22 Burst results for "Absolately"

"absolately" Discussed on News/Talk/Sports 94.9 WSJM

News/Talk/Sports 94.9 WSJM

02:15 min | 1 year ago

"absolately" Discussed on News/Talk/Sports 94.9 WSJM

"Just right. It's an ad but even the logo the company doesn't that's allegedly going to offer me some kind of a special deal that doesn't quite look right What about those. do you know some. You have cases where that happens absolately. I mean that is one of the fastest ways. That's that a criminal actor can get inside of your mobile phone or inside of your computer and start doing damage. And so what are the things that we are seeing Increasingly are s- are phishing campaigns. Where criminals will send out emails and they send out thousands of thousands of these emails and every day. And they're hoping that just one person is tricked and thinks that it's legitimate and clicks on a link inside of that email and what happens is if you click on that bad link it sends you to a website that will automatically in most cases in without you realizing it. You'll start receiving Wear onto your device. Melwork melwert this. The term bad bad software. This is code that hackers have created the plant into your electronic device that will allow them to maintain a permanent door your device so they can go inside and see all your files your information. In some cases they can see exactly what keys. You're typing a key logger program so as you're typing on your computer the soccer could see what you're typing in real time itself. What it is is it simply software code that goes onto your device that gives them access to see what you have on your files of. What you're doing is one of these. Well you have to be careful because they're really getting jerry. Good i mean it in some cases as you mentioned it's it's obvious right when you look at it. There are a lot of spelling errors grammatical errors. The logo doesn't seem quite right. The colors are not what you're used to seeing from your favorite retailers That should raise red flags. You should not be clicking on any lakes in any email..

soccer jerry
"absolately" Discussed on The Grid

The Grid

02:26 min | 1 year ago

"absolately" Discussed on The Grid

"And it suited. My parents gomersall shinwa. Some the goals nathe phase circles naomi. When i read that part in the book i can help but be moved by the fact that also obviously the nazis were very brutal to people with disabilities and so that felt like almost a bit of a premonition as well. We assume up after you now. Yes absolutely they immediately deported people with disabilities midget and now. She owned the fist decision. On your mother edsa. It's a magnificent than story of motherly. Love i mean one of the most memorable parts for me of your first book is when she carried your school report card with her because she was so proud of you and thought that that. Might you know help on this horrible journey and violence that you experienced in an outfits but can you tell us about your mother and how important the the love has been for both of you even even after her passing. And what would you say about your life now. There'll be no more deterrent jin matter since you don't plan salary. She always thought that. I could continue to study. You know the love of parents and the love of a mother. it's irreplaceable. my mother at all free moments. She worked a lot but she freed herself to take care of me. She brought me during the winter on the ice so that i could skate. Her feet were frozen because she didn't skate but i was having fun. Of course she also brought me. So that i learned to swim i had to be a complete young girl to know lots of things to manage in life to be able to be a healthy and strong young girl and fortunately in the ghetto during the war. The things have been very different. Get to hundred on no-shows weekday told you fiddle you see it in at no kiss ruposi killer killer and then she would be happy absolately. She would be very happy. I think about my parents a lot. I think about my mother lot every time. Something pleasant happens to me. i think i'd them. And when i have some difficulties i think.

gomersall shinwa naomi
"absolately" Discussed on Exvangelical

Exvangelical

05:52 min | 1 year ago

"absolately" Discussed on Exvangelical

"What wrong. because they don't really understand what dry if the christian radio and what really drives the christian right is not I think a lot of people have bought into the idea that the christian right is about values and morality right because they've successfully marketed themselves as such And so that's why they can't. People can't wrap their minds around y a movement that claims to be about values and we're like donald trump. And so you really have to understand better. What the christian right is about to understand. That relationship has more than transactional if that makes sense rare absolately There are a handful of terms that i think would be really good to to codify in sort of define a little bit in our discussion. The terms are all related. And your book does a wonderful job of showing this sort of connective tissue and intellectual on social history that connects these groups But to delineate them would would be helpful. And as you present the your book they are the new rights which was guided by a paul warrick and others the christian right which is known for figures like jerry falwell and the moral majority and then the outright which is known for people like steve bannon and richard richard spencer. And your book details. How all these groups relate to one another. Could you help us understand these three different groups and how they have had shared interests and sort of led to one another and one might be surprising ways so the new bright was a movement that grew out of people who supported gary. Barry goldwater failed. Nineteen sixty four presidential run and a lot of came to washington with the idea that they needed to make a more robust conservative movement. That was more of Shall we say right wing populist Than what they viewed as kind of the country club republicanism of the republican party of people. Like william buckley who was the editor of the national review and so they started putting together. This movement Both in washington and beyond recruiting people to run for congress. And so on and paul..

paul warrick steve bannon donald trump richard richard spencer jerry falwell Barry goldwater republican party of people gary washington william buckley national review congress paul
"absolately" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"absolately" Discussed on Radio Boston

"Absolately. Yeah my father in. He's probably listening right now but he My father always said to me. You are beautiful. You are intelligent. You are Capable of doing and being anything that you want to be even if if you are told otherwise never believe that and I think right now. He's maybe not whispering so much shouting but he he's still think he's really really proud. Of the fact that i am getting an opportunity to work with black and brown folks on black and brown issues supporting black and brown people like that's the triad that i think for a man from mobile alabama. Who came to boston in his. You know years Is really excited to to know that. I'm going to have the chance to spend my days doing network in you. Know fifteen seconds anything you wanna say back to him. Oh boy there's more to come. We have a lot more work to do. And he's he's probably gonna write me a note leaving on my table when i get home so i'm sure there's there's another interview to happen all right. That has mccabe mccreary. Who's finishing his chief of learning and community engagement at the museum of fine arts and is the incoming president of the new commonwealth equity and social justice fund. Mckee appreciate the time thanks. I hope you'll come back and talk to us again when you're in the role i will thank you. That's our show for today. Radio boss.

mccabe mccreary alabama museum of fine boston commonwealth equity and social Mckee
"absolately" Discussed on Data Engineering Podcast

Data Engineering Podcast

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"absolately" Discussed on Data Engineering Podcast

"Your host is tobias macy and today i'm interviewing mark groover about his work at stem to bring the project to a wider audience and increase trust and their data so mark. Can you start branch reducing yourself for sure. Thank you for having us. It's great to be back. I m mark grover. I am the co founder and ceo of stem a- and stem is a managed data discovery in meta data. I also created the leading open source. Data discovery in meditated platform called. Amundsen has left. And and i did that. I was a pm out left. And prior to that. I worked at cloud as a software developer and i worked on hive and sparking apache top super excited to be here today. And you've been on. The show spent a couple of years ago now talking about the emerson project around the time that it was open sourced and so now. You've built the stem a business to help continue the work. You've done on amazon wondering if you can just give a bit more of an overview about what it is that you're building at stem a and some of the story behind how you decided to create a company around the amundsen project and would it is about this overall space that has inspired you to spend so much time and energy on brick continuing to bring it forward absolately so the story starts at lift and when i got to lift lift ones in the heavy growth phase were doubling every year including the number of data users in lift had a very data driven culture had left wasn't didn't have the right ingestion streams to bring data in that we didn't have the right data in the warehouse that we didn't have a warehouse. You know the problem wasn't that we didn't have the tools in order to consume data like we had we had airflow setup for doing derive data processing generating you know derived data from raw data. We had internal streaming platform that was bringing in both events from the lift web application left services and most importantly lift mobile applications. We had a warehouse that was built off presto. Netl engine that was running..

tobias macy mark groover mark grover Amundsen amazon
"absolately" Discussed on Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

05:40 min | 1 year ago

"absolately" Discussed on Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

"That's one of the things that i've been really wanting to figure out like. Okay what am i gonna do in this realm but also you know just taking a break to in trying to find other avenues to just explore like how i could create a more gets a bigger network to address mental health in native youth. Especially now because you know. As i mentioned in the beginning like we're in this global state of grieving and we're dealing with this pandemic and you know before this endemic. Our youth were already struggling with mental health issues from bullying from being invisible from alcohol. Drug abuse you know all these different issues before the pandemic after the pandemic you know we're going to be dealing with our us who have lost loved ones who have lost their parents or their grandparents. You know who have suddenly found themselves in the role of caretakers because they lost people and now they have to be the parent or they have to be the caretaker for grandparents or even for parents. So i've been really trying to figure out a way that i could build a better network of support for our native youth in terms of helping with the mental health issues in Finding a way to get them support in general in just to be able to do whatever it is they wanna do whether it's pursue our or pursue music just to find some passion outside of just trying to survive day-to-day because we've i think we've come to that point as native people where it shouldn't just be about our survival but how we thrive and you know i think we need to allow our youth that opportunity to kind of step outside of their comfort zones in explore. What it is that they wanna do and who it is. That really wanna be absolately. We'll thank you. thank you for that. Thank you for the work. You've been doing definitely definitely well. I'd be remiss. If i didn't mention oh an effort that that we have underway..

"absolately" Discussed on World Cafe

World Cafe

07:09 min | 1 year ago

"absolately" Discussed on World Cafe

"As the double album legacy plus sitting down with father and son speaking about the pride and joy of sharing releases and the appreciation of each other's craft talent and effort was filled with exuberance. I'm excited for you to hear it but also these performances you can feel the energy in these songs performed on the stage of the new africa. Shrine in lagos nigeria. Let's get into it. It's femi- and mati kuti as we struggle every day here on the world cafe a Busby tied to a opposed. Slama post. loosley. Ooh talk small. That is funny. Kuti and the positive force with a live performance of as we struggle every day recorded live at the africa shrine for the world cafe. Femi's new album is stopped. The hate it was released together with debut album from his son. Monday kuti forward together. It's wrapped up in a beautiful double album called legacy plus mata and femi- are my guests. I am kalaheo here on the world cafe. Gentlemen it's nice to meet welcome to the show. Thank you right here. Listen thank you for hovels absolately. Femi- this is so cool to generations of family recording their albums and releasing them together. What does it mean to you to release your eleventh album in tandem with your son's debut is probably the most beautiful thing. Don't definitely the most precious g- means everything to me. I mean there's just so beautiful. I mean as priscilla. You know my father's and they you know mind is that you see michael monopoly. He's own style expanding..

mati kuti Slama post Femi new africa kalaheo Kuti lagos nigeria kuti femi mata africa priscilla michael monopoly
"absolately" Discussed on Streams of Income

Streams of Income

03:33 min | 1 year ago

"absolately" Discussed on Streams of Income

"Giovanna lady jay ellison guy. She is amazing. I met her at. Dan miller's coaching with excellence event. I believe it was twenty sixteen and she is a pastor's wife. She has a membership Coaching program called thrive three sixty five. She is a one coach. Do is doing amazing things online of learned a lot from her over the years. She has a podcast. If you are looking to create income online streams of income online if you are looking to become a coach or just do anything with take what you know in your heart and share it with the world. You've got to listen to her. Listen to this episode. Follow her because she is a a model of how to do this. And i'm very press. You actually kind of started. Low backwards started with the vip days where she was doing live events before she had a coaching program. But guys it doesn't really matter where just start with your people who's in front of you. Who is your audience. Start with them. Serve them and she is the poster child of how to serve people well and create an income from it. You're gonna love this episode with giovanna ellison here it is john lady j. alison thank you so much for being on streams of income. Absolately honored to be here ryan and we were met at dan. Miller was a coaching. Excellence in twenty fifteen or sixteen. Actually maybe and set out. Gosh i don't remember. I think we were already. I think might even be an early twenty seven january twenty seventeen. Did you spoke And i was just like wow. You're the real deal in just following you ever since..

Giovanna lady jay ellison Dan miller giovanna ellison john lady alison ryan Miller dan
"absolately" Discussed on The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

05:23 min | 1 year ago

"absolately" Discussed on The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

"Up. Like someone like hurting. That's actually a pretty good first name. We need to the agriculture. Go for a walk. I think i know what. I'm going to name baby matter. Do you think they ended in that because he was going to grow and get bigger increase aggregate go wrong possible. And this is growing sharp so increase. Blame the recent burning of boston on wig wearing and he's like we're wearing wigs. That's why the fucking city burnt down her. Yeah absolutely because lord. The lord kindles yes. Fires big wigs are kindle fire absolately. So cotton was good friends with soule even though right there on the opposite side of the whig right Battle there. He was born ten years after him. Cecil was first generation. Okay contact saying the hand. The same circles that many of the same friends they eat together all the time and they talk politics but the only place they never agreed wicks wicks. It's broken a lot of great french. Cotton were a long brown. Curled perry wig that emphasized his big notes That's so they also show that shit off feature. Yeah i think that's right. I want to showcase the beak over big nose. And i have this big head. Instead of a wig sue a war a skullcap to hide his ball dumb and keep it warm. So so i mean but god didn't like i know god didn't give you but their thinking like well. It's it's hair so your your your your fate your fabricating reality whereas this is just sort of a bald hat okay..

wicks wicks soule boston Cecil perry Cotton
"absolately" Discussed on In the News with Mike Dakkak

In the News with Mike Dakkak

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"absolately" Discussed on In the News with Mike Dakkak

"And that's when you get collateral damage the tissue and then you get an inability debris and you go south after that. So i really wish that our government would consider that possibility and i wish that they would tell us you know they make they. They emphasize so much getting the vaccine and wearing face masks social justice think if they would just say eat certified organic diet. I think we would be a lot better off. With respect to this disease if we could get people to to switch to a certified And get the farms to switch to growing certified organic food. It needs to be a massive effort in this country. Not just for. But for general health. As i as i understand it. The trouble that it causes in a body is not so much the virus. But it's the by as you just lose to the body's reaction to the vice and vitamin d can be helpful absolately. I'm not a doctor. Even play one on tv. But as i understand vitamin d helps to regulate the body's response. Vitamin d strengthens the immune system. And that's something. I talked about my book to and glyphosate disrupts the ability to activate we have an epidemic vitamin d deficiency in. It's partly due to glyphosate. And so of course we're also encouraged to stay out of the sun where sons famous sunscreen is going to interfere with the ability to make day and we're way too careful with the sun. In my opinion. I think the sun is extremely healthy. Not just for the vitamin d. And again i talked about that in my book Really interesting stuff. And so if the government would said he'd just subtract certified getting food and get out of the sunlight exposure south to the sun. So you can get that natural vitamin d which is so much better than taking pill in my opinion yet. Do you know that Very early on in the that outbreak. I had a doctor's appointment. And i went there and i said i'd love to get tested for vitamin d in this. This particular doctor by the might not. My doctor said Why would you wanna get tested for vitamin d. And i said well. Because as i understand it really really helps with potential code section and he thought for a second and he didn't say anything but then after i got my lab results back. I saw that. He tested for vitamin d in house. Actually vitamin d deficient and so he prescribed vitamin d. I've been take namara Your point..

"absolately" Discussed on Goodbye to Alcohol

Goodbye to Alcohol

04:40 min | 1 year ago

"absolately" Discussed on Goodbye to Alcohol

"It actually is so rewarding just just having someone else to explain your thoughts is is the best thing you can ever do yourself just reflection back nothing when you sit with somebody like that some you just e things start making sense to you d- because you're reflecting in the power of that person's listening has an effect on you will fools don't think it's self indulgent toiling. I would say when we stopped drinking. We start to get to know cells. Because i i read somewhere that your emotional maturity stalls at the age when you start drinking heavily so i thought well eighteen for a long long time because we just normal feelings even good feelings you just numb everything so you never learn how to deal with them. So there's no personal growth going on that so yeah. I think that that's hugely important to really delve. In and talk deeply about also and we. We do recovery coaching. And we say to people you know all role is not only to to help you to ditch the drink but we want to move on with you and help you to find more purpose and meaning in your life you know. It's got to be a deeper purpose entertaining others as the party animal. I think i it was really good. I could down pint. You'd probably know. Johnny we'll snake by and blackwoods. It was like side with with like black tar and beer. And i used to be down that quick than anyone else at the university. I was very briefly at and yeah i mean not so yes. This is it. I am the champion of the world. Because i can down upon a bit quicker than anybody else i mean. Surely my life is going to hop absolately so three years now. Three years old coal free. Congratulations yes do you. About day one or once in a state the yeah. Yeah well i was done. I was so done. When i when i you know that day that lead up to that day..

three years eighteen Johnny Three years old once day one
"absolately" Discussed on Greg Laurie Podcast

Greg Laurie Podcast

05:05 min | 1 year ago

"absolately" Discussed on Greg Laurie Podcast

"Computer programmers and facebook and google and on an ibm and intel is the largest private employer in israel was six plants including a six billion dollar plant. They must be doing because they're a blessing us. And we're blessing them. Half of israel's exports or high-tech much of it is coming from the global american companies that are sitting in israel gobbling up startups as we speak and i want to say one more thing we're known as the startup nation but we're also a startup where a sixty seven year old startup and so is america. It's a little bit older than us. But in historical terms were to startups to democracies the arc of history is not about democracy. This is very special. Which is why we're very close. Which is why. I believe that. The deep roots that connect us from the puritans until today and connect us with israel are roots. That are here to stay so we may have political disagreements in the news but that comes and goes the basics. Are there absolately.

israel google facebook six plants six billion dollar intel sixty seven year old today america ibm one more thing american
"absolately" Discussed on Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

02:49 min | 1 year ago

"absolately" Discussed on Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

"That was the guitar one of the guitar. Players They ron bumble foot thaw and the other guy who was the keyboard player. Chris pitman now when i met chris. I met chris on facebook because my friend rick sent me his league it was like hey man i bet if you start talking to pittman that you and him could probably hit it off so started talking to. I didn't believe i was actually talking to chris. Pitman what i thought was going on was my friend was screwing with me and he was getting ready to pull up the prey so i would say this eft up stuff like i would do anything i could try to. I was what i was doing. I thought rick was bathing me. So i was bathing him into saying something that i was gonna flip and turn psycho absolately that and then that never happened and so i asked chris for tickets to an after party and he said and he gave me a generic answer. But he didn't say taking us. I say pass is pass tickets you get pass and He didn't give me a pass and So i said okay. We'll i'll see you there anyway. And and i thought it was rape mess with me 'cause bumble flight Had given me a pass to come to this after party. Bright and okay. So you know you're going to a party would guns n. Roses first off their. You already know that you can go ahead and rule that out axles not their. Dj's i don't remember if dj was not dizzy is probably not their actual is definitely not there but the rest of the band is hand. You get to meet these guys in. Hang with just chat with them and see what they're like is people and I will say when. I first walked in You go into this room first off. There's a waiting room while the band. I don't know what they're doing. Because i wasn't there like you go in a waiting room for about thirty minutes to an hour before they opened the doors. And let you and your with all these people and everybody. Somebody's cousin mom. Okay brother. Something like that. And then here i am one of these things. It's not like the others and you're waiting to go in and everything and then you go in. And i remember this 'cause like i had mentally prepared myself for this. There's going to be cocaine. This is vegas. There's gonna be blow. There's probably going to be some stripper. I'm gonna at least some teddy's where i go. Something nowhere scraped us. There's going to be wild sketch for easiness that i at.

chris Chris pitman rick pittman Pitman facebook Roses one first about thirty minutes guitar hour
"absolately" Discussed on AA Beyond Belief

AA Beyond Belief

02:34 min | 1 year ago

"absolately" Discussed on AA Beyond Belief

"That be if you had another lapse. If you played that tape forward if you had that urge to wanna use again would you have a different effect would be. Would you make a different decision. And and that's the way. I used to have tool for the most part but again it's starting with c. I start with the a instead of just having one c- i broke it down into to cease so i kind of taken that tool in recreated the way i use it if that makes us that's okay another one of our big tools. John is The hierarchy of values at that is probably best one of my favorite wants. Because if you ask somebody. And i don't know did you. I don't know if you ever had a problem in the past with alcohol drugs Yourself i have yes Okay so do you mind if i take you through. Let's see how this works absolately. Okay while we're three or four. Give me four. Sese roy value in your life boy. Well i would say Independence i would say Having a some security job A relationship as three of them. I guess just having a good sense of My sense of self esteem. i guess Since of still fourth your self worth yeah so where did. Alcohol was an alcohol. Drinking alcohol fit into those values of boy. Well i I couldn't have relationships That was not possible for me. i Couldn't hold a job. I was getting in trouble with the law. Lot looking like tried my go to jail so really just couldn't have much of a life together so i wasn't and i didn't feel good about myself either. So okay yeah so in other words again. Where did alcohol fit in if you gave me a list. And you're thinking is because the way they came up from the top to the bottom one the or prioritizing that little bit so we're on that list did alcohol. Pin alcohol took the priority. Alcohol is the priority ninety five percent of the people. You ask that question to say it doesn't fit in. It doesn't fit in okay. The viper sent which you just became a part of it came i. Yeah a blast. Because i've been in recovery for so long. Not and i know that now but but but you're right if i if i had transport myself back in time to nineteen eighty-eight i probably would say it doesn't fit.

ninety five percent four John three nineteen eighty-eight fourth one
"absolately" Discussed on The Brandon Triche Show

The Brandon Triche Show

03:52 min | 1 year ago

"absolately" Discussed on The Brandon Triche Show

"I love the The faith-based elementary school. And i just thought it'd be supercooled applicable there. Of course notre dame didn't have the same dream as i did. I wasn't quite at that level to play in a big school so Gone to a major university. That would've been an. Am you take both of them. Awesome awesome schools and said attacks would would've been happy to play there as well but yale was Was was my ended up in my cup of tea or athletic aptitude i. I don't know anything about divisions or schools. Did as going playing at yale. Did you ever get to play against notre dame ever or was that like absolately not sort of thing. They wouldn't railroad enough would've been embarrassing. Would've been hearing from for just like you can move out of the way and let go. I'm not sure by the way they will. Just run right over me offer you. Were talking a little bit about faith. Can you tell me a little bit about your faith as far as like you know what you believe in and your you know your background in faith sure well. I was grew up in a christian household Both my parents are strong believers but really understand how i came to fay in jesus christ as category understand me and my friends and family know that i am one of the most competitive people on on earth and That is my big. Also the biggest san. Because of my competitiveness. I fall prey to pride and ego and there's many many examples but i think One of the best microcosm of it was when i was in. Yes four th younger yogurt. That probably eight years old and doing the swim team and of course you when we were going through swim team. You've put us in those like bikini bottoms feeders. I it was so humiliating. The president but i was doing the all-star swimming and my mother In was packing up my my clothes in the morning and she had thrown and instead of my speedo my brother speedo and while a little bit younger than me yet. A bigger waistline than me so as put these on just slightly too big and loose so the first race in the day i dope into the water the water or and this is one of those incidents and i think we've all experienced it where in it's just a blink of an eye but to the person is happening to his feels like an attorney. I could feel those that speedo sliding down my waist off my left leg my right ankle hanging on and then fly back through the water and in that instant i have an eight year old kid or so i decided not gonna stop save my embarrassment and put back on my speedo or my. Just gonna keep on truckin that sell competitive. I i am was kip ongoing little sheets. What up in down and get your jersey. Somebody bringing sorry the wall. So that's not competitive. I was so fast for that. A couple of years later amid church camp and throughout the the camp We have been doing athletic competitions and As we as we got near the end of the final day..

both jesus christ Both earth one yale first race speedo eight year old A couple of years later eight years old four th younger christian notre dame one of those incidents One
"absolately" Discussed on Scott H Silverman's Happy Hour

Scott H Silverman's Happy Hour

06:01 min | 2 years ago

"absolately" Discussed on Scott H Silverman's Happy Hour

"Questions knowing to question to ask yourself deciding. Every overall objective what's underlying objectives Do they go are they. In line is my immediate ejected. Gonna go along with bigger one and so when you start making decisions it gets you out of. We have to. We have to understand our feelings but we also have to learn to tell them to shut up sometimes right and if your mind is in your minds kind of scrambled from things that have been going on with your compulsive obsessive addictive behavior. Sometimes again the old idea. I said earlier. You're my mind is like a bad neighborhood. Try not to go there alone. My thinker isn't necessarily. You know when i first got sober. I you know. I had no idea where i was. What day of the week was or how you know. And that was so long ago but still you know the the the to seek new tools. Which i i really hear you talk about. Providing is really powerful so we just have a couple minutes left. I want to ask you this question. Because i don't wanna forget this. Is there anything we haven't asked you that you'd like to tell us. What question would you like us to ask you that you shared or you didn't tell me before our little journey here you got. Oh my goodness. I really need to whatever that is. What is that but would you like to share with us. What people can expect when they if they were interested in the change. Your story workshop and that is Positive energy you know. Of course there are tears. It's it's hard. It's a hard thing you'll ever do changing your story But it's it's the best job you'll ever have become positive like you are a absolately. Yeah yeah more than a week or two it takes awhile boy awhile but you know. Atmosphere hope and expectation of the change story workshop has aspects of traditional therapy. You have to deal to heal. So we look at feelings emotions. How they're acting the behavior but they also gain what they would from having a recovery coach..

more than a week two first couple
"absolately" Discussed on The Spivey Special Podcast

The Spivey Special Podcast

05:12 min | 2 years ago

"absolately" Discussed on The Spivey Special Podcast

"Their birkbeck iraq Barker all the greats. That was like i think one of my favorite parts of the day to just watch him both of you because i know how much you love the sport in just the history of the sport and i mean we're grown man but we're acting like kids in that room. It was almost a little annoying. That t g k was trying to russia's out of the room like they had another tour right behind us. I would've liked to spend some more time in that room. also go for. I think we were acting like kids. 'cause we had quite a few beers that could've been a piece absolately cool to That tour because when you guys had said you coming out for the trip. I was trying to think like okay. What else could we do for the day and I've grow going to springfield college. I had a lot of buddies who we're all in sport management so a lot of these. A lot of my friends after graduation went work for the red sox. So i a buddy. Mike kameta who was under my classes and we kinda went through all our years of undergrad together and he worked for the red sox so he gave us those tickets for free. also give tickets to the game for free as well which we'll talk about nabet And we kind of put an audible at the last second yet again. The end tonight night isn't as clear as the beginning of this. I would say though. I mean we've done a few just the tours that i've done of the stadiums but the red sox won was one of those feelings like this cole. Yeah you get the experience. It's super famous stadium. It's one of those things that i've never get to see like dodger stadium. We've been too many many many many times. You've been their playoff games. Have been there for a whole bunch of regular season games and Yeah it's pretty cool. It was different being defend. My where you've never been there and then you look up and you see the green monster guy was cool when we were walking around. We're taking pictures outside of the stadium like first thing in the morning. First time we'll walk around the corner like the green monster. Let's take a pitcher and be awkward outside. A people are still cleaning up from the night before the game and the izaak walking around. That's pretty cool. So the tour ends t g k kicks us out He took our picture. I on the green monster which will post this week on. Social media already got all saved him prepped..

Mike kameta both this week red sox First time one first thing tonight night college one of those second springfield russia favorite monster birkbeck iraq
Cyber Power Index highlighting Australian Governments gaps in cyber capability

Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

06:22 min | 2 years ago

Cyber Power Index highlighting Australian Governments gaps in cyber capability

"Like any INFO Technology Sector security has plenty of indexes flooding around or get. Indexes collided by vendors and people trying to sell things to us I thought this for Senate index was. Useful because it doesn't come from I accompany product. It say independent academic attempt to benchmark Com, sub security capability and intent from nation sites It appealed to make per couple of reasons may not have had A to do with Bill Center in the past spend a little bit of Thanh. Talking to their academics in previous roles and particularly locked the way that This report sets metrics that up designed to objectively major subsidy maturity in nations So it says what are the kind of things that we could judge the intent of a nation in the obscurity spice and one of the kind of things that we could use to objectively major capability. And it tells an interesting story in Australia Australia's categorized in the higher intent, low capability quadrant and the reason for that is because when the the objective metrics this reporter applied to the statements made by by government ministers by government departments, entities about what our intent is. Assab security spice. Where about the most ambitious nation in the world for ask security attend? But. Then when you look at what our actual capabilities against that intent on again measured in a series of objective metrics. We fold anti sixteenth in that space. So, FA May that told a pretty familiar story because this over promising on delivering stories. One that I think is familiar to a lot of. People in the Strand security sector. In the context of these trying government's actions since the twenty six, Day sub, security strategy. A lot of announcement to be my bet when you follow up way those announcements. In the years after that have been made you say less deleted then was announced to the media. Will what's on the industry? Kodak in the two thousand, sixteen strategy that was undefended at least out of the Prime Minister's office. This one is looking out at a ten years. The two thousand twenty strategy is looking at at the ten year timeframe. And proposing one point six, billion, dollar funding. Backdrop, but a lot of that is going into law enforcement and as you say might be into that capability. What's your take on the strategy itself? Overall as you say, it's it's another announcement is on the strategy whether it's not as another thing but certainly yet your thoughts on the strategy itself and where maybe else we could have been in twenty twenty from the twenty six danes strategies. Have you have you seen that the two thousand twenty strategy's building on the twenty, sixteen or? Taking a completely new direction. While the that, you can certainly say the why the two thousand twenty strategy is reaction to experience the twenty six strategy That the twenty sixteen subsequently strategy had a very large number of of objectives and Nisha announced under it. I think the government found the experience of trying to implement those very large number projected initiatives again, adopted under outcome Tambo's prime ministership around the breathing bruising exercise because the twenty twenty strategy dramatically rationalize is temptation I'm say that the broad spread of of initiatives and objectives under the strategy a kind of a toddler. Your decide that the Gospel confessed about ninety percent of the funding. Associated with these twenty twenty strategy he's allocated to security agencies So it goes into building. Capabilities with particularly the is day but also other security agencies on. Enforcement agencies like the the I pay, and that's well and good We have I think outstanding internationally recognized capabilities within is. and this is the conduct that you have to keep investing in order to. Maintain those capabilities in my time that that international ranking. Suppose big Criticism that that libraries had is one that we've been exploring for at the loss twelve months and that's really When you look at security policy to strike the problem is the ability to project those capabilities out of the silos of how defense and security agencies. To the problems in Australia Com in terms of lifting a bench, mock the baseline up security security. Brazil and Sada resilience across the Australian government trying economy You know there's a lot of examples of that. Wall is day is absolutely world standard. Saab resiliency combined entities is as at the government's own description reminding at relatively low levels. you know the is days top full became mandatory in the. Seventies ago now. had a slew of a straight national ordered office inquiry since then. when you type them all up on like twenty nine percent of Kamal entities compliant with all the top four. Seven years after theoretically became mandatory say interesting. Is Connect between very high capability. Inside Is Day lower levels of saga resilience and more broadly throughout government not to sign story that we see in the corporate sector unites now at banks and Al. Telcos, absolately will class intends to their sub security posture. But you only have to sort of take one stiff through the down. In the I six navy top fifty. And you start seeing. Very, different levels of resilience.

Info Technology Sector Senate Bill Center Australia Australia Kodak Australia Prime Minister Saab Tambo AL Nisha Absolately Reporter Brazil
Google is now offering its 'strongest defence' against hack attacks to iPhone users

Daily Tech News Show

02:22 min | 3 years ago

Google is now offering its 'strongest defence' against hack attacks to iPhone users

"Let's talk a little more more about what Google's doing for two factor authentication. Why Not Google up start Excuse me Google is an upstart brand new company. A little mom and pop operation now. That's not true. True Google updated. Its Smart Lock West to include support for using the phone as a second factor froth occasion of Google log ins on chrome when enabled the seems. It's pretty cool Logging into Google surface in chrome will generate a push notification in the smart lock APP on Ios that can be tapped to approve log over you. Bluetooth this is more secure than Google prompt which worked over the Internet but not as secure as a physical security key important distinction. The APP requires oh I A- west ten or later because it uses the iphone secure enclave the feature was available for android phones already. So that's the thing you're already using Betta if you're already an iphone user and you're used to using Your phone to do the sort of thing with apple authentication. Whenever that's needed then this is gonNa feel very familiar failure to you for your Google apps and your Google stuff that you use through the chrome browser? So I I think this is GonNa be great and I will plan on using it yet. Bottom line if you have the ability to turn on in two factor authentication do it no matter what. It's always better than not having it on. However if you have the option to use an actual key instead of SMS S. The key is better than SMS? And this is another way you can have a key. If you don't actually own a physical key you could do this. Granted there are some vulnerabilities in the Bluetooth connection. which is one of the reasons you became doesn't offer that and Google does but having a second factor with Bluetooth is still more secure than SMS which is still more secure than not having one at all so This is good because it's another option for people to use and the more options you give them to use the more likely they are turn on a second factor which usually absolately do. I'm really glad you broke down. The hierarchy of this is better than nothing. This is better than that. This is better than that all the way down to sort of the best because I think people get really gummed up on that and it's easy for them to hear something like Oh. Did you hear Bluetooth dangerous now. Because because that's unbeliev ability and they don't realize that even then if there are at least doing that they're doing better if they were doing nothing at all because a lot of people just throw their hands up and say well. I guess I just won't do anything if nothing secure. Yeah So let's get to

Google Apple
Does the Deficit Matter?

The Indicator from Planet Money

08:44 min | 3 years ago

Does the Deficit Matter?

"As evil number one fat, sandy not wanna eat fat. It was bad. There was no such thing as good fat. It was just all bad fat. And so in the store there was low fat everything there were these Lafayette cookies your snack cookies cardio. Yes. Like hockey pucks like had the consistency of packing phone. We're like frozen yogurt. Then it was like a low fat alternative to ice cream, which also kind of had the consistency of packing foam eighties. Eating a lot of stuff with the consisting of packing foam, like even low fat butter. You could've mentioned cholesterol, good, cholesterol, and bad cholesterol. Is at all bad. You know, that's that's another one for your list. That is Jason Furman. He's a professor of economic policy at the Harvard Kennedy School, and he also worked as an economist for the Obama administration. And we wanted to talk to Jason because he writes anything's a lot about another kind of universal evil that we had back in the eighties deficits the deficit is the shortfall between the tax revenue. The government collects in a given year and the money it spends when the government spends more money than it takes in. It has to borrow money to cover the shortfall that is the deficit, by the way, the deficit is not to be confused with the national debt. So the debt is like the amount of water in the bathtub and the deficit. Is like the amount of water. That's coming out of the tap in a given period of time and flowing into the bathtub to the debt is you're running total. The deficit is what you do in any given year politicians on the right on the left in the center. The one thing they could all agree on was the deficits were bad. It came up a lot deficit spending should not be a feature of budget. We have to cut the deficit because the more we spent paying off the debt the less tax dollars. We have to invest in jobs and education, the massive national debt, which we accumulated is the result of the government's high-spending diet. Well, it's time to change the diet and to change it in the right way. Government spending is a dangerous road. The deficits the people of America have been overcharged and on their behalf. I'm here asking for a refund, but now attitudes about budget deficits are evolving a lot. There's even a whole sort of tr. Trendy school of thought economics now, saying budget deficits, don't matter nearly as much as we thought that unless budget deficits lead to inflation. We can rack up all the deficits we want. No big deal. Jason Furman is not in that camp. But he says, you know, just like fat deficits are not the universal evil that we used to think they were. Although he did say that he didn't think it was an exact analogy it's a little bit different in that there. Probably is some timeless truth about dieting undefeated. I don't even think there is an underlying timeless truth because the world actually is changing and financial markets are functioning one way in the eighties and other way now and you need to. You know, change, your your an update, your ideas with with us changes in the world this indicated for planet money, I'm carseat, and I'm Stacey Vanik Smith. Dan, the show deficits why did everybody used to think deficits were bad, and what changed? Support for this podcast in the following message. Come from Jimmy Nye, the regulated exchange making it easy to add bitcoin and other crypto currencies to your portfolio, protecting your investments with oversight and state of the art cybersecurity open a free account at Jim ni- dot com slash indicator. Support also comes from WordPress dot com with powerful site building, tools and thousands of things that she was from users can launch site that's free to start with a room to grow. Get fifteen percent off any new plan. Purchase at WordPress dot com slash indicator. Today's indicator is a trillion as in a trillion dollars this year. The budget deficit is set to hit a trillion dollars. Jason Furman urine economist with Harvard's Kennedy School, you also served as an economist under President Obama trillion dollar sounds like a lot. That's scary Ohno's lot and that'll be popping for people absolately. Do I wish the deficit was smaller? Yes. Would I feel better about our economy? We had a lower debt as sheriff are Konami. Yes. So I feel like when I was growing up in eighties. The deficit was just this universally acknowledged terrible thing like the deficit was was bad. I feel like that his changed. But why has it changed? I mean, why did I mean it was really talked about. I think sort of this universal evil. Like, the one thing we could all grand was that the deficit was bad. Sometimes deficits can be good. Sometimes they can be bad. And sometimes they can be just not nearly as important as you'd like to think the time when they're good is in a recession you need to get yourself out of a recession. A'deficit means you're spending money or cutting taxes, that's helping the economy and in the nineteen eighties deficits back then really were a problem now deficits aren't causing high interest rates. So I don't think they're causing nearly the same magnitude of problems for the economy as they once were. Feel like they're kind of two parts of the deficit that people tend to worry about one is this kind of like there's almost sort of a morality like a moral principle at stake about deficits and the other one is just that sort of drags are Konami down. You could think about it in terms of morality because it can affect the distribution of income between generations. They're it depends on what you're doing it for if you're running a deficit to invest in infrastructure. You might actually be helping a future generation if you're running a deficit to give big tax cuts to people who are going to just run out and spend it today, you might be hurting a future generation. So I think there is a morality play between how this affects different generation. So what do you think is the best approach to the deficit right now? I mean, it sounds like maybe one extreme the other extreme don't like neither of those are good idea. What's a good idea? I can't give you. Scientific certainty. Exactly what the right way to handle the deficit is if you have a great new idea for college or a great new idea for social security or a great new tax cut. You wanna do then, you know, cut spending or raise taxes so that you're not adding to the deficit and making even higher than otherwise would have been that strikes. Middle course, it says you're not making a major exit for deficit reduction. You're just doing no harm. What I wouldn't do though is pass a law that makes that deficit even larger what are some good things about running a deficit. You know, the good is in a recession. It can help stimulate demand. Get people in businesses to spend more and help you get out of the recession in normal times. If you're using the deficit as a way to spend money on good things like infrastructure like scientific research, then it can actually make you richer in the future. Not. Poorer the flip side, the bad is if you're spending money on bad things, it can make future generations poorer, and it can drive up interest rates. Probably only happens a little, but it can that results in less business investment unless economic growth, you mentioned that like the economics of deficits have changed. How how have they changed? What has changed? And what is what does it mean for deficits the single most important number to know in? Judging country's fiscal situation is the difference between its interest rate and its growth rate 'cause if your interest rate is higher than your growth rate, your debt is going to be spiraling up as a share of the economy. If your interest rate is lower than your growth rate that helps contain how much your debt is rising relative to the economy right now in the United States growth rates are higher than interest rates, and that's helping us. To grow out of some of our debt burden and it's that key variable or minus Chee watching how that changes over time is I think a real key to understanding how much you should be worried about deficits at any point in time. Jason furman. Thank you so much. Thanks for having.

Jason Furman Konami Hockey Harvard Kennedy School America Stacey Vanik Smith United States Obama Administration Jimmy Nye Professor Chee Barack Obama Ohno DAN Jim Ni
Food Delivery Companies Face Challenges Outside Big Cities

WSJ What's News

02:59 min | 4 years ago

Food Delivery Companies Face Challenges Outside Big Cities

"Heather the benefits are obvious for food delivery companies here who are able to troubleshoot these challenges. This is a huge market to capture right now absolately, so all these food delivery companies most of which were founded in big cities, many of them along the coast are now looking for new growth, so they are expanding into the suburbs. And smaller cities to try to get new customers, and it's really become a land grab at this point about who can get in there. I try to capture new markets and should their investors that they are growing. But of course do. This is challenging so in a lot of these markets have really isn't a gig economy driver pool already established. So these companies have to establish that that to recruit workers were willing to do these these flex flexible, hour shifts. They have to sign up the restaurants or grocery stores to be interested in the service. They have to get demand from customers. So there's a lot of lead work that comes into expanding into these areas. The plus side is for these companies they can help again show growth to investors that their ideas, and this model is workable outside. Just the biggest cities which is what they really want to try to prove at this point. And these problems you found are also amplified in smaller, cities, and suburbs where consumer habits really play a big role you found for example, that in many of these areas residents are more likely to go pick up food themselves rather than have it too. Livered? So you're really talking about changing consumer habits. Yes. So again, a lot of these companies were founded in big cities where people don't have cars. So a lot of folks, you know, New York LA, the they don't have cars. So they're used to ordering for food or ordering for other things positions the convenience factor. Save their at their office desk all day. They just want the food delivered to them now. And there's so many restaurants that are willing to do that that it's just become second nature. So in the suburbs and smaller cities that culture that custom is not as much established. So these companies are having to impart to drum up that interest in thirsts from customers from retailers restaurants might not be used to thinking about delivering to do that that said, you know, ally. These delivery services have been around for a number of years now in its people say get familiar with them in the bigger cities. But then maybe move into the suburbs as they get older. Maybe move. Into smaller cities, the knowledge about them is expanding. So some of this is just in Evelyn of the marketplace overtime who what are the challenges of signing on local restaurants to use outside delivery services, especially for those who may have their own delivery, employee's. So a lot of the full service restaurants don't have delivery services. So traditionally

New York La
Denver ministers trying to redefine the fight against racism

Here & Now

03:09 min | 4 years ago

Denver ministers trying to redefine the fight against racism

"Colorado. Public radio's Marie Awad spent some time with a soul to soul sisters. She has our story. The first thing you need to know about Reverend Don Riley divall and Reverend to one a Davis is that they don't have a church. They don't need one says Riley devolved the work that Thuan or call. Do we could not do in the confines of a congregation or even a denomination? We had to create our own thing. And do it how we feel it how we feel called? She says both of them already put in their years as pastors in the African Methodist episcopal church, then they retired defined their non. Off it soul to soul sisters three years ago. Davis says in order to do the work that they do fighting racism they had to play by their own rules. We don't need someone give us permission to do the work. But we are creators, we are co creators, and if we can't co create and doing that work, then do your thing. God bless you wish. No ill on you, you rock and do what you believe is anti racism work, and we're going to do this. And what is this? It's facilitating conversations predominantly among white people about racism about how it works all the different ways it can manifest itself. And most importantly, what a white person's role is in the task of dismantling racism at first they would give presentations to congregations, but Riley divall says not everyone wanted to hear what they had to say heard a lot of hurtful things a lot of hurtful things, and we just decided absolately not that's not healthy. That's not. Itself care. We're not going to open ourselves up to being treated like that nowadays the pair. Let people come to them, and they have to the tune of more than eight hundred people just last year, they run multiple programs now, including one that's still involves congregations. Another called facing racism is a four week intensive there's lots of reading from writings by Malcolm X to rap lyrics is okay. And it is loving. And it is responsible for us to be like, it's not mean, it's not my word to educate this person at a session. I attended people discussed wanting to confront racist family members or ask for advice on how to navigate tough conversations with friends. No one was called out. And no one was judged again Reverend to wanna Davis we are encouraging critical feeling in critical thinking, so you can think differently in this world. So we are again exempt. Defying and embodying what it is to experience difference in how to do this dance the two also emphasized that the work of combating racism is ongoing. So there's a facing racism alumni group that meets

Davis Riley Divall Marie Awad Don Riley Thuan African Methodist Episcopal Ch Colorado. Malcolm X Three Years Four Week