18 Burst results for "Abu Musab"

"abu musab" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

02:10 min | Last week

"abu musab" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"For 20 minutes, but I don't know anything about running a show. Suleimani ran the show for Iran for for Cuba for Venezuela. For North Korea. He is the guy who who Singlehandedly has proliferated nuclear and other weapons of mass destruction among evil regimes around the world, and he would have continued doing it. He cannot be replaced. And you say this man you call the engineer. His top bomb making guy was also taken out. Yes, And that guy all Mohandas, the engineer. He was the guy that way back in 1983 put together an attack on the American Embassy in Kuwait that killed three local employees whom I didn't know personally, but every day when I walked into that embassy when I was serving there for three years Every day I stopped and I looked at the plaque Commemorating them because those were people, local employees that didn't know anything about politics. They just they had a great job working at the American Embassy. They were killed by Abu Musab Vielma ended by a bomb that he made he and 17 others were in jail for the longest time and Saddam Hussein released them when he invaded Kuwait. And that's the kind of person that was solid Monty's right hand man in Iraq. That's what they did about a minute. Barbara wanted to askyou Senator Dianne Feinstein is saying this act of taking out Salamoni might factor into any impeachment vote she might have regarding an impeachment of President Trump Do. Democrats think they can go back and add to the list of Impeachable offenses and by the way, Nancy Pelosi is announcing that she wants a Thursday vote to try and limit Trump's war powers on Iran. Losing Graham saying the last thing we need are 535 commanders in chief. Let him be Yeah. Nancy Pelosi Addison Wednesday night reading the Constitution before she holds a vote Thursday morning. She doesn't get to do that. This is not a This is not a question of declaring war President Trump made a very specific commitment that he's not taking war. I spoke with a friend in the region state before yesterday and he said, Listen, I said, What do you think of.

Trump Suleimani American Embassy Kuwait Iran Mohandas engineer Abu Musab Vielma President Nancy Pelosi Saddam Hussein Nancy Pelosi Addison North Korea Iraq Senator Dianne Feinstein Venezuela Graham Cuba Barbara
"abu musab" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

04:01 min | 3 weeks ago

"abu musab" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Way, did slam a briefing held by top administration officials on the targeted strikes that killed Salamoni, saying the information did not describe an imminent threat to U. S. Troops and diplomats, etcetera. The barn. Many would agree that the over 600 Americans killed already is well beyond justification. Of course it is. And this is what Solely money did every day was plot new terrorist attacks? Against America. It's like saying that that a guy who builds buildings was never going to build another building in his life as soon as he finished one. All he have all an architect ever thinks of is drafting new plans for a new building. All of all, a road paver everything. This is paving a new road. And all the money ever thought of was plotting another attack against the United States. I don't need specific intelligence to tell me that he was plotting another attack against us. That's what he has done every day for the last 20 years. And he made himself extremely effective at it. There is nobody who can take its place. His new deputy, Ismail, tiny, that, you know he may have been shadowing him. But it's like having it would be like me watching you do your show and then having you step down and say, Go ahead, Bart, you know, take over. I can come on in pontificate for 20 minutes. But I don't know anything about running the show. So lay money ran the show for Iran for for Cuba for Dennis Whalen for North Korea. He is the guy who who Singlehandedly has proliferated nuclear and other weapons of mass destruction among evil regimes around the world, and he would have continued doing it. He cannot be replaced. And you say this man you call the engineer. His top bomb making guy was also taken out. Yes, And that guy l'm attended the engineer. He was the guy that way back in 1983 put together an attack on the American Embassy in Kuwait that killed three local employees. Whom I didn't know personally, but every day when I walked into that embassy when I was serving there for three years every day I stopped and I looked at the plaque Commemorating them because those were people. Local employees that didn't know anything about politics. They just they had a great job working at the American Embassy. They were killed by Abu Musab Vielma ended by a bomb that he made He and 17 others were in jail for the longest time, and Saddam Hussein released them when he invaded Kuwait. And that's the kind of person that was Solomon his right hand man. In Iraq. That's what they did about a minute bar but wanted to ask you, Senator Dianne Feinstein is saying this act of taking out Salamoni might factor into any impeachment vote she might have regarding an impeachment of President Trump Do. Democrats think they can go back and add to the list of impeachable offenses? And by the way, Nancy Pelosi is announcing that she wants a Thursday vote. To try to limit Trump's war powers on Iran. Lindsey Graham saying the last thing we need are 535 commanders in chief. Let him be Yeah. Nancy Pelosi, Addison's Wednesday night reading the Constitution before she holds a vote Thursday morning. She doesn't get to do that. This is not a this is not a question of declaring war President Trump made very specific commitment that he's not seeking war. I spoke with a friend in the region state before yesterday, and he said, Listen, I said, What do you think of what's going on a very shrewd observer of it all, and he said, listen, he said. Iran will try to do anything. They could grab America's armor, hands or legs to drag them into war. That's what they want, and we have to leave it there. Bart, Last words, Thank you so much. His hair loss. Run in your family..

Iran American Embassy Dennis Whalen Ismail Trump Nancy Pelosi Kuwait Bart America engineer Abu Musab Vielma President Salamoni Saddam Hussein Addison Senator Dianne Feinstein United States Lindsey Graham Iraq
"abu musab" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

02:05 min | 3 weeks ago

"abu musab" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"He is the guy who who Singlehandedly has proliferated nuclear and other weapons of mass destruction among evil regimes around the world, and he would have continued doing it. He cannot be replaced. And you say this man you call the engineer. His top bomb making guy was also taken out. Yes, And that guy l. Mohandas, the engineer. He was the guy that way back in 1983 put together an attack on the American Embassy in Kuwait that killed three local employees whom I didn't know personally that every day when I walked into that embassy when I was serving there for three years. Every day I stopped and I looked at the plaque Commemorating them because those were people, local employees that didn't know anything about politics. They just they had a great job working at the American Embassy. They were killed by Abu Musab Vielma ended by a bomb that he made he and 17 others were in jail for the longest time and Saddam Hussein released them when he invaded Kuwait. And that's the kind of person that was. Solomon needs right hand man in Iraq. That's what they did about a minute bar but wanted to askyou Senator Dianne Feinstein is saying this act of taking out Salamoni might factor into any impeachment vote she might have regarding an impeachment of President Trump Do. Democrats think they can go back and add to the list of Impeachable offenses and by the way, Nancy Pelosi is announcing that she wants a Thursday vote to try to limit Trump's war powers on Iran. Lindsey Graham saying the last thing we need are 535 commanders in chief. Let him be Yeah. Nancy Pelosi Addison's Wednesday night reading the Constitution before she holds a vote Thursday morning. She doesn't get to do that. This is not a this is not a question of declaring war President Trump made very specific commitment that he's not seeking war. I spoke with a friend in the region state before yesterday and he said, Listen, I said, What do.

American Embassy Nancy Pelosi Addison Trump Abu Musab Vielma Mohandas Kuwait engineer Nancy Pelosi Saddam Hussein Senator Dianne Feinstein President Lindsey Graham Solomon Iraq Iran
"abu musab" Discussed on I Spy

I Spy

05:53 min | 3 months ago

"abu musab" Discussed on I Spy

"Welcome back to ice by we return to the story of NATO Bacchus has. She hunts for the Outside. Jihadist Abu Musab Zarqa we in Iraq by the end of two thousand and four thousand five. I had moved into an operations role whereas targeting officer and I was heading up these cowie branch and I was responsible for trying to stop him in his organization from conducting operations inside Iraq and outside of Iraq and that sense of responsibility is just completely overwhelming. Especially when you're in a situation where it just seems like it's just never ending the R murdering people at very large numbers. He's going after early Shia targets. He's killing innocent civilians. He's attacking schools in that situation. Where things are moving so quickly. It's hard to have empathy for another human being. Does things like that on the operation. Side targeting officer as actually looking for tactical information actionable. So you're understand the whole structure of the organization itself. But you're also strategically looking for vulnerabilities. Nodes that you can take out to help either. Air Support or on the Ground Special Operations forces to conduct capture or kill missions periodically. We'd get some semi credible Intel about Zahra Kelly's locations or movements. And then one day regard some information that our was going to be traveling in a white vehicle and this time we had really credible intelligence. On's our COWIE's movements but it was very last minute like it was going to happen instantaneously. So there's a drone Iraq but it was not an armed germ like we hear about all the time now. It just had video capability so as soon as we were able to figure out where this this pickup was going to be moving from. We had a drone up over that area and then identified the vehicle so we're following vehicle. Special Operations forces is is trying to scramble up behind him. Because it's all happening very last minute. And they catch up to him and then it's a car chase and he pulls into pulls into this farm essentially with what you know being Montana. We would call a shelter belt which is like a grove of trees that are set up to block the win for the buildings around there he pulls in. It's the canopy of the trees. We can't see through it so we don't know what where he's gone. At this point he evidently gets vehicle. Search running an grove of trees extends quite a ways down into this like little valley so he got out and ran and we couldn't see him. We don't have any way to tell special operations forces on the ground like which way once they get to the pickup and capture all the belongings and everything confirm. It was him in the car. 'cause he he left everything behind but yeah that was That was incredibly infuriating to get that close to him without actually capturing him he left behind a laptop it was encrypted but not in a super sophisticated way so special operations had the laptop and they were just determined to all of it themselves. We'll that's not their specialty that CIA NSA. Even if be I can do that. All of which are plenty available. There are all located together. All he would have had to do was handed off to the person I have invented with them sitting there but instead they kept it for a couple of weeks and that was infuriating. There's a lot of this happens within entered government agency fighting. You know we would have been in it. Within an hour been able to exploit a lot of intelligence off of that laptop including contacts phone numbers. A lots of intelligence could have exploited if we would have been able to do it right away all of which was old by the time we got it and then we found a lot of really weird videos and pictures of like graphic contents animals. I'll just say this is our. Kelly was pretty much sociopath by two thousand five. I felt like we were still scrambling around asking. How do we stem the tide of this violence? If aren't articulating any strategies to build things around the country that can actually counter the violence. Otherwise we're just it's just like a constant game of whack a mole. I mean we were still trying to figure out. What's our main goal in Iraq? We didn't have one certainly right after the invasion. We didn't have any kind of plan for how we deal. Like helping rebuild or maintain and infrastructure. How do we make sure that they can provide jobs and building economy? Make sure people have electricity and food right after the invasion? What's the overarching? Ingolf were a government that's form. What's the overarching goal for? Letting them have autonomy to form what kind of government they want. I mean we just didn't have. I think those those release like basic things in place prior to the invasion and we couldn't articulate. What's our end goal for. When we feel like Iraq has become independence.

Iraq Abu Musab Zarqa officer Zahra Kelly NATO Bacchus Ground Special Operations cowie Intel Ingolf little valley CIA Montana Air Support
Smuggler claims he moves ISIS members throughout Europe

WBBM Evening News

00:34 sec | 11 months ago

Smuggler claims he moves ISIS members throughout Europe

"FM and CBS news investigate. Amazon covered a new front in the battle against ISIS human traffickers should have been helping members of ISIS infiltrate western Europe hi please do not as a refugee but as an ISIS wife who wanted safe passage to Germany no problem all right instead. in fact he told us he'd moved all the ISIS members before he even bragged that he'd smuggled three brothers of Korea's al Qaeda terrorist Abu Musab al Zarqawi a claim we can

Isis Abu Musab Al Zarqawi CBS Amazon Korea Europe Germany
"abu musab" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

03:47 min | 11 months ago

"abu musab" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"J. newsradio nine fifty stay with us is an accident so the car fire blocking an eighty four westbound west of Van **** traffic and weather just ahead. if you're carrying a gun the public supermarket chain doesn't want to see it Publix joining a growing number of retirees and retailers and asking customers not so openly carry firearms in its stores even if state laws allow it. Alice becomes a week after the compare competitor Kroger and Walmart and target on other companies are asking customers to not openly Kerry either in their stores the policies don't amount out right prohibitions in particular because stores generally haven't said how their workers should deal with customers who don't voluntarily follow the rules that they put into place. W. W. gain use time ten thirty four governor whispers executive order to ban flavored vaping products in Michigan the focus today of a house oversight committee hearing. WWJ newsradio nine fifties Michael Cohen will have those details in seconds your tax dollars school road and breaking news watch never stop on his radio nine fifteen W. WGA hearing included testimony from the chief medical executive of the department of health and Human Services who said the ban was necessary to protect young people from the harmful effects of nicotine lawmakers also heard from opponents of the executive order including marks lists owns of bait shop in the upper peninsula helping these people to save their own lives has been the most rewarding experience of my life and now our governor seeks to make that a crime punishable by six months in prison these orders also make it a crime for my customers to have more than four bottles of the flavored liquid slow says his customers typically carry three to four bottles at a time adding that the flavors are absolutely necessary and are the key to quitting smoking Michael Cohen WWJ newsradio nine fifty federal investigators now beginning to examine the charred remains of that dive boat that caught fire off the coast of southern California the boat was raised as federal investigators released their preliminary reports now into that tragedy CBS news correspondent Jonathan vaguely ideas in Santa Barbara and says investigators now focusing on batteries and power strips as possible causes for that blaze the boat was required by the Coast Guard to have one crew member service overwhelming night watchman it's unclear what started the fire but among the possible causes the NTSB is considering is whether lithium ion batteries used to power phones and cameras over heated in response to last week's tragedy the Coast Guard re issued its emergency open water safety guidelines which included limiting the unsupervised charging of lithium ion batteries and the use of power strips thirty four people were killed in that fire. the CBS news investigation and covering a new fronts in the battle against ISIS human traffickers have been helping members of ISIS infiltrate western Europe I posed to notice a refugee but as an ISIS wife who wanted safe passage to Germany no problem I'll why instead. in fact he told us he'd moved on the ISIS members before he even bragged that he'd smuggled three brothers of Korea's al Qaeda terrorist Abu Musab al Zarqawi a claim we can for them CBS news correspondent Holly Williams who in under cover for the story updating you on the road to sign ninety four westbound just west of Van **** we do have a car fire blocking all lanes traffic and weather just moments away a new study is sounding the alarm about social media and use by teenagers researchers studied nearly seven thousand teens and those who spent more than three hours using social media are at risk of becoming socially.

CBS J. newsradio executive Michael Cohen ISIS Publix Alice Abu Musab al Zarqawi Kroger department of health and Human Santa Barbara Michigan Walmart NTSB Kerry Holly Williams
"abu musab" Discussed on Covert

Covert

11:48 min | 11 months ago

"abu musab" Discussed on Covert

"Their weapons ammunition night vision goggles and radio equipment these fighters were part of a secret of Unit code-named Task Force black they we're traveling towards a remote farmhouse on the outskirts of Baghdad inside was their target Abu Musab Al's Hikari the mastermind into behind countless bombings kidnappings and beheadings as the leader of Al Qaeda in Iraq as the operation approached the farmhouse to smaller helicopters flanked them they were accompanied by a couple of smaller headquarters lynxes with snipers in them that would orbit over the target and then last in the order if you like this little fly on Mada were a couple of big helicopters with the force that would be used to put what they call a calm around the Alpha the corden being the belt of security so that if anybody jumped out the window made a run for it S- quarters as they call them they edit eh either the people in the helicopters the orbiting snipers or the call would take care of those people the fighters landed stealthily onto the Desert Floor Floor and began closing in on the property to scouts climbed over a small stonewall and crawled towards the farmhouse looking for signs of life and and possible entrance points pinning their backs against the uneven concrete. They peered through a crack in the wall to catch a glimpse inside inside the building walls if you like a protection detail of people for this particular Amir that's at the SAS targeted there were at least two possibly three wearing wearing suicide vests they will hall a dozen sold rifles. There were dozens of hand grenades. These people are heavily armed. They must be protecting being something or someone important but could it be. Abu Musab also Cari finally after years of brutal anarchy in the war-torn country. Could this be his end. Welcome to covert show about the shadowy world of international espionage top secret military operations rations. The entire country was essentially embroiled in a civil war. There is a beheadings every day. They're suicide bombings. There is retaliatory acts of terrorism going on between the city and she answer every day you would wake up and read about murders decapitations types. I'm Jamie Rennell and I'm going to take you inside history's greatest special operations missions to learn about the brave soldiers and operatives who risked their lives to terminate the world's most wanted eliminate terrorist threats and protect countless innocent law. Abu Mussa Balza Cari had been thought to be responsible for years long bloody war in Iraq. Was this evil I think arguably over over the last several years no single person on this planet has had the blood of more innocent men women and children on his hands then Sarkar why and how and why did our colleagues terror begin but as a cow is doing in Iraq is trying to destroy completely the state in order to to rebuild it and from the ashes of this date we will rebuild the new state and this new states will be sort of carbon. Call me of the Caliphate. This is the true story of Task Force Black and the killing of one of Iraq's most vicious terrorist leaders Abu Abu Musab all's Hikari this is assault on al-Qaeda part one the rest of the fighters from task force black joined the scouts at the perimeter wall of the rustic farm building but as they drew near something surprised them mark urban even the author of two thousand eleven's task force black the explosive true story of the special secret forces war in Iraq as the SAS men from B squadron of twenty two s started to move towards the AL for the target. They realized it was not going to be a typical sort of mission. They they thought they could hear sounds inside the building. They approached the building very gingerly and a few of the men walked around a parked car that was under a car park and to to that surprise and satisfaction found that there was a door just wipe behind the call. If all's are Cowie one of the world's most wanted aged terrorists was inside. Why would he leave the door wide open. Would it be so easy to get inside. The unit opted to enter the compound through through the door only to find it was a trap almost as soon as they went through the door. They were hit by a hell of bullets the people inside clearly the news somebody who was coming they were armed and they will wait so they'd. Father's initial volley of bullets hit a couple of the SAS guys the SAS go always withdrew. Obviously they had casualties to treat so they withdrew to a safe distance. The airwaves were alive at moment with reports that there was resistance instance inside the building under they needed to take the appropriate action immediate action deal without resistance immediately for the commander on the spot a number of very difficult questions some of these incidents where heavy resistance was encountered they simply pulled back and dropped a bomb on the building and killed everybody inside for many different raisins the SAS on the ground decided not to do they wanted this person alive for intelligence purposes the longer they withdrew from the action the more opportunity to terrorists. I would have to destroy data that could lead the coalition forces to other Al Qaeda compounds the team again advanced towards the open door. They felt it was is worth trying to fight their way and that's what we did. They went into the building. They started to engage people in the dauntless in the rooms as they went into the building trying to clear Rimbaud task force black ran through the building taking out each al Qaeda operative in their path while al Qaeda fighters sprayed the night air with AK forty eighty seven fire but the al Qaeda cell were no match for the methodical and controlled fighting style of task force black suffered many casualties now. The downstairs was secured but the upstairs still needed to be investigated as one of the SAS fighters entered the stairwell of the farmhouse farmhouse. The top of the stairs above him was dark with no sign of life. He slowly walked up the stairs readying himself for any signs of booby traps. APPs were ambush as he reached the top step on the stairs a figure appeared as one of the SAS men who who was a staff sergeant. A team leader went up the stairs to the upper level. There was a suicide bomber waiting for him at the top of the stairs who detonated his suicide. We saw device. There was an explosion the SAS man was bloom down the stairs. There was a man down but special forces continued up the stairs moving past. Ask the now dead suicide bomber. The rest of the house was cleared. The fighters scan the rooms to their horror. Several women and children were caught up in the blast tragically. There were no survivors among them. The soldier however was still breathing with only slight bruising and Minor Lacerations Association's he would recover meanwhile operatives had captured five male al Qaeda hostages with the House now clear threat task force black started looking for any evidence linking the House with Alexander Cowie and to the teams surprise the sound of footsteps came came from above them grenade hit the ground outside the compound next to the entrance of the property followed by a flurry of machine gun fire there were other people they've been throwing grenades and opening fire at the SAS. They were killed to another man wearing a suicide vest a squirt or as they call it flat the back of the building and hate under a car that was parked behind the building. He was taken out. It's not clear whether it was one of the snipers helicopters talk about a corden forces were around the building the tallest building the Alpha so at the end of a sort of terrifying twenty minutes. There were a whole lot of dead people in this building including one person blowing himself up in an attempt to kill US soldiers. Another who hadn't had a chance is to detonate his best was lying dead under the car. There were spent cases grenades got every one of the date al Qaeda members that the has been stepped across. I've seen a photo of this had a grenade in his hand with the pain removed and clearly steph quite gingerly across him as they tried I to see what else was in the building. The special OPS mission proved to be a success inside the house. We captured five senior ranking members of al-Qaeda. We didn't know at the time they were senior. Ranking we thought or suspected they were because of the way they dress because of their mannerisms but we didn't really know what we had. That's it's the voice of Matthew Alexander senior military interrogator who oversaw the team tasked with finding out who those five men were and more importantly if they could lead him to Abu Musab collie. This was a guy who had murdered thousands of people in fact he murdered many more people than some of Bin Laden ever. Did you could say a colleague could be responsible for upwards of one hundred thousand deaths by starting the civil war in Iraq he wanted to be the leader of all tied in Mesopotamia and he I saw this struggle as part of the larger al-Qaeda struggle for dominance in the Middle East but is really all about him and his the strategy was to start a civil war in Iraq between Sunni and Shia and he believed American forces. We get mired down in that civil conflict and then the American public would demand and we be withdrawn when he didn't count on is that we would stay now. I know you've heard me talk about the great courses sources plus before and I wanNA bring it up again because I really can't speak highly enough of these folks. I love their streaming service. It's called the great courses plus and it's priceless source of knowledge and just about any field. It's a streaming service that offers thousands of different lectures on a billion different topics. Now the word lecture conjures I to mind division of me falling asleep my backpack in a room full of a thousand other students. This is not that the topics are incredible and they are taught by people who actually really have done whatever it is. They're teaching and they really care about what they're talking to you about. You can learn about stuff from the human brain all the way to learning outdoor survival the skills or how to play guitar even the one that I'm working on right now is fundamentals of photography truth be told. I am terrible photographer. my wife yells at me whenever I take a Selfie or try to take picture her and cutting off heads constantly but this course is led by an award winning National Geographic photographer so you you know he knows what he's talking about. Not only is he making sense of the camera settings all those little things that look like hieroglyphs that could never figure out before but he also gives you a lot of great tips tips and tricks to take better photos for work and family outings or even as a new hobby. No matter what type.

Iraq Abu Mussa Balza Cari SAS Abu Musab Al Task Force Alexander Cowie Abu Musab Abu Abu Musab Baghdad AL Amir al-Qaeda Jamie Rennell Bin Laden Sarkar
"abu musab" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"abu musab" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"Neda Baucus is a former CIA targeted. She wrote a book about eliminating al-qaeda, terrorist Abu. Musab al-zour Kelly killed so many innocent civilians, that was the focus of my job. So she knows something about Al Qaeda, and she says that the Iranian government radical, though it may be is not connected to L Qaeda, and that her former colleagues at the CIA are right now trying to make that clear to the White House near going to be going through all the intelligence and then giving them the bottom line about the basically passive relationship. Iran has had with al-qaeda and trying to get the administration to listen to that. But she's worried that just as the White House, ignore the intelligence before invading Iraq. It is ignoring the intelligence now, right now, the White House. The administration is really trying to push through any military action with Iran, based on the two thousand one A M F now usability for. And that's the regulation, we used to go into Afghanistan after nine eleven go after after all Qaeda, which is why they're trying to tie this back to L Qaeda again, so that they can do this under that regulation, while native Lakos is no longer with the CIA. She's speaking out, because she sees us flirting with the same kind of mistake that she witnessed before the decision to invade Iraq, letting an agenda, Trump, the intelligence, they've rose on the CBS News Radio network. Progressives homequote explorer, gives you multiple quote options so you can pick what's right for you. See for yourself at progressive dot com. Attention the Virginia citizens defense league is sounding. The alarm America's rhythms are under attack from the domestic enemies of the constitution through deception anti rice adversaries are trying to disarm Americans, while shredding constitutional protection dill be fooled by red flag laws and promoted gun violence.

Musab al-zour Kelly White House CIA L Qaeda Neda Baucus Qaeda Iran Iraq al-qaeda Virginia Afghanistan America CBS Trump Lakos
"abu musab" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"abu musab" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"And tracking down terrorists, but the truth is often filled with personal and political challenges beyond those that screenwriters, imagine, Nita Bacchus worked in several jobs at CI including a targeting officer focusing on the founder of al-qaeda in Iraq, Abu Musab, all's are cobby in her new book, the target or she describes the experiences and challenges. She faced along the way last week. David got on the phone with Nita to talk about what the targeting officer, does what it was like interrogating detainees in Iraq and the difficulties she encountered in getting her book to print, it's the law, fair podcast episode four hundred twenty three native Bucko on the target are. Nato. Thank you for joining us. Thank you for having me. You betcha. You've got a remarkable book, that's out the, the target or is, is the title. And that's title that may not resonate with everybody until they read it to find out this description of job that few people really understand within the CIA, and we're going to get to it, your subtitle, being my life in the CIA hunting terrorists, and challenging the White House. We're going to break down each part of that. But I wanna start a little bit earlier. How did you get to the point where you were even working at CIA? What road took you there? I was really focused on working overseas. And at the time that I finished undergraduate, it just didn't seem plausible that a US employer would pay me to work overseas. We were in a bit of a recession grad full just kind of seemed out of my grasp the time trying to figure out how to pay for it. Probably just pulled around for a few years. And finally implied. Now, something happened before you even.

Nita Bacchus CIA Iraq officer Abu Musab Nato al-qaeda Bucko US White House founder David
"abu musab" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

09:30 min | 1 year ago

"abu musab" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"I would bomb the out of him. Dark secret place with Brian suits on KFI. If I am six forty more stimulating talk. It is the dark secret place. Our number three, a deep dive into the life and death of ISIS. Now, maybe I'm premature on this. But I am taking the Kurdish and the F word for this. Because the ISIS media department that normally is embedded with the actual ISIS fighters has melted away actually over the past year, and ISIS have not been able to produce on there. Really, well, produced very very slick high definition sound tracked well, edited as cinematic quality propaganda videos. In fact, it's been several years since they've actually put one out primarily because the guys in the ISIS media department, well have been purged ISIS. Many of them were accused of being traitors and because of the past couple of years. I haven't been there haven't been many victories for them to tout. And so their offerings have been pretty lean there now left to angry high school students in Indonesia, sending Photoshop threats of downtown LA with exploding high rises and a guy badly layered with the ISIS flag in the front. That's that is. Isis in two thousand nineteen that and a tiny little village along the frady's river in the south central part of Syria that is all this left of ISIS. Isis surrendered many hundreds of heavy weapons mortars. Antitank missiles things like that a few days ago. A now, according to the Syrian democratic forces are again, the guys that we recruited trained equipped lead. And and supported who have done such a phenomenal job in fighting against ISIS. But they've only done a really good job. Because a really extraordinary job by several hundred at the most three or four thousand Americans on the ground in Syria have done a really extraordinary job of coordinating American overwhelming fire support from the air as well as artillery on the ground to fix and destroy ISIS. Isis have not seen the nor. Did they probably even think of the kind of fire support that America brought to the battlefield not Russia? Not even Syria, and certainly not the Iranian militias and not the Turks, but the United States. It's sent a very capable tiny task force called operation inherent. Resolve that has been decisively lead over the past two and a half years by a general VO tell that have done a really outstanding counterinsurgency job and this will go down in history. As one of the most successful counterinsurgency in the past several hundred years because number one, I has been one of the most fearsome and effective insurgencies over the past hundred years because number one they came from nowhere, the United States invaded Syria in apartment Iraq in two thousand and three and almost simultaneously instituted the debate vacation policy. This is the policy where we dissolved the Iraqi army the regular army, the conscript, not just the Republican Guard or these special Republican Guard who should have been detained and tried as war criminals, but we desire. Solved the regular Iraqi army putting hundreds of thousands of men out on the streets without gainful employment in a basket case collapsed rocky economy from this raw material is where the insurgency against the United States was easily organized by all Qaeda, and then also by the Iranian Revolutionary Guard who were able to mobilize the the newly empowered. Shia majority of Iraq in two anti American militias in the form of Muqtada solders Mahdi army or Josh al-mahdi. Meanwhile, the more lethal guys where the al-qaeda organiz guys the Sunni guys the guys from on bar province. The guys from north in decreed along the the the Tigris and Euphrates valleys up north between Mosul, and Baghdad these were the people who were. Now out of power. These were the people who were in power for thirty years when as as one Iraqi described to me a gang of decree sheep herders took over Iraq in the form of Saddam Hussein and his clan. And this was the high tide of the Sunni Arabs in Iraq. Well, now, the United States army and Marine Corps came to Baghdad and the Sunnis. No now were minorities, they were the richest recruiting ground for al-qaeda, and they were easily the most effective insurgents from early on because Al Qaeda operatives came flooding into Iraq with a battle experience from everywhere from Afghanistan to Chechnya, the idea experience, originally, primarily came from Chechens who had been very effectively fighting Russian occupying forces in Chechnya with field expedient roadside bombs that we call improvised explosive devices and. They brought that raw material and Ron knowledge to Iraq and taught Iraqis how to go into unguarded ammunition dumps poll mortar and artillery rounds out and put explosive filler into the fuse. Well, tie it to a circuit through a cell phone, cheap Nokia ninety one hundred ten dollar cellphone dig it. Very very shallow grave next to a road. And then wait for an American convoy to go by dial, the cell phone number blow up the ID was devilishly simple. And it was devilishly effective of the five thousand plus American casualties in Iraq at at least three thousand or from roadside bombs or ID's. So the nasty little secret about the American occupation of Iraq. Is that after the surge the United States and the newly constituted democratic? Iraqi government was actually a prevailing in Iraq. And making inroads in fighting the Sunni insurgency to the point where even the Shia militias decided to sit down for a little while and even cooperate and fight some of the. Some of the Sunni terrorist groups, primarily Al Qaeda in Iraq. And then something really horrible happen. Abu Musab bizarre collie who was Al Qaeda's number one guy in Iraq. It was the number one. Most wanted man for US forces in Iraq. His Al Qaeda in Iraq guys, blew up a mosque a very significant mosque in the city of Samara, and what initially had been feared from the moment. We got to Baghdad and that that being a Shia on Sunni, internal civil war. A payback war that we had so far avoided suddenly was on. And this was probably our Cowboys goal. In fact, this is well before we kill them about a year before we kill them. That his goal and al-qaeda's goal in. Iraq was to go ahead and set off the religious war, these sectarian war between the majority Shia, and they hated Sunni who were part of Saddam's favored inner circle. And now they had blown up a significant and very revered mosque of the city of Samara. So the bloodletting was on at a point when the American surge at work, and we had turned a corner in Iraq. This is a a lost pivot point to most American media. And this is approximately two thousand eight in all likelihood, you could place the the birth of ISIS right around two thousand eight because the Sunni insurgency took it on a completely different face after the elections had happened, and they were -ffective at a democratically elected government came to power in Iraq. The people who were running the Sunni insurgency Al Qaeda in Iraq decided to. Change the game. They just didn't change their name yet. But for all intents and purposes, ISIS almost preceded the Syrian civil war. But it wasn't until the Syrian civil war that ISIS got itself. A name got itself an identity and entered the major leagues the life and death of ISIS in four parts part. Number to Syria comes apart at the seams right after this on the dark secret place. KFI AM six forty more stimulating talk. Michael shapiro. The news several people reported her the shooting and stabbing in Highland Park. Shots will report it around three twenty this afternoon.

Iraq ISIS media department Isis United States Syria Iraqi army Baghdad KFI al-qaeda Saddam Hussein Samara United States army Republican Guard Mahdi army Brian Iranian Revolutionary Guard Highland Park Indonesia
"abu musab" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

05:56 min | 1 year ago

"abu musab" Discussed on WSB-AM

"You can promote better, and we can predict what leadership's going to be needed for the future with a little more clarity. Right. And you we already went over a Walt Disney. What are some other leaders that you wanted to highlight here? Well, it was interesting. We we took on Coco Chanel. And you'll be surprised to know. I didn't even know she was a person before we wrote this book and yet Coco Chanel an orphan born in France, but comes an extraordinary business person. But she also establishes maybe one of the first brands and the brand was her. She lived a lifestyle became a persona and made people want to buy her products because they wanted to be like cocoa while at the same time. She was a rock hard business person through some pretty difficult years. There are some others. Like Abu Musab Kabwe, the leader of Al Qaeda in Iraq who might. Organization killed in June of two thousand six after going after him for about two and a half years of bloody pursuit and struggle against him. Very difficult. Upbringing wasn't very well educated. But found that if he was the most convicted person, meaning the most intense believer in the organization, and he could constantly demonstrate that in the book, we talk about him. I trying to remove tattoos on his arm with bleach when that didn't work. He has a razor blade smuggled into the prison, and he cut the tattoo off and all the other prisoners saw that and what they saw was somebody who believed so deeply was so rigorous in his adherence to Islam that he became a naturally magnetic person for them later when he led al-qaeda in Iraq. Although he was a very effective leader in terms of moving around the battlefield it was that white hot zealotry that made people attracted to well. So. In a way as much as he was evil. And he was your number one target, someway, you respect him. Well, and I learned from him as well. Because in reality, he was very effective. And had I been on the same side is him. I think he would have been a tremendous comrade and yet obviously I was opposed to him and we had to count. So. So lastly about what's going on in the world today. You see that we still have a word terror ISIS has been diminished. Iraq has a shot if they could finally pick a new government Afghanistan is very much up in the air. When you look in the region. Do you look at a Ron at the root of most of the problems like this administration? Does a Ron's a huge contributor to it. And if you look at the Iranian Kuch force in other parts of their military that are helping HAMAs Hisbollah other organizations, and certainly for Cheryl Assad regime. Yes, what we're we seem to be evolving past just a terrorist period, Al Qaeda in Iraq, and ISIS, and we're almost into regional great power politics between Iran Saudi Arabia. The major players how that plays out it could play out into in a major conflict or it could continue to burn at the periphery like Yemen, and in Lebanon, I know general Admiral mcraven was extremely critical of the president came out and gave some a blistering accounts. Do you think he was right to do that? I do. And because you agree with what he said. Or if you're a civilian you can answer at any moment anytime losing uniform. Would you know, I don't think in uniform you should do that. And I think that military after be very particularly retired military. You have to be very thoughtful about when we weigh in. But I think APO mcraven has opted you're talking about where he lay down the line. I have just incredible regard for Bill mcraven, and he operates on values, and you are not a fan of the president. Is that safe to say, well, I think I think we as Americans have got to decide what kind of person we want in the presidency and not argue about who it is now or who is going to be next. We had to go back to the first principles and say, what do we want our president to be how much integrity? How much forthrightness how how smart do we want them? What kind of experience? And I think if we did that if we had a conversation on that in America, we might come to a different appraisal of our current president. But also who need for the future. And how do you explain this forty seven percent popularity? Well, I think it's. Not very difficult to people's emotions to play to people's emotions on different issues. And so I'm a little bit of a skeptic on some of the polls either way, but I would say that we need to make sure that we don't confuse popularity with what we need of the best teacher your coach you had in high school. It may not have been the one you enjoyed the most of the time where you love the most purchase short, look and say, you know, that person made me better. And I think that leaders are supposed to make us better. They're not supposed to take the petty side of us and play to it. They're supposed to pull us up. Right. And you think Trump Trump's doing that? I don't think he's doing you. Don't think he's not pulling us up. I think he is calling to the more negative side of us. All right. We'll see how this goes general Stanley mcchrystal. The book is out leaders myth and reality. Congratulations on everyone can benefit from it. Not just people that were lucky enough to get through West Point. Thanks a lot general. Thanks bye. All right. You just had three segments with general Stanley mcchrystal. Isn't it? Great next. Another great guest. Arthur Brooks, a.

Iraq president Coco Chanel Admiral mcraven Stanley mcchrystal APO mcraven Walt Disney Ron Abu Musab Kabwe Trump Trump al-qaeda France ISIS Afghanistan West Point Iranian Kuch force Saudi Arabia Arthur Brooks HAMAs
"abu musab" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

05:22 min | 1 year ago

"abu musab" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Can select you can promote better, and we can predict what leadership is going to be needed for the future with a little more clarity. And you we already went over a Walt Disney. What are some other leaders that you wanted to highlight here? Well, it was interesting. We we took on Coco Chanel. And you'll be surprised to know. I didn't even know she was a person before we wrote this book and yet Coco Chanel an orphan born in summer, France, but comes an extraordinary business person. But she also establishes maybe one of the first brands and the brand was her. She lived a lifestyle, but came a persona and made people want to buy her products because they wanted. It to be like cocoa while at the same time. She was a rock hard businessperson through some pretty difficult years. There are some others. Like Abu Musab, we the the leader of Al Qaeda in Iraq who my organization killed in June of two thousand six after going after him for about two and a half years of bloody pursuit and struggle against him. Very difficult. Upbringing wasn't very well educated. But found that if he was the most convicted person, meaning the most intense believer in the organization, and he could constantly demonstrate that in the book, we talk about him. I tried to remove tattoos on his arm with bleach when that didn't work. I razor blade smuggled into the prison, and he cut the tattoo off and all the other prisoners saw that and what they saw was somebody who believed so deeply who was so rigorous in his adherence to Islam that he became a naturally magnetic person for them later when he led I'll cut it in Iraq. Although he was very effective leader in terms of moving around the battlefield it was that white hot zealotry that made people attracted to him. Well, it's so in a way as much as he was evil, and he was your number one target on way, you respect him. Well. I learned from him as well. Because in reality, he was very effective. And had I been on the same side is him. I think he would have been a tremendous comrade and yet obviously I was opposed to him and we had to count. So. So lastly about what's going on in the world today. You see that we still have a warrant terror ISIS has been diminished. Iraq has a shot if they could finally pick a new government Afghanistan is very much up in the air. When you look in the region. Do you look at a Ron at the root of most of the problems like this administration, does Iran's a huge contributor to it. And if you look at the Iranian Kuch force other parts of their military that are helping HAMAs Hisbollah other organizations, and certainly Assad regime. Yes. Well, we're we seem to be evolving pass just a terrorist period, Al Qaeda in Iraq, and ISIS, and we're almost into regional great power politics between Iran Saudi Arabia. The major players how that plays out. It could play out into in a major conflict or it could continue to burn at the periphery like Yemen and in Lebanon. I know general Admiral mcraven was extremely critical the president came out and gave some a blistering accounts. Do you think he was right to do that? I do. And because you agree with what he said. Or if you're a civilian you can answer at any moment anytime news in uniform, would you know, I don't think in uniform you should do that. And I think that military have to be very particularly retired military. You have to be very thoughtful about when we weigh in. But I think APO mcraven op Ed you're talking about where he'd be laid down the line. I have just incredible for guard for Bill mcraven the operates on values, and you are not a fan of the president. Is that safe to say, well, I think I think we as Americans have got to decide what kind of person we want in the presidency and not argue about who it is now or who it's going to be next. We had to go back sort the first principles and say, what are we want? Our president to be how much integrity. How much forthrightness how how smart do we want them? What kind of experience? And I think if we did that if we had a conversation on that in America, we might come to a different appraisal of our current president. But also who need for the future. And how do you explain this forty seven percent popularity? Well, I think it's not very difficult to people's emotions to play to people's emotions on different issues. And so I'm a little bit of a skeptic on some of the polls either way, but I would say that we need to make sure that we don't confused popularity with what we need the best teacher your coach you had in high school. It may not have been the one you enjoyed the most of the time where you loved the most. But you sure to look and say, you know, that person made me better. And I think that leaders are supposed to make us better. They're not supposed to take the petty side of us and play to it. They're supposed to pull us up. Right. And you think Trump Trump's doing that? I don't. What he's doing? You. Don't think he's not pulling us up. I think he is calling to the more negative side of us. All right. We'll see how this goes general Stanley mcchrystal. The book is out leaders myth and reality. Congratulations on everyone can benefit from it. Not just people that were lucky enough to get through West Point. Thanks a lot general. Thanks bye. All right. You just had three segments with general Stanley mcchrystal. Isn't it? Great next. Another great guest. Arthur Brooks, a whole lot.

Iraq president Admiral mcraven Coco Chanel Stanley mcchrystal Walt Disney Trump Trump HAMAs Iran Abu Musab France ISIS Afghanistan West Point Saudi Arabia Yemen Arthur Brooks Ron Assad
"abu musab" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"abu musab" Discussed on Kickass News

"Here is an incredible fashion designer, but even more she's a branding and marketing genius whose an orphan at a young age work. Sure. Way up takes an opportunity to about the time of the first World War Two revolutionize fashion not just in France. But around the world, and then she builds an impera on that to include the fragrance should on number five by being both a good business person. But then also being. Brand herself. When people bought Chanel products, they were buying Coco Chanel 'cause she dressed a certain way, she actors certainly shed a lifestyle, and she invited you to be like cocoa. And the best way to do. It is where her clothes use her perfume embrace her lifestyle, and it it worked beautifully as a leader. She was a tough person. She was tough to work for. Yeah. People loved to work for because she was special have you embrace the Chanel lifestyle. I'm not that far yet guy. Probably the figure in this book with whom Americans are least familiar is a Chinese Admiral name Jong her who is pretty well unknown over here. But in China, he's revered as this great hero. And today, he's even become a symbol of China's emergence as a super power, what does Jong her say about China's global ambitions in the twenty first century. Well, he says a lot he was a fifteenth century figure theoretically seven feet tall with a waste five feet around. He'd been castrated at age ten, but then remained loyal to the to the Ming dynasty which had actually killed his father and castrated him. But, but he led this big spoilt seven different voyages of treasure ships out around the world and China now has pulled his memory most people in the west and didn't know who he was pulled his memory up to show that they're a global power to show that they have always been. International most of us think of China's the last two hundred years when the middle middle kingdom was very insular and to a great degree backward. Now, she Zhang paying with the one belt one road strategy is saying that was a very temporary thing what you saw China. And the last two hundred years isn't us. We actually were global nation. We have always been that way. And here here's proof. And so who a nation pulls up and makes their heroes says an awful lot about what that nation wants to communicate. And I know that you're probably more often asked to comment on Iraq or Afghanistan, but is the rise of China and the state of play in the South China Sea, something that you give a lot of thought to these days. Well, I do I'm not in government. But anyone who doesn't give a lot of thought isn't thinking, economically or diplomatically or potentially militarily because China which again had two hundred years of I described. As a bad weekend. They are back in a big way. And what we've gotta do is re look how we fit in the world. Most Americans have a post World War Two view right after World War Two America was forty six percent of the world's global domestic product, which is an aberration and not sustainable now that we've got the rise of kingdoms like China and other parts of the world. I think we need to understand that our role will be interacting not necessarily in opposition. But it's going to be complex, and we're going to have to deal with real. Not in a in a way of denying the reality. But in a realistic approach, you actually include of all people too, many people surprise, Al Qaeda and Iraq leader, Abu Musab als we among the biographies of leaders in this book. Now, this is the man that you hunted and eventually killed what can you learn about leadership from your enemy in combat when it's it's interesting to step back. We took thirteen leaders for this book right to include Coco Chanel Harriet, Tubman. Margaret Thatcher Albert Einstein Leonard Bernstein, Sweden, a wide range because they're not just military leaders are political, but someone I had to put in there was Abba Moussa votes collie because I fought him as part of my task force for two and a half years, and we ultimately killed him and in June of two thousand six but I came.

China South China Sea Coco Chanel Harriet Jong Iraq Margaret Thatcher Albert Einst France Abba Moussa Sweden Abu Musab Zhang America Tubman Afghanistan two hundred years forty six percent seven feet five feet
"abu musab" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:17 min | 1 year ago

"abu musab" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Let's check the markets and some of today's top business stories. I'm Charlie Pellett. Stocks rallied for a second day to close out one of the worst months of the bull market on an upbeat note now for the month of October, the S and P five hundred index was down seven percent. Tony Dwyer is equity strategist at Canaccord Genuity. There are fundamental excuses. You could use for sure, but this correction really started out as excessive optimism historic Aaron extreme overbought in historically, low volatility, those three things kind of ushered in period that was right for the in correction and now now it's kind of opposite. You have an extreme oversold Wall Street. Meanwhile is looking ahead to Friday's jobs report has businesses stepped-up hiring with more. Here's Bloomberg's Vinny Del Giudice is the ADP employment report shows private payrolls expanded by two hundred twenty seven thousand in October. That's the biggest gain since February and top Wall Street. Forecasts the ADP data suggest a man for workers was fairly broad based across industries. The government will issue which monthly employment report Friday, Jude is Bloomberg radio. Facebook shares gained after earnings Paul Meeks is chief investment officer at slowly Dahl and Holst forget that when this company went public back in two thousand twelve that it almost immediately had to transition business from desktop to mobile. And so the company has been through a wrenching change before it has succeeded. And now they're going to go through another change, which is going to be all about video and Facebook shares rallied today by three point eight percent also moving higher after earnings General Motors up by nine point one percent as P five hundred index up Twenty-nine points ending October at twenty seven eleven advancing today by one point one percent. The Dow up two hundred forty one are by one percent. Nasdaq up one hundred forty four up by two percent. I'm Charlie Pellett. That's a Bloomberg business flash. Bloomberg best with June Grasso. And Ed Baxter continues. What do Walt Disney and Coco Chanel have in common. How about boss tweed and Margaret Thatcher? Well, they're all leaders, and they're all disgust in general Stanley mcchrystal's new book leaders myth and reality. He spoke with Bloomberg's Amy Morris and Peter Barnes, one of the points that you make in your book is that there's no magic. Bullet. There's no special formula for leadership explained that routes. Exactly, right. There's no set of traits or even behaviors that a leader can adopt and follow and be successful. Things are much more dependent upon the context of the situation. And what we really addressed in the book is the fact that leadership isn't what we think it is. And it never has been and the implications for that we have this two dimensional view of what leadership is and leaders. So we select elect promote and follow people in many cases, following some myths rather than reality in one of the points. You make in this book is that it's not just from the top down. You are not a boss. You are a leader. So it's a give and take did you ever find yourself in a position where you had to take a little bit as a leader some feedback from whoever was following you. Well, that's exactly right. You start your career typically trying to be technically and tactically competent in your job. And you want to direct your. Or leadership the skill. You have on people and over time, you find out that leadership is really an emergent property from the interaction between leaders, and followers, and then contextual factors in the situation. It should cause a thoughtful leader to be more humble about their role because they're not the dominant player, and yet historically we've looked at leaders in history through biography, and in a biography, you put the spotlight on that person and follow them to their life. And everything else is sorta out of the spotlight and in the shadows. And we discount just how important that is. So really leadership is almost like a chemical reaction that occurs between followers and the leader, sir. You're right about some bad guys as leaders Robespierre, the French revolution. Abu Musab bowser Cowley, the Al Qaeda leader that you fought in Iraq. Why give them any pages in your book because we follow them both Abbas Mesaba Maximilien Robespierre what we call zealots and in the case of Zelic. Well, we have a someone who burns white-hot with a confident conviction of their cause. And they tend to be unwavering they are just laser focused on something, and that becomes very magnetic to us because we think, wow, if they believe so strongly, and they're so willing to do things for their cause they must be right in the case of Robespierre. His goal was a virtuous French society. And yet he became to the point where he believed that terror was a necessary road to that in a five week period. They get TNT nine hundred people all in the name of virtue. And of course, they guillotine Robespierre because a zealot burn so white hot. They can burn. In the oxygen out of a system and people either tire of them or they're unwilling and unable to keep up that level of conviction. Abba, Moussa we was similar. He was poorly educated. But he became completely convicted about a fundamentalist form of Islam. I fought him for two and a half years. And I will tell you grudgingly. He was a good effective leader. Now when I say good, not good or bad in positive or negative. But he was an effective leader on the battlefield. And he got people to follow him who didn't have his same level of conviction for the cause. But because he was so magnetic about it, and so convinced to it, of course, the same way we killed him. But but he was almost sure to die simply because that kinda zealotry is hard to maintain in the ninety seconds or so we have left. This sounds like a lot of trust not just trusting your leader. But you have to be able to trust the people who are following you. How crucial is that in the leadership role? Yeah. The interaction the relationship is more than anything we typically account for and in reality. What that means is not only must you trust your leader. And the latest trust the following mistrust ourselves and our own values because we have agency in the process, we as followers, we have responsibility. We have to trust the direction that we want to take the leader as opposed to just standing sheepishly and following a leader and trust in them and just not less than ninety minute. Here. You talk about the myths of leadership. What is what is the one big meth? I think the biggest myth is results that we pick leaders who produce a good bottom line or win wars you win elections. And in reality when we went through the data, we follow leaders for very emotional reasons, and many of them are serial failures. And yet we follow him failure after failure. Because they reached some part of us that makes us. Feel good about it. Like a cult of personality. It's extraordinary. Yeah. It's it's illogical, but you look at leaders who constantly fail, and yet have people.

Bloomberg Abbas Mesaba Maximilien Robesp Charlie Pellett Facebook ADP Canaccord Genuity Vinny Del Giudice Tony Dwyer Stanley mcchrystal TNT Walt Disney General Motors Abu Musab bowser Cowley Ed Baxter Jude Coco Chanel June Grasso chief investment officer
"abu musab" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

12:58 min | 1 year ago

"abu musab" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Leadership of the halibut. Interesting topic. Oh my goodness. Yes. It's. Lot of books have been written about it and seminars given classes taught and stuff like that. I don't know how well anybody's ever done. It really nailing it down general Stanley mcchrystal was described by Robert Gates of Philip room. We have a lot of respect here is perhaps the finest warrior and leader of men in combat. I have ever met his credentials in the United States military are impeccable. He is leading a quite an interesting life of leadership and his new book is leaders myth and reality general mcchrystal joins us now. How are you, sir? I'm great, thanks for having me. Oh, it's our pleasure. You know, just another book on leadership didn't really hold any interest for me. But then I started flipping through yours. I looked at the table of contents looked at all the different styles of leadership in the leaders throughout history. You took a look at now, I can't wait while you're kind we really didn't want to write another book on leadership until we realized we think we understood leadership, and so we took this one on. Well, listen, let's talk a little bit about your your day job, or at least you're old day job commanding troops being a general, you know, both Jack and are from military families. We do a lot of work for military charities. And so we're fairly familiar with the culture as much as civilians can be. It's been said to me many times that the higher you rise in the military. The higher ranked the less soldier in the more. You're a politician. It was that a challenge for you. It's a challenge for everybody. I think because you your ethos is that of a soldier. That's what you want to be. That's where you identify when you find yourselves in the halls of politics. It's complicated. Sometimes it's a little bit distasteful. I guess it's necessary business, but it's not something that fits comfortably. Well, and you still have responsibility for the the lives and wellbeing of a hell of a lot of soldiers who are looking to you. And I think it would be an awful thing to forget, you're a soldier. Well, that's the thing. And you know, they require you to represent them. And sometimes you're trying to translate a pretty complicated situation in a war and something that many of the politicians have not experienced personally, you're trying to put that into terms. They can understand drive decisions. And you feel the responsibility of that. Because it's hard to get it. Right. When you were in command in Afghanistan. What was the biggest number of people you had underneath you at one point. Well, we got to one hundred and fifty thousand NATO troops u s and NATO troops. And then we had about three hundred thousand Afghan forces, which is sensually not under my direct command but worked with that. So it a pretty significant number of people. So you're trying to you. You've got ideas of what you need to do who needs to go where and do what to accomplish the goals, you want accomplish you have to run that through the politicians, and then you have to have the support of the people back home. That's got really add to the difficulty. Well, that's right. And you learn over time that does become utterly critical. If you can't keep the support of the people back home, if you can't explain to political and policy leaders well enough to have their support did anything else, you do won't work because it just won't be built on a solid foundation. And we've found that in wars Korea Vietnam and whatnot that regardless of how clever your military actions may be if you haven't got the other parts, right? You really can't succeed in the long term you go through a whole bunch of different of famous names in your book and talk about their leadership ability Sousa, greatest leader of all time. Oh, boy, that's an impossible question. Of course, the leader the leader in this book that I admire the most interestingly enough, Dr Martin Luther King junior, and it's not because of his 'cause that that civil rights causes righteous. It was because his skill at taking all the disparate groups that actually made up the civil rights movement managing and leading that effort against pretty stiff resistance, and some tepid political support was extraordinary, and yet we tend to think of him as given the I have a dream speech. And yet it was really this master because he was never elected or appointed to anything he had to do it by moral suasion and skill. So that's a perfect example then for for the direction I wanted to go because I've read enough about Martin Luther King junior. No, he didn't want to do that. He wasn't. He wasn't because we often think of leader of people having leadership Bill abilities that they you know, that they that the indicate when they're first graders and all through. Grade school in that sort of superhero, and they're driven to be a leader and everything like that. And he didn't want to do that at all yet. He was so what is it in some people that you just born with it? It's charisma what is it? I think it's the moment. Actually, you know, obviously, Dr king had good schooling good values from his father. He was prepared in some ways. But in reality the moment met demand, the Montgomery bus crisis in December nineteen sixty five fifty five he's a twenty six year old pastor who is suddenly asked to lead this thing, which for more than a year has all the African Americans walking or getting to work other than using public transportation. It was an extraordinarily effort for the time and very effective and completely different from anything. He had been schooled or ambitious for general Stanley mcchrystal's online. The new book is leaders myth and reality. And I appreciate you making that point. That's when we try to make here on the Armstrong and Getty show semi regularly. Some of these people that we have monuments for in Washington DC, well, all of them. They were not superheroes. They were not gods. They were human beings who had aches and pains. And and and you know to fakes and colds, and like the rest of us, George Washington answer to all of those pains. But he did what he did Martin Luther King junior. Did what he did. And so I think that's a great lesson. I'm looking at the list of leaders, you go through for Martin Luther and Martin Luther King to boss tweed, the Margaret Thatcher to Harriet Tubman to Coco Chanel. It really an interesting approach to study in leadership. Well, it's all of them were leaders. You may be surprised to know. I didn't even know Coco Chanel existed. I thought the Chanel name was just on stores. But the reality was she's an extraordinary leader. She comes seaborn near the end of the nineteenth century is becomes an orphan. She becomes a courtesan, and then a seamstress, and then she meets a moment in time where women's fashion needs a change from all heavy course, things to something lighter. Economics of the first World War provide an opportunity, and then there's the beginning of women entering the workforce. So she's this moment in time. She not only seizes it, but she becomes a leader of it through her own persona. She acts the part she looks the part. She becomes the symbol of what women can be and essentially marketing fashion, but she was a hard leader. I mean, if you worked for her it was not a bowl of cherries. But it was inspiring because they were doing something special. And I think you see leaders like that who go through difficult challenges. They may be hard on the people that they were around. But in reality, they create something like, Walt Disney or any of these zealot leaders Abu Musab are Collier rogue spear. They push something in a direction by creating a connection with us as followers I keep getting back to the same question. You talked about the moment. Meeting the man or the woman in that's what. Put them in a position for leadership. Is it something you're just born with all the seminars that that they have in classes and things like that. Can can you get anything from those that Atkins actually can make you a better leader? Well, I think you can. But there's a great danger to them because many of us know, what it takes to be a better leader than we are right now, we could all right them down. And if we have the self-discipline to do them all the time, we we would be better. But the real reality is every situation is so contextual. So that taking eight affective CEO at one company and moving him to another company statistically fails, most of the time, and we say, well, wait a minute that person she was great in that company, and we moved her here. Why couldn't she do it again? Did she lose focus or something? No, the context was different. And so the followers are different the requirements are different. The best leaders are almost comedian like they get into a situation, and they're able to sense. What the requirement is the requirement of the followers acquiring another situation. What kind of leadership is needed in that particular moment and then keep shifting so that that leaderships appropriate doesn't mean you change your values? Doesn't mean you're dishonest one moment and honest next. But it means how you react to people. How you communicate? How you make decisions is all extraordinarily reflective of that person's empathy and inability to discern what's needed in a moment Stanley mcchrystal is on the line. General. Let me ask you about a couple of the leaders that you write about in the book, I find it fascinating that you that you took a serious look at the leadership style of Abu Musab al-zarka Kelly. Tell us about his leadership. Well, I fought him for two and a half years. My organization we killed him. And you know, there was a desire to hate him. And and I wasn't unhappy. We kill him. But the reality was I developed a grudging respect for a guy who had very little education. Got thrown in prison for five years in comes out of that crucible personally disciplined he comes out of that crucible understanding that although he can't intellectually meet the requirements of some people. He's got this self and conviction. So that he can lead, by example in prison. He's got a tattoo. He wants to remove any has a razor blades smuggled into him. And he cuts it off his arm with a razor blade and the other prisoners see that and they say, here's a guy. Who's so committed to his beliefs is belief in Islam he's willing to do that. And so by becoming that kind of a leader, he becomes this magnetic personality, and then when he led Al Qaeda in Iraq, he was you know, I could argue a psychopathic killer. I mean, personally beheaded people, but he did it for a cause that he did. Waiver from any apparently believed in and so he brought a lot of people who weren't as strong a believers as he was they weren't as confident that she was, but he could cause them to go where they wouldn't have gone simply by being that beacon that zealot who is so confident in his belief that people go, well, there must be something to it. And then the second leader I want to ask you about. Specifically, you have an entire chapter on Robert E Lee tell us about that. Well, it's interesting. We we first we're going to pair Robert E Lee is one of these heroes is a symbolic hero and pair him with Harriet Tubman, and we said that would be very uncomfortable. But we knew we had to put Robert E Lee in the book because through my life. He'd been sort of my role model. Going to Washington Lee high school I'd gone to West Point many years after him. I had used him as a symbol of what military leadership should look like even had a picture of it. My wife had given me in our home for forty years. And then as we got to after the Charlottesville incidents with white supremacism, and what my wife said, you know, I think that picture maybe sending a message to people in our home that you don't want to send. And you know, she was right. Isn't it? It wasn't Robert E Lee's fault. But the reality was it had been hijacked, but still when I studied Robert E Lee, I realized that I'd studied a lifetime and looked at him as a military leader. And I said, you know, he was charismatic. He was decisive is all the things you want the military leader. But if you really look harder he also as a commander he had a higher casualty rate among infantry than any other commander in American history. And so it was very dangerous to be in his army, and he lost the war. Now, there are a lot of reasons, but he did and he did it in support of the south which was seceding to maintain slavery. And even if you allow for the context of the times of the nineteenth century, it's hard not to take that into account in assessing someone. So what I think I came to was a more realistic holistic view a robbery. I still admires many things about him. But I view him is distinctly human distinctly flawed. Just like I am. I wonder about how we should handle that. And I know this is different topic from your book, but I'm a big stonewall Jackson fan..

Martin Luther King Stanley mcchrystal Robert E Lee Abu Musab al-zarka Kelly Harriet Tubman NATO United States Coco Chanel Chanel Robert Gates Afghanistan Philip room colds commander Washington stonewall Jackson Washington Lee high school Montgomery Jack
"abu musab" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

05:09 min | 1 year ago

"abu musab" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"You can promote better, and we can predict what leadership's going to be needed for the future with a little more clarity. Right. And you we already went over a Walt Disney. What are some other leaders that you wanted to highlight here? Well, it was interesting. We we took on Coco Chanel. And you'll be surprised to know. I didn't even know she was a. Person before we wrote this book and yet Coco Chanel an orphan born in summer, France, but comes an extraordinary business person. But she also establishes maybe one of the first brands and the brand was her. She lived a lifestyle, but came a persona and made people want to buy her products because they wanted to be like cocoa while at the same time. She was a rock hard business person through some pretty difficult years. There are some others like Abu Musab buzzer Cobb. We the leader of Al Qaeda in Iraq who my organization killed in June of two thousand six after going after him for about two and a half years of bloody pursuit and struggle against him. He had a very difficult. Upbringing wasn't very well educated. But found that if he was the most convicted person, meaning the most intense believer in the organization, and he could constantly demonstrate that in the book, we talk about him. I trying to remove tattoos on his arm with bleach when that didn't work yet as I wrote razor blades smuggled into the prison, and he cut the tattoo off and all the other prisoners saw that and what they saw was somebody who believed so deeply was so rigorous in his adherence to Islam that he became a naturally magnetic person for them later when he led Okada in Iraq. Although he was a very effective leader in terms of moving around the battlefield it was that white hot zealotry that made people attracted to him. Well, it's so in a way as much as he was evil, and he was your number one target, someway, you respected him. Well, and I learned from him as well because. In reality. He was very effective. And had I been on the same side is him. I think he would have been a tremendous comrade. And yet, obviously I was opposed to him. We had to kill so. So lastly about what's going on in the world today. You see that? We still have a word terror ISIS has been diminished. Iraq has a shot if they can finally pick a new government Afghanistan is very much up in the year. But when you look in the region, do you look at Iran at the root of most of the problems like this administration, does Iran's a huge contributor to it. And if you look at the Iranian Kuch, forcing other parts of their military that are helping HAMAs Hisbollah other organizations, and certainly Assad regime. Yes, what we're we seem to be evolving pass just a terrorist period, Al Qaeda in Iraq, and ISIS, and we're almost into regional power politics between Iran Saudi Arabia. The major players how that plays out it could play out into in a major conflict or it could continue to burn at the periphery like Yemen and in Lebanon. I know the general Admiral mcraven was extremely critical the president came out and gave some blistering accounts. Do you think he was right to do that? I do and because you agree with what he said. Or if you're a civilian you can answer at any moment. Anytime news in uniform, would you know, I don't think in uniform you should do that. And I think that military have to be very particular retired military, you have to be very thoughtful about when we weigh in. But I think APO mcraven op Ed you're talking about where he laid down the line. I have just incredible for guard for Bill mcraven any operates on values, and you are not a fan of the president. Is that safe to say, well, I think I think we as Americans have got to decide what kind of person we want in the presidency and not argue about who it is now or who it's going to be next. We had to go back to first principles and say, what do we want our president to be how much integrity? How much forthrightness how how smart do we want them? What kind of experience? And I think if we did that if we had a conversation on that in America, we might come to a different appraisal of our current president. But also who need for the few can how do you explain this forty seven percent popularity? Well, I think it's not very difficult to pluck people's emotions to play to people's emotions on different issues. And so I'm a little bit of a skeptic on some of the polls either way, but I would say that we need to make sure that we don't confuse popularity with what we need the best teacher your coach you had in high school. It may not have been the one you enjoyed the most at the time where you loved the most. But you're sorta look and say, you know, that person made me better. And I think that leaders are supposed to make us better. They're not supposed to take the petty side of us and play to it. They're supposed to pull us up. Right. And you think Trump Trump's doing that? I don't think he's doing you. Don't think he's. Not pulling us up. I think he is calling to the more negative side of us. All right. We'll see how this goes general Stanley mcchrystal. The book is out leaders myth and reality. Congratulations on it. Everyone can benefit from it. Not just people that were lucky enough to get through West Point. Thanks a lot general. Thanks bye. Brian.

Iraq Coco Chanel president Admiral mcraven Iran Walt Disney Stanley mcchrystal Trump Trump HAMAs Okada ISIS Abu Musab Afghanistan Saudi Arabia West Point Yemen France Brian Assad
"abu musab" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"abu musab" Discussed on WJR 760

"Uh about the threat that alqaeda still poses how isis works in the in the midst of all this the books called the network and it is at isis we need to worry about now is it still al qaeda who is it i think is what terms actor i look uh you know i've been following the rise of this organisation whether recalled alqaida or how hide in iraq and and going back to the year 2000 uh before the nine eleven attack you know isis you can trace it back to abu musab all her khoury who led alqaida in iraq and after his death thin and the radicalization uh of those of military officers in the iraqi army uh which was disbanded after we invaded in two thousand thousand dri uh uh you know those people became radicalised grew a group and then guan alqaida uh safe haven bridge taken away out afghanistan events spread around the world basically there was a rebranding of one element of of alqaeda which without hard into rioting was called isis is going to be called something else within a year you'll be other organization forming end there they you know now really home note territory i in iraq and syria of with the fall of their capital and raka uh you know they they have element in africa they have element in southeast asia uh they have elements in yemen in afghanistan and pakistan another play and this is a generational read i mean you're you're not going to solve this by uh by making new stringent rules about of renting a truck uh death as a generational war of ideas we'll hear more about it next week those if you're lucky enough to be there mike becher will be at the oakland town hall meeting oakland town hall dot org.

al qaeda iraq khoury syria yemen mike becher alqaida iraqi army afghanistan africa southeast asia pakistan oakland town hall
"abu musab" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"abu musab" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Confederate leaders jefferson davis this roberty lee than stonewalled jackson on the state owned stone mountain in nigeria a woman blew herself up and killed twenty seven other people at a market in northeast nigeria yesterday in an attack bearing the hallmark of boko haram militants according to to local officials to more suicide bombers detonated their devices at the gates of a nearby refugee camp wounding many more people and emergency services officials stated in all eighty three people were wounded in the three explosions neared made you gurry the epicenter of the long conflict between government forces and boko haram nigeria's military last year russell back large areas from islamic insurgents what the militants have struck back with renewed is e he'll since june killing one hundred forty three people or four yesterday's bombing and continuing to weaken the army's control the group which has waged an eightyear war to create an islamic state in northeast nigeria provoked international outrage by kidnapping more than two hundred schoolgirls known as the cuba girl's back in april of two thousand four he hits betterknown faction led by abu kharshenko based itself mainly in the sprawling some visa sulforaphane has been characterized by his use of women and children suicide bombers targeting mosques and markets in the meantime a rival faction based in the league chad region led by abu musab elbow noory and voting ties to isis has quietly become a deadly force capable of carrying out highly organized attacks last month an oriole prospecting team was captured by alpine oris group at least thirty seven people including members of the team died when rescuers from the military ambigious launch attempted to free them the boko haram insurgency has killed over twenty thousand people and forced two point seven million more to flee their homes over the last eight years time for sports we q of the nfl exhibition.

lee jackson nigeria suicide bombers emergency services islamic insurgents army abu kharshenko jefferson davis stone mountain kidnapping cuba nfl eight years