35 Burst results for "About Twelve Years Later"

Suspect found dead after shooting 4, causing DC lockdowns

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 3 weeks ago

Suspect found dead after shooting 4, causing DC lockdowns

"Police police police police in in in in the the the the nation's nation's nation's nation's capital capital capital capital and and and and it it it it suburbs suburbs suburbs suburbs are are are are investigating investigating investigating investigating why why why why a a a a gunman gunman gunman gunman opened opened opened opened fire fire fire fire from from from from his his his his apartment apartment apartment apartment on on on on people people people people walking walking walking walking below below below below Friday Friday Friday Friday I'm I'm I'm I'm Ben Ben Ben Ben Thomas Thomas Thomas Thomas with with with with the the the the latest latest latest latest reason reason reason reason Fairfax Fairfax Fairfax Fairfax county county county county Virginia Virginia Virginia Virginia say say say say they they they they identified identified identified identified a a a a residence residence residence residence tying tying tying tying to to to to the the the the suspected suspected suspected suspected shooter shooter shooter shooter and and and and assisted assisted assisted assisted DC DC DC DC officers officers officers officers in in in in executing executing executing executing a a a a search search search search warrant warrant warrant warrant the the the the suspect suspect suspect suspect was was was was found found found found dead dead dead dead hours hours hours hours after after after after firing firing firing firing indiscriminately indiscriminately indiscriminately indiscriminately at at at at people people people people walking walking walking walking through through through through the the the the busy busy busy busy northwest northwest northwest northwest Washington Washington Washington Washington neighborhood neighborhood neighborhood neighborhood your your your your private private private private college college college college prep prep prep prep school school school school at at at at least least least least four four four four people people people people including including including including a a a a twelve twelve twelve twelve year year year year old old old old girl girl girl girl were were were were hit hit hit hit much much much much phone phone phone phone police police police police chief chief chief chief Robert Robert Robert Robert conte conte conte conte said said said said officers officers officers officers recovered recovered recovered recovered a a a a half half half half dozen dozen dozen dozen weapons weapons weapons weapons along along along along with with with with ammunition ammunition ammunition ammunition from from from from the the the the apartment apartment apartment apartment this this this this was was was was very very very very much much much much a a a a sniper sniper sniper sniper type type type type set set set set up up up up with with with with a a a a tripod tripod tripod tripod and and and and this this this this person person person person obviously obviously obviously obviously his his his his intent intent intent intent was was was was to to to to kill kill kill kill and and and and hurt hurt hurt hurt all all all all members members members members of of of of our our our our community community community community the the the the shooting shooting shooting shooting was was was was recorded recorded recorded recorded and and and and posted posted posted posted online online online online on on on on the the the the message message message message board board board board four four four four chan chan chan chan Ben Ben Ben Ben Thomas Thomas Thomas Thomas Washington Washington Washington Washington

Fairfax Virginia Police Police Police Police Ben Ben Ben Ben Thomas Thomas Fairfax County County County C Washington Robert Robert Robert Robert Co Chan Chan Chan Chan Ben Ben Be
Live updates: Governor: 'Colossal losses' in Ukrainian city

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | 2 months ago

Live updates: Governor: 'Colossal losses' in Ukrainian city

"The governor of China he has said that Russian bombardments of the Ukrainian city has led to colossal loss and destruction shall spring out in the background as rescue workers from its through the remains of a multi story building hit by Russian selling parts of the building was reduced to a pile of masculine concretes rescuers pull out the dead body of a woman cries in the background the body belongs to a family of five who were killed in the strike two adults and twelve year old girl and three year old twins you Canadian authorities also said that ten people were killed and turn the heat while standing in line for preds Russia has denied involvement the governor also said civilians were hiding in basements and shelters without access to utilities the city of two hundred and eighty thousand people China heave which is close to the borders with Belarus and Russia was one of the finest cities to come under attack when the Russian invasion of Ukraine began on Karen Thomas

China Russia Belarus Ukraine Karen Thomas
Valentine, Cormack And New York City discussed on AP News Radio

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 3 months ago

Valentine, Cormack And New York City discussed on AP News Radio

"Couples choose Valentine's day to say I do America's minus my elbow Cormack have been together for twelve years last month they decided it was time to make it official so they're at the New York City marriage bureau side why not do it on Valentine's day because it's a special day and it's you know it's romantic the downtown courthouses a popular place to get married depicted in movies something broad job of PT from Italy light yeah I feel is act like a movie because but instead they it's always a dream to be a matter of specially in New York City her new husband Louise rob a lot of from Brazil says they're also having a religious ceremony later in Tuscany Julie Walker New York

Valentine Cormack New York City America Louise Rob Italy Brazil Tuscany Julie New York
Couple say "I Do" on Valentrine's Day

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 3 months ago

Couple say "I Do" on Valentrine's Day

"Couples choose Valentine's day to say I do America's minus my elbow Cormack have been together for twelve years last month they decided it was time to make it official so they're at the New York City marriage bureau side why not do it on Valentine's day because it's a special day and it's you know it's romantic the downtown courthouses a popular place to get married depicted in movies something broad job of PT from Italy light yeah I feel is act like a movie because but instead they it's always a dream to be a matter of specially in New York City her new husband Louise rob a lot of from Brazil says they're also having a religious ceremony later in Tuscany Julie Walker New York

Valentine Cormack New York City America Louise Rob Italy Brazil Tuscany Julie New York
Woods returns to golf, still 'long way' from the real thing

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | 5 months ago

Woods returns to golf, still 'long way' from the real thing

"Tiger Tiger Woods Woods horrific horrific car car crash crash caused caused injuries injuries so so severe severe that that doctors doctors so so that that might might have have cost cost him him a a leg leg now now ten ten months months later later the the forty forty five five year year old old fifteen fifteen time time major major winner winner puts puts his his remarkable remarkable recovery recovery to to the the test test Tiger Tiger joined joined just just twelve twelve year year old old son son Charlie Charlie in in a a limited limited field field of of twenty twenty major major winners winners each each paired paired with with a a family family member member Justin Justin Thomas Thomas and and his his father father Mike Mike or or defending defending the the title title world world number number one one Billie Billie coordination coordination with with their their dad dad Peter Peter the the tennis tennis great great hello hello Trevino Trevino player player in in the the luncheons luncheons Bob Bob and and Tom Tom among among others others for for the the PNC PNC George George McNeely McNeely Orlando Orlando

Tiger Tiger Woods Woods Charlie Charlie Justin Justin Thomas Thomas Billie Billie Mike Mike Trevino Trevino Peter Peter Tennis Bob Bob Tom Tom PNC George George Mcneely Mcneely Orlando
Woods to make return from car crash at PNC Championship

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 5 months ago

Woods to make return from car crash at PNC Championship

"Woods woods right right leg leg was was badly badly injured injured in in a a car car crash crash ten ten months months ago ago there there had had been been speculation speculation of of a a return return he he was was spotted spotted on on the the practice practice range range during during a a tournament tournament in in the the Bahamas Bahamas last last weekend weekend woods woods announced announced he he would would compete compete next next week week with with his his twelve twelve year year old old son son Charlie Charlie in in the the P. P. and and C. C. championship championship in in Orlando Orlando Florida Florida what's what's it it said said last last week week he he was was a a long long way way off off in in his his recovery recovery dousing dousing hopes hopes of of a a return return to to the the PGA PGA tour tour by by suggesting suggesting his his leg leg wouldn't wouldn't allow allow him him to to practice practice as as much much as as for for the the PNC PNC championship championship Tiger Tiger Woods Woods says says he's he's playing playing as as a a dad dad and and couldn't couldn't be be more more excited excited and and proud proud I'm I'm a a Donahue Donahue

Woods Woods Bahamas Bahamas Charlie Charlie P. P. C. C. Orlando Florida Pnc Pnc PGA Donahue Donahue
"about twelve years later" Discussed on That’s Strange

That’s Strange

04:05 min | 7 months ago

"about twelve years later" Discussed on That’s Strange

"That exact same thing. I'll go I've i've never seen one. But i can tell you if if i if i saw out. Pride jump through window. Oh for sure absolutely terrified. Yeah who's talked about I will point on show was kinda at a friend's house who He had a ghost a kid in his in his basement. Everyone knew about till later. Yeah it's horrifying. And anytime i think about it i think about that and i can't remember if it's amityville the one over the banister the child's face that's supposed to make me feel comfortable. I'm sorry bro. you're not really doing your job to well. Maybe change tactics up a little bit. Mr just missed the mark just by by just a bit just a bit. Creepy kid with the black is is just not working anymore. So so you did say your. Your father was very skeptical of anything in. He said he didn't experience anything at all. Did did you did the children or the mom tried to tell him about it. I i remember a couple of times. So we've we've talked about things that and he was very dismissive about bailey. Yeah now there was There there was a in my parents bedroom. Who used to. I used to go up there. They watch snick snack. Yom there's tv there in the right out into the main hallway until left win to their Their master bathroom for the master bedroom. And i used to sit there and watch nick and this is like well. All of that was on. Not are your dark so it wasn't mess with or anything but all that candidate kelly era I would see in the corner to corner by looking at peripheral vision. A lady just standing there and it was choosing the white dress. It was her and she was just stand there like a like a like a like a cardboard standing and choose their look on in. Go back to watching it twenty minutes later. You don't even see it like just appear you don't see it like like Manifest itself all of a sudden us notice. It's back in your april whatever that's when it appeared or not i don't know but You look and she's gone about twelve years later. We were having this conversation. Nor can we were talking about Expensive or kids at brought that up for the first time..

kelly era Mr bailey nick
"about twelve years later" Discussed on Launch Your Farm Podcast

Launch Your Farm Podcast

05:06 min | 7 months ago

"about twelve years later" Discussed on Launch Your Farm Podcast

"What you can do to create a ton of content your up systems. That won't take a ton of your time. And we talk about a super easy way to use reports and guides to position yourself as the expert in your community and generate more leads for your business and we talk about how you can use your passions and interests to connect with your potential audience and add value to their lives. Plus we talk about a ton of other ideas that you can use to your geographic farm. So be sure to check out this episode like subscribe and enjoy the with scott. Welcome back to another episode of launcher farm. Show i'm your host right smith and today we've got a great guest. It's scott from listening to lead. So scott take a second tells yourself and while you're here hey ryan. Thanks for having me yeah. My name is scott pierce listening sleeves. I'm the founder We started in two thousand nine. I was a real estate agent at colo. banker bees and a few independence and started doing some things Bees that led to the founding of listening to leaves and here. We are about twelve years later awesome. Yeah it's a great program. And i really love what you do so i wanna diamond to some of the strategies that but talk to us about how that kind of started and how you evolved into the technology created. Yes so i started posting listings from sotheby's as a director of online marketing there for four offices in northern california and started putting our listings on craigslist in such a way that we started pulling in multimillion dollar leaves like crazy and actually went to my broker and say hey we need to. We need to take us and spread. This ought to other suburbs offices maybe chargeable. He was not interested. And i even ran up the flagpole to sell the bees corporate not interested Thank god 'cause i quit. Insert the company awesome. And it's an awesome ride for the last twelve years. Yeah it's been cool to see the evolution of your systems in what you've done coming from that initial just posting on craigslist so for ozzy. We're talking about farming and it's a big thing to grow your database to get connecting the community. So can you talk about what you do and then we can talk about some. Get into the more details of how you can be getting using systems tools. Yes oh.

scott scott pierce colo ryan smith sotheby northern california
Stafford relieved to have Lions reunion 'over with'

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | 7 months ago

Stafford relieved to have Lions reunion 'over with'

"Matthew Stafford threw three touchdown passes leading the rams to a twenty eight nineteen win over his former team the lions Stafford who spent twelve years in Detroit finished with three hundred thirty four passing yards Cooper Kupp had two scoring receptions Detroit's Jared Goff had two hundred sixty eight yards in the air and one touchdown but with this team driving late in the game and in position to possibly take the lead Goff threw an end zone interception to Jalen Ramsey mark Myers Inglewood California

Matthew Stafford Cooper Kupp Jared Goff Detroit Rams Stafford Lions Goff Jalen Ramsey Mark Myers Inglewood California
Aidan O'Connell, David Bell lead Purdue past No. 2 Iowa 24-7

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 7 months ago

Aidan O'Connell, David Bell lead Purdue past No. 2 Iowa 24-7

"Eight no colonel threw for three hundred seventy five yards and accounted for three touchdowns as Purdue beat second ranked Iowa for the fourth time in their last five meetings twenty four seven David bell had a career best two hundred forty yards receiving it produced first victory over a top two teams since nineteen seventy four against second ranked Notre Dame I was just going out there trying to make plays and missed on finding a way to beat number six in the country so I knew that not only myself but the whole receiving corps led to come the one reason everyone again I was scored its fewest points at home since a thirteen seven loss to Nebraska in twenty twelve the law since the Hawkeyes twelve game winning streak Purdue intercepted Spencer teachers four times the most thrown in a game by Iowa in twelve years I'm the ferry

David Bell Purdue Iowa Notre Dame Hawkeyes Nebraska Spencer
NASA's asteroid hunter Lucy soars into sky with diamonds

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 7 months ago

NASA's asteroid hunter Lucy soars into sky with diamonds

"NASA launches its Lucy spacecraft on a twelve year quest to explore some of Jupiter's Trojan asteroids one of the atlas five rocket blasted off from Cape Canaveral Saturday morning submission is the first to aim for the thousands of not millions of asteroids that share Jupiter's expansive orbit around the sun scientists believe the Trojan asteroids may hold clues about the formation of our solar system they named Lucy after the three point two million year old skeletal remains of a human ancestor found in Ethiopia which was in turn named after the Beatles song Lucy in the sky with diamonds in a pre recorded video for NASA Ringo Starr paid tribute to John Lennon Johnny will love that I'm Julie Walker

Nasa Cape Canaveral Lucy Ethiopia Ringo Starr John Lennon Johnny Julie Walker
Lucy in the sky: Spacecraft will visit record 8 asteroids

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | 7 months ago

Lucy in the sky: Spacecraft will visit record 8 asteroids

"NASA is set to launch a series of spacecraft to visit and even bash some of the solar system's most enticing space rocks the first Gadgil launches early Saturday a robotic spacecraft named Lucy is up first Lucy will set the record for the further solar powered mission traveling five times further from the sun than the earth systems engineer Jessica Lounsbury says it will go on a twelve year cruise to swarms of asteroids out near Jupiter Cathy open with the south western research institute says there are a lot of missions for Lucy one of them is to map the craters across our services the service of the Trojan asteroids we're gonna look for craters smaller than a football field about seventy yards across barely a month later and impactor spacecraft named dart will give chase to a double asteroid closer to home the mission will end with dark ramming the main asteroids mon let to change its orbit a test that could one day save earth from

Gadgil Lucy Jessica Lounsbury Jupiter Cathy South Western Research Institu Nasa Football
Nixon Foundation Honors Gov. Pete Wilson

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

02:28 min | 8 months ago

Nixon Foundation Honors Gov. Pete Wilson

"I'm up with very little sleep this morning because we had a blast. Last night i came out to california with the fetching. Mrs hewitt so that we could celebrate with three hundred of his closest friends and staff family. Admirers donors supported governor. Pete wilson's career. Originally we had scheduled this at the nixon foundation at the nixon library. And your belinda. For the thirtieth anniversary of. Pete wilson governor of california in nineteen ninety-one and of course the virus got away to postpone it to april and then we postpone it until last night which was serendipitous from the perspective of the fetchy. Mrs hewitt i as we met for the first time on the same time i met. Pete wilson for the first time. That a pete wilson fundraiser at mission bay hosted by the san diego young republicans in one thousand nine hundred seventy eight. What behind the ears. Ohio kid thinking no. This is a pretty good place. Look at all these cute girls in that went over there. And pete wilson was working the crowd the only campaign out at ten. He went ten eleven and the one that he lost was the one that i won. Because he had an event which. I met the fetchy mrs hewitt but we worked with bob wide. His longtime chief of staff and the room was full and rocking yesterday. Great reception the governor was there. Mrs wilson wilson is a star people who live in washington. Dc new gail from people's time in the senate remember peak is a marine yearly. But we be leftover that he's a marine enlisted became. An officer is older brother. Let him there as listed managed that you know break. You're on if you joined the marines. And pete did anyway right out of jail after that law school after that. Advance work for a young richard nixon running for california governor in nineteen sixty two. That didn't work out. Well for president nixon but eventually it did for the country and for president nixon pete went and became an assemblyman then. He became the mayor of san diego for twelve years. Then it became the united states. Senator for eight years and then he became the governor of california for your great governor is a great senator largely responsible along with dan. Quayle and ronald reagan for the passage of star wars sti which many credit with the collapse of the soviet union. Finally governor wilson was just in federal. He doesn't change that age. He's the same guy and there is a tribute videos. Very funny thing. They can either be terrible or great. This was great

Pete Wilson Mrs Hewitt Nixon Foundation Nixon Library California Bob Wide Mrs Wilson Wilson Belinda Mission Bay San Diego President Nixon Nixon Pete Ohio Marines Senate Pete Washington Governor Wilson Quayle
Kelly Ties Rockne as No. 12 Irish Hold off Purdue 27-13

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 8 months ago

Kelly Ties Rockne as No. 12 Irish Hold off Purdue 27-13

"Karen Williams scored two long touchdowns the second a fifty one yard run with six oh five remaining as twelfth ranked Notre Dame held off Purdue twenty seven thirteen Jack corn was sacked four times and struggled with his accuracy completing fifteen of thirty one passes for two hundred twenty three yards and two TV's Avery Davis led the Irish in receptions with five for one hundred twenty yards the victory was the one hundred fifth in Brian Kelly's twelve year career at Notre Dame tying him with legendary Knute Rockne is the winningest coach in school history I'm the ferry

Karen Williams Jack Corn Avery Davis Notre Dame Purdue Brian Kelly Knute Rockne
A Space for Mom's to Be More Than 'Just Moms' With Mom Halo Founder, Alana Kayfetz

The Mom Room

02:55 min | 8 months ago

A Space for Mom's to Be More Than 'Just Moms' With Mom Halo Founder, Alana Kayfetz

"Halo which was previously known as moms. Te'o mom's toronto was to me like an act of desperation. When i was looking for my girls crew is looking for moms to like connect with and everywhere i went like people didn't talk to each other. It was really weird dynamic. I come from a twelve year history of a community builder. Fundraiser working nonprofit sector. Have always sort of been a gatherer of people and organizer of stuff so i was looking for my crew and i couldn't really find them so i had just moved into the neighborhood. We live now. I'm a young mom. I have my babies. Maybe five months old and i just like flew out on a local facebook page. I'm okay. I'm looking for some moms. Who wanna come over to my house to just maybe hang out at byu. Ob bring your babies. Your boobs in your bottles and bottles met lake. I was obviously like your your baby bottle. Your wine bottle. Hello whatever that was in two thousand. Sixteen that i thought was really clever. And lo and behold like nineteen random. Women's showed up to my like my matchbook cows. They're like i remember. This french canadian woman was like what's the catch. What are you trying to sell me on. Like absolutely nothing. My husband is a retired shops. Like beautiful feud we had like twelve bottles of wine. And we just. I had this aha moment of like moms. Just want to have their identity. Were their moms and also have a baby on everything. Baby baby baby all the time so. I really leaned in hard to this leg putting mom i like baby on the head wide on the lab. That's how it came. In to be. Rene then i remember that year. That was a really cool event in toronto that i really want to go to. It was like a very busy like food and beverage event. And i want to wear my white dress and i wanted to shut my baby with me and i went to go buy tickets. It was like a three hundred dollars ticket and the like. I'm sorry you can't come into nineteen event. I was like my baby is in a stroller. Like you can't bring the baby after this shit. I'm gonna create an event that looks and feels as beautiful as boozy. That's food and beverage where women can bring their baby. And that's how the first ever very mommy wine festival came to be with this like really leaning hard into finding a place where moms could come be themselves have a glass of wine and hang out with their babies fast forward years later and that's secretion of our community now which is now known as the mom halo. We pivoted hard because we realized we were serving women with our virtual digital content that we're like very much outside of the greater toronto area so very canadian following and we still sort of hit hard with i would say epa content. That's both virtual. We are in person really fun and it's not about why right. It's on about getting drunk and being fraternity girls. It's about permission right. It's about giving moms permission to say it's okay for you to be both. You can love being mom behaving mom. You can exercise five days a week. If that's your thing not my thing but if that's your thing and you wanna drink on the weekends that's your thing like just do you like whatever you is just

Toronto BYU Rene Facebook EPA
Florida Appeals Court Rules in Favor of DeSantis' Mask Mandate Ban

The South Florida Morning Show

01:56 min | 8 months ago

Florida Appeals Court Rules in Favor of DeSantis' Mask Mandate Ban

"You put je mask on you. Pick jim ask off. You put your mask back and forth. Shake it all about yet. An appeals court ruled friday. Keep governor to santa's parental mask option. Not his mask mandate or his right band. Not it's not a mask ban. It's a parental option in place. Which means that they can now withhold the salaries of school board members and districts that are requiring face coverings for all students. I would assume at eight o'clock this morning. All of these schools will be served in person with papers find at least thirteen school districts including florida's large sixth-largest. That's palm beach broward. He doesn't he doesn't waste any time. And he's not the kinda guy who just makes some sort of veiled political threat you will follow through. He went to harvard. Su he was a jag attorney and he knows the law and he knows the laws. He wouldn't do this if he didn't think the law was not behind him. Yeah you're right right the double negative all right well and it's the whole cabinet the legislature behind him to they're not messing around with this thing and i'm telling you where's the backlash from parents. I'm sure it's there. It's just we're not hearing from them. Who are so mad at their school board for playing chicken with the school board funding. Yeah it's irresponsible the other thing is that vaccines for twelve year olds. No you cannot do it. Because they don't know what the dosing is right the approval though no it doesn't even have approval they don't know how to dose it but in yet the l. which which is la unified school district. Which one bigger one they just have mandated a vacs requirement for kids. You can't you can't scare. I know exactly what you're saying. So i don't understand the decision. How can you even do that science. Isn't there you can't give a kid the regular amount that you would get no and they don't know how much that is. So my gosh very scary common i i figure it out but i know i got a feeling that are going to figure out quicker the not you

Palm Beach Broward JIM Santa SU Harvard La Unified School District Florida Legislature Cabinet
Boston-Area Catholic Priest Found Guilty of Child Abuse, Banned From Priesthood

Le Show

02:07 min | 8 months ago

Boston-Area Catholic Priest Found Guilty of Child Abuse, Banned From Priesthood

"Now. News of the godly catholic priest who formerly led parishes in the boston area has been barred from public ministry. After an ecclesiastical panel found him guilty of sexually abusing a minor in the nineteen sixties. According to the archdiocese of boston it confirmed the resolution of the case involving reverend paul mclaughlin. It said mclaughlin. Ninety one had been found guilty of child abuse and his sentence has been affirmed by the vatican his sentence. Four years in no live a life of prayer and penance. Ouch that smarts. In the light of that sentence the archdiocese said mclaughlin who currently lives in california. Well let's get the lapd check is a social media. No he's barred from exercising any public ministry including celebrating masses edition. He may not provide spiritual direction may not wear clerical attire and cannot function as a cleric quote he is to live in contemplation of his sins and pray for all of those affected by his conduct said the archdiocese the globe. The boston globe reported in february two thousand three that three men. The prior year had come forward to accuse mclaughlin of abusing them in the nineteen sixties in september two thousand and one is placed on administrative leave following an allegation of use abuse reported to have occurred in late nineteen sixties with a minor. One man said mcglaughlin. I'm not gonna read that one. You can imagine it. When he was eleven or twelve years old he was also accused in a separate lawsuit of abusing a boy at least ten times from nineteen sixty seven to nineteen sixty nine. The boy was a ten.

Mclaughlin Reverend Paul Mclaughlin Boston The Boston Globe California Mcglaughlin
LA Unified to Force Kids to Get Vaccinated

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:47 min | 9 months ago

LA Unified to Force Kids to Get Vaccinated

"L. a. unify the la unified school district to meet thursday. That's today over. Kovic vaccine mandate for students approval. Likely what does that mean. What agent above twelve. So ladies and gentlemen if you are in the la unified school district and you vaccinate your twelve year old You're doing something deeply irresponsible just to keep your kid in the despicable corrupt school that your kid goes to anyway so you have a double whammy you might be. I'm not saying you are. You might be hurting your child. You're certainly not helping your child ba- far better if your child ninety nine point nine percent of the time got covert and natural antibodies. The number of children dying from covert is infinitesimally small smaller than the flu. Yet they are telling you you must give your child vaccine and you will do it because it is so much easier to send your kid to school than not to and i get it it is. It's a lot easier to send your kid to school so even though they will corrupt your child rob your childhood innocence. Teach your child to hate everything you stand for. Teach them to hate this country. Teach them a godless curriculum and produce a worse. Human being who has nothing and now has to have an inoculation vaccination at twelve. You will still send your kid there when there is a beautiful loving wonderful option not to send your child to school to send your child to a school that does not require this and does not teach america hatred or to home school. Your child

La Unified School District Kovic LA FLU ROB America
Remembering Michael K. Williams & His Legacy

Awards Chatter

01:48 min | 9 months ago

Remembering Michael K. Williams & His Legacy

"Today's episode. We remember the magnificent character actor. Michael kenneth williams. Who was found dead on monday of a suspected drug overdose at the age of fifty. Four williams was a five time emmy nominee for best supporting actor in a limited series or tv movie for bessie in two thousand fifteen. The night of in two thousand sixteen and when they see us in two thousand nineteen for best informational series or special for vice in two thousand eighteen. He was an executive producer of the show. And for best supporting actor in a drama series this year for hbo's lovecraft country indeed. Even before his tragic passing he was the favourite to take home. His first statuette on september nineteenth williams also appeared on the sopranos alias. Boston legal happened. Leonard and many other acclaimed. Tv shows as well as in films. Such as two thousand seven's gone baby gone two thousand nine the road and two thousand thirteen twelve years a slave which won the best picture oscar but he was best known for his work on to other. Hbo drama series for which he criminally never was even for an emmy the wire on which he played omar little and boardwalk empire on which he played chalky white the wire which was created by david. Simon is considered by many including me to be the greatest show in the history of television. And he the greatest character on it a gay shotgun-wielding stick up man who terrified even baltimore's most hardened criminals whistling hunting. We will go as he stopped the streets and famously warning one challenger you come at the king you best not miss. The new york times described the character quote one of primetime preeminent anti heroes in a tv era defined by them close quote

Michael Kenneth Williams Williams Bessie Emmy Omar Little HBO Leonard Boston Oscar Simon David Baltimore The New York Times
Remembering Michael K. Williams & His Legacy

Awards Chatter

01:58 min | 9 months ago

Remembering Michael K. Williams & His Legacy

"Today's episode. We remember the magnificent character actor. Michael kenneth williams. Who was found dead on monday of a suspected drug overdose at the age of fifty. Four williams was a five time emmy nominee for best supporting actor in a limited series or tv movie for bessie in two thousand fifteen. The night of in two thousand sixteen and when they see us in two thousand nineteen for best informational series or special for vice in two thousand eighteen. He was an executive producer of the show. And for best supporting actor in a drama series this year for hbo's lovecraft country indeed. Even before his tragic passing he was the favourite to take home. His first statuette on september nineteenth williams also appeared on the sopranos alias. Boston legal happened. Leonard and many other acclaimed. Tv shows as well as in films. Such as two thousand seven's gone baby gone two thousand nine the road and two thousand thirteen twelve years a slave which won the best picture oscar but he was best known for his work on to other. Hbo drama series for which he criminally never was even for an emmy the wire on which he played omar little and boardwalk empire on which he played chalky white the wire which was created by david. Simon is considered by many including me to be the greatest show in the history of television. And he the greatest character on it a gay shotgun-wielding stick up man who terrified even baltimore's most hardened criminals whistling hunting. We will go as he stopped the streets and famously warning one challenger you come at the king you best not miss. The new york times described the character quote one of primetime preeminent anti heroes in a tv era defined by them close quote given this week. Sad news i thought i would resurface an interview that i recorded with williams just over a decade ago. Shortly after the first season of boardwalk empire

Michael Kenneth Williams Williams Bessie Emmy Omar Little HBO Leonard Boston Oscar Simon David Baltimore The New York Times
"about twelve years later" Discussed on Halfway There | Christian Testimonies | Spiritual Formation, Growth, and Personal Experiences with God

Halfway There | Christian Testimonies | Spiritual Formation, Growth, and Personal Experiences with God

05:51 min | 9 months ago

"about twelve years later" Discussed on Halfway There | Christian Testimonies | Spiritual Formation, Growth, and Personal Experiences with God

"And when i started those. You've been back then. The conventional wisdom is you need to be consistent so that your audience knows what to expect. And i remember the first couple of years. I thought there's no writing blog posts two week. 'cause i was working fulltime as the impatience and vietnam little's and but now about twelve years later. I don't know we've got probably a thousand blog posts on my blog. What it did. Though was it narrowed my focus. The lord showed me that look. I've trained you to be a doctor. I've trained you to understand how the mind works. Now go use it to educate other people so that they can live in the fullness of their identity in me so now i coach now i write books and now i speak typically on mental health issues but really the underlying message is that we need to know who we are in christ and where our identity comes from ya. I love that. I just think that is the absolute most most perfect thing. What was the response to your to your first book then after a few finally got that. Got that written and did anything surprise you. It was amazing. It was amazing. Because had i written the book or the proposal the way i had started it it would have been a dry clinical book. Nobody would have liked it and as a depressed reader. They wouldn't have made the book. I know it a right but the feedback that i get now if you look at my reviews on amazon the typical responses are. She understands me because she's been there. And i think the most interesting thing was. You know. Eric i for so many years i thought it was on me. If it was gonna be had to be up to me. And i thought i was responsible for the harvest and what god showed me is that i'm responsible to be obedient to him. And he's responsible for the harvest. My favorite email that. I got after that first book was from a woman named hope in south africa. And she wrote to me and she said she'd been horribly depressed and suicidal. For years she attempted suicide something like fourteen times and went to her pastor and said i need help. I made resources. I don't wanna live like this. And her pastor said got nothing for you. I don't know who descended to. I don't know what resources to give you. And she had a little bit of money she was not employed but someone had given her a little bit of money for birthday says she went to a bookstore that was going on a business and my book was called hope prevails and it was on sale because the store was going out of business. She picked up my book because her name was hope. And she read it to cover and then went back to her pastor and held it up and said this is my source of hope. This was the answer and she sent me a letter saying thank you for using your own pain job others yet through their pain art. There's no way. I could have gotten my book in south africa into the hands of this young woman. New hope but god could good and he did and so now i try to be obedient to what god asked me to do. But i tried to leave the results up to him. Yeah okay so you said earlier that you that you kind of lordship thing you know was a was a big deal for you. Was that just a matter of the surrendering to the to the rest and the need was there more. Was there more to them. It was really a matter of recognizing that jesus says in mathew that his yoke is easy and.

vietnam south africa amazon Eric mathew jesus
"about twelve years later" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

07:55 min | 1 year ago

"about twelve years later" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"Since you mention it and you get very quick idea on what rapamycin as we last spoke more bearish more bullish and why i'm a bowl. Does coin rapa hands so what is right by the way i mean i know i know what the diamond diamonds thing but what does it. Where did it come from no idea. No idea where diamond hands comes from. Okay did i missed that somewhere in my my immune econ classes. No i don't think so. So what is rapamycin. Rapamycin is a drug that is a naturally occurring anti fungal agent made by a bacteria that was discovered on easter island back in the nineteen sixties otherwise known as rapa nui right. Rapanui is the correct name for easter island and the bacteria streptomyces hydra scopus which was discovered there by a group of explorers explorers. Maybe the wrong word but people doing sort of medical prospecting a group from montreal. Believe in call nine hundred sixty six. They took a bunch of soil and dirt back from rapanui to the lab in montreal where it's sort of sat there unattended to about five years. A chemist stoop chemists by the name of surrender. Seagal right lamb yeah. He started legal. No and no ponytail so surrendered some really interesting. Chemistry isolated the compound and noticed. It had these really remarkable properties which was it was the most potent antifungal he ever seen or the world had ever seen. Frankly at the time as his son aged tells the story who have gotten to know a little bit. He felt he had basically come onto the biggest blockbuster cure for athlete's foot the world was ever going to know and right about that time the company he worked for closed. Its montreal headquarters. Actually laid people off ordered the destruction of all non-viable compounds and shipped him off to new jersey. In one of the greatest acts of scientific fortuity he did not follow orders and he instead stuck said rapamycin into a little mini freezer that he and his family transported to their new home in new jersey. They kept it in the freezer for many years. Until ultimately another drug company purchased the company he worked for and the new management said. Hey anybody working on anything interesting. He said i'm working on this thing interesting that i haven't looked at in a few years. And they said bring it out. Must've been interesting lawyer. conversation fist. On the not following orders dinner so out came rapamycin which he named mason and mason is typically the the suffix. I guess that we use her. What's the what's the second part of a workout sucks for antimicrobial agents and of course rapa tribute to the rapa. Nui like a zoo throw mason. Correct it quickly became clear that this had remarkable anti proliferative properties so it could stop things from proliferating so that was obviously a big just fungi and in particular it was very effective at making a certain type of lymphocyte which is a white type of white blood cell not proliferate and then basically went down the path eventually pfizer then bought amorous which was the company that bought his previous company whose name i don't even remember at this point. Pfizer ended up pursuing this and it was fda approved in nineteen ninety nine for treatment of organ transplantation so patients that have an organ transplant. Transplanted have to be put on a really heavy regimen of drugs to suppress a part of their immune system called the cellular immune system. That will attack foreign organ. That's what is that called. Host graft not graft versus host is actually when the organ usually. It's in the case of lymphoma or leukemia when someone has a bone marrow transplant and the the graft what they've been transplanted host is. This is this is really host versus graft but traditional sort of rejection actually did a really cool podcast on the topic of transplantation. History with a guy named chris on de and it's i mean i know this subject well but having a discussion with chris really opened my eyes to just what a beautiful story it is. And what. The big breakthroughs were with drug development. And how you know at one point. It was all you could give. People was present his own. And you couldn't save anybody and then you had other drugs like cyclosporin. That were introduced. But then you get into this third generation of amazing drugs like rapamycin that took organ preservation to to a higher level. Now you're not swapping kidneys. How do you know well at least not since the last time you sold one tijuana settle a bat but why would you take rapamycin. I'm skipping ahead. A little bit yes. Let's skip ahead so so ninety nine. This drug comes on the market. For organ rejection and about twelve years later a study gets published by rich miller randy strong colleagues as part of what's called the interventions testing program or the it p which is an amazing nih funded program that tests molecules. That are believed to have a shot at enhancing longevity and it does so in her really really rigorous way probably the most rigorous way we can test small animals of interviewed. Rich miller as well. Probably one of my favorite podcasts. In terms of like nerdy out on all of the molecules it can potentially impact longevity and rapamycin was in many ways the poster child for the it p. program because first of all it's hard to get anything to live longer second of all when they were making the formulation for the rapamycin to feed the mice and these were very special mice. These were not your typical crappy lab mice that have no bearing whatsoever to real animals. These are very special type of mice. That are much more akin to real animals and that's very important distinction between what happens in ninety nine percent of miles research which is almost in applicable to humans. And it's why so many drugs that get tested in these b six mice and things like that show some marker of success and they become wild failures beyond the mice. But this was different. They had trouble getting the formulation to work and by the time they finally did the mice were like twenty months old. Which means they're almost at the end of their life. They're like seventy year old sixty five year old mice and they contemplated just scrapping the experiment but they were like screw it. Let's just run it late. So they started feeding the treatment group with rapamycin and the placebo group. Get to continue eating their regular chow. Because it was oral administration yes rapamycin was mixed into their chow. And lo and behold the rapamycin group despite initiating treatment so late in life had a staggering improvement in lifespan. There's been so many it. Ps that have replicated this. I don't wanna misquoted. But some of the effective like a seventeen or nineteen percent improvement in the males or females and eleven to twelve percent in the males and remember the atp use a very rigorous way of assessing this. Which is they're taking a look at total life not just remaining life. It's an even higher bar to clear. How much lifespan. Along gatien happens of course went and repeated. The study administering the dose when they were younger and saw an even greater response. This has been repeated over and over and over again and to my knowledge there is not a single animal. Study that has tested this hypothesis. That has not found on a result..

montreal eleven chris new jersey seventeen nineteen percent Pfizer nineteen sixties twelve percent seventy year old sixty five year old easter island third generation about five years ninety nine percent of miles about twelve years later ninety nine twenty months old second single animal
"about twelve years later" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"about twelve years later" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"He felt he had basically come onto the biggest blockbuster cure for athlete's foot the world was ever going to know and right about that time the company he worked for closed. Its montreal headquarters. Actually laid people off ordered the destruction of all non-viable compounds and shipped him off to new jersey. In one of the greatest acts of scientific fortuity he did not follow orders and he instead stuck said rapamycin into a little mini freezer that he and his family transported to their new home in new jersey. They kept it in the freezer for many years. Until ultimately another drug company purchased the company he worked for and the new management said. Hey anybody working on anything interesting. He said i'm working on this thing interesting that i haven't looked at in a few years. And they said bring it out. Must've been interesting lawyer. conversation fist. On the not following orders dinner so out came rapamycin which he named mason and mason is typically the the suffix. I guess that we use her. What's the what's the second part of a workout sucks for antimicrobial agents and of course rapa tribute to the rapa. Nui like a zoo throw mason. Correct it quickly became clear that this had remarkable anti proliferative properties so it could stop things from proliferating so that was obviously a big just fungi right exactly and in particular. It was very effective at making a certain type of lymphocyte which is a white type of white blood cell not proliferate and then basically went down the path eventually pfizer then bought amorous which was the company that bought his previous company whose name i don't even remember at this point. Pfizer ended up pursuing this and it was fda approved in nineteen ninety nine for treatment of organ transplantation so patients that have an organ transplant have to be put on a really heavy regimen of drugs to suppress a part of their immune system called the cellular immune system. That will attack foreign organ. That's what is that called. Host graft not graft versus host is actually when the organ usually. It's in the case of lymphoma or leukemia when someone has a bone marrow transplant and the the graft what they've been transplanted the host is. This is this is really host versus graft but traditional sort of rejection actually did a really cool podcast on the topic of organ transplantation history with a guy named chris on de. And it's. I mean. I know this subject well but having a discussion with chris really opened my eyes to just what a beautiful story it is and what. The big breakthroughs were with drug development. And how you know at one point. It was all you could give. People was present his own. And you couldn't save anybody and then you had other drugs like cyclosporin. That were introduced. But then you get into this third generation of amazing drugs like rapamycin that took organ preservation to to a higher level. Now you're not swapping kidneys. Do you know well at least not since the last time you sold one tijuana settle a bat but why would you take rapamycin. I'm skipping ahead. A little bit yes. Let's skip ahead so so ninety nine. This drug comes on the market. For organ rejection and about twelve years later a study gets published by rich miller randy strong colleagues as part of what's called the interventions testing program or the it p which is an amazing nih funded program that tests molecules. That are believed to have a shot at enhancing longevity and it does so in her really really rigorous way probably the most rigorous way we can test small animals of interviewed. Rich miller as well. Probably one of my favorite podcasts..

new jersey chris montreal Pfizer third generation second part about twelve years later ninety nine one rich miller randy one point nineteen ninety nine Rich pfizer leukemia amorous rapamycin one tijuana many years de
"about twelve years later" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

04:39 min | 2 years ago

"about twelve years later" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"This is Marty along with Chris half as we look at another great game in Giants franchise history Chris and this one we're going to go back to April the fifth at two thousand seven it's the third game of the year it's the giants versus the San Diego Padres a giant your home thirty seven thousand nine hundred and fourteen at what they call either AT and T. Barker whatever they're calling it in those days it's clay Hensley for the Padres mad Mars for the giants and Chris why we chose this game as one of the great games in giants franchise history is to honor Bruce pochi crescent these lost the first two to the Padres seven nothing Peavey me zero five three claim Meredith over Hennessy this is game three and he's going for his first win as a San Francisco Giants manager thank Chris we know where the story ends up about twelve years later well one thing Marty if there's anything we learned about Bruce Moshi besides the fact he's a winner he's also a competitor he's as competitive as anybody and he didn't like losing his old team the Padres is at all it was kind of fitting and he got this first is made and joins victory against his old club well here's a game listen to these lineups Chris this is two thousand seven baseball changes Padres Marcus Giles its second Brian Giles and write in solitude first barred catching Cameron and center cleo green it short because one office third sledging left in Ansley pitching for the giants I love this line up Dave Roberts in center Misskelley short bonds in left field German second base a really at third class code first Maulana doing the catching Randy women right and Matt Morris on the hill so Christian this one it's clay Hensley against Matt Morris is we get under way pretty good pitching matchup there that Moore's of course was expected to be a top notch pitch. the frontline pitcher for giants at times he was it other times well. and work out a lot of late with veterans for the giants punter any degree option what we're seeing now of course the shoes were different developmentally than some of those guys Dave Roberts which really have actually played for Bruce in San Diego so he will quit trying classical also solution Bruce news one person was club that's for sure all right bush poaching going for his first win as a manager of the Sam Cisco giants giants first name Robert to base it on the shelf life of center and who else Barry Bonds a double and the giants go up one nothing San Diego fits clear green a double Hensley believe not a base hit and it's one one we go to the bottom of the fifth to the giants now with two out Dave Roberts gets a walking he still second base Dave Roberts had some big stone bases in his career was scale walk bond to walk there loaded ray dharma bass said it's three to one a really a base at forty one classico obey said five to one so the end of five innings the giants have the lead five to one now Chris manned Mars go six innings five hits a run to auction to strike out and I bring this up because it's both she's attempt at his first win so after six innings where does he go the bull pen and here comes the parade of pictures out of the bullpen Jonathon Sanchez for naming many choke for an ending Steve Klein starch the ninth and we'll get into that in just a second yes the other managers especially what separates Bruce bocce from a common run of managers and the answer is almost inevitably the same the man knows how to run his pitching staff particular handles more than what he did on this night was very typical and that's high praise and drop people we see typical it's average with Chris boshi typical is excellent this typical bull pen management was a very much in evidence on this evening well we go to the nine Kenny is already use Mars Sanches chalk and here comes the client gets two outs easily Giles gets a double. Giles gets a single now first and third and they bring in our mondo Benitez I'm sure to a few boos and Benitez really struggled in his career as a Sam Cisco giant he walks the end of a bass said now it's five to three its first and second Chris to out Mike Cameron comes up and Benitez throws at pitch on the outside part of played Kaman tries to pull it he pops it up to second base ray Durham is there he corrals it the game and the giants win and five to three and Bruce pochi has his first win as a San Francisco.

giants Chris half Benitez Kaman Giles Bruce pochi Marty San Francisco Cisco ray Durham Mike Cameron twelve years
"about twelve years later" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"about twelve years later" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Sports leader this is Marty l'oreal only Chris half as we look at another great game in Giants franchise history Christian this one we're going to go back to April the fifth at two thousand seven it's the third game of the year it's the giants versus the San Diego Padres a giant your home thirty seven thousand nine hundred and fourteen add to what they call either AT and T. Barker whatever they're calling it in those days it's clay hands leave for the Padres mad Mars for the giants in Chris why we chose this game as one of the great games in giants franchise history is to honor Bruce pochi crescent these lost the first two to the Padres seven nothing Peavey me zero five three clay Meredith over Hennessy this is game three and he's going for his first win as a San Francisco Giants manager thank Chris we know where the story ends up about twelve years later well one thing Marty if there's anything we learned about Bristol she besides the fact he's a winner he's also a competitor he's as competitive as anybody and he didn't like losing his old team the Padres as at all it was kind of fitting and he got this first is made and joins victory against his old club well here's to the game listen to these lineups Christmas of two thousand seven baseball changes Padres Marcus Giles its second Brian Giles and write in solitude first barred catching Cameron in center cleo green a short cruise one office third sledging left in Ansley pitching for the giants I love this line up Dave Roberts in center with scallops short bonds in left field German second base a really at third class code first Maulana doing the catching read the women right and Matt Morris on the hill so Christian this one it's clay Hensley against Matt Morris is we get under way pretty good pitching match up there that Moore's of course was expected to be a top notch pitcher for. live picture for the giants at times he was it other times well. and work out a lot of late with veterans for the giants hundred degree option what we're seeing now of course the shoes were.

Cameron clay Hensley Brian Giles San Francisco Giants AT Marty l'oreal Moore Matt Morris Dave Roberts Ansley Chris half Marcus Giles Bristol Marty Hennessy Meredith Peavey Bruce pochi T. Barker
"about twelve years later" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

12:38 min | 2 years ago

"about twelve years later" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"AIR resignation leaves the Federal Election Commission would just remembers they're supposed to have at least four we can continue to do investigations that I've already been authorized but we can't authorize any new investigations can't issue any rules we can issue an advisory opinion what this means for twenty twenty next time on the take away weekday afternoons at three on ninety three point nine FM this is fresh air and if you're just joining us my guest is ava duvernay she produced directed and co wrote the new Netflix series when they see us which dramatizes the story of the five young men who are now middle aged man who became known as the Central Park five after they were accused and then based on false and coerced confessions a convicted of raping and assaulting a woman whose jogging in Central Park when about twelve years later when the convictions were vacated they sued the city of New York and years later won a total of forty one million dollars in a settlement and you know after making these coerced confessions they recanted their confessions and they never backed down from recanting even after they were in prison and some of them were offered no parole if they just you know took responsibility for the crimes that they committed they said we wouldn't commit those crimes the that's right even Corey wives who thirteen some years in prison and the worst prisons in New York state never wavered from the truth which was that he didn't do it and lying had gotten him to that place he believes that lying got him into prison you know following the the coercion trying to please being told that he would be allowed to leave if he said certain things those with the regrets that he lives with as a as a man you know decisions that he made you know trusting authority figures as a as a boy he never intended to lie again so yeah you know you know they never wavered they never lied again after they all connected they never went back on their word a lot of the final episode is devoted to the story of Cory and he kissed or is it just like particularly heartbreaking he was charged only because he agreed to accompany his friend who is being picked up on the park by the police on the night of the attack in Central Park and of course name wasn't even on the list of people who they were rounding up he was just the cop said to him once you come to the station house with with your friend and so to be loyal to his friend he came along ends up making a false confession ends up getting convicted and ends up being the only one of the five who's tried as an adult and is sent to adult prisons where he is repeatedly brutalized and assaulted and also I think what makes hard it harder for him is that he either he can't read well or he can't read it all I I wasn't quite sure like if you take if you could read it all but that makes it harder for him to figure out what's going on sometimes and also he was born or early in childhood had a hearing impairment of his speech is a little bit slurred and and like I think all of those things must've added up to make his years of just especially difficult and I'm wondering having met all of these men when they were in their forties if you feel that he is still like suffering a lot because of all of these extra things that he was exposed to yeah I mean it's definitely suffering he did thirteen years this child his youth was stolen from him right he did more years than and then the others so yeah I mean he's definitely affected by all of that and it was trying to make his way through a new life you know we always says life after death life after death this is what he is trying to navigate how to be here on the outside in the world having gone through you know a type of darkness that you know is it is this really almost impossible to describe what you see in the film is not all of what he endured email is even worse than you depict there was more they want more heating there there there was more damage done to him more darkness more or more trauma and so whenever he's in front of me I just think he's Americal even when he's not in front of me I think about so much we've become close and he's very he's got a brilliance about him when you sit and talk to him you know most people are patient enough to sit there and talk to him but when you do you get rewards and so you know I tried to take all of my conversations with Cory which was so heart expanding for me you know he really teaches me a lot of my own life and it's helped me a lot of my own life and to take all of that and somehow put them into the final piece of this four part film the series to just explain it to share the heart of this man I mean he it is a is a is a real hero in terms of being able to look at someone and say he is he is battled something greater than most of us ever will and it's come out on the other side to tell the story so Ken burns documentary was made before the city awarded forty one million dollars to the five in the settlement of the fives lawsuit against the city and also when the burns documentaries made president trump was not you're just Donald Trump he wasn't president yet so first I want to ask you about trump what what it's like to see the role that he played in being a megaphone for finding the Central Park five guilty before they were even tried you know just like days after they were arrested and charged he took out full page ads in all of New York's for major newspapers saying bring back the death penalty bring back our police and this was an argument for the death penalty basically for for children I mean there were fourteen fifteen and sixteen years old so I'm just interested in what it was like for you to see his role in the Central Park five yes we played a very famous role in the case you know with the taking of the ads but ultimately you know he's not the story ands so it does it and I made the decisions to keep it very you know he's a very sparingly and use them and you know with his own words in his own footage and we do it a couple times and there's a couple mentions you know when you really research this time he was one of many prominent voices that were out saying all kinds of crazy stuff I mean Pat Buchanan basically said that Cory why should be lynched it should be hung in a public park this is the climate of the time and and it was all seen is acceptable and it was this all happening without much of a second thought certainly not on the thought about the humanity of these boys and their families so so yeah as as we as we went through just make decisions not to lean too much into trump that's one of the reasons why I want to change the name from Central Park five two when they see us I thought that the Central Park five it becomes so kind of synonymous with him and him asked checking in talking about a particular around the documentary as he slammed Ken burns and tweeted against him that I just really wanted to to to to change the perspective in which we were thinking about this case can you tell us something about their lives now there are great people I love them a lot you know they're really meant I could cry just thinking about them all the good good guys you know three of them live in Atlanta it's funny because you know antrum acquainted Craig is the first to leave he goes for Atlanta he finds this beautiful black oasis in Atlanta where you you know predominantly black town with you know lots of people from a lot of different parts of the country and he does a certain certain prosperity that happens in some parts of the city and lots of activity and things to do and so he goes out there by way of Baltimore and a couple other cities that he'd stopped in and lived along the way any fines Atlanta and Raymond comes to visit Raymond is the person he's closest to they're the really best friends and raven comes to visit me was like yo what is this you've got grass wait in the back no wait what and so shortly after Raymond picks up when he moved to Atlanta and then a few months after that use of picks up and moves to Atlanta so three of them live in Atlanta and then Kevin lives in New Jersey just got married when I first met him he was not married he was dating this really wonderful woman and I remember him thinking maybe she's the one and I'm like you see the wind what's going to happen now is married and they live in New Jersey with their new daughter and and and and his step daughter and they are the cutest little family and then Corey is in Harlem and he has tried to live other places and just love Harlem you know when he moves out of the city he longs for Harlem I mean he will he will drive back in the Harlem just to to be there he goes to al Sharpton's weekly meetings every Saturday in Harlem community meetings he's a real part of the community I walked the streets with Oprah before it's similar it's people love him they respect him they look out for him they give him a lot of love there and that's why that's why he likes it it's home that's what the five of them are doing you know in different in various places you know with their own emotional reckoning you know but but my hope is fan and I've seen it a bit that the that the film is is gonna therapy in some ways they're able to talk about it but the main thing is now people know the story Cory's really really Adam it that people know his story he said to me early on is what's not the Central Park park five it's four plus one I had a different story and he wanted people to know and we we we did everything we could to tell his story it's a very singular story it's different from the other guys and so does the fact that now when people walk up to him they know him they know his story they respect what he went through I think is I hope and I pray that it has a positive effect on him in on all of them ava duvernay thank you so much for talking with us thank you so much I appreciate it thanks for having me ava duvernay directed co wrote and produced the Netflix series when they see us which is nominated for sixteen Emmy is including two for duvernay best writing and best directing for limited series after we take a break we'll hear from Michael K. Williams is nominated for an Emmy for his performance in when they see us as Bobby McCray the father of intron.

Federal Election Commission forty one million dollars thirteen years sixteen years twelve years
"about twelve years later" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:01 min | 3 years ago

"about twelve years later" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Is fresh air. And if you're just joining us, my guest is a Duvernois. She produced directed and co wrote the new Netflix series when they see us which dramatizes the story of the five young men who are now middle aged men who became known as the central park, five after they were accused, and then based on false and coerce confessions convicted of raping assaulting a woman who's jogging central park when about twelve years later when the convictions were vacated, they sued the city of New York and years later won a total of forty one million dollars in a settlement. They lied about each other as part of these coerced confessions, and they named the names of the other young men who are in, in the five. How do they realize they had lied about each other and had incriminated each other because they didn't even all know each other? Right. Only two of the five knew each other, and it wasn't until four of them were put in a cell together, at the end of the interrogations period after they all, or for the five had been taped that they find themselves in a room together, and then they began to introduce themselves to one another. So the four boys in that room, did not know each other. It was Yussef Kevin and Tron and Raymond, and they start to talk and started to tell each other, what they said and how they'd heard each other's names. And basically, the stories that they told me all separately, we were for word recreate in the in the film, the, the part that always kind of destroys me and watching that is these boys were made to be a wolf pack, you know, Wilding gang. In the news at the very same time that they're in a room, just meeting each other. And so, you know, that, that they're the, the revelation of what they had done an incriminating one another through being fed each other's names by police, you know, came to light when they were all together in a cell and after making these coerce confessions, they recanted their confessions, and they never backed down from recanting, even after they were in prison. And some of them were offered, you know, parole if they just, you know, took responsibility for the crimes that they committed. They said, we, we didn't commit those crimes. That's right. Even Corey wives, who. Thirteen some years in prison in the, the worst prisons in New York state never wavered from the truth, which was that he didn't do it and lying had gotten him to that place. He believes that lying got him into prison following the coercion trying to please being told that he would be allowed to leave if he said, certain things, you know, those with regrets that he lives with, as a, as a, as a man, you know, decisions that he made, you know, trusting authority figures as as a boy. You know. So he never intended to lie again, because it only got him in, you know, in what he calls death. You know, he says that he died in prison, many times and, and that, that this time now feels like life after death. And sometimes he does. Don't even know if he's asleep or awake because it's so surreal. And so, so, yeah, you know the. They never wavered. They never they never. They never lied again after they all connected. They never went back on their word. So Linda fairstein, who is the head of the New York, DA's sex crimes unit is depicted in your film, as bending the truth in order to convict the five, and she after series came out, she resigned from several boards of directors, including the board of Vassar alma mater, she was dropped by her book, publisher and dropped by her agent. Oh, and I should say Elizabeth letter or the lead prosecutor in the case. She resigned after you're serious from her position, as an adjunct faculty member Columbia University law school. Do you think that those repercussions were result of new information that you uncovered? Or do you think there were result of just making what was already known more visible by dramatizing it and getting a big reaction? Big response as a result. No. I mean, everything that's in the pieces is public record and his out there at been it had been told before by journalists in books and articles in documentary and podcasts. I mean, the story had been told, you know, the power of net to drop it in one hundred ninety countries and put it right in people's homes, and you know, to be able to watch it through dramatization that feels very real and not like news is just the way that some people empathize more with stories like this. But there was there was nothing nothing new that hadn't been said or reported previously. What was your reaction to Linda fairstein having the resigning from Vassar and being dropped by her publisher in her agent? I don't think I have the reaction that most people thought I would have I it was information. Really elicit any kind of fig motion Amina. I certainly feel like people should be held accountable and she is. And, you know, I mean that, that's it. My, my focus is so much on the men and my focus is so much on trying to eliminate real insidious nature of American criminal Justice system that for me that piece of it is it might feel sexy and headlines. But it's really not my focus so, yeah, it was, it was information it was kind of duly noted my guest is Eva Duvenage. She produced directed and co wrote the new Netflix series when they see us which dramatizes the stories of the central park, five will hear more after a break and film critic, Justin Chang, will review to a story four I'm Terry gross. And this is fresh air..

New York Linda fairstein Netflix publisher Duvernois Vassar alma mater Wilding Eva Duvenage Yussef Kevin Terry gross recanting Corey adjunct faculty member Justin Chang Amina Elizabeth Vassar prosecutor Columbia University
"about twelve years later" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:58 min | 3 years ago

"about twelve years later" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is fresh air. And if you're just joining us, my guest is a Duval natio- produced directed. And co wrote the new Netflix series when they see us which dramatizes the story of the five young men who are now middle aged men who became known as the central park, five after they were accused. And then based on false and coerce confessions convicted of raping assaulting a woman who's jogging in central park when about twelve years later when the convictions were vacated, they sued the city of New York and years later won a total of forty one million dollars in a settlement. They lied about each other as part of these coerced confessions, and they named the names of the other young men who are in, in the five. How do they realize they had lied about each other and had incriminated each other because they didn't even know each other? Right. Only two of the five knew each other, and it wasn't until four of them were put in a cell together, at the end of the interrogations period after they all, or for the five had been taped that they find themselves in a room together, and then they began to introduce themselves to one another. So the four boys in that room, did not know each other. It was Yussef Kevin Anton, and Raymond. And they start to talk and started to tell each other, what they said and how they'd heard each other's names. And basically, the stories that they told me all separately, we were for word recreate in the in the film, the, the part that always kind of destroys me and watching that is these boys were made to be a wolf pack in Wilding gang. In the news at the very same time that they're in a room, just meeting each other. And so, you know, that, that they're the, the revelation of what they had done and incriminating one another through being fed each other's names by police, you know, came to light when they were all together in a cell and after making these coerce confessions, they recanted their confessions, and they never backed down from recanting, even after they were in prison and some of them were offered parole. If they just, you know, took responsibility for the crimes that they committed. They said, we, we didn't commit those crimes. That's right. Even Corey wives, who. Thirteen some years in prison in the, the worst prisons in New York state never wavered from the truth, which was that he didn't do it and lying had gotten him to that place. He believes that lying got him into prison following the coercion trying to please being told that he would be allowed to leave if he said, certain things, you know, those with regrets that he lives with, as a, as a, as a man, you know, decisions that he made trusting authority figures as as a boy. You know. So he never intended to lie again, because it only got him in, you know, in, in what he calls death. You know, he says that he died in that prison, many times and, and that, that this time now feels like life after death. And sometimes he does. Don't even know if he's asleep or awake because it's so surreal. And so, so, yeah, you know the. They never wavered. They never they never. They never lied again after they all connected. They never went back on their word. So Linda fairstein, who is the head of the New York, DA's sex crimes unit is depicted in your film, as the bending the truth in order to convict the five, and she after serious came out. She resigned from several boards of directors, including the board of Vassar alma mater, she was dropped by her book, publisher and dropped by her agent. Oh, and I should say Elizabeth letter the lead prosecutor in the case. She resigned after you're serious from her position, as an adjunct faculty member Columbia University law school. Do you think that those repercussions were result of new information that you uncovered? Or do you think they were result of just making what was already known more visible by dramatizing it and getting a big reaction? Big response as a result. No. I mean, everything that's in the pieces is public record and his out there at been. It had been told before by journalists in books and articles in documentary and podcasts. I'm in the story had been told, you know, the power of Netflix, drop it in one hundred ninety countries and put it right in people's homes and, you know, to be able to watch it through dramatization that feels very real and not like news is just the way that some people impetus more with stories like this. But there was there was nothing new that hadn't been said or reported previously. What was your reaction to Linda fairstein having resigning from Vassar and being dropped by her publisher in her agent? I don't think I had the reaction that most people thought I would have. I mean, it was just information. It didn't really elicit any kind of fig- motion. I mean, I certainly feel like people should be held accountable and she is. And, you know, I mean that's it. My, my focus is so much on the men. And my focus is so much on trying to illuminate. Real insidious nature of American criminal Justice system that for me that piece of it is it might feel sexy and headlines. But it's really not my focus so, yeah, it was, it was information it was kind of duly noted. My guest is Eva Duvenage. She produced directed and co wrote the Netflix series when they see us which dramatizes the stories of the central park, five will hear more after a break and film.

Netflix New York Linda fairstein publisher Duval natio Vassar alma mater Yussef Kevin Anton Wilding Eva Duvenage recanting Corey adjunct faculty member Elizabeth prosecutor Columbia University Raymond Vassar forty one million dollars twelve years
"about twelve years later" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"about twelve years later" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Got questions about interest rates refinancing buying a home. Staging a homeselling home any issues, you may have had. Yeah. Whatever you wanna talk about one thing right now going on graduation in your kids. You graduate. Well, my graduating engineer. Yeah. Okay. All the graduations out there, and all the high school graduations, article I pulled out of the wall Wall Street Journal in their housing section talking about the best thing, basically, it was it was it shows how when people let their kids live for free, like come home from college and not pay rent or a stage in their life. I've found people with thirty forty year old kids living in their house. When you do that you're costing them financially, they turn out to have less net worth less response this there aren't as productive in life. And one of the best things you can give to the grad after college. The lease. You know, I love this idea that I'm not I'm not a dad. So I'm just gonna Granddad. Don't ask me how that happened. But, but it's something that I just think it's funny I see people all time, where the kids, just keep sponging and you don't like kick them out of the nest say fly little birdie, I love it. I think it's a Lowes commercial that shows the kid comes home from college and his bedrooms. Now a cot rise, a closet and dad made are showing room. Yeah. Yeah. So. Just one thing you want to teach them responsibilities. Even if you say, hey guys, here's you know, here's your rent payment, and maybe it's only a couple hundred bucks, but that money goes into a savings account for them you invest it for them. But teaching them these things because I wish I had bought a home sooner I moved out early. But I didn't buy a home 'til about twelve years later, when I told my mom tired of paying rent, she said, well, let's go get a house and merits. I should've kept the darn thing. I think I bought it for sixty grand here in central Florida. I read an article about ten years ago, actually was in a in a book, and it said that, if you buy real estate when you're in your twenties, you have a seventy percent greater chance on retiree as a millionaire. Well think about this average net worth of a renter. I think is for nationwide is little survey. I saw think two years ago, I was talking about on the show was about sixty seven grand or something like that. The average homeowner had a net worth of about two hundred and fifty grand. Right..

Wall Street Journal engineer Florida thirty forty year seventy percent twelve years ten years two years
"about twelve years later" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

KUGN 590 AM

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"about twelve years later" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

"The most comfortable pillow you'll ever known you will ever known. That's good. You will the mess. The message here is clear for the best night's sleep in the world whole wide world. You want to go to my pillow dot com. I've had my pillows for a couple years now since we started talking about them for that I had a lot of problems getting good night's rest, pillows are very important. You don't want to go flat. You flip around all night, long, wake up with a sore neck, maybe a headache feel like you need a nap even after you've had a full eight hours today. I said, the Phil inside my pillow when I go to bed the way, I want it. It's patented. This Phil because what happened with Mr. Landau who created my pillow he was having a tough nights sleeping. Like a lot of you do couldn't get comfortable bought lot of expensive pillows, undeserved dollars and couldn't get a good night's rest. So he was an engineer says, L figure this out I'll make one for myself, I'll show them. So there and he did and so are later but about twelve years later he's established the largest leap operation in the country. Fifteen hundred people making pillows night, and day all week long. So you can have a great time in bed. Quality sleep Pillow's made right here in America pillars you can wash and dry and for the Memorial Day, special, my pillow dot com gives you to pack of my pillow premiums for sixty nine ninety eight my pillow premium, sixty nine ninety eight lowest price ever offered on the radio available at my pillow dot com, the promo code DJ V. So get those premium pillows and get a. Good night's rest. My pillow dot com. Promo code DJ V for fantastic offers. Hey, this is Victoria, with the DJ show. Wanna leave a great lasting impression. Studies have proven that a smile is a person's most unforgettable feature. I've got the perfect risk-free solution that will have you on your way to a more confident you, Power Swabs, the world's most advanced teeth whitening system, transforms, your smile in his little as five minutes. That's right. It's only five minutes after using Power Swabs, once I was instantly amazed by the.

Phil Mr. Landau Power Swabs America engineer Victoria five minutes twelve years eight hours
"about twelve years later" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

14:13 min | 3 years ago

"about twelve years later" Discussed on KGO 810

"Came first the depictions of Jesus, that we have all known over the years with, you know, the bro the beard, the long hair did that come I or was it the, the shroud, that came first in terms of people. Pal's identification with Jesus may or may not have looked like that probably the earliest solid depictions. In the fourth and fifth century and the orthodox church. And there's a very famous artwork called the Christ Antic crater that looks very much like the man of the shroud. And most people that have studied this believe that, that image that Christ panda. Crater art work was based itself on this route. Out came first. Now, of course, Jesus was tortured before he was put to death. They put you know thorns around his head. They speared him in the side when he was on the cross. They hammered him in the legs. And in his palms of his hand, does the shroud, depict, some of those wounds areas, actually depicts all of them as you described. And interestingly enough, we thorns, we've looked at artworks throughout religious art history. And you'll see the Kremlin thorns typically depicted as a kind of a circle it around the head, interestingly enough, that comes from the first century, where artists would depict people. Great Satcher with laurel wreath around their head. And so the cram of thorns at least in artworks shown, kind of a circular wreath around the head, but the man of the shroud has bloodstains covering his entire scalp, and that implies that they didn't take the time. To we've pretty crown for this man. They were that they were about to execute. They just took a nasty thorn Bush and smashed it on his head. So the motif of the circuit comes from the artwork. So the first century, but the reality, at least of what we see on this. Route is the entire scalp is covered with wounds, implying that they probably just smashed the whole foreign Bush down onto his head causing wounds across the entire scout. Can you tell how tall the individual was well, we can but not as precisely as we'd like I have to remember, it's a woven cloth. And so it can be stretched in any direction, and we had very careful in seventy eight not to stretch it and distort the image on it. We had a smooth it out without pulling too tight, and stretching, the image, the other thing about the shroud damage is unlike an artwork that has defined edge like a artwork or properly focus. Photograph the edge of the image of the shroud, just fades out. So it's hard to know exactly where to start and end your measurements. And because of that, and the fact that the cloth can change its shape based, just on the relative humidity in which it stored by as much as a few centimeters, we can only do a approximation of about five foot. Ten five foot eleven as the man on the shrouds height. Can you tell weighed by that? I'm sure that others who have studied the shrouding done the more anthropological kinds of studies have come up with that. I don't really recall off the top. It's a good question George, not one anybody's asked me lately, but I, I would guess perhaps hundred sixty hundred seventy five pounds of that, that would be a guess interesting. Interesting take all this, now, the shroud itself, there's a travel around the people have a chance to see it or do they keep it in turn. It's generally brought out historically. It was about four times, each century about every twenty five years, or so, in the more more recent era, starting in nineteen seventy eight. Of course, when we examined it, it was, again, shown in nineteen ninety eight and in two thousand and two thousand ten and two thousand fifteen so it's had a lot more exposure over the last forty or so years than historically. The next scheduled public exhibition is at least tentatively set for two thousand twenty five which also happens to be the next holy year of the Catholic church. And so we're all into painting that about a year before they. Before the actual exhibition of the shroud. And the folks in turn will put on their website a reservation form. It doesn't cost anything to go to see the crowd, but they do require a reservation. You can now do that online. And so they tell you don't show up early show up at the time you've selected and the lines, wick back in nineteen seventy eight whereas long as ten hours before you got into the Shrout hundred thousand or more people lined up queued up just to see it now it's fifteen to twenty minutes, maybe on the weekends about an hour. So it's much more efficient because of the internet and the opportunity for people to make reservations. We expect that, that website to go online about a year before the actual next public exhibitions on a small piece of the carbon dated, Barry. But there's some controversy over whether some pollen may have gotten on it or something like that. The controversy certainly is there was a radio carbon dating done in nineteen eighty eight and three laboratories were chosen to do so Zurich, Switzerland. Oxford England and AirAsia here in the US and those three labs were each given a small piece, one little piece was cut from one corner of the cloth divided in half one half set aside the other half divided into thirds by weight and given to the three laboratories, they came up with a date range of twelve sixty to thirteen ninety saying that it's impossible for the shroud to be any older than twelve sixty, of course, those of us have been studying this route knew that there was wrong evidence historic historical evidence in the store record, showing the evidence of the shroud, existing well before the earliest date given by the carbon dating, but for many years, that, you know, the whole world, just sort of accepted. Well, can't be. Old enough. So it must be real. It wasn't until about twelve years, later round two thousand that theory was proposed stating that there was nothing wrong with the carbon dating only the choice of a single sample from that corner turns out, that, that sample was anomalous that, apparently there was cotton interwoven, which is, by the way, forbidden by Jewish law kinds. It's called and so that date, they're now three papers in the period, viewed literature, challenging, the radiocarbon dating, the first two came out one and two thousand five then in two thousand eight and most recently just just a few weeks ago. Third paper came out now. Interestingly enough, yours for the twenty seven years after the radiocarbon dating, the three laboratories refused to release the raw data. Well, that was what we were wondering why well in two thousand seventeen and a tally in researcher. Tristen Casabianca using the freedom of information act in England went to the British Museum and. Literally forced them to release the data the reason the British Museum had, it was that the researcher at the British Museum at the time, Michael tight was. Appointed as supervisor over the three labs, make sure everything was done correctly ironically as soon as the radiocarbon dating results came out. Megan pounds was a non anonymously donated to the Oxford lab. Dr Michael tight lift the British Museum and took permanent chair at Oxford that didn't look so good. Well, anyway, into seventeen using the freedom of information act, the British Museum, ultimately released the raw data and new paper came out just a few weeks ago will be featuring it in our next update on trout dot com on June third or maybe fourth and that paper further supports the questionable content of the single sample chosen for dating. So there's now a third peer reviewed article challenges, the radiocarbon dating in the peer, reviewed literature, very is the image like a negative photographic negative. It is the, the lights and darks of image on the shroud are the reverse of what we look at, you know, we're used to seeing light highlights yard shadows, and the image on the shroud is, in fact, the inverse of that now being an old school analog photographer, I spent many, many years in the dark room. And when I first looked at the act. Actual shroud. I immediately see what was on that cloth had the appearance of a photo negative to me now. Imply that the shroud was made photographic -ly, because there was no silver, which would have been the light sensitive material necessary for there was no silver found anywhere on that cloth and it's not a painting and it's not a painting. You know, our team in seventy eight went there to answer the single question, how's the image formed, and we were able to answer that we we're able to come back and tell you what it's not it's not a painting. It's not a scorch and it's not a photograph. Those were the three kind of common suggestions for what might have formed the image. So we can tell you, it's not any of those, but we don't know of a mechanism that can create an image with those chemical and physical properties to this day, and in all the attempts in the last forty or so years, duplicate, the shroud. Many by people using one of my photographs of the crowd is a basis for their work. No one has ever come close to matching all of the chemical and physical properties of the shrouds image several years ago. CNN. A documentary basically called finding Jesus. Yeah. They highlighted the shroud. What were their conclusions? Well, you know, I. I pretty much given up on television documentaries about the shroud. And George IV appeared in about twenty I know. You know, I, I can only recommend to after all that. And, and so I, I was not very happy with that particular documentary because they dug out some very visual things that had long before been proven, erroneous, one of them being that theory of gentleman named nNcholas Allen, South African art historian, who claims that the shroud was made photographic Lii. And ironically, he said that they used silver, and then they removed all the silver and fixed the image using the, the man's urine. So effectively nNcholas Allen said they created the shroud of urine. I guess at any rate, the frustration is this, there is only one property of the shrouds image. That is similar to a photograph that's the lights dark reversal that we've already mentioned. But every other aspect of that image is unlike any other photograph that I've ever seen. Hi, Barbara, California at the time, and I had been contacted by one of the local technical companies, they were a contractor Los Alamos National labs and they contacted me as a photographic consultant for a seven month project. And of course, it was Los Alamos, obviously, had something to do with the timing bombs, and I can't really say much more about it. But for seven months, we did that project. And I worked with a gentleman named Don van who was an imaging scientist working for that subcontractor company a few weeks after we finished that project. He called me again. You know, when you're self employed and the phone rings. You're hoping it's the next project. They called me again. And I thought how another project with done. And instead, he said, Barry, what do you know about the shroud of Turin? And I kind of laughed and I said, but Dom Jewish and Don laughed and said, so my remember he's one of the other Jewish guys on our team. And. he was the one who was there when they took an image of the shroud a photograph of shroud put it into an instrument called v._p. janelle eiser which took the lights in the dark of the image and stretched them into three vertical space on a green screen monitor proportionate to each other and when they did that with a normal photo you get a jumble of shapes that make no sense at all when you do it with the shroud image you get the natural relief of a human form and it was that property that encoding of depth information into the image that actually prompted the formation of the shroud doctor in research project when they saw that that was the first time that a scientific instrument visualized that property so that was sort of the milestone of the moment and that was the catalyst for our team to be formed and although it initially i was hesitant to participate it was that image property more than anything else that prompted me to say yes During the team, although I have to admit.

British Museum thorn Bush Barry George IV Christ Antic crater Pal orthodox church nNcholas Allen researcher Don van Zurich Los Alamos CNN Turin janelle eiser Switzerland self employed Catholic church
"about twelve years later" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

12:45 min | 3 years ago

"about twelve years later" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Tell you about our guest before we get rolling here. Barry Schwartz was the official documenting photographer for the shroud of Turin research project. That was a team that conducted the first in-depth scientific examination of the shroud, and that was back in nineteen seventy eight. He's also the founder editor publisher of the international recognized shroud of Turin website, the oldest largest and most extensive shroud resource on the internet today in two thousand nine he founded the shroud of Turin education and research association to which he has donated the website and his extensive Shrout photographic collection as well. And he was also featured on one of our beyond belief episodes, that you can find beyond belief dot com. Berry, welcome back. How are you, sir? Georgian. It's great to be back with you for, for the few people who might not know what the shroud of Turin is. And where it's capped why don't you tell us about it? Shrouded. It's called the shrouded in because it's kept in Turin Italy. It's a fourteen and a half foot long three and a half foot wide sheet of linen, cloth that bears the front and back, image ventral endorses full head to toe front and back of a crucified, scourge speared, man. That was also crowned with a crown of thorns and the bloodstains that are on it. That indicate these wounds are all permissively accurate and many people, of course, believe that it is the burial shroud of Jesus of Nazareth. How long have we known about the shroud? The shroud. History goes back certainly about the mid thirteenth hundreds without a break. It it's chain of custody. Prior to that their gaps in its history, which of course, gives the skeptics. All the navy challenge it. But there was a clock that was well, first of all, we can go all the way back to the gospels where mentioned in the gospels that there was a burial shroud. That was provided by Joseph of Arimathea people always say, why wasn't the image on the shroud mentioned in the gospels. And it's very simple. It's forbidden by Jewish law to have any depictions of God, and so it also has blood on it, which is required by Jewish law to be buried. So nobody could come running out of the tomb saying logo we found without putting themselves at great risk few hundred years. I'm sure it was just hitting the way to keep it away from my conic class, and those who would. Destroy it or even the people who might have protected it in the fourth and fifth centuries. We will the first image, we see that looks like the man shrouds about two eighty five AD in the Goma T, A catacombs in Rome in the fourth and fifth century. The iconography of the orthodox church started making paintings that look exactly like the man on the shroud with many dente fine marks that are very consistent with what's on the shroud itself. There was then another gap in its history. There was a cloth that was in Constantinople. Or debts. And that was known as the men dig in which means in Greek not made by human hands, or another ridge, not an art work that disappeared. I think in about twelve o four when the crusaders came and sacked the city and this man cloth had been walled up in the wall of the city to, to hide it protected. It disappeared never to be seen there again in about one hundred fifty years later. It shows up in the hands of a French crusader in the thirteen hundreds, and from their history is unbroken until today. So that sort of a brief overview of history lot more detail on trout dot com. Of course, in very what came first the depictions of Jesus, that we have all known over the years with, you know, the bro the beard, the long hair did that come I or was it the, the shroud, that came first in terms of people. Pal's identification with Jesus may or may not have looked like that probably the earliest solid depictions were, what would have been in the fourth and fifth century and the orthodox church. And there's a very famous artwork called the Christ Pantocrator that looks very much like the man of the shroud, and most people that have studied this believe that, that image that crash, crater artwork was based itself on the route. So I have to say that you're out came first. Now, of course, Jesus was tortured before he was put to death. They put you know thorns around his head. They speared him in the side when he was on the cross the hammered him in the legs. And in his palms of his hand, does the shroud, depict some of those wounds areas actually your picks all of them as you described. And interestingly enough, we talk about a crown of thorns, we've looked at artworks throughout religious art history. And you'll see the crown thorns typically depicted as a and of a circuit around the head, I, interestingly enough, that comes from the first century, where artists would depict people have great stature with laurel wreath around their head. And so the crown of thorns, at least in artworks was always shown, as kind of a circular wreath around the head, but the man of the shroud has bloodstains covering his entire scalp, and that implies that they didn't take the time. To we pretty Krim for this man. They were removed that they were about to execute. They just took a nasty thorn Bush and smashed it on his head. So the motif of the circuit comes from the artwork, so the first century, but the reality at least of what we see on the route is the entire scalp is covered with wounds, implying that they probably just smashed a whole born Bush down onto his head causing wounds across the entire scout. Can you tell how tall the individual was well, we can, but not as precisely as we'd like first of all, you have to remember, it's a woven cloth. And so it can be stretched in any direction, and we had very careful in seventy eight not to stretch it and distort the image on it. We had a smooth it out without pulling too tight, and stretching, the image, the other thing about the shroud damage is unlike an artwork that has defined edge, my artwork or a property focus. Photograph the edge of the image of the crowd just fades out. So it's hard to know exactly where to start an end your measurements. And because of that, and the fact that the cloth can change its shape based, just on the relative humidity in which it stored by as much as a few centimeters, we can only do a an approximation of about five foot. Ten five foot eleven as the man on the shrouds height. Can you tell how much he weighed by that? I I'm sure that others who have studied the crowd done. The more anthropological kinds of studies have come up with that. I don't really recall off the top. It's a good question George, not one anybody's asked me lately, but I, I would guess perhaps a hundred sixty hundred seventy five pounds that, that would be a guess, interesting. Interesting take about this, now, the shrouded self those travel around to people have a chance to see it or do they keep it in turn turn, and it's generally brought out historically. It was about four times, each century about every twenty five years, or so, in the more more recent era, starting in nineteen seventy eight. Of course, when we examined it, it was, again, shown in nineteen ninety eight and in two thousand and two thousand ten and two thousand fifteen so it's had a lot more exposure over the last forty or so years than historically the next scheduled public exhibition. Is at least tentatively set for two thousand twenty five which also happens to be the next holy year of the Catholic church. And so we're all intimidating that about a year before they before the actual exhibition of the crowd, and the pokes interim will put on their website, a reservation for them. It doesn't cost anything to go to see the out, but they do require reservation. You can now do that online. And so they tell you don't show up early show up at the time you've selected and the lines, which back in nineteen seventy eight whereas long as ten hours before you got into the shroud hundred thousand or more people lined up queued up just to see it now it's fifteen to twenty minutes, maybe on the weekends about an hour. So it's much more efficient because of the internet and the opportunity for people to make reservations. We expect that, that website go online about a year before the actual next public. Exhibition wasn't a small piece of it carbon dated the very but there's some controversy over whether some pollen may have gotten on it or something like that the controversy certainly there was a radiocarbon dating done in nineteen eighty eight and three laboratories were chosen to do so Zurich, Switzerland. Oxford England and Harrison here in the US and those three labs were each given a small piece, one little piece was cut from one corner of the cloth divided in half one half set aside the other half divided into thirds by weight and given to the three laboratories they came up with a date range of twelve sixty two thirteen ninety saying that it's impossible for the shroud to be any older than twelve sixty, of course, those of us who've been studying this route knew that there was strong evidence historic historical evidence in the store record, showing the evidence of the. Shroud existing well before the earliest date given by the carbon dating, but for many years, that, you know, the whole world is sort of accepted. Well can't be old enough. So it must be real. It wasn't until about twelve years, later round two thousand that theory was proposed stating that there was nothing wrong with the carbon dating only the choice of a single sample from that corner turns out, that, that sample was anonymous, that apparently there was cotton interwoven, which is, by the way, forbidden by Jewish law kinds. It's and so that date they're now three papers in the period, viewed literature challenging the radiocarbon dating. The first came out, one in two thousand five and two thousand eight and most recently just just a few weeks ago. Third paper came out now. Interestingly enough, George for the twenty seven years after the radiocarbon dating the three laboratories, refuse. Used to release the raw data. Well, that was what we were wondering why. Well in two thousand seventeen in talian researcher, Kristen custody on using the freedom of information act in England went to the British Museum and literally forced them to release the data the reason the British Museum had, it was that the researcher, the Bruce museum at the time, Michael tight was. Appointed as supervisor over the three labs, make sure everything was done correctly ironically as soon as the radiocarbon dating results came out. Megan pounds was non anonymously donated to the Oxford lab. Dr Michael tight lift the British Museum and took a permanent chair at Oxford that didn't look so good. Well, anyway, twenty seventeen using the freedom of information act, the British Museum alternately released the raw data and new paper came out just a few weeks ago will be featuring it in our next update on trout dot com on June third or maybe fourth and that paper further supports the questionable content of the single sample chosen for dating. So there's now a third peer reviewed article challenges, the radiocarbon dating in the period, literature, very is the image like a negative photographic negative..

Turin British Museum orthodox church George Turin Italy thorn Bush Jesus of Nazareth Berry Barry Schwartz Rome researcher Joseph of Arimathea official Shrout founder navy Megan pounds Constantinople
"about twelve years later" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

KUGN 590 AM

11:08 min | 3 years ago

"about twelve years later" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

"On the JV program. Thirty four after the hour. I'm Steffan general horns, lovable, Terry. Keelan lovable care she'll in lovable, and I know all the people who are hanging around with this just as loveable so thanks for being here. Paying attention to what Victoria has undermined moment. Billy Bush is in the news. This is the first time in three years that he's actually been in the news for a good reason he has gotten hired and he will now host. This is first job since the whole scandal on the access Hollywood bus. Yeah. Which a lot of people said that the access Hollywood BUSTER over right over Billy Trump, obviously. But you know, Billy Bush lost his entire Kibo. Who did a lot of things worse than him that survive from it? I never did quite understand that old. Banning. So so three years later second. I wanna make sure that we acknowledged CARA has told us that so far today we started about three stories and we've never finish them. We have a new start every minute is a new start. Right. So anyway, so Billy Bush knew gig will be as the host of extra extra. It is an updated version of the current syndicated entertainment show extra which is hosted by Mario Lopez. Now, the rumors are that that Mario Lopez will be moving to access Hollywood to replace Natalie Morales. That's not official yet. But that is what that's that's been the rumor for a while produced by the same outfitters, the different all Warner Brothers. So I would say yes about I think they're so many. I don't know. I don't watch any of them. But they're you know, if you're in a doctorate. They all act like they're best buddies with whoever their interview. Oh, it's so lovely. Even know who those people are. Well, Mario Lopez. Yeah. Lopez is around what are you doing here Kim Kardashian? Why should I be? Oh, yeah. Woman. What's your problem? Right. So Billy Bush is he's forty seven in the last three years. He has had a lot of obviously had his career ended pretty much, and then his wife filed for divorce, and so he's had a lot of people in his personal life as well. So extra extra will take in-depth looks at topics ranging from pop culture to politics and. This. In the summer. Why is wife divorce him? I have a job. I'm sure it's a lot more complicated than that. I don't know they have three daughters together. So I don't know. Turgeau into a party. Hollywood directors walked in with him. I didn't never seen it before. And we sorta stuck together with the whole night. And we went over to the bar, and he said you wanna drink. I said, no, thanks. But then he started making he was a bartender at some point in his life. And he was buying the bar. Everybody walked up to him and acknowledged to ABC makes me this Millie. And he's in the nephew of George W how is he related to the Bush family is he a cousin of George W he's in. Few. But I think it's a couple away from George W is it, okay? Speaking of stars in the political families of the world. There was a pretty uncomfortable interview between Seth Meyers who can't seem to get out of. He's was to be just like Stephen Colbert when he grows up apparently can't seem to stay away from the dump Trump stuff and he interviewed Megan McCain when they were talking about what's her. I can never pronounce Omar wasn't first name Ilan. Omarosa. No. Alon, Omar, right. Exactly, she slammed her pretty hard and Myers slammed. Her pretty are. They were both pretty uncomfortable stuff, which I don't think is the main reason, but seems to me that she didn't know they were going to talk about politics. And then Seth Meyers brought it up. And so then she slammed in. Yeah. It was kind of I don't know comfortable stuff. Yeah. This. Late night comedy comics are now doing politics. That's Stephen Colbert is like the whistles on people's presidential tours. It's it's not it's not the days of Johnny Carson. That's for sure. No, isn't voided politics at all cost. Right. Yeah. No matter what the feds apparently had a big day in the cocaine world to see this, Victoria. They've been trying for a year big bus somewhere in was it, New York or jersey knows in New York. Yeah. Three million dollars worth of cocaine nineteen people arrested cocaine is back in a big way. It's it's all over nightclubs. Again. It's like the eighties all over in in LA in New York. It's kind of crazy not never was my seen ever. But it's crazy that it's it's back. And it's and it's a it's a very like young kid like college and early twenties is this stuff expensive money. Money. No idea how much cocaine. I have no idea. You wonder about how expensive it is? Probably expensive people have jobs or. Ellen's known as a rich kid drug. Yeah. I think so. Yeah. Yeah. I would say my son would tend to that a lot of people that he treated as a drug counselor were addicted to cocaine I started off with the stuff that's lighter and more easily found and then graduate speaking, here's a Kentucky teenager named Jerome Kunkle made headlines suing the health department of his town over there vaccination policy, and it seems that he's now come down with chicken pox. I don't know. I'm laughing. Dive into chickenpox for the most not in our country, but he has deeply held religious beliefs. He says and from the family's perspective they recognize that they ran the risk of getting sick. And they were okay. Matter-of-fact concl- sued the northern Kentucky health department after it ruled at all students who had been in his school Edmund vaccinated against chicken pox, couldn't come to class unless they got the shots. But there were thirty two confirmed cases of it at the time. And anyway, Mr. cocoa said he didn't believe that that vaccine was the only one they were trying to push as so the judge. They went to court the judge ruled against the family favor of the health department. And so they're in the midst of appealing it. Meanwhile, the kid gets chickenpox. That's if I were to ask Dr Ken about that he'd say, well, you know, it's better to get the vaccine once you have the chickenpox though, you don't get like the get it again. Chicken box. Yeah. Yeah. Because the first time that I had it was was very mild. And then a couple years later, I got it again. And the second time was bad. I've never heard of anybody. I had it's it's a branch of Epstein Barr mono and all that other stuff comes from shingles. It's all the same thing. And I had it once in. Well, actually now, you think that you made me think about this. I got Epstein Barr and mono in nineteen eighty eight. And then I got the shingles about twelve years later. Of the fun way. I did not. In fact, I got I got being very sick on a on a trip that I lead of Americans classical music tour that I took and I was no it was not it was a great the kissing on a classical music tour. I did. The person that I was kissing didn't have it didn't come from her until you came along. All right enough that kissing department is see the let's go to Los Angeles for the seizure of those guns. Jennifer that and all that s- amunition. Yeah. Guns in this guy's garage. What? And the and what's really weird is that just happened this week? And then last week in Burbank, which is where all the studios are. It's a pretty nice area. It is found in a million. I think the home was million five, you know, expensive, home or two five. Five. Yeah. Yeah. I cannot let forge eleven Burbank. You can't even get a two bedroom for less than eight hundred thousand it's ridiculous. But anyway. So Burg was the scene of a huge drug bust. There was a report of someone leaving their door open and the dog like their dog ran out and says someone in the neighborhood called the police the police showed up and they couldn't find anybody at home. And when they went through the house, they found it was his huge grow operation for illegal marijuana. They were also making oils and stuff like that hemp oil. So they shut that down. So to like one every week of these big huge scale busts for weapons and drugs and all sorts of stuff going on around five rifles to this day. See the pictures. Yeah. Never know who's living next door to even when in Beverly Hills of all the other side of it is how does one person get all these guns? You can't buy them legally. You can't. Yeah. They're legally selling them to. Yeah. And that's apparently the neighbors. I guess tipped off the cops saying that they were that the person who owns the house. It's a woman she and there were three SUV's in the driveway that are registered to her. But they haven't seen her in years. So I don't know what's going on there. So we don't know if someone was squatting in the house, or if they were just renting the house, but it's it's a lot of weapons that TV show Ellen barkin is in. She's a murdering robbing mother sends her kids out to do jobs that set show call someone cable. Sure carries founded by now if she hasn't show find it by the time we come back fifteen before the hour. Blue star Medicated ointment gets five star reviews from our loyal users for fast relief of the pain of almost any skin irritation. Insect bites and fungal infections. Works on the summer. Rashes? I get every year. Psoriasis on my elbows. Blue star worked wonders amazing stuff. Mirror on and the H is gone. Look for the white box with the blue star in the first aid section feel blue star work fast or your money back as we walked garden, gnome, Catholic Catholic.

Billy Bush cocaine Hollywood Mario Lopez chickenpox Stephen Colbert Epstein Barr Ellen barkin George W Seth Meyers Kentucky Burbank Billy Trump Victoria CARA Terry Warner Brothers New York Omar
"about twelve years later" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

03:58 min | 3 years ago

"about twelve years later" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Okay. So a couple of things that have happened is we're gonna talk more about the McNall at the bottom of the hour. We also we're going to give away our tickets to the V I P R VIP tickets to shop til you drag pretty flip foam events, which is Sunday may nineteenth at Rosedale center from two thirty pm. And you get a meet and greet with a lot of hot a lot of people, drag queens. Carson Christly all the VIP and everything's it's also yes, the only way to get in and getting the best. So last night in the clubhouse was Christina Applegate was in the clubhouse with Linda Carter Leney. And they were there to promote duds me this new show that is on that flex and Donny. I've watched two of 'em Yang three in your really. And and James Marsden is in the cast. Let's see who else at Asner. Senior and tiny. You're looking forward to watching this at the end of the week last week. I give it thumbs up. It's very good. It's about a friendship that blossoms between a tightly wound widow, which is Christina Applegate and a free spirit with the shocking secret all say. Shocking. But the first episode you'll go all boys at the center of the second episode you go oh boy. Donny and Julia you both had that reaction that prize in this show is genuinely oh attrac- shocking. Shocking. Is it an hour half hour. I can't remember. Yeah. It's it's really it's a dark comedy kind of. Yeah. It's dark. I'm not sure about the comedy. It is dark. It's not an violent sort of way. No, no secrets it's about secrets, and how secrets the longer you. Keep a secret more hurt. You do to yourself and everybody around you and. Just for reference. Yes. Christina Applegate was of course, on married with children Kelly Bundy, thank you. And she was also on Samantha who. Yeah. Which I loved and she was on a bunch of other things background and anchorman. And she lived grew up in the house that my cousin Michael lived in laurel canyon forever until the red carpet. Okay. Here we go. All right. I'm ran so excited to Mito. Laurie freezes even though she pretends he's gonna have something to say. Very early on before truly experienced red-carpet correspondence. And he comes down and like, oh, Christina credit. I talked with you gotta talk to us. Come back here. And she's like, oh, okay. She's standing right in front of us. And I said my cousin lives in the house. You grew up in. Yep. But. And that was a pretty much. But it was. Now, I'm going to wrap up the story about twelve years later is that this house my cousin's been trying to buy to Latin a half, and it needed a big overdue remodel and my cousin was trying to buy it from the owner. But the owner went under him. He's lived there for what do you mean? When he was a renter on the owner of the property went bypassed him and sold it to someone else to say goodbye, thous, which was getting demolished, Christina Applegate. In a mother who lived there came over and hung out with my cousin is oh. This before the red carpet way, six months ago. Oh, so that that's very interesting. So I just thought. You didn't bring you up at the time when Christina came remember meeting..

Christina Applegate Christina credit Rosedale center Donny Christina Laurie Samantha Linda Carter Leney Julia Carson Christly James Marsden Kelly Bundy Asner laurel canyon Michael twelve years six months
"about twelve years later" Discussed on CNN's The Daily DC

CNN's The Daily DC

04:18 min | 3 years ago

"about twelve years later" Discussed on CNN's The Daily DC

"We must be pioneers of the future. This congress must accelerate a future that Vance's America's preeminence in the world and opens up opportunities for all building comedy that gives all Americans the tolls. They need to succeed in the twenty first century public education, workforce, development, good paying jobs and secure pensions. Here's speaker Pelosi twelve years after she first became speaker of the house broke that marble ceiling that she likes to talk about twelve years later. Taking that gavel back and becoming speaker again just to show the political resilience of a woman who is dominated the National Democratic Party conversation for quite some time, clearly a political survivor when you think about all the money that has been spent against her all the controversy. She creates for her own members by being a political lightning rod that she is. And of course for being that target of the opposition. She is still here and today reclaiming the most powerful post in the congress and number three in line for succession to the presidency. She the number four person of mine. The Senate president pro was new today. Senator Chuck Grassley, the senior Senator for the majority party in the Senate, the Republicans Chuck Grassley of Iowa. Became set in proteomics today. And he is number four in line after today's events for the presidency, this freshman class in the house that Nancy Pelosi will now oversee is huge. There are ninety two freshman sixty two Democrats thirty Republicans. This is one of the most diverse houses we've ever seen in this democratic majority certainly the most female, my colleagues, Adam Levy and Ethan Coen have put together a whole series of facts and figures of the the firsts in this congress one that particularly strikes me is the age Alexandria, Cossio Cortez of New York, you remember her she defeated. Joe Crowley, the member of democratic leadership out there in that queens district in New York. She was born on October thirteenth nineteen Eighty-nine. Just this fall, she celebrated her twenty ninth birthday. She is the youngest member of the house of representatives. But. There are thirty eight members in their thirties. Eighty six members in their forties vis is a young house, and it is a more female house. There is no doubt about that. We've seen more women elected and sworn in to the house of representatives today, then we had ever seen before there are one hundred and two women in this new hundred and sixteenth congress in the house. Eighty nine of them are Democrats thirteen of them are Republicans that is the kind of disparity we see in the gender gap in a lot of polling as well around the partisan divide as it comes to gender, but eighty nine Democrats thirteen Republicans of the freshman class. This is amazing. Thirty six women are in the freshman class. Thirty five of them are Democrats only one is a Republican. So history is being made here. We're seeing the first Muslim American women elect. To congress. The first native American women elected to congress. These record numbers overall. There's no doubt. It's historic day on Capitol Hill. But what it represents what it means is also there is a new world order in Washington DC, and this government shutdown is going to be priority. Number one now because the House Democrats will vote today to pass them spending bills to open up the government. The president has already rejected what they're passing. So we are still in a stalemate. And here's the thing for the House, Democrats, they now have the majority. So they're now also going to have to prove that they can actually accomplish something and delivered to the American people.

House Democrats congress Nancy Pelosi Senator Chuck Grassley National Democratic Party president Senate New York Joe Crowley Vance America Ethan Coen Adam Levy Iowa Cossio Cortez Senator Washington