21 Burst results for "About Six Hundred Years Later"

Why Do Americans Celebrate the Fourth of July with Fireworks?

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

02:08 min | 11 months ago

Why Do Americans Celebrate the Fourth of July with Fireworks?

"Does this sound familiar at all. Without a visual clue it might be a little hard to figure out. But that's the sound of fireworks. Many of you are curious about how these celebratory explosions work. And why we use them. Historians and archaeologists think fireworks started in china. Maybe as early as twenty two hundred years ago and they've been used in europe and other parts of the world for at least eight hundred years in the united states where our show is based they've become a big tradition on the fourth of july. So hi my name is nicholas in six years old. And i live in plymouth michigan and i want to know why people do fireworks on the fourth of july. Thank you bye while nicholas. Americans have been celebrating. July fourth fireworks since seventeen. Seventy seven the first anniversary of the signing of the declaration of independence. John adams was one of the people who signed that document in seventeen. Seventy six a year earlier declaring their wish for the american colonies to become independent from england. Afterwards adams wrote to his wife that he wanted that day to be celebrated with lots of parades shows bonfires bells illuminations. Adams was a well known person. In the early days of the united states he later became the first vice president and the second president so his wish would have been shared with others as well and so on the one year anniversary of the signing. The city of philadelphia had a big celebration with thirteen fireworks. One for each of the original thirteen colonies. Now john adams didn't come up with this idea entirely on his own. English royalty had been using fireworks for national celebrations since at least the thirteenth century. Which went fireworks came to europe. They were widely in use by the fifteenth century. That's about six hundred years ago. But they were hard to find in the early days of the united states so celebrations back then often included guns and cannons more than actual fireworks.

Nicholas John Adams United States Plymouth Europe China Michigan Adams England Philadelphia
Nicolas Flamel and the Philosopher's Stone

Supernatural with Ashley Flowers

02:08 min | 1 year ago

Nicolas Flamel and the Philosopher's Stone

"If you're a harry potter fan the name nicholas fla mel is probably bringing some bells for you. Nicholas and his wife. Paranoia are mentioned in jk rollings. I harry potter and the philosopher's stone. They're both over six hundred years old. Because in the novel nicholas has discovered a magical artifact that makes him immortal in the united states. this object is known as the sorcerer's stone but for simplicity. I'm gonna stick to the british term philosopher's stone now supposedly this stone is incredibly powerful legends about it have been around for about two thousand years. They say it has the power to turn any metal into gold. And it's connected to this beverage called the of life which keeps you alive forever. It's not super clear of the philosopher's stone makes the elixir. Or if it actually is the elixir or if the recipe for the stone is close enough to the elixir. That if you can make one you can make the other either way. The central idea is consistent. If you discover the philosopher's stone you can become immortal. Ancient accounts describe the stone. Bright red and it wasn't really a stone at all. it was actually more like a powder or a fluid something you'd add to a bubbling vile to create anything. You want and i do mean anything. See alchemists just trying to get rich and achieve immortality. They were trying to unlock the fundamental secrets of the universe. Like why lead is led and knock gold or why me and not someone else and the idea was that with a for stone you could transform anything or anyone into whatever you want it. And it's not like there's just one stone because according to out chemical tradition you can actually make a philosopher's stone so researchers weren't necessarily trying to locate one. They were trying to create it. Supposedly the closest anyone ever got was this guy named nicholas flannel.

Nicholas Fla Mel Harry Potter Paranoia Nicholas United States Nicholas Flannel
Uprooting Your Delusions With Andrea Fella

10% Happier with Dan Harris

04:45 min | 1 year ago

Uprooting Your Delusions With Andrea Fella

"Andrea fell. Thanks for coming on really appreciate it pleasure to be with you. Nice to meet you. Likewise so i know from reading the notes of your discussion with my esteemed colleague samuel that you're interested in talking about the subject of views and delusion why that subject why is that interesting to you and what do you mean by views and delusion it feels to me like views in our country right now are creating a lot of stress and suffering and looking to me. I like to kind of look at what the interface is between what's happening in the world and what the buddha had to say. The buddha talked a lot about how suffering works how stress how people get into stress and difficulty and the tools and the the analysis he made of our minds. It really speaks to us with all of the changes that have been in the last twenty six hundred years. There's been a lot of change in our minds work. And so what he has to say about. How our minds work and the kinds of problems and stresses in suffering that we're in now as a world i'm interested in that kind of overlap. And how what. The buddha in terms of how the mind works can speak to us now can help us to maybe find some ways to navigate the difficulties that we're in in terms of delusion delusion operates in a lot of different ways in our minds. There's kind of a basic way that delusion operates which is that we're not aware of what's happening. That's the kind of most obvious way the delusion works you know when we're kind of checked out or spaced out or not really connecting with what's going on that's a form of delusion but it's that's not even the most Kind of insidious form of delusion the more dangerous we could say or the more kind of hidden even hidden forms of delusion because we all know when we come out of being spaced out. It's like oh. Yeah i didn't. I don't even know what was happening. Like we wake up after. We were driving on the freeway. It's like wow. How did i get here. We know that we've been lost but the kind of delusion we're not aware of is when we are kind of aware of what's going on but not aware that how we're taking in information how we're interpreting. The world is based on a perspective based on a view or a belief in the buddhist teachings. He talks a lot about the delusion based on taking what is impermanent to be permanent. What is unreliable to be reliable. What is not self to be self. We could also throw in there. What is uncontrollable to be controllable. And those are deep forms of human belief for view that we tend to believe that. What's impermanent is permanent. We tend to believe what is unreliable is reliable but there's a kind of a middle ground place where views beliefs ideas that come just from living and by view i really do mean what we normally mean in in our language about a view or a perspective or a belief is what i would call synonyms. We all have used beliefs perspectives. That are shaped by how we have lived in our lives shaped by our personal conditioning shaped by our families by our culture and this is the terrain. I'm kind of interested in exploring today. The terrain of what we might call the views and beliefs that are shaped by our personal and cultural conditioning. Because this is where i think. A lot of our suffering is happening right now in our world in our country in particular in the united states. So the the shaping of those views is natural. I mean the whole way that our minds work. Our human minds are always encountering the world and learning from it and shaped based on how we have been trained. How we what we've experienced. This is just the conditioning of our lives. Because i grew up in a particular family. I learned certain things about how families operate because i grew up in a particular culture. I learned certain things about how people who are strangers. Interact

Andrea Samuel United States
"about six hundred years later" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

Everything Everywhere Daily

06:03 min | 1 year ago

"about six hundred years later" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

"Hemmer robbie was the king of the babylonian empire from approximately seventeen ninety two to seventeen fifty bc. Just to put that into perspective. This was over a thousand years. Before the city of rome was even founded as babylon emperors went hammurabi was pretty successful when he rose to power babylon was still a relatively minor player in the region and when he died he had conquered most of potato along both the tigris and euphrates rivers. The region was almost entirely in. What is today modern iraq. Like any good king win. Hammurabi wasn't conquering nearby kingdoms. He was passing laws and making sure that his kingdom ran smoothly and efficiently. It is believed that hamurabi sent out scholars to the various kingdoms. He conquered to collect the various laws of all realms and then collected them into a uniform code of laws for everyone. The result of this was the code of hammurabi which is believed to be two hundred and eighty two laws regarding any number of different infractions. Crimes and disputes the laws were inscribed on a stone and clay tablets and spread around the kingdom. The stele which was found in one thousand nine hundred one is exceptionally well. Preserved the object itself is a hard blackstone known as diorite. it's shaped like a giant human finger at the top is an image of hammurabi receiving the laws from the babylonian god chumash. There is then a preface which states the following quote and who in bell called me by name hamurabi the exalted prince who feared god to bring about the rule of righteousness in the land to destroy the wicked and evil doers. So that the strong should not harm the week. So that i should rule over the black headed people like chamo- and enlighten the land to further the well being of mankind unquote about six hundred years later. The was taken by the king of elam. Shrek know if you've ever watched the two thousand two movie the emperor's club with kevin kline. You'll remember that should noonday was as the example of someone that no one remembers except that i just mentioned him in podcast and he was in a movie under the reign of Dante was believed that he erased two three dozen of the laws. Originally written by hamurabi researchers have been able to recreate the deleted laws by finding other clay tablets. That had the law's written on them sometime after that it was buried as ancient things tend to do and it was rediscovered in one thousand nine hundred one. So what does the code of hammurabi say. Many of the laws are examples of what is known in latin as lex talionis which is a law where the punishment is similar to the crime. You might know better as an eye for an eye. For example law one hundred ninety six states quote if a man destroy the eye of another man they shall destroy his. I if one break a man's bone they shall break his bone unquote however the rules were different depending on what social class. You're in for example. I didn't read the entirety of law. Ninety six just now the rest of it is as follows quote if one destroy the eye of a freeman or break the bone of a freeman. He shall pay won gold meena if one destroy the eye of a man slave or break a bone of a man slave. He shall pay one half his price unquote so the social status of the victim of a crime was a consideration in the law. If some of this sounds familiar. That's because it's very similar to the laws that are in the bible in the book of leviticus the code of hammurabi was written well before the book leviticus so it's quite possible if not probable that some of the laws from leviticus were adopted from babylonian laws the final version of leviticus was written after the jewish babylonian exile. So it's in fact very possible. There are laws in the code deal with commerce divorce rent liability and even medical malpractice there even laws dealing with contracts and the issuing of receipts. It's true that most of the laws are of a rather brutal. If x than wide variety with punishments ranging from drowning burning severing hands gouging out is that cetera. Most of these type of laws are no longer on the books in most countries. Obviously however there are some surprisingly forward thinking laws for something that was written down thirty seven hundred years ago for example law one hundred forty nine states quote. If this woman does not wish to remain in her husband's house then he shall compensate her for the dowry that she brought with her from her father's house and she may go unquote that is basically an ancient version of no fault divorce. However there was one concept that was in the code of hammurabi which was revolutionary and is still with us today. That is the concept of being innocent until proven guilty. In fact these are the very first law's written down in the code. Here are the first three laws in the code of hammurabi quote law one if anyone in snare another putting a ban upon him but he cannot prove it then let he that ensnared him be put to death law to if anyone bringing accusation against a man and the accused goto the river and leap into the river if he sink in the river his accuser shall take possession of his house but if the river prove that the accused is not guilty and he escaped unhurt then he who had brought the accusation shelby put to death while he who leapt into the river shall take possession of the house that had belonged to his accuser law three if anyone bringing accusation of any crime before the elders and does not prove what he has charged you shall if a capital offence charged put to death unquote so basically they had really harsh perjury laws and they made it really hard to pass frivolous lawsuits. So while i don't think anyone would really wanna live under the code of hammurabi today. It's an important part of humanity's legal history old hammer. Arby's two hundred and eighty two law's written in stone with a very first step in creating a system which has led to the one hundred and seventy five thousand two hundred and sixty pages of the united states code of federal regulations today

kevin kline Dante Robbie one thousand Hammurabi over a thousand years babylon both Ninety six today euphrates babylonian one half about six hundred years later one thousand nine hundred one one hundred ninety six states hammurabi nine hundred three dozen hamurabi
The Code of Hammurabi

Everything Everywhere Daily

06:03 min | 1 year ago

The Code of Hammurabi

"Hemmer robbie was the king of the babylonian empire from approximately seventeen ninety two to seventeen fifty bc. Just to put that into perspective. This was over a thousand years. Before the city of rome was even founded as babylon emperors went hammurabi was pretty successful when he rose to power babylon was still a relatively minor player in the region and when he died he had conquered most of potato along both the tigris and euphrates rivers. The region was almost entirely in. What is today modern iraq. Like any good king win. Hammurabi wasn't conquering nearby kingdoms. He was passing laws and making sure that his kingdom ran smoothly and efficiently. It is believed that hamurabi sent out scholars to the various kingdoms. He conquered to collect the various laws of all realms and then collected them into a uniform code of laws for everyone. The result of this was the code of hammurabi which is believed to be two hundred and eighty two laws regarding any number of different infractions. Crimes and disputes the laws were inscribed on a stone and clay tablets and spread around the kingdom. The stele which was found in one thousand nine hundred one is exceptionally well. Preserved the object itself is a hard blackstone known as diorite. it's shaped like a giant human finger at the top is an image of hammurabi receiving the laws from the babylonian god chumash. There is then a preface which states the following quote and who in bell called me by name hamurabi the exalted prince who feared god to bring about the rule of righteousness in the land to destroy the wicked and evil doers. So that the strong should not harm the week. So that i should rule over the black headed people like chamo- and enlighten the land to further the well being of mankind unquote about six hundred years later. The was taken by the king of elam. Shrek know if you've ever watched the two thousand two movie the emperor's club with kevin kline. You'll remember that should noonday was as the example of someone that no one remembers except that i just mentioned him in podcast and he was in a movie under the reign of Dante was believed that he erased two three dozen of the laws. Originally written by hamurabi researchers have been able to recreate the deleted laws by finding other clay tablets. That had the law's written on them sometime after that it was buried as ancient things tend to do and it was rediscovered in one thousand nine hundred one. So what does the code of hammurabi say. Many of the laws are examples of what is known in latin as lex talionis which is a law where the punishment is similar to the crime. You might know better as an eye for an eye. For example law one hundred ninety six states quote if a man destroy the eye of another man they shall destroy his. I if one break a man's bone they shall break his bone unquote however the rules were different depending on what social class. You're in for example. I didn't read the entirety of law. Ninety six just now the rest of it is as follows quote if one destroy the eye of a freeman or break the bone of a freeman. He shall pay won gold meena if one destroy the eye of a man slave or break a bone of a man slave. He shall pay one half his price unquote so the social status of the victim of a crime was a consideration in the law. If some of this sounds familiar. That's because it's very similar to the laws that are in the bible in the book of leviticus the code of hammurabi was written well before the book leviticus so it's quite possible if not probable that some of the laws from leviticus were adopted from babylonian laws the final version of leviticus was written after the jewish babylonian exile. So it's in fact very possible. There are laws in the code deal with commerce divorce rent liability and even medical malpractice there even laws dealing with contracts and the issuing of receipts. It's true that most of the laws are of a rather brutal. If x than wide variety with punishments ranging from drowning burning severing hands gouging out is that cetera. Most of these type of laws are no longer on the books in most countries. Obviously however there are some surprisingly forward thinking laws for something that was written down thirty seven hundred years ago for example law one hundred forty nine states quote. If this woman does not wish to remain in her husband's house then he shall compensate her for the dowry that she brought with her from her father's house and she may go unquote that is basically an ancient version of no fault divorce. However there was one concept that was in the code of hammurabi which was revolutionary and is still with us today. That is the concept of being innocent until proven guilty. In fact these are the very first law's written down in the code. Here are the first three laws in the code of hammurabi quote law one if anyone in snare another putting a ban upon him but he cannot prove it then let he that ensnared him be put to death law to if anyone bringing accusation against a man and the accused goto the river and leap into the river if he sink in the river his accuser shall take possession of his house but if the river prove that the accused is not guilty and he escaped unhurt then he who had brought the accusation shelby put to death while he who leapt into the river shall take possession of the house that had belonged to his accuser law three if anyone bringing accusation of any crime before the elders and does not prove what he has charged you shall if a capital offence charged put to death unquote so basically they had really harsh perjury laws and they made it really hard to pass frivolous lawsuits. So while i don't think anyone would really wanna live under the code of hammurabi today. It's an important part of humanity's legal history old hammer. Arby's two hundred and eighty two law's written in stone with a very first step in creating a system which has led to the one hundred and seventy five thousand two hundred and sixty pages of the united states code of federal regulations today

Hammurabi Hemmer Robbie Hamurabi Lex Talionis Kevin Kline Elam Rome Iraq Dante Bell Goto Shelby Arby United States
"about six hundred years later" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

Everything Everywhere Daily

03:19 min | 1 year ago

"about six hundred years later" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

"Robbie was the king of the babylonian empire from approximately seventeen ninety two to seventeen fifty bc. Just to put that into perspective. This was over a thousand years. Before the city of rome was even founded as babylon emperors went hammurabi was pretty successful when he rose to power babylon was still a relatively minor player in the region and when he died he had conquered most of potato along both the tigris and euphrates rivers. The region was almost entirely in. What is today modern iraq. Like any good king win. Hammurabi wasn't conquering nearby kingdoms. He was passing laws and making sure that his kingdom ran smoothly and efficiently. It is believed that hamurabi sent out scholars to the various kingdoms. He conquered to collect the various laws of all realms and then collected them into a uniform code of laws for everyone. The result of this was the code of hammurabi which is believed to be two hundred and eighty two laws regarding any number of different infractions. Crimes and disputes the laws were inscribed on a stone and clay tablets and spread around the kingdom. The stele which was found in one thousand nine hundred one is exceptionally well. Preserved the object itself is a hard blackstone known as diorite. it's shaped like a giant human finger at the top is an image of hammurabi receiving the laws from the babylonian god chumash. There is then a preface which states the following quote and who in bell called me by name hamurabi the exalted prince who feared god to bring about the rule of righteousness in the land to destroy the wicked and evil doers. So that the strong should not harm the week. So that i should rule over the black headed people like chamo- and enlighten the land to further the well being of mankind unquote about six hundred years later. The was taken by the king of elam. Shrek know if you've ever watched the two thousand two movie the emperor's club with kevin kline. You'll remember that should noonday was as the example of someone that no one remembers except that i just mentioned him in podcast and he was in a movie under the reign of Dante was believed that he erased two three dozen of the laws. Originally written by hamurabi researchers have been able to recreate the deleted laws by finding other clay tablets. That had the law's written on them sometime after that it was buried as ancient things tend to do and it was rediscovered in one thousand nine hundred one. So what does the code of hammurabi say. Many of the laws are examples of what is known in latin as lex talionis which is a law where the punishment is similar to the crime. You might know better as an eye for an eye. For example law one hundred ninety six states quote if a man destroy the eye of another man they shall destroy his. I if one break a man's bone they shall break his bone unquote however the rules were different depending on what social class. You're in for example. I didn't read the entirety of law. Ninety six just now the rest of it is as follows quote if one destroy the eye of a freeman or break the bone of a freeman. He shall pay won gold meena if one destroy the eye of a man slave or break a bone of a man slave. He shall pay one half his price unquote so the social status of the victim of a crime was a consideration in the law. If some of this sounds familiar..

kevin kline Dante Robbie one thousand Hammurabi over a thousand years babylon both Ninety six today euphrates babylonian one half about six hundred years later one thousand nine hundred one one hundred ninety six states hammurabi nine hundred three dozen hamurabi
Archaeologists delved into medieval cesspits to study old gut microbiomes

60-Second Science

00:19 sec | 1 year ago

Archaeologists delved into medieval cesspits to study old gut microbiomes

"Time than it takes to drink a cup of coffee you can learn about muscle mass loss during spaceflight track the migration of asian hornets and explore the supernova. That caused extinctions at the end of the devonian period subscribed to science sessions on itunes spotify. Google play stitcher. And wherever you get your podcasts. I'm scientific american assistant news editor. Sarah lou frazier. And here's a short piece from the january. Twenty twenty one issue of the magazine in the section called advances dispatches from the frontiers of science technology and medicine. The article is titled quick hits. And it's a rundown of some non corona virus stories from around the globe in costa rica researchers embedded gps devices in decoy sea turtle eggs to track poaching patterns in their first field test. Five of the hundred and one decoys which had similar size weight and texture to real eggs traveled significantly potentially reaching consumers in latvia dna harvested from a seven hundred year old public toilet in riga as well as a six hundred year old cesspit in jerusalem will help researchers examine. Human microbiomes have evolved over time. Microbial dna from both sites matches some species common in modern hunter gatherers and some in today's city-dwellers in antarctica. New analysis suggests a fifty million year old foot bone found on seymour. Island comes from a species of bird whose wingspan reaches six point. Four meters across the researchers also attributed part of a large jawbone with tooth like structures to the species in a madagascar garden researchers found several volts goes chameleons a rare species whose females can change from green to vivid black white and blue excited. The short lived species had not been documented for more than one hundred years and no females were previously recorded at all in indonesia. new research shows that fluffy but venus slow lawrence's frequently bite one another to settle territorial disputes a rarity in venomous animals in australia an enormous newfound coral reef off the continents northern coast is taller than the empire state building rising more than five hundred meters above the sea floor considered part of the great barrier reef. It is the first detached reef structure discovered there in one hundred and twenty years. That was quick hits. I'm sarah lewin frazier.

Sarah Lou Frazier Rica Riga Latvia Costa Google Antarctica Jerusalem Seymour Indonesia Lawrence Northern Coast Australia Sarah Lewin Frazier
How Tall Is Mount Everest REALLY?

Short Wave

09:51 min | 1 year ago

How Tall Is Mount Everest REALLY?

"Okay lauren fire. Today we are talking about mount everest. Which is the highest mountain on earth when you measure from sea level and today we're focusing on how that measurement is made weird we start. How about some old timey newsreel resort evidenced bothering his survey of eighteen hundred and forty one estimated his height pinton nine thousand feet back in the nineteenth century. When george everest brit was the surveyor general of india the used trigonometry to measure the height of the mountain like what we learned in middle school points angles and triangles totally. Yeah and incidentally the mountain got its english name from sir george everest but it was actually an indian mathematician. Radin seek dr. Who did most of the work and actually figured out that. This mountain is the highest point on earth. That sounds right for colonialism. Totally yeah okay. So how accurate was this trigonometry. Approach will i put that question to be nagaraj on. He's a geoscientist. One of george everest's successors at the survey of india office which still exists about is now staffed by indians. In fact i was sitting in the same chair. Our team location. Where you're sitting. Because i didn't want to change the room. So he says the trigonometry that his predecessors use throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries was surprisingly accurate. I mean the standard height. Everyone now uses for everest that twenty nine thousand twenty nine feet. It dates back to nineteen fifty five. Wow that's pretty impressive. Okay so how did they actually calculate that measurement for mountain like. Walk me through it. It was not easy. They measured it from eight different points throughout langdon distance and everything and computer and took the mean. It was a very difficult matter very heavy machines. Heavy machines called theod delights instruments used to measure angles between visit points on the horizon and vertical planes like a cross between a telescope and compass. You might have seen municipal surveyors using them sort of on a tripod. Oh ya know. I've seen those folks reflective vests and their little tripods them. Yes yeah okay. So but for measuring mountains. They are these big heavy versions. I don't know how many hundreds of kilograms they carried forward to make this measurement it has slowed colored most of the time we didn't know work so the foot that was put on. Who's very difficult nowadays. Nothing much what the chinese are doing. Our a nepalese are doing their hypic instrumentation with the chinese and the nepalese are doing now involves satellites so instead of measuring everest from afar on the horizon with these theod delight contraptions these send a team up to the top of the mountain with a hand held. Gps receiver hey. That sounds like a little easier to me. Maybe but maybe not. Here is d nash mandar. He's gps expert from nepal. Who teaches now at the university of tokyo. It's a very harsh environment. There that very windy and you have all these battery or power problems and like the people who climbed everest. They come steadier probably more than half an hour. I think that's limit for them because they already exhausted. So they've got thirty minutes to connect to multiple satellites because they are solar flares and interference. at altitude. You can't rely on just one reading and they have to measure the thickness of ice and snow underfoot because you wanna reading from the actual rocky mountain right and not the ice and so for that you need a ground penetrating radar so another piece of equipment to haul up the mountain. Yes oh fumbling. With all of that on top of everest. You've got wind. you've got your oxygen depleting. The clock is ticking and that is still the easy. Part monitor. Says because all of that data from the top of everest. It's only half the story. Yeah so you need to know from his point. And that's the biggest problem then need a reference somewhere but we don't have a seat difference in nepal because nepalis a landlocked country. It's land everywhere. The nearest sea level is in india. Sitting knew how high this mountain is you. I need to know how low sea levels and you need a reference point sea level which it turns out varies depending on where you are. Yeah i mean sea levels tricky right. It's not necessarily constant and climate change is really messing with sea level these days. Yeah and has monitor says there isn't even a cenex to so here's how they do it. They measure sea level in india at the bay of bengal at china's yellow sea at many other points hundreds of them to calculate the mean sea level. And then they figure out where sea level would be. if there were a ac- right next to everest o- okay and then you measure from there up to the peak. Oh no no. No you have to account for the shape of the earth bishop of the art okay. It's a live swyto very much. Swyto right the earth is elipsoid. Soil like a oval-shaped watermelon because of the earth rotation makes it kind of bulge slightly at the equator. Plus you have to account for how gravity effect sea level in different places around the world and mountains themselves affect gravity so the earth at sea level this invisible line along the earth's surface. It's actually like kind of lumpy. So you're telling me that we are standing on a lumpy elipsoid. That's exactly what i'm telling you. So sea level is actually not level at all and the next step. You got map. Those lumps essentially variations in the earth's gravitational force. And then you get the gop lead a. I'm sorry a joy d- yeah so the geo is the shape of the earth at sea level taking into account gravity and the planet's rotation. And now you follow that joy to appoint directly under everest. And that's what you use as a reference point for the mountains height okay so after all that sea levels gravity you finally get a reference point you take that you compare it to your. Gps measurement from the top of the mountain and you get everest height. Well not so fast. Because there's also these pesky plate tectonics oh my lord. This is harder than actually climbing everest. I'll say i'll say right now. Yeah yeah so. The mountains peak is variable to like and i'm not just talking ice and snow like the rock is actually moving. Sri daddy jaw is an engineer and expert on himalayan plate. Tectonics i have been field kinney. My philosophist been between behaviors and then ever asked is on the edge of two plates. The eurasian plate and the indian plate and j has measured how the indian plate is slipping underneath the eurasian plate and how that is pushing everest skyward measurements for last you. One point four million yearning threes in high. Like a few hundred years. We can only do bring Comes johnny has concluded that everest is gaining roughly a centimeter every ten years. So that's about a foot every three hundred years other scientists say that's far too conservative that the growth could be three times even four times that much but i mean however fast everest is rising. Things can happen very quickly to change that like earthquakes hung or at least they have in the past. So professor john day studied a nineteen thirty four quake that calculated took about sixty centimeters off the mountains height. So that's at least six hundred years of growth a raced in an instant and there's been another quake since in two thousand fifteen and we're not sure how that affected the height because there haven't been any definitive measurements since then so i'm guessing you're about to tell me it's time to remeasure mount everest. It is indeed so last year nepal sent up a team of scientists to do just that and this year with the climbing. Season cancelled for kelvin. China did the same and both countries have been analyzing their findings and their due to release the measurements pretty much any day. Now this is very exciting yes especially because most of the surveys of everest has been done by foreigners british colonial rulers. There was an american survey was an italian one and professor monitor. The gps expert from nepal says yes. He's motivated by science and the search for truth and all of this but you know also in part by the previous. Why don't we measure our own mountain and so nepal dead and we are waiting for those findings now. It may turn out to be taller shorter. Whatever the point though is that it's changing and that's what scientists say matters to them. Here's garage on the former survey of india guy again. I feel the joint will here. Shedding the knowledge will use the society beget understanding. What is there a big deal if you come and see okay. I'm announcing mall. Dividends did this much healthy that who cares you know because she missed the learning that teaching how people understand how do people perceive almost put in what model you used. Then be be happy if he's happy about what this tells us about. The earth overall the technology. They're fine tuning on. Everest has all these practical applications from agriculture to defense and scientists say if their research gets more eyeballs because it involves the tallest mountain in the world. Hey that's a great

George Everest George Everest Brit Nagaraj India Nash Mandar Nepal Mount Everest Langdon University Of Tokyo Lauren Yellow Sea Himalayan Plate Bengal Professor John Day
What Personal Video Can Do for Your Business

Duct Tape Marketing

05:08 min | 1 year ago

What Personal Video Can Do for Your Business

"Hello welcome to another episode of the duct. Tape marketing podcast. This is john chance. My guest today is david j. He is the founder and ceo of a software platform. I guess we're going to call it. That called warm. Welcome which helps businesses upgrade from boring texts to personal video so they can build meaningful relationships that drive real revenue so david thanks for joining me. Thanks for having me. John so before we get into the platform just even why. Somebody should be using video engagement to these. Tell me a little bit about your story. this is a startup for you. So is one of those. Is this one of those stories where you couldn't find tool that worked the way you wanted it to so you built it yourself. Well you know frustration i read. It does so yet. You know. I i actually got the idea from a friend of mine and He saw some other video technology. We were building in our use. This descend personal videos into personalized. My entire business and i was like that is a great idea. I'm going to steal it and And so i took it ran with it and then we started to kind of build Kind of feature after feature on top of that now. Is this your first. Go at something of that nature or is old hat for you. I somewhere in the middle. I've a few other start-up sped a are kind of at all different stages But yeah i started out in the service business of photography back in two thousand Dropped out of college and Became an artist straight. Sounds like a great idea in front that just kind of felt the frustrations of a service business. You know hard to scale hard to grow your constantly having to redo the same work in. So that's when i got into Building tech startups. And and so. I have a few of those and This is the newest one The time seems to be right for video and You know you can't. You can't ever bet on timing. it's just one of those things. you get luckier. You don't y- i have been I'm actually working on my transfer. Twenty eight twenty one of obligatory blog posts. And then i've done for many many years and one of the things. I was talking about it and it's funny as would call this a trend as much as as sort of winston an acceleration of things that were already happening You know basically comes down to marketers need to be more human. I mean. I know that's obvious people been saying that for a long time but i mean i think we really a kind of that was certainly amplified by the of crazy times of twenty twenty. Certainly video is a way to be more human Throw on top of that personalized video. So some one to one type of video. So how does your. How do you feel like you're platform. And maybe this is the time to kind of save power works but how do you think your platform fits into that idea of Again his state even call the trend. But i think it's upon us. I think it it is a trend. I think it's it's actually maybe a thousand year shift in how humans communicate You know for the past thousand years. We've been obsessed with the written word. And of course six hundred years ago the printing press came out and we became really obsessed with the written word because it was maybe the first thing in our world that scaled and we loved things at scale right so not like. Wow we can write something once and you know printed a million times and the the fact is that that the written word is really not a great way for humans to communicate and most people nowadays Understand that when you go on facebook or on twitter and you're like this is not a great way for people to be talking about and And then you know you introduce video as well as abdin obviously of the internet and you say wow now video can scale and you can get more nuance. you can get More of what somebody is trying to communicate. Not just what they're saying what they're typing or at their writing the body language myth. Yeah yeah so so again. We've we've led up to the you're hesitant guests. I'm trying to get you to talk about warm. Welcome because we've led up to the fourth you're using video but will but but what is warm. Welcome injected that because obviously video has been around. I mean i i've got quick quicktime on my computer i could shoot you video right now You know just send it to you. So so how does warm welcome kind of take that and an extended into a tool that becomes a useful platform for small business owners

John Chance David J David John Winston Facebook Twitter
3000-Year-Old Orbs Provide A Glimpse of Ancient Sport

60-Second Science

01:29 min | 1 year ago

3000-Year-Old Orbs Provide A Glimpse of Ancient Sport

"Ballgames are a big source of modern amusement even amid pandemic but they're nothing new consider for instance, a forty, five, hundred year old linen ball found in a child's tomb in Egypt, or thirty, six, hundred year old rubber balls from Central America where the contest called for players to slam the ball with their hips. Now, researchers have pinned to date on what they say are the oldest sporting balls in Europe or Asia three spheres dug up from the tombs of horsemen in the desert of northwestern China crafted three millennia ago we're quite sure that they were used Houston. Some kind of Bat, and Ball Game Patrick Birdman is an archaeologist at. The University of Zurich and part of the team that analyzed the ancient sporting equipment. The balls are about three inches in diameter wrapped in rawhide leather and stuffed with leather strips in hair, and then also when you look at the Chinese character of fall itself, it's quite interesting because this character is made up of the ideograms of hair and letter details and photos of the balls appear in the Journal of Archaeological Science reports as for how this ancient ball and stick game was played. It could be something that Polo but it could also be something like like an early form of hockey or goal, but since we don't have any. Textual evidence and we don't have any sticks from the same period we don't really know. Regardless of the Sport Fared Min and his colleagues write that a ball game of any kind would have provided excellent exercise and military training to.

Houston Patrick Birdman Journal Of Archaeological Scie University Of Zurich Egypt Central America Hockey Europe Asia China
"about six hundred years later" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

05:39 min | 2 years ago

"about six hundred years later" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Tom lives in England he is the man who's got me through the quarantine because before it began my friend Steve Tennes took me aside at the last dinner party we host and said you've got to read this book to million by this English follow Tom Holland and I listen to it when the shutdown occurred and then I listen to dynasty which is about the Caesars then I listen to Rubicon which was about the Roman Republic then I listen to the shadow in the shadow of the sword which was about the rise of this one and now I'm listening to Persian fire I'm like on a Tom Holland diction he joins me now from England good morning Tom how are you I'm very well and all the better hearing that I've given you an addiction well it's not your readers by the way of these books are terrific you select them personally my readers yes I did I have nothing but the best rated but I mean the people who narrate the books to actually make them into audio you may I know who I I think I did she use them and be honest well I've read like the result he read them myself so I've I've I've you did I shed the name with the the spider man actor is kind of boosted my desire to take the boots myself becoming access well I quite fancy reading one of them myself you're gonna have a tough time now I read them all out of order and I always ask I have a thing about thrillers Sir Daniel Silva and CJ box and others come on once a year and I always say read their books in order yours don't really have to be read in order and to me it is the latest but if someone wanted to do a crown on chronologically would they not begin with Persian fire then moved to Rubicon then moved to dynasty Ben moved to in the shadow of the sword and then moved to dominion yes I think they probably would because passion five begins in about six hundred BC say well that's that's a long time guy and then recalled it tells the story of Jesus season which is about six hundred years later so I yes I think that would be the wisest way to do it now now Tom all and explain to people where you come from I mean popular historians like Barbara Tuchman in the United States and and I described you yesterday is the wrong chair now of Great Britain hi to a friend who said why are you on this Holland K. what is your background I'm Mike my background walls but I want to be a great novel that was my ambition thank you when I left university I set myself becoming a great no less and they they offer two well that discovered the I. I was never going to be a great novelist I began to realize actually what what what correct me what leaves me what's excited me what thrills me was actually the very H. R. because that's what I'd be fascinated by as a child and they would say write about what you know I don't think people will go back into that Austin that child did it that used to get their inspiration and in a sense that's what I was doing so if the first book I I write recall also filed with the red Republic and that was because that was the period that it always makes me as a child I mean I think it's the most extraordinary railing remarkable story possibly in the whole history it's got not just devious sees that but Cicero Pompeii and clamp truck around all these kind of names that still resonate to this day I was suddenly so when I sat down to write that book I felt a kind of great surge of excitement but I'd never find when I was writing fiction I realize this is what I actually want to do and the thing that that gave it a particular kind of agency for me was the fact that even though I was writing about something that happened two thousand years ago the backdrop to when I began it was was nine eleven and the build up to the Iraq war which of course was it was the story of an imperial Republic going into the Middle East and basically that's what's happening in Rome in the in the in the in the first century BC I'd say that was also that sense that even though this is very very it's the stuff that happened thousands of years ago it does yeah Robert Tuchman wrote this great book a distant mera yes there are other periods as well as the as the fourteenth century the hold up this it may resume the images in the reflections they may be distorted they may be strange they may be airy but they all kind of reflectance as well and and so I don't really I guess that's that's what I that's where I'm coming from I'm interested in a lamb what might seem very distant it's the people but I think that they they are not without relevance for the present my goodness see that even now oh my goodness they give so much perspective and and what I think your gift I don't wanna make you blush but I think your gift is to use the vernacular of today with the scholarly seriousness to make them very approachable and not dusty they're the opposite of dusty there engrossing these characters in in Persian fire yeah I've always known about the Spartans and I've read the three hundred by my friends even press the okay to fire I know the big stories I know the great gods I know Troy but I haven't got it organized chronologically and what you've set out maybe in a given that sort of way is four eight twenty twenty reader to go back and if.

Tom England Steve Tennes
Royal Family Reaches a 'Megxit' Deal

Dean Richards' Sunday Morning

08:31 min | 2 years ago

Royal Family Reaches a 'Megxit' Deal

"And now we're talking a little royal talk with Emily I'm an Eddie who is a royal watcher we've talked about so far the the official things of what the new mags it resolution or you said which I like the royal resolution I'm just wondering now you are royal watcher you have been a huge supporter of Harian Magen as we've talked about on my podcast many times you root for love I guess that you room you for life yeah that's I mean you should have a teacher that says well I root for lady maybe I will and so I want to know so so I would like to know we've talked about a lot the the official things but just from a from a royal watcher and a big fan of hearing in Magen what's your perspective on this where do you fall down on this where I think a little bit bad because I mean this is a fifteen hundred year old institution and I feel like this was so dramatic and you know the way it caught the family off guard and I think a little bit about about this in a little bit dark about it I think part of their appeal was this kind of fairy tale idea you know that that she started with defense like once again she's a commoner even American and I which is certainly not the first quote unquote commoner Canary in that family but everything about it just seemed like a fairy tale which you know I and they have so much glamour about them but I don't know I mean I hi they did seem like they were really suffering I mean anyone who watch that documentary that they did with the British journalist Tom Bradby could be that they were both very deeply unhappy mostly with how they are being treated by the media we at the end of the day I feel like how can you really force them to continue to live like that if they truly want out well I tell you that you know what yeah I I agree with you I think what's interesting I I've really I have usually idea when I come up with an opinion I don't make I don't make me do the jerk opinions but when I do decide on something I don't waiver and I have been all over the board on this one the show with the story itself has continued to change and and it has been very fluid and develops almost day by day so it's hard to really what you may have thought about on Tuesday based on new new facts that that happened if you change your mind on Thursday and that just happened again with new news yesterday about them losing their titles and everything but the one thing that that that seems to me the in you hate to get into this and I'm not trying to I'm not trying to you know label anything but this was very millennial I mean this is right this smacks of of the millennial tag and I'm not making any judgments but in terms of of what the the knock is against Bolanos and I'm sure people I'm sure like right now well you know Harian Meghan are talking to to Chuck prince Charles and saying okay boomer but what this really is you know what I'm I just I I I I'm I don't want to do this you know I this is not my thing it's annoying if they are you know and and I just think like you know this is what you were born into at least from Harry standpoint you know Meghan came in should have known what was expected and to just bail on this I I I I what I hope that hairy is is all in on this and this is not just something that he's doing because his wife is giving him a hard time I don't know if that's happening or not I hope not because you know as I said before he was born in that bubble and that's the world that he does know but he'd never known any other life I know it will be really interesting to see how this unfolds but I know it's confusing because on one hand you have you know when you when you read the reports coming out of the U. K. you've got sources saying that this is all her and that she is driving that then you also have sources saying you know what he wanted out for a long time he is totally traumatized over what happened with his mother at you know and he feels that like that whole white and you know that the media obsession with her that that all of that led to her death and so he what he wanted out for one thank you and I can have the power to do that but it's hard to really under it's hard to really get a grip on really who is driving the S. but also the motivation it's like again you know I'm taking what they said in their documentary ACLU that you know they had a really rough time and they don't feel they have a lot of support but on the flip side there's a lot of cynical reports out there they're speculating whether this actually has more to do with the fact that they've kinda realized how powerful a bland today already has and have arts gonna try to figure out a way to monetize that so that's a very cynical point of view well the only thing I could one that's out there hard to really know the only thing I hope not is that I hope that Bravo executive Bravo television executive Andy Cohen is not watching this because I could just a I could just see the light bulb going on over his head wait a minute Harian Magen superiors gone wild and this is the new reality show and I could just see this right now right before you know housewives of Beverly hills we've got a Harian Megan and and while I mean the funny thing is as crazy as idea that is could you imagine the ratings for that I can assure you that anti co and that has already got one okay but you know and they are going to move to North America it sounds to me like they're saying Canada but I think it was stern Osborne the talking about this the other day on you know she's on a talk show and she was saying just wait I bet you they'll end up in LA and she might be right that bad you know part of what their end of the deal is that they've made it clear that they everything they do well continue to uphold the values of the clean and so what that means is they do you actually have to be really careful about what they do not in all seriousness it will be interesting to see I mean I did you mention you know your prediction estimates are acting again I'm wondering if you're going to try to go kind of the more from Michelle Obama route of like teaching engagement band yellow book and things like that like I it's hard to tell but whatever it is they do you really think bigger than like a growth and happy you know well the only thing that I would say in closing here is that if they were looking to to minimize the attention given to them this only does the opposite because now they are an oddity their anomaly and they've almost put a spotlight on themselves again and maybe that was the goal at least from her mind I'm not sure but this story is still developing and it is quite interesting especially as you said it you know a fifteen what would you say fifteen hundred year old I mean I think at least of kind of the modern day mark yeah we now I mean and I mean the good thing about as I made a joke earlier but is true in in in in our lifetime we've seen so a lot of changes to traditions as I said right now it in theory we have two popes there was there had been a resignation of a pope in six hundred years and now a member of the royal family is not just you know not into it and not wanting to be it and and maybe you know mad about there as I said before their role of despair but they're actually doing something about it which was unheard of as I said before all those other spare airs like Andrew and Margaret and princess and they all just pick their live what was that phrase you said don't complain what is the well that was the queen mother never complain never explain well that that is gone that model was gone and in

Emily Eddie Official
Peru Deports 5 Tourists Accused of Damaging Machu Picchu Temple

Jason and Alexis

03:26 min | 2 years ago

Peru Deports 5 Tourists Accused of Damaging Machu Picchu Temple

"Growth so some tourists traveled to Peru which I've always wanted to go to much you Pete you you know it takes a while I've had friends that have gone in it you know it's a track it's a journey you don't you can't just be dropped in by helicopter it's not a small little trail that you walk from a gift shop too much you Pete you it's an it's an ordeal to get there it's a privilege to be able to do this in your lifetime all in some tourists have been deported from the country thank goodness they found them by now but like I said six hundred year old temple temple in in Peru they went they broke into the temple during the night and then they have remove somehow we don't know how but a large stone has fallen off a part of the temple because of them being in their Messin around and they also pooped in there and I okay so destructive behavior you know let me just say you know if you're a teenager and you're a kid and you do this kind of stuff you're going the wrong way he need to be turned in the right direction that's one thing okay it's a little forgivable you know because your brain still growing in your an idiot but these are grown adults the other adults who are doing something like this and it infuriates me they should be put on a no fly list and they don't get to go anywhere else so they did find these guys they did find them yes and they jacked them out of the country as they should well explain the process of getting there I mean is it is a hiking walking yeah it's a you know this wasn't found Intel gosh the history of March you Pete you it was undiscovered for a very long time and right I'm just wondering where is the furthest away runner closest road how how long do you have to stay on board how their long too and I I love the internet don't they have any portapotties or was this egregious on purpose pooping all it's got to be agree just on the edge if they had to go that bad they could have gone outside of it right you know what I mean like intentional right now what I mean yeah because usually you would run out into the bushes and find a lawyer or something and and leave tell us about it yeah like I almost had to do it cut right lasted two years soon or are they should do what I do and have a Mister chair which is a a to a toilet seat on the camp stool yeah you can go anywhere then so if you want to get to the temple looks like its the hiking their you know you've got at least an hour okay hike in nine if you want to go to the temple of the moon it's three hours so when the mentally what is wrong with people I mean it it's like window Joe beaver of Pete in that month bucket for that more maintenance guide have to clean up I mean I get the whole teenager thing I in your right their their brains are still growing but we were all teenagers and I gotta tell ya I don't think I would ever I know I know I can win this wasn't majors this with these no but I'm saying yeah but yeah well that even more but even as an adult how were you raised raised you what what pack of wolves raised you but you think it would be all right to do that there's just fundamentally something not right with you I don't

Peru Pete
Peru Deports 5 Tourists Accused of Damaging Machu Picchu Temple

Woody and Company

00:31 sec | 2 years ago

Peru Deports 5 Tourists Accused of Damaging Machu Picchu Temple

"And there was a group of terrorists that are actually being deported after desecrating the ruins their of much U. P. chill and they snuck into this site it's the six hundred year old temple there temple of the sun and the calls the rock to fall from one of the walls by messing around in there and then one of the tourist actually pooped inside of the room to be kidding did I cannot even reading this I saw the story in way what kind of the heathen are you doing something

Peru Deports 5 Tourists Accused of Damaging Machu Picchu Temple

Woody and Company

00:31 sec | 2 years ago

Peru Deports 5 Tourists Accused of Damaging Machu Picchu Temple

"And there was a group of terrorists that are actually being deported after desecrating the ruins their of much U. P. chill and they snuck into this site it's the six hundred year old temple there temple of the sun and the calls the rock to fall from one of the walls by messing around in there and then one of the tourist actually pooped inside of the room to be kidding did I cannot even reading this I saw the story in way what kind of the heathen are you doing something

"about six hundred years later" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

09:43 min | 2 years ago

"about six hundred years later" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"This is the John that the story in the all around and the road the mad Kerr John has Texas lands and he's made murder is our is often regarded as a man who could have inherited and been the king of England and the Duke of Normandy and the county of orange and the lord of Ireland but Arthur is now dead a very young man a teenager and John retreats to England December seventh twelve oh three Stephen as he arrives home there's much rejoicing does he know that he's home almost for good that that's the end of his adventures no I don't think he knows the eight the end of the defense is a tool I think he fully expects to be able to take back what is rightfully his in those lands on the continent and in fact one here Raleigh in England in December of twelve of free normally had yet to full always you get the full these characters was still holding out the gate the forces of king Phillip of from so so what's the commander had left the field and the field was still his and therein is the mystery you lay it out here John sits at home while he gets news this is now the campaign season of year twelve oh four the the the towns that fall fillets falls con falls marshal a monster Machel falls rule all falls they follow those all fall in may and then a rule is the capital of Normandy and Normandy is now after for the first time my note here is that this is the first time in three hundred sixteen years the French king is commanded Normandy John has lost the prize right that's that's everything he's it's it's like he's lost India peace Churchill yes it it's it's quite quite extraordinary and there is no obvious explanation as to why Joan Walton in Normandy even contemporize couldn't really understand it near contemporary we have a a later accounts somebody's going to give the twelve twenty through which a match in the he was sent the salted with his new wife the he simply played with is the one twelve of them worrying about what was happening in Normandy this story is complete nonsense it's not true but she but this is the link that people have to go to in order to try and imagine stop them from being in Normandy Hey where's he prepares the citadel England for invasion does he always think that Phillips coming is that why he won't go there yeah I think he does I think he does I think that's the explanation the the the following year in twelve a five he was prevented from going to the concerned by the wall age old arch bishop of can spring nine coach Hubert Walter who was nearing the end of the day he said to him if you leave England now you might lose everything this is the best must've been playing on his mind in twelve oh four as well this is the cat the campaign season of twelve oh five there's a there's a cycle to John's life they celebrate at Michaelmas said they celebrate Christmas and they bring all the revenues and that's going to become important now and then the campaign season gets underway February March and they say oh March April for France or they sail March April for England and so he expects an invasion in the spring of for he he expects an invasion in the spring of oh five the next campaign season after the fall of Normandy it does not come and he prepares a counter invasion almost like there the ships are going to pass between them yeah but it right at the end he cancels it now he cancels it because he's advised by the archbishop of Canterbury but also this is the first suggestion that he doubted by his barons is that true yeah it is it is the but it comes back to the point but those continental land they know the loan England they do not belong to the king of England they belong to the G. could Normandy all the kinds of OJ okay these are wrapped up in the famed person but if you'll sitting there in England at the barons and you'll king is also used to go to Normandy as as his sole job but to do so because he's too because nobody knew you've got let her tree in Normandy you scratch your head to say well well you should apply why should only follow this person the jeep room the two who might have known the agents to a land which I have no interest in order to lay down my life for him all spend a lot of money for him so there's a real problem that John has the nineties persuading the English ministry leaked to follow him to the confidence to pursue these campaigns this problem the second problem is that the real hopefully the people absolutely at the top of society like William Marshall might be a little less than who have land in Norman day they do a deal with for the H. K. they actually got to deal with it whereby they become the man of king Philip for their lines in Normandy so they don't go to the room the only that because it's legal nobody there before he takes the little old John this dreadful position John is a peculiar person in this one episode I made a circle around it Steven I wondered what we know about it he was so frustrated that they wouldn't following to invade France that he sailed around the Isle of Wight and then came back what did it with a laughing outing was him was his source duration at this point in the king would you ever lost it Joan and he would make you pay if you love and mercy the kings will fall to dangerous people John was far too dangerous a person's the law his mother had said he was adolescent but he was younger than at we now get on to a crisis that John creates out of his willfulness because all of a sudden the archbishop of Canterbury dies and the host is opened and John wants to sell it and enter the pope pope innocent the third who is a powerful voice in this drama a powerful voice in the creation of the Magna Carta not positively but in any event challenging the G. King John by the barons also meant challenging innocent the third but here's where John the trays the pope's support because the pope has a candidate he sounds like a very good candidate and he becomes a principal in the Magna Carta Stephen Langton of Paris is a theology teacher in the early this is proto university of Paris the second in the world he sounds like a hero do we know much about him to be a hero and and indeed to many people he is a hero he was a great school one of the great scholars of his generation not just the field with the teacher but a stolen of the first right and and and this quality scholarship enabled him to become a cardinal of the Roman church he'd come to the notice of pope innocent the third in the mind of an outstanding quality and leave that were actually the souls of men one wanted to appoint to the job of being on the ship of conflict and the office of accounts but look look for the appointments the kings made to bishoprics were were people who were basically good administration they were they were good civil servants and you pointed them at the shipment but you didn't do that with the archbishopric accounts for you because the person that the person who hired who would be alone recruit who had a reputation for being a great scholar and indeed a great individual Stephen Langton will stop and that was the pope's choice it was the right choice but John wouldn't have it he wanted to sell the post so immediately he is now a cross purposes with the pope at the same time John claims that he's raising money to re invade France stick a recapture Normandy he's the Duke of Normandy and he invents the one the thirteenth what is that state thirty three the run you form of taxation the idea of the thirteenth was to kind of report is six property seven houses in their lines and then movable property as well so in the everything that I had like whole sizzle and cool and the idea was that everybody would hate to see that the prophecy that state and which is about seven percent I am very much of the taxation but actually it was a radical radically use because before that point nobody had sold for levy taxation all the great hours to cracks in this particular way and they said as much they said this was an outrageous and at first they refused to pay your support and no taxation without representation you'll know that about six hundred years later yes it's only it's remember it's about the money that's what the joy against even here we are in the thirteenth century it's about the money John.

Kerr John murder England Normandy Texas
Why Oregonians should stay home for the much-hyped ‘unicorn’ meteor storm

Glenn Beck

05:02 min | 2 years ago

Why Oregonians should stay home for the much-hyped ‘unicorn’ meteor storm

"Now we've got to wrap our minds around this but it's something that I've never heard of and that is a meteor storm not just a meteor shower but a meteor storm called the unicorn meteor storm and it is scheduled I say that facetiously for tonight yeah but it may be too cloudy here to see if we're gonna talk about anyway because that's how we roll we are joined now by U. T. D. astronomy professor Roger the leaner who can explain this a little more than we can good morning professor yes good morning Amy invaders so tell us about this meteor storm and what the differences between a media storm and a meteor shower well at first unlikely as it sounds there is such a thing as space weather so indeed if your outside the right events that happened the vaguely predictable just like the real weather almost but sometimes you get a feel stones I guess would be the analogy in this case international medial storm that happens every year in the in this November twenty first of twenty third but then occasionally there's a combination of factors and you for that a new video store and so these don't happen very often I thank god and the stronger I mostly worried about them because then you can hit satellites and then maybe the internet will go down yeah I was just reading just yesterday about some people some astronomers who were not only concern but kind of annoyed by the fact that the satellites that all the satellites we have an orphan our blocking their view of other parts of the galaxy but now this meteor storm you say is something that happens every year and maybe you can explain why that is why do we have something like this every year so many many or stones but normal sort of leftovers from comments that happened that comes through the sewer system around the sun regularly and this was this comment seems to have something like a six hundred year period which is longer than a human lifetime and so we tend not to notice these kinds of things even though they're quite regular so why are they calling it a unicorn unicorn meteor shower well because it's very rare like unicorn so yes obviously we we maintains the the maybe all storm itself I mean the media's Harris poll the album monster it and that's the constellation where the I'm from every cycle so the unicorn is are very rare combination of a coincidences that may lead to a very spectacular show tonight yeah it is very frustrating that it is highly unlikely we're gonna be able to see it from here because we do have rain and thunderstorms in the forecast for tonight here in North Texas but as you know when the full counselors and know better than me to your store and so they may be at an opening so I encourage everybody to just go outside around ten thirty central time and look up at the starry may you might notice something also notice something I am I and my understanding is correct me if I'm wrong is that the the frequency of the of the meteorites are falling stars if you prefer that that we should be able to see if we can see it would be greater greater frequency than that of say the Perseid yeah that's right and so this particular incident of consumption months things that attack number of clients in recorded astronomical history nineteen twenty tolerates thirty five eighty five ninety five so yes these things are predictable the name of eight cents then the exactly how bright this home is gonna be it just depends on how we should insist maxim but let me just inject that the biggest problem from my point of yours and astronomer in space whether in spades jump that humans are put into orbit around the earth so at night you see both natural yours but also human made one what what are the chances that one of these meteors can actually hit earth okay so that's not so much larger question in this case most of the media what they're probably going to be small enough that they will not I doubt they tend to burn up in the air and so they will not actually reach the surface of the earth but prepared this forum so if you're out there looking and you see something coming towards you doc very scientific

Egyptian Vats 5,600 Years Old Were For Beer Brewing

60-Second Science

02:43 min | 2 years ago

Egyptian Vats 5,600 Years Old Were For Beer Brewing

"Is scientific American sixty second science. I'm Suzanne barred some fifty six hundred years ago. People in the Egyptian city of here canopus did something. That's still a very popular activity today. They brewed and drank beer. We know this because archeologists examining the area near the ruins of a cemetery for the elite discovered a structure containing five ceramic. That's that would have been heated from below residues in the vats confirmed that they had once made beer and made that if these five vests were operated the same meantime three hundred twenty five liters produced which is equal to six hundred fifty cans of Budweiser Texas Tech University. Microbiologist Momento al-Massari. He says this ancient beer would've tasted very different from what are modern. Pellets are used to the Egyptian beer makers did use malted wheat and barley in the brewing in process but no one had mastered carbonation yet so the resulting grew was a flat. UNFILTERED malt beverage with a low alcohol content Elmasri colleagues recently sampled thick dark deposits from the herrick novelist fats. The chemical analysis confirmed that they were indeed the product of beer making being and not some other fermented food the tests also revealed other ingredients ancient Egyptians putting their beer the researchers found a high concentration of the amino acid pro lean which is abundant in dates and some other fruits. This result suggests that this could have been used or incorporated in the beer for flavor and maybe to add some sweet notes hops which act as both a flavoring and preservative weren't added to beer until medieval times. They use it hawks who was unknown to they need conditions conditions and we think that the US as it to preserve their beer the residues were indeed high in phosphorous acid a product of barley grains added during the fermentation process process. Phosphoric acid is often used today to prolong the shelf. Life of alcoholic beverages phosphoric acid via barley would have made it possible to mass-produce ask produce beer store it for extended periods and even transport it all consistent with the important role beer played in ancient Egyptian society it not only provided hydration and nutrition but was also part of religious rituals among the elite. The study is in the Journal scientific reports studying ancient beer. It has allowed Elmasri to reflect on the intersection of science and history. I teach a microbiology lab. We grew beer in the lab and the students see the whole permutation mediation process and thinking how engines were able to do a similar thing thousands of years ago. It's a very

Momento Al-Massari Elmasri Budweiser Texas Tech Universit Suzanne United States Journal Scientific Three Hundred Twenty Five Lite Fifty Six Hundred Years Sixty Second
Told in their own voices, the suffering of the suffragettes

Inside Europe

05:21 min | 3 years ago

Told in their own voices, the suffering of the suffragettes

"Kate Smith just one of the women who had engaged in militant axe. She became known. This is suffering yet. And in the nineteen seventies. Choose one of nearly two hundred suffrage campaigners who are interviewed by Oxford. University historian Brian Harrison the archive is now housed the women's library at the London School of economics. Did you do a lot of? A very mild explosive only said further the corners of the letters you see it wouldn't a straw. And it wouldn't sit father house because someone on the inside of boast office would know or realize that something's wrong and smell the slugger something you wouldn't ever hurt. Anybody wouldn't burn down the post office familiar decade from nineteen thousand five so for jet, smashed windows, blue postboxes and engaged other acts of arson and destruction. What was the explosive do, you know Onno we had their own rich cities. I don't understand the toll on ever had to do. It was made up in mild them if the. When we use it in some pools concede rel who's just woman didn't tation and one caller of one Pugh. Wasn't very powerful. No, the blasters powerful the blast Fitch down -ly dozen via accumulating from that six hundred years only Basel's launched a militant campaign in Cambridge and originates the plants burn down some empty houses. She'd recruited a local teacher to actually carry out the full her, but when the police came knocking at all of his door. She was very nearly incriminated. I went to trust the main road to post office policemen on duty there, he knew me and that I would trust. I said good nice. Me and then told we'll. Get out soon. Connecticut bid, so underst- bid and the Colson about Hoffa. Sounders knocked the dull these confident it lump tourist countries that good. And I came out to get. We'll talk negative me the policemen on duty. And did it couldn't be neat feat seen just about that time crossing the road? Live was absolved. The strong thing was that I had had in my bedroom. And I want to do with it. They went after moved pulled it down the W C, and I did or Ledley I know soaked bounds. Hit a word because mobile been all this mall. She news mostly the window smashing. Militant Sopher jets would carry out. We'll be on shops businesses, but leeann are Cohen decided to take it to the next level by staging a protest at the tower of London finding something heavy to throw proved a challenge. And they only to take about out of the great when the five, of course, and this bar was so. When Medusa talent and find this thing to to a whole net get through with the file we did made them into parcels narrow tongue. This is my protest to the government for its stretcher it the work in women of Great Britain Leonora successfully through one of her missiles, and it smashed a case containing the crown jewels. She says she was Catholic to hurt anyone in the process boost soon arrested the police came and fell on me because said what had I done this for. And I told them that the message was on the possible and was arrested and put it in one of those dungeons down. But no, I try my got out, and I was mopped to Leman street police station, and the crowds absolute with the beefeaters and the police, and then it was locked up in the filthy, sell some of the central figures in the suffer jet movements. Who had created the women social political union in the first place with a punk house mother, Emily and two of her daughters. Christabel and Sylvia, I've come to meet Sylvia's granddaughter. Helen that family home in Manchester. So we're here in the panko center, which was the home of Emily Pankhurst and her daughters and son. It was the place where the suffrage movement was born vitamin us. This is where it happened. Awesome extremes there. They were a blow. Going up. Okay. The to you. I think they're blowing up politicians houses postboxes, where do you see it's because if people were doing that today? So people would see it as being pretty extremist me. I think that you have to look at the their acts in the context of what the government was doing to them all the time. And also take the blowing up of Lloyd. George's some house that was the summer house built full him by the press baron..

Emily Pankhurst Leeann Kate Smith Pugh Sounders Hoffa London School Of Economics Oxford Brian Harrison George Sylvia Connecticut Great Britain Leonora Onno Tower Of London Arson Basel Cambridge Fitch
Pope Faces Crisis of Credibility Over Coverup Accusations

All Things Considered

03:46 min | 4 years ago

Pope Faces Crisis of Credibility Over Coverup Accusations

"Pope Francis, is now squarely in the center of, the still unfolding clergy sex abuse crisis in the Catholic church a former Vatican embassador to the US archbishop Carlo Maria Vigano says. The pope covered up sexual misconduct by former Washington DC archbishop. Theodore mckarrick called on the pope to resign here with us now, to, talk, about. These developments is NPR religion correspondent Tom gjelten hey Tom also so this. Charge came in a. Pretty extraordinary eleven page letter from vegan? No, released this weekend whatever mation does. He claim, to have well, Vigano is a longtime Vatican insider he was as you say the Vatican embassador to. The United States from two thousand eleven to. Two thousand sixteen so he, has certainly had access the information most of his allegations concern former archbishop McCarrick cardinal McCarrick until he was forced to give up that title this summer Vigano says, there was knowledge of mechanics misconduct years ago. That it was brought to the attention of. The Vatican now we should point out that. He does not claim there, is knowledge of McCarrick abusing a minor with that was the charge that, actually led to his resignation they can, always talking largely about sexual misconduct with seminarians he says then Pope Benedict forbid McCarrick from celebrating mass or giving lectures he claims. That Francis then reverse those punishments which is why he should. Resign now there are two problems with this one we haven't yet. Seen, any, evidence. Of those sanctions being imposed on McCarrick too we also know that McCarrick. Continued to do those. Things he was supposedly forbidden to do? Even, when Benedict was still pope and. How pope, Francis reacted to, this letter claiming there was this cover up well on the plane this weekend coming. Back from Ireland he's he basically refused to. Talk about it he said, read the statement and make your own judgment it's not clear what he meant by that Exactly denying no. But he may be saying consider the source we know that archbishop figure no is a longtime critic of pope Francis his letter is very strident inflammatory phrased very much in. Culture war terms there's actually some people in the Vatican say he has a reputation for being a troublemaker. So maybe the pope is just saying take this with. A grain, of salt now these charges Vigano makes go back several years. But he released this letter while the pope, was on this high profile trip. To, Ireland how do you think the timing. Was significant here was it deliberate well the reason that that trip was so. High profile is because of course it came in the. Midst of this clergy abuse crisis now figure knows critics suspect that he is was using this crisis to leverage his longstanding anti Francis campaign on the other hand it. Is important to note that his. Charges, are directly related to the sex abuse. Crisis within, the Catholic leadership there are basically two theories. Of the root cause of this crisis Francis And his allies say it's clerical, ISM, by which they mean too, much deference to. The clergy putting the clergy, on a pedestal vis-a-vis the laity they say. That Tennessee has led to. Impunity for priests and bishops the other argument. Which is one subscribed to by Viggo is that this has everything to do with homosexuality. There's been too much accommodation of homosexuals, within the church we should also point. Out, that researchers have really challenged that idea that, there's any connection between child abuse and sexual orientation and how unprecedented wise this letter in. The first place or a really this whole moment? Right now for? The, Catholic church the entire moment is unprecedented I mean we have an expo Benedict resigned first time in six hundred years we have. Francis, being elected the first pope from the south some people say there's a civil war going on in. The Catholic church there, have been so worse before but this is a big

Francis Carlo Maria Vigano Pope Benedict Mccarrick Archbishop Mccarrick Cardinal Shane Pope Francis Tom Gjelten NPR Pope Francis United States Ireland Stockholm School Of Economics University Of Kentucky Washington Dc University Of British Columbia Theodore Mckarrick Ari Shapiro Archbishop Rwjf Johnson Foundation
An Ancient Star Appears

Science Solved It

01:25 min | 4 years ago

An Ancient Star Appears

"The stars this is i insulted and today's episode an ancient star appeared welcome the science solved it motherboards show the greatest mysteries that were solved by science i'm kelly rogers

Six Hundred Years Two Weeks