6 Burst results for "Abra Bush"

"abra bush" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

03:45 min | 1 year ago

"abra bush" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

"Love <SpeakerChange> that <Speech_Female> injury <Speech_Female> <hes> <Speech_Female> because I. do think <Speech_Female> this is a moment to get <Speech_Female> outside the box <Speech_Female> and stop <Speech_Female> worrying about how <Speech_Female> the way we used to do things. <Silence> <Silence> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Here's my last <Silence> question for you. <Silence> <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> you touched on it a little bit <Speech_Male> because <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> you said you're reading more. <Speech_Male> But what are the things <Speech_Male> that you're? You're taking <Speech_Male> comfort and right now. <Speech_Male> You're <Speech_Male> you're off <Speech_Male> line off <Silence> duty kind of. <Speech_Male> the, spin, <Speech_Male> a seventeen <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> hour zoom <Speech_Music_Male> day. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> What are the things <Speech_Male> that have brought a <Silence> smile to <SpeakerChange> your face? <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> You know what <Speech_Female> I have missed, <Speech_Female> and all this <Speech_Female> and occasionally <Speech_Female> I go out. <Speech_Female> Looking for <Speech_Female> is just a really <Speech_Female> good <Speech_Female> burger and <Silence> fries. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Really a good <Speech_Female> Burger <Speech_Female> and fries <Speech_Female> can do a lot <Silence> for the soul. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> I'm <Speech_Female> cooking a lot. <Speech_Female> Actually <Speech_Female> I made my first <Speech_Female> loaves of bread. <Silence> During the pandemic, <Speech_Female> I'd <Speech_Female> never baked bread <Speech_Female> before. My mother <Speech_Female> clearly failed. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> So I've <Speech_Female> been baking <SpeakerChange> bread. <Speech_Female> Which has been <Silence> fun for me? <Speech_Female> I wanted <Speech_Female> to do it for a long time. <Speech_Female> I've knitted some <Speech_Female> again. <Speech_Female> I haven't spent a <Speech_Female> Lotta time knitting in the last <Speech_Female> few years, but I've been <Speech_Female> knitting <Speech_Music_Female> I also have <Speech_Female> been watching excruciatingly <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> trashy television <Speech_Female> when I have a <Speech_Female> chance <hes> <Speech_Female> you know <Speech_Female> anything on Netflix <Speech_Female> is <SpeakerChange> fair game <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> the trashier <Silence> the better. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <hes> <Speech_Music_Female> I've been listening <Speech_Music_Female> to podcasts <Speech_Female> quite a lot <Speech_Female> as I walk in <Speech_Female> the mornings. <Speech_Female> <hes> <Speech_Female> here again <Speech_Female> I I <SpeakerChange> would be shamed. <Speech_Female> Tell <Speech_Female> you what I was really <Silence> doing. <Speech_Female> I <Speech_Female> been on a steady <Speech_Female> diet of like leadership <Speech_Female> books <Silence> and <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> OUTLANDER! <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> Sometimes <Speech_Female> knee. <Speech_Female> And some of that <Speech_Female> just garbage <Speech_Female> feels <Speech_Female> like <hes> <Speech_Female> lemon sorbet <Speech_Female> for my brain. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Just need <Speech_Female> it to <Silence> be. <Speech_Female> I <Speech_Female> just need the escape <Speech_Female> right <Speech_Female> and that's really what that's <Silence> about I think. <Speech_Music_Female> <hes> <Speech_Female> I've also been <Speech_Female> planning and dreaming. <Speech_Female> Up <SpeakerChange> Future vacations. <Silence> <Speech_Female> <hes> <Speech_Female> I <Speech_Female> I had planned <Speech_Female> to be gone a lot <Speech_Female> of July actually. <Speech_Female> I usually spend a <Speech_Female> couple of weeks <Speech_Female> in Europe in the summers, <Speech_Female> but this summer I was going <Silence> to go down the Danube. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> On on a cruise, <Speech_Female> and so that's not <Speech_Female> going to happen, so that's on <Speech_Female> my list, but you know <Speech_Female> I've been thinking about driving <Speech_Female> through. The Baltics <Speech_Female> are driving through Scotland <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> what that would <Silence> be like. <Speech_Male> Colour <Speech_Female> Liar I can tell <Speech_Female> you holding <Speech_Female> rainy. I'm <Speech_Female> sure it will be cold and rainy <Speech_Female> I'm I'm <Speech_Female> sure. <Speech_Music_Female> <Silence> So, <Speech_Music_Female> <Silence> You Know I. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> We are going to come out of <Speech_Female> this mess at some <Speech_Female> point, and <Speech_Female> things will get back <Speech_Female> to some new <Speech_Female> form of normal <Silence> whatever that looks like. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> A <SpeakerChange> man, I'm looking <Speech_Female> forward to getting on an airplane <Speech_Female> again, but <Speech_Female> it's it's GonNa be <Speech_Music_Female> a while <Speech_Music_Female> I think <SpeakerChange> until <Silence> that happens. <Speech_Female> And, in the <Speech_Female> meantime you know <Speech_Female> again I'm <Silence> spending time with my <Speech_Female> wonderful <Speech_Female> little man <Speech_Female> friend, <Speech_Female> who is <Speech_Female> fifteen pounds of <Silence> Lovin, named Puck <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> <hes> <Speech_Female> in enjoying <Speech_Female> being at home. <Speech_Female> It's nice to <Silence> be at home. <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> Great. <Speech_Male> Abra <Speech_Male> I. WANNA! Thank you <Speech_Male> so much taking the time to <Speech_Male> speak with me today. <Speech_Female> Thank you <Speech_Female> Zane. It's been absolutely <Music>

"abra bush" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

06:19 min | 1 year ago

"abra bush" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

"So it's it's helped me kind of track those things and be very conscientious of how I am sending my days on my time. I'm grateful for that same. Thank you. My pleasure. Those! Curious, it's a hello kitty planner. Linked to. Handbag. Of! I'm glad it's been helpful tool. It's been incredibly helpful to me. Start my third one and I I use more and more of it all the time. I have a really didn't use the index the first quarter, and and now I'm using the index every day and I have morning rituals and shutdown rituals and startup rituals, and I've got rituals, rituals and I. It it has really helped me be more on top of things, so thank you for that. Pleasure. If you could go in a time machine back to talk to twenty year old. Abra and but Abra is currently a student right now. In the middle of this pandemic, what would and you know everything you know? What would you tell your twenty year old self to help position themselves for the future. What are the? Things that you see that are possibilities in. What would you ask yourself to focus on? Think about explore. Honestly Zane I. Don't know that I would do anything to front. I try really hard to live my life without regrets and I tried to play full on every day. I think what I would tell twenty year old Abra. Is that it's GonNa be okay. Really, You will figure this out. It will come in time as long as you work hard. And you? Take opportunities. As they come along. You seek out opportunities as they come along. I should say. Throughout my career, I've really never sort of sat back and waited for things to come to me for waited for new opportunities to come to me. I have sought them out. I have created them. I suppose in some ways I've been kind of entrepreneurial about that, and it's not something I think about I. Don't think of myself like that at all. But. You know if I think about the lunch and learn series for example that's very entrepreneurial, but I don't think of it that way I think it is a service. So I would tell Abra. To do the things she loves. Playful out. Be Good to people. Don't worry about how the future. HOW THE FUTURE UNFOLDS! and to really embrace. All the things in this life. All of that. What are some of the most inspiring things you've seen from colleagues or students in the past few months? I was really inspired by the student cafeteria concert March. I was sorry I couldn't be there. But I was so inspired by the. Again the the the the fact that a student really pushed for this to happen and that we that it was able to happen. And it was so there was so much passion in the playing of those students that night. And frankly for the singers to that were doing the dress rehearsal for the opera. It was so lovely to see those clips. I was so grateful for those people that. That video recorded those events because it was just lovely to see the outpouring of empathy for one another and the. And you know looking back now. It's been months, and those are some those of the last performances that had been peabody photos of the last performances that. The last kind of collaborative collective music making we've we've have and. I'm glad that that the students took advantage of that, and and really pressed for that I think that was absolutely the right thing to do, and I applaud them. I also have to say that I've been struck in the last couple of weeks. In particular by some of the heart fell out pouring in the jazz community for the loss of so many of their elders, their elder statesman their. Their idols there you know significant community members, and some of the words expressed about those musicians, and some of the stories about those musicians have been very touching to me to see. Also have been inspired by little clips of things. I've seen that have been very inventive. you know opera using electronics and. People who are? Who can't be together and collaboratively music make yet are continuing to do so. Here's a lot. There is a lot of creativity in this fields. and. I hope that we start to think about. These digital platforms as enabling that creativity, and not being a limiting factor. You know one of my colleagues. Keep saying. Stop kicking the box but get outside the box. Because I think what he's trying to get at is instead of just fighting against the limitations that we have. Get outside the box. Think about how to use the box for something more valuable, more creative. I love that. I.

Abra Zane I.
"abra bush" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

08:09 min | 1 year ago

"abra bush" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

"I looked this morning. We've not even formally advertise. We already have one. Hundred and fifty people signed up for it so I'm excited about that. In in total. We've had twenty over twenty seven hundred registrations for that series. I'll be frank. Zane I was afraid it would be My Mom Maybe you twist your arm. My sister's cat registered and maybe a couple of friends across the country when I said I would do this But frankly there's been such a huge need across the sector, both in this country, and in Europe we had people from Brazil and The Philippines and all across Europe participating in these sessions, because frankly, this is a tough moment for us. None of us were trained pedagogic. -Ly to do this work via remote mechanisms or in. A synchronous. And so It's been exciting to do. Honestly that's been my creative outlet during this time. I have enjoyed it very much i. it actually gives me a lot of peace. Seduce something creative right now, and that's something creative. I can do without feeling. I have to be a perfectionist about it. That's my. That's my music training. Background coming out there but The yet been fantastic and I've. I've been so grateful to those conservatory colleagues as deans and provosts across the country who were super supportive. Continue to be supported by. See some of them every week on the Webinars, which is nice. And Continue to really support that work. It's needed for all of us. which is Great. So. As you're thinking about that. And you're seeing the possibility of. The future. I wanted to kind of touch back on something that you mentioned earlier. which was the idea that you were talking about with that? You wrote down in your in your planner about. Thinking about in the middle of this of this I wanNA think about a bend abundance, and how that's. This is impacted you in on a personal level that way. How is this? Pandemic inspires you to think differently about the work you do. At peabody, and and is the leader. In the middle of all of this I have thought differently about my work at peabody over the last couple of months. It's not something I spend a lot of time really drilling into though so I think that's my hesitation. By the tiny ear on zoom seven and a half hours a day or eight hours. A day I'm exhausted like I can't even think I'm so tired some nights. So. I've had to. Be! Much more. Plan full. In my days. Much more cognizant of what I have to accomplish a day versus what can move to the next day? I have to. Really take good notes. And make sure that I. AM pushing an agenda forward single. Day and honestly think without a system. To do that, I would have already. Given up. I. I will say this to using. You have helped me with that tremendously. So I will out you and say that Zane four she brought to my office one day in the fall, a planner that he was using, and I drooled all over X., and put my pause all over it and fell in love with it. and. Didn't want to didn't want to run out and purchase it. I don't know why I don't know what I was doing I just simply job, but I I called it and I was mesmerized by it. And then. Dr Four she in his infinite wisdom. Gifted me with said planner at the holidays. And I. It was really the best Christmas gift I got. I have to say and. I started using this planner in January. And I was very excited. But I also have to say that with out structure to my days, and without a clear understanding of what my goals are for those days in those weeks. And without sort of. The ability to track habits. I don't know that I could have pushed forward the fall planning in the same ways I've been able to do it. this particular system, which doesn't really matter what it is because it could be anything. It could even just be a blank notebook that you have that. You have a system for or a bullet journal. Are there any number of systems out there? That system has helped me so much organized my life and make sure that I'm clear about. Both my personal life, and the things that I need to do in order to sane during the day, but also my professional life as well so here are some examples I have been very conscientious about making sure I'm getting exercise every single day and I will acknowledge that. I'm not always the best of that. But through this entire pandemic I made it my goal to close the exercise rings on my I watch every single day and I have done that since March fourteenth very proud to stay. In addition to that, I made it a goal throughout this pandemic to network with colleagues across the world. And so two to three times a week I. Schedule a catch up, call or a zoom, meeting or glass of wine, or just a just a check in with folks to see how they're doing and to keep connections between myself and other people in the field. Who I think do interesting work and who I admire, that's actually been really nice, because it's been great to check in with with friends and colleagues and mentors, but also just to stay connected to the field, and not feel so isolated like I'm an home all the time. I another thing that I made a plan for myself to do was to read read more I. Am I. Read for Work All Day long and so I haven't been as good about reading in the last couple of years as I used to be so. I have been reading more through this this pandemic. More than anything else I have just been trying to prioritize staying in the moment through all of this. I can't control the future. I can't control. What's going to happen I? All I can do is stay in the moment. Try to stay healthy. Try To make sure that I'm working to maximum potential so that when students do return to campus and faculty. They returned to the safest environment. That is possible. And an environment in which I know, I would feel safe. Returning that has been deeply important to me and personal for me because. I've been worried about many groups of individuals as they return, but I've also been worried about singers, which is my whole Maria's.

Zane I Europe peabody Dr Four Brazil Maria The Philippines
"abra bush" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

08:06 min | 1 year ago

"abra bush" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

"So in my mind, all of these things have just now risen to the four of what we're doing. We teach students in the twenty first century and a conservatory setting. And I think it's incumbent upon us as higher education leaders to acknowledge that that's what's going on in the field, and to make opportunities for students to press forward in those those areas in ways. We never did before. I I was I I I'm really struck by what you're saying by this and I wanna ask you feel like we were. The ship was headed there and it's kind of like. We just caught the wave to get to the shore earlier. In in regard to the technology piece, and thinking about how we're going to build our these skills, and do I think that's right and I I especially think so. You know even now. We've spent months staring into our computers months. That's how we've connected with people. I live alone and I have connected with friends. Family members colleagues across the world. Via Zoom for months. And, I've connected with very few other people. During that time. I think that by the time we get to the end of this pandemic whenever that is I wish I had a crystal ball, and and and you know in whatever capacity that is. I can't envision a world and which. Electronic distribution and video recording video distribution isn't ubiquitous. We we are here and we're spending all of our time here. This is going to change culture. This is going to change society. I wish I had bought zoom stock in late. February. I regret. That was not. But I do think that we are going to see you know significant movements in low latency. Internet connections high speed Internet. I hope and I pray that we start to see. Internet connectivity available for all at it's a right, and not a privilege in that we start to see greater access to computers and IPADS and other sorts of resources to ensure that people can connect. It if anything can come out of this, it's it's things like that that as we press forward from the pandemic I think you're going to be important, but yes I I can't imagine a world in which we go back completely. So I want to ask another question as you thinking about how things are moving online how people are interacting in these ideas around access to Internet for all and technology for for all one of the things I've noticed is that there's been a much more of an openness and an abundance of sharing online and sharing resources I've noticed you also established. A summer series at peabody. Could you talk a little bit about that? Yeah, so in March as all of our conservatory peers across the country were one by one shutting down. A colleague of mine and I. were. texting one day and decided that we wanted to try to get our colleagues together. For many many years. The economic leadership at most of the nation's schools of music schools. I'm sorry. Schools of music and conservatories Matt at the National Association of Schools of music annual meeting in November, but over the last ten years or so a number of significant institutions, including our peer, said, and and peabody have left that organization so as a result, we naturally come together anymore as a cohort, see one another talk about challenges or opportunities in the field in the ways we use to. And so this colleague of mine, and I decided to poor friends together, frankly the academic leadership at the nation's top conservatories and schools of music. To. Talk about what what was going on how we could support one another. Maybe lessons learned from one another. What's been what had been working? What had not been working? How were they supporting students? In terms of getting instruments in their hands as we, we left campus or other financial resources, those kinds of things it's become actually a very. Important group in my in my life. We still are meeting every other week on Monday afternoons. And you know topics have ranged from how to support faculty how to Support Students There's really nothing going on. That could be remotely considered collusion. I can't imagine anyone would ever ask about collusion when it comes to chamber music. We. We really truly are trying to share best practice. At some point in April, we were discussing the fact that our faculty all needed better training and To function. In the coming year, espe- in this remote environment. We all had an inkling at that point as we still do that, it will be challenging to have all students back on site. Some might not be able to return. Some might choose not to return, but that our faculty needed greater skills in remote education in synchronous asynchronous learning. And in how to just deal with Zoom Day law right. And so I sort of floated the idea to them that we host a lunch and learn series I. I said I would host it. Coordinate it. I asked my colleagues if they would help me identify topics that were most important to them or that they needed the most. And also helped me identify anyone within their communities who might be excellent resources, or who may be doing that skill very well. So. Topics such as how to teach ear training in a remote environment were how to teach keyboard specifically piano class. Or even just instructional design basics or recording arts basics. Were things that many of our conservatory colleagues were not able to provide to their faculties during this time. You may know that a great number of the music schools in this country and a great number of universities frankly have laid off a significant amount of staff this summer. Because of the uncertainties of tuition revenue for next year, and we at peabody have been very fortunate to have an incredible team and the academic technology instructional design area led by Joel Mont Homo. That have continued to work and continued to support our faculty in remarkable ways. So I knew I had that team that I could call on for support and I knew. We had zoom and I knew we could do webinars. That's really all I knew. When I agree to this I spent several weeks in May. Really coordinating the panels that would would be going on, and we set out to do nine sessions so essentially every Tuesday from the beginning of June until the end of July. we have subsequently even just in the last couple of days added a session. That will I think this one will be very exciting. It's three of Johns. Hopkins scientists UNACADEMIC leaders. and. They're the part of the team. That's really supporting us and helping US bring students back onto campus and a couple of months they will be speaking with a saying and answering questions regarding health and safety, and how to reopen a music school or a performing arts organization in this pandemic moment..

National Association of School peabody US Joel Mont Homo Matt
"abra bush" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

07:37 min | 1 year ago

"abra bush" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

"Welcome to Mexico an interview podcasts from peabody's launch pad office. This is a special release outside of our normal interviews with recent peabody. To engage with the current dramatic changes in our world, launchpad director doctors aim four. She is interviewing distinguished professionals in our field, the impact of Covid nineteen students performing. This week. They speaking with Dr Abor Bush peabody's senior. Associate Dean of Institute Studies. High Abra thanks for being here. Today is Zane. It's great to be with you. So? How have you been spending your time in the last few weeks? Well. I have to tell you that I've been busier than I've maybe ever been in some way is. The pandemic has been just a crush of work for those of us in higher education leadership positions. And while had been credibly grateful to have a job and maintain my my job I. also have been trying to be very mindful about how I'm taking care of myself right now because. every day is a lot and. There just seems to be no end in sight to the to the work at this point. Can you talk a little bit about how you're taking care of yourself? Yeah, so I decided really early on in this pandemic That I was going to be very mindful about how I thought about things. And actually I just was going back through my plan or a couple of days ago. I noticed in my plan our that I on the very first day was home, which was March fourteenth. That I had written this into my planner. And I don't know if I said this or if this was a quote from somewhere so I apologize if I'm not attributing it to somebody. But, I said starting today I will constantly attract abundance with my thoughts. So I made the conscious decision at the outset of this that how I thought about the pandemic, and how I thought about being at home with something I consciously could control. And I have worked really diligently throughout this process in spite of. Some of the challenges, and in spite of really stages of grief that that I think many of us have encountered. To try to keep that abundance or that opportunity mindset through the whole thing. Her that meant that I very quickly started reading books about happiness, and about courage and leadership and I read Briny Brown and read about vulnerability and I I. I was I decided to take Laurie Santos's class. The Core Sarah Classroom Yale the science of being. And another thing I ended up writing in my journal at one point was she said that fifty percent of happiness as genetic predisposition and ten percent are life circumstances, but forty percent you can control, and that's your thoughts and actions so I've just been determined through all of this all the challenges to find opportunity everywhere I can. And I think about the future in positive ways As we go through this just really incredible sort of cataclysmic moment. will thinking about and touching on that a bit more in a in a slightly different direction and thinking about the future and the positivity around that. How do you think this is going to impact this this crisis? We're in right now is going to impact the landscape of higher education for the arts. Do you see any possible exciting things out there on the forefront of this? I'd say I think this is very exciting and. It has been one of the things that's kept me going through some very long days on zoom over the last several months. There were a number of things already. That were challenges in the Performing Arts and Higher Education Right. So, if we think about the state of the performing arts, even since two thousand and eight. It has been really difficult for arts organizations to remain financially viable and solvent over the last several years. Know many orchestras have been out on strike opera companies. It's been hard and. Meanwhile we have been. We have been spending more and more time in higher education. Talking with our students, about what career paths truly look like in the performing arts today, and what we imagined, they might look like in the future. A lot of that work has centered on not only maintaining us since of excellence in craft, but also the ideas of sort of entrepreneurial habits of mind for our students. and by that I mean you know what are the kinds of skills? And what are the sorts of things that you need to be able to do in this twenty first century in order to? Have a financially viable future for yourself or an organization. You might run at some point or How can you monetize your work? you know with recording companies having sort of collapsed and. And compensation, going down in many places for many artists over the last decade or more. Those, have been very real. situations that we've needed to address as we train twenty-first-century performing artists. Do all of that we would talk about. Periodically as we as those of us, who have these conversations would have them about the need for students to be very flexible. In their skill set, and for them to have a deeper understanding of technology and. And how to make recordings of themselves, and how to again push their workout into the public in new and creative ways. You tubes not so new anymore. facebook not so new anymore, but but it is very different than the way. Music was consumed for generations before that. So I think this pandemic has simply escalated the. The need for and. Really shorten the timeline we have in order to. Teach students and to help them learn techniques around recording themselves for the video recording an audio. Editing techniques. How to put your music or your performance on a platform so that it can be seen externally. I've been struck. I was struck by how quickly. After the lockdown, really start on the east coast, performing artists took to facebook or took to youtube, and and we're doing house concerts and have continued to this entire thing to. Really! Put into the public sphere. Very beautiful, passionate and Satisfying work. And it's reached a much broader audience than we're accustomed to reaching. and has actually been sort of food for the soul through this difficult time in so many people's lives..

Performing Arts peabody Covid Dr Abor Bush Mexico Associate Dean director facebook Core Sarah Classroom Yale Zane Institute Studies Briny Brown Laurie Santos youtube
"abra bush" Discussed on ESPN FC

ESPN FC

03:25 min | 3 years ago

"abra bush" Discussed on ESPN FC

"Neville, told us all the stuff, you said yesterday, you thought maybe with some gamesmanship and turns out the two players wanna down the two centrebacks outnumber, right? Were right there in the starting eleven. Yeah. I think it's always smart. I mean not. Say that they didn't. They weren't question marks and Mushin is how big are those. Like what was the font on those Russian marksman knows like nine ten or was fifteen and really doubt when you get knocked on the ankle it hurts in the movement. Like, when it's, it's not a sprain, like you had to play through the pain. So I'm not surprised at how and played the illness. So, you know, Milly bright, she was that said she got she got put a tough test today. It looked like she was told to shut down Graham Hanson, from Norway, and she definitely harried Hanson enough. The Hanson, probably had her worst performance of the World Cup. Even though she stills on the bulletin to just wasn't as effective with the ball. When we saw the Norway lineup is soon as it came out. We were know if it was in the green room or in one of these hallways here, you kinda hinted that you knew what the plan was going to be as soon as you saw the lineup. What did you mean by that? And do they get it wrong? So at lend they like to play a four four two. So when uplands not in the lineup you know, that's she come. She comes in the second half as a forward is one of the two, you know. That they're going to go more defensive because then they kinda still play or save now comes in for outland and she plays that right wing bat. Right. Mid and she does a lot of defensive tracking because what they're trying to do is shut down the wings. But on she plays more on the right hand side. So today, you could just tell it was more about Mindy, like I just think the, the ball movement was so incredible from England, especially Lucy bronze on the second goal Ellen white starts that. So this is what's Ellen white had a great game. But it's not just because we're finishing or even her dummy that she might say done that we all know she was probably trying to shoot it. It just went through a legs. But what she did is she got that ball off the back played it quick to Lucy bronze continue to run. And then Lucy bronze played that beautiful ball into parachute. Then let it go. I mean, it was just so worked that it was impressive in the Jill Scott. Right. That was another player who's played in three World Cups, and has now scored in every World Cup. She's played in, but it's really Hurley riding runs and the timing of those that's impeccable because. Offense. That's really tough to pick up and the midfield from Norway very similar to do their game against Nigeria could not keep up with the pace, not baseness early on, like overall quality or what I think of their careers. But if I had to pick a full were left in this competition right now based on today's form. I think I'd take Ellen white, and I include Alex Morgan in that. Do you think she's the best forward left on form? I think her ability find pockets of space and quickly released the ball and the accuracy that comes along with her being so composed. It's almost like the game slows down for her in the box because her ability to skipper, footwork right to hit at one time. And also, it's a quality of service is getting some excellent service, and then other times, she isn't she needs to take that a second touch, but that I touch controls the ball so well. So I think yell abra Bush wrote this, and she said, you know, the one thing in the always does. Well as it strikes the ball really, really. Well, there's the technique on the ball in terms of passing and straight driving. The ball is just so good. And I. You can see that Ellen white her on the half turn her with her back to goal. She just knows where to be, and she's calm in those big moments to put away. So right now, she is, as full Noah put droppable, and I think that's a really good adjective for. So we.

Ellen white Lucy bronze Alex Morgan Norway Graham Hanson Mindy Neville Milly bright Mushin abra Bush Jill Scott Noah Nigeria England