The D.. And I just said to sow. Discord and undermine our way of life I fully share the intelligence community in denies assessments past efforts at past efforts, and those today to interfere with our election and of the current threat. Our adversaries have shown they have the willingness and capability to interfere in our elections DA just has and, continues to work closely with state and local.

academia government
"academia" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"academia" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Your speaking to and the work that you and jake brunton are doing with your podcast for the new christian intellectual is kind of the the the premise the unspoken premise there of why you would even have to make the quote unquote case for a crisis straight like the only context in which you need to make a case for christ is if you actually acknowledge that reason and the mind play some role in drawing you into your faith that in other words there is a relationship that is not contradictory not antagonistic between reason and faith but actually complementary which gets us into some that the three major issues that you guys cover in your work one being the role of the mind in the christian life can you expounded on that a little bit right uh what micro bigger meaning there has to be a regan academia and you know wherever met jacob route a couple of your back and one of her member convenient you heard i eat crew whatever may be and if it turned out big gator made up and i don't want to believe and here i write that absolutely program guarded there because there's so many people think awoke from other reason behind that and i don't know if to clear home what that would be because you know i it bereavement worker irving be if it were not earn we are their own we want to pursue crew and we believe that either award we we what the bible but we don't leave it simply because somebody told you we don't believe in the bible holger do we think there's act will report and enter quite a good book is gonna going to lay out the case for why we believe what we do but the the broader divi can we're trying to help christian vendors stand is that it's not go round telling people.

regan academia jake brunton jacob irving