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Transcend: The New Science of Self-Actualization, by Scott Barry Kaufman, Ph.D.

The Psychology Podcast

05:35 min | 3 months ago

Transcend: The New Science of Self-Actualization, by Scott Barry Kaufman, Ph.D.

"About Maslow's we're we're going to go into your new book coming out called transcendence is that right that's it's called transcend transplants. Verb got it transcend. Is it like an order? You're giving people please transcend. Yes yes that's the idea. It's an action action word for sure. It's a hopefully a inspirational northstar kind of book. They kind of shows what humans could be well any builds on the work of Abraham Maslow's. So tell us a little bit belt who he is we all. We've all heard of him but Philipson is if we didn't know oh good. I'm really glad you said that. Because I've had other people billy well no one's no good no sue Masilela. Why should they care about your book and we thanks so I like your attitude about that? Everyone knows who might as well. Well I think most people who've taken introductory psychology class who have taken an introductory management class have come across maslow's writings. Yeah for sure. I've come across at least if they never even heard him as well have come across that. Connick pyramid now. As Abraham Muscle was a humanistic psychology. The pyramid is the hierarchy of needs. That we're talking about correct maslow's hierarchy of needs and it's usually depicted as a pyramid where you have n- order of needs. That must be met before one can become everything. They're capable of becoming sandwiches labeled soft actualization. Now this is the story this is this is the story that's being told to so many introductory psychology management students and people who see at diagrammed on the Internet however it turns out that massive never drew a pyramid and and there are so many misconceptions about the hierarchy of needs. It's it's incorrect. How it how. It's been taught the past sixty years. Correct a list of needs a hierarchy. But he's never drew them in the form of a pyramid correct. He never conceptualized in that way. His theory was very developmental. He made it very clear that we are constantly this dynamic of moving two steps forward and one step back and then we can also that we can. We can target multiple need simultaneously. We don't have to wait to to start self actualising until everything else has done until we check all the boxes and also as I like to say in. The book of life is not a video game. It's not like we reached one level of the hierarchy like connection. Some voice from above is like congrats. You've unlocked esteem mortal combat or something. It's just not the way the world works and was very clear about that so I really tried to infuse the spirit of what Mazal actually meant as well as the rest of the humanistic psychologists it really is an attempt more globally in this day and age in this world today to to bring back a lot of the ideas of of the humanistic psychologists have been lost but tell us what the hierarchy is. What are the levels the original model in medicine and I revised it revised it but in the original model you had the safety needs or even had below that yet physiological needs okay like food water shelter and safety needs need for certain sense of predictability in your environment and then you have belonging in love and he lumped him together which I teased them apart? And we can talk about that in in my my revised model but he had love and belonging together and then he had a steam needs which is esteemed from others esteem. It's the esteem and others hold us in both. I'd say he. He has two components of that. Both the scene from others as well as our own self esteem. But the problem with that is it's hard disentangle that because we do drawl so much of our own self esteem on this team. It's almost like redundant in like ninety percent of humans and then but then you can get to the self actualized individuals so that's too that's the next level is self actualization is a big. It's a big leap jets. I've always viewed that as quite a jump like okay. I feel really pumped up ego. Wise boom can self actualize? I you know this seems to be a lot of steps along the way there. And in a Lotta ways. That's what I try to. My book is is connect those dots and I took self actualization out as a stage. It's not because it's not we ever reach again. Life is not a game. It's not like you ever reach self actualization and then you win the princess or whatever that was whatever my my video game. I understand just an ordinary language. The words you know physiology safety belonging esteem but self actualization. I'm betting most people hurt either directly or indirectly from maslow's hierarchy of needs. Can you can you tell us a little bit about what he meant by that? I contact Maso talks about in different ways. But there's one one quote he's he used to. If you give me a moment to actually find it I really love this quote. It was the best description of self actualization. I could find okay. Short tie found a unpublished essay that he really wanted to publish it was he was calling critique of self actualization. This was really his attack. He really wanted to publish this before he died. And instead it was left in an unpublished collection. But this is the quote. I think this is this really gets the heart of what he really thought about. Self-isolation we try to make a rose into a good rose rather than seek to change. Roses into Willie's incessant pleasure in the self actualization of a person who may be quite different from yourself even implies an ultimate respect and acknowledgement of the sacred and the uniqueness of each kind of

Abraham Maslow Connick Pyramid Abraham Muscle Philipson Sue Masilela Billy Mazal Maso
"abraham maslow" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

05:11 min | 9 months ago

"abraham maslow" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Technology Entertainment Design Design. Is that really what I've never known delivered Ted Conferences around the world. If the human imagination we've had to believe an impossible thing the true nature of reality beckons from just beyond those talks those ideas adapted for radio from NPR. I'm Guy Roz. You'd never know it from just walking round but in simple mid century building on the campus of Brandeis Rush University near Boston. There's an office where some of the most revolutionary ideas in psychology were first developed an office. It's just a room Yup. nope blackout side. Yeah. We really should have a plaque outside that officiant we margie lachmann professor of psychology at Brandeis University gave Eh tour of the office same halls that he would have walked down that once belonged to and he was here Abraham Maslow's. Were you hear what Abraham Maslow's okay so he knew so there are a few people around Maslo worked here until a year before his death in nineteen seventy desk located here but it was about twenty years before that they looked out this window in the nineteen fifties when his ideas really really began to change the field of psychology before that psychology focused on what's wrong with the person they looked at people who are neurotic. Roddick people who had psychological disorders psychology was really the study of of problems in mental illness in other words before Maslo. Slow psychologists were more interested in why people were the way they were rather than how they could change even improve. I don't think there's anything pollyanna about saying. Yes improvement is possible. You have to work hard at it. Here's the way to do it and so instead of looking at what was wrong with his patients. Maslo Tesla was really one of the first to think about what's right with the person. There is a possibility of improvement now it. It has to be probabilistic. This audio was recorded during a retreat in the mid nineteen sixties where he lectured on self-improvement now decades earlier art people looking for this kind of help might have been called patients who were sick on it but they were called clients. There was much more of a face to face relationship between the therapist and the client that was a natural human relationship of trying to work together to understand problems problems or issues that might occur that was really revolutionary at the time believe it or not and Maslo didn't just come up with this idea that perfectly functioning people could nonetheless strive to be better persons can be improved as you might remember from psych one guarantee. AP actually designed a framework to help understand how some people are more difficult than others that framework is known as Maslow's hierarchy of NEAT beat. It's an idea that to this day shapes modern psychology on the show today we'll explore maslow's five human needs in order of of importance the things he said humans need to survive and then to thrive and so this notion of hierarchy start at the bottom and you build up like a pyramid and at the base the most fundamental human needs basic survival needs shelter food and as we'll hear later sleep we they have not taken sleep seriously since the twentieth century second on the pyramid security without security. You're not gonNA build a society there. Maslow's believed you could move up to higher order. Growth oriented needs that other people really hadn't talked about before love and belonging the reality. Odi for primates is you can't even survive without belonging to a group. Then comes esteem to be in a healthy relationship to like yourself. I chose takes work and finally something called self actualization really focusing on growth and finding meaning in life and purpose in life. The world is so so full of things to do that. You can try to do better and if you can do nerve. That doesn't matter what you do. Mesler believed there was something fundamentally finally human about these needs and about our desire to be better and more fulfilled most of the work at the time had been bill had actually been done with animals animal work had been done looking at things like hunger and thirst in these basic needs and he tried to apply this to humans is and found that that wasn't all there was he. It wasn't just people were trying to survive. They were trying to do something beyond survival and they had this basic seemed like a basic motivation to improve and to reach their greatest potential earn.

Abraham Maslow Maslo Tesla Brandeis Rush University professor of psychology Guy Roz NPR Mesler Maslo Boston Roddick twenty years
"abraham maslow" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:58 min | 11 months ago

"abraham maslow" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Children over one million children now have criminal records because we put cops in our schools you know Abraham Maslow said when the only tool you have is a hammer every problem looks like a nail then every discipline problem looks like a crime surprise just in the twenty eight twenty thirteen school year alone seventy thousand students were arrested two thirds of them students of color in call one there were actually school police there there were two of I mean you go through the list says Sam again treats these the demi middle school the shooter was arrested not by the school police and while elementary the third shooting mass shooting these for school shootings and on arm teacher thanks down the sugar in the fort like fort worth and on the fourth day of school shooting I mean we can just go right through the list shooter flags down police turned himself in in the fifth one Santana high school security try to stop the shooter but got killed sure was caught by police later a red lion high now the six that Chris will shooting after Columbine sure committed suicide record high a gym coach disarm the shooter an arm gym coach in red lake high the eight school shooting in this you're committed suicide the nine school shooting after Columbine Campbell high the shooter was disarmed by an arm teacher the tenth school shooting as X. elementary this gross is your shot himself eleven schools shooter western high on arm janitor an arms principal disarm the shooter the twelfth school shooting west nickel mines the shooter committed suicide the thirteenth Miller south committed suicide I mean it just goes on like this the the the fourteenth Chardon high school the shooter was chased out of school by an arm teacher the fifteenth was sandy hook this you're committed suicide the sixteen sparks metal is this your committed suicide the seventeenth the web while I get this you're committed suicide you know I mean where where are where are the Hannity force is going to be where are the brown shirts well they say they don't seem to have helped out with school or mall shootings in fact the one wall shooting that I can think of where a quote good guy with a gun actually stop the shooter the good guy with the got none was an African American who himself was shot by the police when they showed up because they thought it was a black guy he must be on and he's got a gun you must be the shooter and Hannity wants to put on a we had seven hundred thousand cops in this country gonna put a million arms people in our malls in our schools not to mention I mean you know you've already got that AJ had do you know sheriff Mack on this program talking about.

Abraham Maslow Sam demi middle school Chris red lake Columbine Campbell Chardon high school Hannity Santana high school principal Miller sheriff Mack
"abraham maslow" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"abraham maslow" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"You just couldn't get information as fast as we can now and now because we can have access so quickly. There's an expectation that we can react to it so quickly and that we feel every moment of the Waking Day with information gathering true. I'm trying to nobody stopping for mindfulness exactly effort fall to do that so I'm trying to <hes> <hes> trying to bring back a field on the psychology of being Abraham Maslow's humanistic psychologists talked about a lot in the fifties and sixties. I feel like we need. We need a psychology of being because everyone is like yeah. Just what you said like. Everyone is just concert preoccupied with future plans hands and it's so funny too because that's where I'm about to jump off but that's where I think a lot of crossover comes because what we didn't talk about is that within the clinical fields oftentimes you also choose an orientation so you might be more of a psycho dynamic therapist. You might be more of a cognitive behavioral therapist. <hes> you might be a really immersive therapist where your what's the word like an ECLECTIC. There has where you blend all these things together but I tend towards and my school luckily offers track in <hes> existential humanistic thing that's my thing and that's the type of psychotherapy practice and I'm really drawn to studying so that's where I think a lot of crossover one hundred percent. Hey if I can help support way. Let me know okay. That's so kind of you. Thank you so much. You know we're probably actually going to take you off. Good please do and hey thank you for the really open honest respectful conversation. I'm such a nerd that I'd just like to consider every single perspective on the table before I realized what I think so so I think that's completely fair and I always appreciate the opportunity to be able to have these passionate conversations that you're right are really respectful and even when you either have different views or maybe one person's playing devil's advocate and you're doing it for the sake of debate devil's advocate for yeah and either way it's always great to be able to really flex those muscles and talk about <hes> talk about not just what the evidence show us but based on that evidence what we do truly believe because those things I think do go hand in hand. These are really important topics and let's up the Combo..

Abraham Maslow one hundred percent
"abraham maslow" Discussed on Nerdificent

Nerdificent

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"abraham maslow" Discussed on Nerdificent

"Danny's been in my house. It's disturbing like there, you can't their Legos everywhere giant buildings and stuff. I'm obsessed with that was my another huge part of the SIMS was like it's weird because it is simulation. It's like you're kind of almost like a little bit of second life where you're living vicariously through these people a little bit. But also just building up. It's a great. He one of the biggest inspirations for the SIMS were just like at the time architecture tools. Yeah. That's what it seems like people who use it too literally like plan, how they're going to decorate their their house in real life. You know, you build your house in the sense and like, oh, what would look nice in this room. Right. Like planet out. No. Yeah. So. Yes. Right. Said he stated the SIMS was actually meant as a satire of US consumer culture, which is going to cause you can like buy things. Yeah. Right. You can I mean they use what is called Similan. Similarly, mouland. Yes. And you, you listen to even the music. And it's very like, would you say, like nineteen fifties housewives? Yeah, it has that feeling of like old timey elevator music. Yeah. But like happy peppy like homemaker is a very marvelous. Mrs Mazel Haina. I end of Mary American consumer like, and it does kind of parody, the thing of like you want new things. You have these people that their needs in their happiness determine, like it's very nineteen fifties Americans, it is. Yeah. It's very like even like your similar be happier. If they're in a room that's nicely decorated or buy them, a new item or something. Well, this is fascinating because he said that he took a couple of things. One was ideas from the nineteen seventy seven architecture and urban design book a pattern language, but also American psychologist, Abraham maslow's, nineteen forty-three paper, a theory of human motivation, and his hierarchy of needs in Charles Hampton Turner's, maps of the mind. To develop a model for the game's artificial intelligence so kind of like what you're saying, like they might be happier in a room full of people..

Danny Mrs Mazel Haina Abraham maslow US Charles Hampton Turner
"abraham maslow" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

03:13 min | 1 year ago

"abraham maslow" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"We could do is just, you know, just manage ourselves. I mean with this organizes even difficult to do that. So it's like everything is threatening. You don't have the capacity to regulate enough even to do that. So. It's very difficult for life to be play. When like Krizan than the next stage, an insecure attachment avoided would be that life is a a battleground that everything's threat, it's really has to do with the security reflects the degree of threat that we perceive as the world and degree of threat at security give rise to the level of play that we are capable of. So when we see the world as when we're we didn't win that insecure intermittent when the tach -ment caregiver was, you know, inconsistent not emotionally or even violent. Then the world is threaten we feel like we live in a battleground, and we perceive threat were doesn't exist. So we're defended. So actually, we create the say. Yeah. So of course, you know, you meet someone who's defensive in you're less likely to be friendly to them. And so the world actually shows up his threatening, you know, defensive people are scary. So you get scared so defenses escalated, so you end up in a world that really feels like a paddle ground because you're seeing it that way in it's actually playing out to be that way. I'm really simplifying as you know in your your listeners are sophisticated will. I mean, just own clear that you really love thinking about play in a really really broad holistic sense of its impact on the whole system of human nature. Not like, you said how it's been co-opted, you know, where I just wanted to complete the when you see just the idea that when you do have secure attachment than the world can be playground that that then we can see realistic risk. We can perceive it as when it's realistic Salt Lake suddenly pollyanna and everything is play. But we can sense when there is risk. And it's safe to have adventures it safe to express ourselves safe to connect. And that makes you know gives us more playmates and new experiences and big US experiences aren't threatening. So the big you the in the unknown that is so much inherent part of life is is actually considered full of possibilities rather than full of threats. Yes. And Abraham maslow's talked about defense versus growth, and you know, we limit our gross much from a wrecking our defenses need to get plays a great way to get out of the comforts on. Right. Yeah. And we can't play when we have enough security. So we take the level security that we have and we can grow it by playing more. Yes. Oh, yes. I love you do talk about, you know, getting out of their boxes to enable creativity forest. You say what you phrases by changing, the preset radio station or turning the radio.

US Abraham maslow Salt Lake
"abraham maslow" Discussed on 15 Minutes to Freedom: A Warrior’s Daily Focus on Journals and Meditations

15 Minutes to Freedom: A Warrior’s Daily Focus on Journals and Meditations

03:39 min | 1 year ago

"abraham maslow" Discussed on 15 Minutes to Freedom: A Warrior’s Daily Focus on Journals and Meditations

"He touched me more, and he'd be a little more involved in everyday activities. But that's not who he was. So he couldn't stay that way. So he would try to change and he would try to make it work. And I would be like this great like all my all my cups are being filled now, and I would try to fill his cups in the same way. Because he obviously had things that I wasn't meeting to it's not a one way street on Wia marriage breaks, and because we just weren't innately a match they don't they don't stay long term they break. So I know like if you're listening to this. I can't say that like what if what if they leave or what if they they changed for six weeks, then it goes back to normal while it happens like give them a shot. It's not a it's not a make or break the same day. Have an open discussion about what it is that you want or need or something that you're missing and see if you can come to some kind of agreement or just an arrangement. I don't know what you would would call it some kind of situation where it would balance out for both of you where you're not trying to change that person. They're not trying to change you. And if it works long-term, and you give it another couple of months and things are still. Okay. You retouched base? We're still all right, then great. Maybe you've found a common ground. But if not. I I hate to say it, but it's time to bail. Orient up like me you end up in divorce boat. Uh-huh. Yeah. And my my advice or how I think is. A little different. As I look back in my life. I didn't have enough of a voice, right? I was too concerned with pleasing other people and really a lot of that waters down to the this in inherent feeling of fear of being alone. And so baby in some of the relationships. I had my twenties maybe verbalised when I really needed. Probably most of them. I didn't because I didn't want to in my in my mind and want hurt that person's feeling, of course. But more even than that up. I'll raise my hand and say selfishly like I didn't want them to say. Yeah, I can't do that the so you're going to have to leave. Yeah. And that's a real fear. I certainly had that fear. Yes. So I obviously I did what I did. Right. I cheated and did all that stuff. And I I don't need to belittle that not that I'm running from it. But that that's the facts of my life from the perception that I have now of what's possible. And what reality is. It's wishing that hierarchy and actually being able to put myself what I'll say is. I rent it's not a perfect equation for me, certainly. But so much of that. Comes from being able to say like, here's what I need. Here's what has to happen. If it doesn't happen. I'll be alone. Right. And we can dive into especially now. Right. A lot more the psychology behind base level something like Abraham maslow's hierarchy of needs and win that really means. Because if you're listening, I don't need a man, I don't need a woman, can you produce at a high level without that? They just keep me. They hold me down. Statistically. Longterm out actually incorrect. Yeah. The way that you you don't you need some food water from shelter for yourself. You need a positive self image and to be able to talk to yourself. Well, then you need a tribe, and then eventually gets a production and a lot of us will justify way skipping over the the tribe right skipping over friends and really sexual partner and jump right into business, and we produce at a really high level in business in that capacity. Especially us men. Right. I'll speak specifically more to you. So you go crush in business..

Abraham maslow partner six weeks
"abraham maslow" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

03:29 min | 1 year ago

"abraham maslow" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

"Steve Jobs was quite famous for saying the most important thing to do as as in his role as a CEO of apple was to say, no to things, and I think was that's one of the things I worked with Bryan. On Airbnb I joined Airbnb, and there were thirty strategic initiatives and in two thousand thirteen when I joined thirty nobody in the company include Brian can name all of them. And so Brian I talked with him about it. And he says chip when I was in charge of Oliver offsite. Retreats for a while. For a few years. And I said, let's do an offset retreated in New York, and we didn't September two thousand thirteen I joined Beck in April, and we had twenty three different potential initiatives from next year that we're gonna be a strategic initiatives. And I said to the top twelve people that got me we're only gonna pick for these. And then we we looked at how we edit what's important to us down to these four. And it was I think one of the best periods of time and Airbnb history because it doesn't fourteen fifteen and sixteen I says, it was a really great period because we got really focused one of the things that is challenging for young entrepreneurs, especially if they're successful is an sharing economy, darling. And everybody wanted to get in the show. So you name it. Everybody is sharing economy company was coming to us and saying can we partner with you on this or that? And I was like, no, no, let's get clear about like what what are we going to grow up? There's a beautiful exercise that Peter Drucker popularized that came from a get him. Ted Levitt, so nineteen sixty HP article Harvard biz. Vural about what business are you in? So I offer this to the audience. So do this exercise. You have one of two choices either. What business are you in or what mastery can or do you offer? So first one is what business are you in? I would say to you, Tom. So what business are you in? You would answer in the most maybe generic way I'm in. So and so, and then I would say, Tom, thank you. What business are you in? And you have a second opportunity to answer it. But the way this works is you can't answer the same way twice by the time. They get to the fifth answer. We will understand that this delay tion of what differentiates what you're doing for Airbnb that process got us to realize we were in the belong anywhere business, which Marriott is not him. Or for joy eve, a boutique hotel company, we realized we're not a boutique hotel, you we're in the identity refreshment business. The other alternative a person could use his what mastery can you or do you offer and you start from that first point and you go to the fifth, and that's the key. I think is learning getting clear on what it is who you are. What's the differentiator? And then allows you to create the editor which is an essential piece of being able to be focused. You said that you can learn a lot by the questions that people ask certainly about the culture of a company, I think you can also learn a lot by who people quote who they look up to there's three people that you to the really lean on. And then the third one that made a surprising insurance twice in your book, and that's moslo Viktor Frankl and loud too. So how did those three find their way into your world? What do they mean to you? What do you think people should take away from them? So Maslo Abraham maslow's created the hierarchy of needs theory, which is one of the best known psychology theories out there. What I love about maslow's. It's it's another organizing principle for actually imagining how you know, what's important..

Airbnb Tom strategic initiatives Brian I Maslo Abraham maslow Peter Drucker Beck Steve Jobs Ted Levitt Viktor Frankl Bryan apple Oliver CEO Harvard New York partner Marriott editor nineteen sixty HP
"abraham maslow" Discussed on This Is Why You're Single

This Is Why You're Single

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"abraham maslow" Discussed on This Is Why You're Single

"Now, let's dive into our reason of the week. This week's reason is what people really want. Yes. So what can women and men be doing to better help their success for finding a partner? If that's what they really want. Because we learned from a book that what people really want is maybe a little different than what we thought. Yeah. It is. And I think that that's something. That's very complicated. I think that was a massive, quote, Abraham maslow's said, you know, figuring out or determining what you want is a rare psychological feet. It's something that few people know. So my big advice for people looking for love and actually looking for a relationship is number one effort into it. So many people think this organic thing will just appear like no you have to take risks and put yourself out there. But the hallway like listen to yourself like so many people told me like I knew this was wrong. But I did it. Anyway, like, I knew this wasn't gonna work, but I did it anyway. So if you're looking for relationship, you're trying to I guess beat closer in tune with your intuition, and like this is what I'm looking for in this feels right to me really following and being able to cut out when for some reason, it's just not aligning or you feel like this person isn't a compatible fit like arm oceans, get really in mashed relationships and even the dating world. So when you're looking for love, you have to have that mix of emotional intuitive. And like that analytical thinking. Like, this is going to work in the real world the rational thinking so just be in tune, though, the hallway you hope to find a relationship feels really bright within yourself. I love that. Yeah. I think. Yeah. Definitely. When you find that person who 'cause we can get it can start to feel normal to have that feeling early on in relationships for your like that. I did that I hate that. I said that. And then just like, well, this is what dating is. But when you find that healthy match, you have less of those moments. Right. And that's how you know, you're going in the right direction. Yes. It's definitely it's totally true. People think that they'll never find it. But it happens. It will happen on that note. It is time for our reason the week done..

Abraham maslow partner
"abraham maslow" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

07:18 min | 1 year ago

"abraham maslow" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"His Ted talk. He's just written a new book called wisdom at at symbol work. And we're having him on because he is speaking to this idea that now that he's at Airbnb, he's refrained his great experience, and you can too. Here's the first part of our interview with chip Conley. Let's talk a little bit about the Airbnb heart of this. And then we'll get into your book. So I have a separate book here. I love Lee. Okay. Lovely also friend of the pod friend of the show in her Airbnb story here, she describes you so Brian chest ski read your book peak. Great companies get their Mojo from Maslo and the book's author meeting out quoting from league alligators book, the Airbnb story, and and listeners you remember we had on the show a few different times, the book's author was chip Conley. The founder of this route Aviv boutique hotel chain which he started in San Francisco in nineteen eighty-seven over time. Conley himself had become something of a guru in peaky explained. Because I'm bald stop now. Okay. You know in that book. You basically applied the teachings of psychologist. Abraham maslow's hierarchy of needs the pyramid of physical and psychological needs. Humans must have met in order to achieve their full potential with food and water at the bottom and self actualization at the top two corporate and individual transformation. Now self actualization at the top sounds a tiny bit uncle Bunga San Francisco Bay area to me. Can you? Explain it. Abraham maslow's was a good a good Jewish. Boy who spent some time in New York teaching created this in the mid twentieth century, and the premise was being all you can be you know, that was the US army line in an ad campaign that they got from slow maslow's said sof actualization is basically being all you can be. And so. Yeah. It does sound a little bit, you know, new age, but the bottom line is anybody in their work, and in their life would like to be all they can be you know, if assuming that there are engaged with life. And so the premise of that book peak was really to help people to understand how to create an organization that can have a collection of individuals being all they can be do you think that in corporate America that we it seems to me at least I you know, I interviewed tons of these CEOs and c suite people and on the record off the record. It seems like we've kind of gotten away from that. I mean, they say Beal, you can be, but they really mean Bill you can be so we can maximize profits. Well, I don't think that's yeah. That's been the case forever. Right. I do think that there's a shift that slightly positive. That's moving in two thousand seven the iphone was created. And since that time, we cannot look at work life balance as even a phrase that makes any sense at all because when you have iphone you have everything on a laptop, and you're you're basically blending your work. And your life. I think what companies now needs to do is create a sense of purpose. So that employees feel engaged to be there. Otherwise, it's like you can sort of leave your life at the door when you walk into the office. Your your work is at nighttime and on weekends. And so I think more and more companies actually have to live up to something that's beyond just prophet. There's gotta be a purpose there in order to be a magnet for great talent. It's interesting. So then, you know, because I think that that is especially true when you think of younger workers, but you sort of learned in. In your fifties. After you have, you know, whatever near fifty with this terrible health crisis. And then asking yourself, what is it that? I really want. And then it seems to me from reading this book in your book at that point the folks at Airbnb chess game, basically saying you come work with me. Yeah. I was fifty two years old. I sold my company a couple of years earlier. And I was you know, there's a great Robert deniro quote in his and the movie the intern. He says musicians don't retire. They quit when there's no more music left inside of them. So was fifty two I had music inside of me. I just wasn't sure who to share it with Brian came to me at just the right time. I didn't really know what Airbnb was going to say. So you weren't following. That is an Indian distri. I'm in San Francisco. I is based in San Francisco, I thought Airbnb was. Of couch surfing. I didn't really understand it. I had never heard of the phrase the sharing economy five and a half years ago. I did not have an Uber or lift apple my phone all of that was true. But I was sort of curious, and so I sat down for coffee with Brian. And I was really impressed by how much of a growth mindset, he had he was just so curious himself, and he said, let's go democratize hospitality together. And I said well that sounds pretty good until you started with think eight hours a week. And then it was fifteen hours a week of what's your role there? What are you? When I came in. It was supposed to be a part time role. It became fulltime almost overnight and seventy hours a week quite quickly. And I was called the head of global hospitality and strategy and for four years was in that role. But I was also Brian's mentor. I mean, I was really his house mentor. But what I started to realize in this gets my book is that after the first week. I realized I have all this accumulated knowledge, but a lot of it's not that relevant. You know, it doesn't really matter in the home sharing world, how many rooms have made cleans in an eight hour shift, but they brought me in for my knowledge. But actually, what I started to offer was I guess what I would say is my well earned wisdom and a lot of that was around emotional intelligence and leadership skills. You mentioned something that's kind of interesting to me. I'm a numbers person. I love this stuff. The meeting age of employees in the United States is forty two that number is more than a decade younger. Among tech, titans and Harvard Business Review study showed the average age of founders of unit. Corns that's companies with more than a billion dollar evaluation. He's thirty one. Yeah. And you say the acceleration of innovation made the elder less relevant. Yeah. I mean, let's be clear. I think the elder became less relevant when we went from the agricultural age to the industrial age because Braun became the big thing and the industrial age, and now brain has become the big thing in the technology technological age, you know, Braun and brain is not why we necessarily look to our elders, but the big shift I think's happening is that as powers cascading to young people faster than ever before in business. There's no doubt because of our increasing reliance on digital intelligence or what I call Diku. We are expecting these young digital leaders to miraculously embody, the relationship wisdom's. We elders have had decades to learn I think that's the opportunity is let's pair these brilliant technologists with people who have a few extra decades of. Experienced judgment and emotional intelligence to actually create a great company if Travis at Uber had done that he still might have his job. We'll get back to our interview with chip Conley in just a minute. Hey during the break. Why don't you check out his Ted talk? Mark. Let's make sure we put a link to that in.

Airbnb chip Conley Brian Abraham maslow San Francisco Ted United States Bunga San Francisco Bay founder Lee Maslo Braun Robert deniro New York America Harvard Business Review apple peaky Beal
"abraham maslow" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

08:19 min | 1 year ago

"abraham maslow" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"We are broadcasting live from the Capital One Bank studios here on the far west side of New York, which I refused to call hell's kitchen because it's feels too far west Mark. I'm sorry. I know technically, it is is it Clinton or not Mark used to live here. So he's the resident expert before he went with the all the kids and millennials down to the Lower East Side. Yeah, he's loving that. Okay. We've got a great treat for you this hour, first of all if you're a person of a certain age over fifty you might be feeling like you're a little bit out of sorts at work not valued. Well, our guest chip Conley is about to explain how you can really reframe. What you do in your workplace? Now chip was the owner of a boutique hotel chain called joie de Vive. You may have see seen his Ted talk. He's just written a new book called wisdom at at symbol work. And we're having him on because he is speaking to this idea that now that he's at Airbnb, he's refrained his great experience, and you can too. Here's the first part of our interview with chip. Stanley. Let's talk a little bit about the Airbnb heart of this. And then we'll get into your book. So I have a separate book here. I love Lee. Okay. Lovely also friend of the pod friend of the show in her Airbnb story here, she describes you so Brian chess ski read your book peak. Great companies get their Mojo from Maslo and the book's author meeting quoting from league alligators book, the Airbnb story, and and listeners you remember we had Leon the show a few different times, the book's author was chip Conley. The founder of these rod Aviv boutique hotel chain, which he started in San Francisco in nineteen eighty seven over time. Conley himself had become something of a guru. In peaky explained because I'm bald stop now. Okay. You know that book you basically applied the teachings of psychologist? Abraham maslow's hierarchy of needs the pyramid of physical and psychological needs. Humans must have met in order to achieve their full potential with food and water at the bottom and self actualization at the top two corporate and individual transformation. Now self actualization at the top sounds a tiny bit unbelieva San Francisco Bay area to me. Can you explain Abraham maslow's was a good a good Jewish? Boy who spent some time in New York teaching created this in the mid twentieth century, and the premise was being all you can be you know, that was the US army line in an ad campaign that they got from Maslo Mazza said self actualization is basically being all you can be. And so yeah, it does sound a little bit. You know, new age, but the bottom line is anybody in their work, and in their life would like to be all they can be you know, if assuming that there are engaged with life. And so the premise of that book peak was really to help people to understand how to create an organization that can have a collection of individuals being all they can be do you think that in corporate America that we it seems to me at least I you know, I interview tons of these CEOs and c suite people and on the record off the record. It seems like we've kind of gotten away from that. I mean, they say Beal, you can be, but they really mean Bill you can be so we can maximize profits. Well, I don't think that's that's been the case forever. I do think that there's a shift that slightly positive. That's moving in two thousand seven the iphone was created. And since that time, we cannot look at work life balance as even a phrase that makes any sense at all because when you have iphone you have everything on a laptop, and you're you're basically, blending, your work and your life. I think what companies now need to do is a sense of purpose. So that employees feel engaged to be there. Otherwise, it's not like you can sort of leave your life at the door when you walk into the office. You know, your your work is at nighttime and on weekends. And so I think more and more companies actually have to live up to something that's beyond just prophet. There's got to be a purpose there in order to be a magnet for great talent. It's interesting. So then, you know, because I think that that is especially true when you think of younger workers, but you've sort of learned in in. In your fifties. After you have, you know, whatever near fifty with this terrible health crisis. And then asking yourself, what is it that? I really want. And then it seems to me from reading this book in your book at that point. The folks at Airbnb Eski, basically saying you come work with me. Yeah. I was fifty two years old. I sold my company a couple of years earlier. And I was you know, there's a great Robert deniro quote in his movie the intern. He says musicians don't retire. They quit when there's no more music left inside of them. So fifty two I had music inside of me. I just wasn't sure who to share it with Brian came to me at just the right time. I didn't really know what Airbnb was going to say. So you you weren't following that if someone in the industry, I'm in San Francisco, I see Airbnb is based in San Francisco, I thought Airbnb was a of couch surfing. I didn't really understand it. I had never heard of the phrase the share. Economy five and a half years ago. I did not have an Uber or lift apple iphone all of that was true. But I was sort of curious, and so I sat down for coffee with Brian. And I was really impressed by how much of a growth mindset, he had he was just so curious himself, and he said, let's go democratize hospitality together. And I said well that sounds pretty good. And so you started with I think eight hours a week, and then it was fifteen hours a week of what's your role there? So when I came in it was supposed to be a part time role. It became fulltime almost overnight and seventy hours a week quite quickly. And I was called the head of global hospitality and strategy and for four years was in that role. But I was also Brian's mentor. I mean, I was really his in house mentor. But what I started to realize this gets to my book is that after the first week. I realized I have all this accumulated knowledge, but a lot of it's not that relevant. You know, it doesn't really matter in the home sharing world how many rooms have made cleans in an eight hour. Our shift, but they brought me in for my knowledge. But actually, what I started to offer was I guess what I would say is my well earned wisdom and a lot of that was around emotional intelligence and leadership skills. You mentioned something that's kind of interesting to me. I'm a numbers person. I love this stuff. The meeting age of employees in the United States is forty two that number is more than a decade younger. Among tech titans and a Harvard Business Review study showed the average age of founders of unicorns. That's more. With more than a billion dollar dilation thirty one. Yeah. And you say the acceleration of innovation made the elder less relevant. Yeah. I mean, let's be clear. I think the elder became less relevant when we went from the agricultural age to the industrial age because Braun became the big thing and the industrial age, and now brain is become the big thing, and the technological age, and you know, Braun and brain is not why we necessarily look to our elders. But the big shift that I think's happening is the as powers cascading young people faster than ever before and business. There's no doubt because of our increasing reliance on digital intelligence or what I call Diku. We are expecting these young digital leaders to miraculously embody, the relationship wisdom's. We elders have had decades to learn. I think that's the opportunity is let's pair these brilliant technologists with people who have a few extra decades of experience judgment and emotional intelligence to actually create a great company if Travis at Uber had done that he still might have his job. We'll get back to our interview with chip Conley in just a minute. Hey during the break. Why don't you check out his Ted talk? Mark. Let's make sure we put a link to that in the show notes or hop on over Jill on money. You can order the book which is coming out in February..

Airbnb chip Conley Abraham maslow San Francisco New York Brian Ted Lower East Side United States Mark Capital One Bank San Francisco Bay founder Airbnb Eski Braun Clinton Robert deniro peaky Stanley
"abraham maslow" Discussed on KSRO

KSRO

02:57 min | 2 years ago

"abraham maslow" Discussed on KSRO

"What gives you the power to use. That power, you've, gotta contemplated and I quote like the you know the the Wright brothers who didn't go to Kitty Hawk saying gee this thing will never get off the ground I mean we're not going to be this, is ridiculous things heavier than be I. Mean you know I. Tell the, law of, flying was not discovered by the contemplation of the staying on the ground of things you know if you if you contemplate the staying on, the, ground of things that's what you'll produce and a lot of flotation was not discovered. By the contemplation, of the, thinking of things you've, got you've got to contemplate. Yourself and see, yourself from the end surrounded by, the conditions which you wish to produce an act from that perspective I was. Giving this talk at a talk one time there was a sixteen year old girl. Fifteen year old girl there her mother, came up she said she said tell tell Dr dire what you said this. Morning to me this morning when we were getting ready to go here, and the girl said well, mom said, that I was talking so fast that I was getting head, of, myself and mom said she says mom said. By Rachel, you're getting ahead of yourself and she said isn't that the point It's, the whole get ahead of yourself and to get out and see it coming before it gets there and and make you know make it, work, the way you wanted to head of the game which is absolutely what you know. She was right, on right, on target and it's, funny because you just reminded. Me quickly I, I was having a We're having a big blast to raise the money for the rainforest project, that I'm, involved in and everyone was like you can't do that you can't, possibly that's going to be too. Much you're gonna you can't get it. And it just went on I might look and. This, time in my life It was the first time I was really experiencing, that there were angels that, you could call, upon and. There you go and. I said no I'm telling you I am. Going to, call, upon the angels and I. Made a couple of. Phone calls to airlines because. What I was. Trying to do was bring this band. To Salt Lake City important, kind of Costa Rican. Band southwest, called said sounds great send us a letter we'll get back to you in a month I. Said no, that's, not good enough, angels I, need something now so I get a call I called delta the guy called me back, right away leaves me a message says. Get back to us we're in I go, to see him and I'm the guy turns out. To be an amazing human being I, mean vegetarian very cool hip you know great guy very unexpected in this corporate world at the end, when he approves it says whatever you need just count us in he reaches in his drawer, and he said I, just want you to. Have one. Of these so when you're air on. The airline, where this any pulls out this little pin with. A jetliner with an angel sitting on the top A little cosmic wind I believe that you've got to contemplate yourself, surrounded by the conditions which at that's the difference when, Abraham maslow's taught me that's the difference between south actualising people and the and the people that live at ordinary levels of consciousness Let's see themselves as already where, they would like to be let's take a break the power of intention with Dr Wayne Dyer Daniel then.

Rachel Abraham maslow Kitty Hawk Wright Dr Wayne Dyer Daniel Salt Lake City Costa Rican Fifteen year sixteen year
"abraham maslow" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"abraham maslow" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Is something that was, developed I believe in. Houston Texas is where they. I, decided to do this the van process where they picked up, people and flying signs. And and take them in and provide them. With day work cleanup highways or businesses people with higher amounts or today so I think it's a wonderful idea we need the labor it's. Good money it it also? Stops the panhandle yes you because you're gonna make more money probably I'm guessing working then you are panhandling now some people may hear this and go I've heard stories of. Panhandlers that you know They make really. Really good money doing mansions right and have What is the truth in that actually I always wondered, well I guess a good day at a Bengals reds game maybe on a weekend or something they, can come out with. About two hundred, two hundred fifty bucks which, is. Pretty good In a day right Some of us making a, week Tax rate there's money out there there's money is that you know that, it on, the sympathy of others you, know in the kindheartedness and that's but that's also survival. Tactic or the people out there so you have to understand both sides to those people are trying to survive and and if, we make it easy for warm then you know it's Well, given the choice would most. People that you come across with Sam. Landis, rather panhandle or would they rather do what you're doing and, that is getting the job Van, Gogh worked for eight ten hours paid. Cash, money and they get returned to to your place there along third street or wherever really I, think they would rather panhandle so right now I it the money's easier you could just. Stand in one spot however that is part of. Of one of the. Strategies from Abraham maslow's hierarchy of needs is now's whereas army is based, off of, that we we will have, set goals and help people want to want to go. Out and work in wants to feel good about themselves Bill self esteem and and help them become more software so it's just, I'm never going to I don't think there's any harmonised because there's? A I think the majority of people it's because let's face, it crappy parenthood I think, crappy parenthood crappy parents cross 'cause a lot of social problems that manifest in different, ways later in life like addiction. And other life, of crime things like that. Because you came from a crappy background. You, know what I'm saying I think that goes a long way, is we need to be better, parents and better better citizens to each. Other, but the nature of addiction is another issue entirely is there a segment of homeless out there, Sam Adams that Sam Landis that that that people just like hey you know what I'm. A free I'm like a free bird The sleeping? Outside doesn't bother. Me all that much I They used to be, called hobos back in the day and there are, glorified and now it's homeless and they're not? Is there are there still. People living the Hobo lifestyle that's part of the. Group Absolutely and back that. That number has not changed in years that's that's what we, call the, ten percent that's what, maslow's zombie actually focuses. On so so there's over nine thousand people in the greater Cincinnati are experiencing homelessness and that means before scout serving people with an on people's, you know floors or or whatnot you know or whatnot and, then there's, that ten percent that live. In places not meant for human. Habitation and that's the streets and that is that is our focus a lot of people live on on the streets because yeah, because they. They wanna, be free up some don't know another way. Out sometimes it's addiction only fifty percent, of those people. That are living. On the streets in these conditions are suffering from diction alcoholism mental illness that's. Again that's the stigma that people put on it not everybody out there is an addict not? Everybody out there's mentally ill You know so Answered that it did because I think there are. People who listen I don't want to. Be pinned down I. Don't wanna mortgage I don't want necessarily job just want enough to survive and survive. My own way and at one time in America that used to be looked at as being a Hobo and there was some sort of glamour may be the wrong..

Abraham maslow Sam Landis Houston Texas Sam Bengals Sam Adams Cincinnati America Van Gogh ten percent eight ten hours fifty percent
"abraham maslow" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"abraham maslow" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Maslow's army battles army is is an organisation for abraham maslow's which we meet each person that we work with on the street which we work with the ten percent who are actually living on the street suffering from homelessness we abraham maslow's hierarchy of basic human meat so we take each person through a process starting with food clothing shelter scaredy we help them build self esteem you know positive relationships and then finally get to that point of self awareness or self actualization so how many people who were on the streets selfesteem i would say that about qualifies each and every one extreme right now let's see about that one third of all homeless people are mentally ill or have drug and alcohol issues they're experiencing homelessness but specifically on the street there's numbers in an increase more than half of the people as much as much higher rate for the people who were actually on the street that several for some kind of mental illness or drug or alcohol addiction right elite half the people out there right now there's our current statistics all right so i mean when you first come into contact when you first interdict with these people what do you do.

abraham maslow ten percent
"abraham maslow" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"abraham maslow" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"I love that i should say that hans is a got their first curses soul he got everywhere he did get a personality william james got everywhere i but he entered the personality i think i well we'll you would i guess in some sense william james even got there before ising because he played around with nitrous oxide right so he was he was one of the first experimenters with hallucinogens fundamentally and he wrote hippie poetry on nitrous oxide noting what was likely something like the stripping away of late in addition as a consequence of of hallucinogenic use so yeah it's all this huxley of course to believes that hallucinogens in particular cleaned the doors of perception using william blake's terminology so that it was possible to see everything if you're seeing it for the first time there's some forms of brain damage that can produce that too so anyways now yeah so we tested it and while it turned out that late in addition does look like low leyton individual looks like it's importantly related to creativity onto trade openness you know abraham maslow's he talked about newness of appreciation as one of the main characteristics of self actualising people and i think that can be linked to late individually i'm sure you would agree as you just described you know kind of everything is you kind of there's a wonder to the world there's a wonder everything is kind of fresh again yeah the cost is likely something like cognitive overload like one of the things that shelly carson and i were trying to investigate when we studied the high openness people at harvard the high openness students which was very good place to study that was that it looks like in order to handle the excess sensory input of low late in addition it's really useful to have very high while probably high q and high working memory those two concepts are quite overlapping so it's difficult to distinguish between the but it seems probable that if you're prone to be overwhelmed by sensory information that you need the cognitive capacity to.

hans nitrous oxide william blake william james abraham maslow shelly carson harvard
"abraham maslow" Discussed on Duncan Trussell Family Hour

Duncan Trussell Family Hour

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"abraham maslow" Discussed on Duncan Trussell Family Hour

"Because kissel an eye on last podcast was getting to our private argument again about how satanism as a religion it's all separate it's like very because of the things that go along with the concept of religion it's very difficult to want to be a part of it like i wanna be i don't want to be a part of anything that involves like weird hierarchies and human based power that then could be manipulated all time no shit man you don't want to be part of that shit that's yeah that's what but it's kind of like you know what happens is you i think it's a fucking abraham maslow's oh wrote this book called religious religion values religious values and peak experiences i think is what it's called it sort of identifies this pattern that occurs which is that some body has an pithy someone dissolves their ego enough that the stuff starts coming out of them pupae gets the stuff starts coming at somebody yeah your spirit comes jerking on trying to tell you man don't jerk off on the single jerk off into the blowhole i right straight straight to the to the bowl what did he come 'cause then it's food i knew an actor that told me a fucking horrible story about how used to drive across the country used eight planes us at the drive with his dogs and he was like as as a long talk about long road trips and he was just like yeah you know we were just joking about how like it's like jerked off doing a road trip it's like driving longtime up a little quick jerk off on the wool napkin just because the supreme just fucking violence of mints reality he's a kid but the best part of going with the dog so they can clean up the mess and it's like when you're talking about like you come it in your hands then you feed it to the dogs.

kissel abraham maslow
"abraham maslow" Discussed on Leadership Biz Café

Leadership Biz Café

04:15 min | 3 years ago

"abraham maslow" Discussed on Leadership Biz Café

"Most importantly, though, when you share your human, compassion, your empathy your connectedness with others. It actually develops you as a human being and impacts not just your business life, but your personal life and your social life as well. So all these things actually grow. So I've kind of developed this new saying I say, I'm often provisioned, but I've never taken advantage of. Because you know, I'm totally fine with being what I call a flash mentor and helping somebody that I hardly know solve of vexing problem of information. I've taken the time to to learn I don't care if they say, thank you. I don't care if they ever give me credit for it in public. I don't care if they take it and compete with me for a consulting training opportunity. What I care about is that I've made a difference in their life. And that feedback makes me wanna do it again. And the thing I've thought about the last few years is my biggest challenge your biggest challenge. The biggest stumbling block to really practicing. This biz love is what I call ego economics. So he go economics work like this you help five people one of the five comes back to you. And says man, you change my life. Two of the five say, thank you. I'm grateful one of the five says nothing, and then the last of the five takes your gift and uses it somehow against you, either competitively or otherwise, he go economic says, I have long forgotten about the one person I helped I can't even remember that. That's not how ego economics works. It centers in on what we think of the rule of reciprocity. What about the one that didn't say, thank you? And how about that one? Who took advantage of me ego economics turns those two into ninety nine percent. And that's why I hear people all the time saying, well, I'm never going to make connections for a person like that again without a contract. Look what she did to me. And I almost want to audit them on the spot. But like tell me over the last five years, how many people have you made connections with and sure as shooting the ego economics always work out that they have long forgotten those people they've helped significantly or those who have properly think them because our ego ten verse says. No one should ever be able to take advantage of us. And I believe you can have the wind here. If you say, I will always share the things that are invisible. And I will share them intelligently with the right people at the right time for the right reason. It also signs a light on our intention. Right. I mean, if we say the idea here is that we're just sharing knowledge is not it's not like a sieve in our tank in the more. We open it up. Dumber, we become I when I share insights of people it actually builds on it because people will share something that they read an adds to that understand that you can then impart to somebody else. But if we're always looking at it from that notion of scarcity like, okay, what am I getting in return than are? We really doing it for the right intention where we're just trying to help others be better were really trying find value in what we contribute, whether it's just sharing our insights or sharing what we know or sharing somebody we know who can benefit this other person or we try. Say we're doing this with the best intentions, but realistically were kind of also having a little scorecard of sending today at least say thank you and so forth. And then really, it is ego gratification or ego. I love term ego economics. Yes. So here's why I love your point of view. I totally agree. I think that I think we have to make a decision in our mind that the intention determines the outcome of the gift. Right. So with anybody's ever helped you kind of know that they're going for the win win. It's not as much of a gift as it is an investment in you. And that's okay. But you can always feel kind of the guilt creeping in, you know, in the back of your mind. So psychologists would say that when we give without expectations others receive more fully and there's significantly this is really important they're significantly less anxiety in our relationship. This is something that Abraham maslow's wrote about in his books, I been reading a couple of his recent works, and he loves to talk about this concept..

Abraham maslow ninety nine percent five years
"abraham maslow" Discussed on The EntreLeadership Podcast

The EntreLeadership Podcast

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"abraham maslow" Discussed on The EntreLeadership Podcast

"And so i became aware of ends book the road back to you and daniel tardy who is a vice president of entrepreneurship you've already on his pocket he's a big fan of the any rim so anyway i took it as a we'll discuss that in the interview a but here's the challenger wanna make because there are a lot of you out there right now who have taken personality tests and your believer in them and then there are probably equal amount of you that may have never even take him before the oh what's the big deal why does it matter well first of all it's not just about a personality test there's so many different assessments that are available to you the idea here is that you have to unlock your full potential that's to me that's the challenge i think you're required as a human being to unlock your full potential that's what it's about i'm not ashamed to say this i believe in a creator and i believe he created all of us uniquely and wonderfully that's what scripture says i believe that so if there is this duty if we are duty bound if we are required to maximize our potential to unlock it and then maximize it then i think we have to take the steps that are necessary to do that and simply put i think we have to look at the great thinkers psychologists who have studied human behavior abraham maslow's a legendary psychologist.

vice president abraham maslow daniel