35 Burst results for "Abigail"

1 Samuel 27: David Flees From Saul

The Bible in a Year

01:55 min | Last month

1 Samuel 27: David Flees From Saul

"First Samuel, chapter 27. David goes to king Akshay in gath. And David said in his heart. I shall now perish one day by the hand of Saul. There is nothing better for me than that I should escape to the land of the Philistines, then Saul will despair of seeking me any longer within the borders of Israel, and I shall escape out of his hand. So David arose, and went over. He and the 600 men who were with him to akshi, the son of Malcolm, king of gath. And David dwelt with akshi and gath, he and his men, every man with his household, and David with his two wives, a hint of jezreel, and Abigail of Carmel, naval's widow. And when it was told Saul that David had fled to gath, he sought for him no more. Then David said to Ashish, if I have found favor in your eyes, let a place be given me in one of the country towns, that I may dwell there, for why should your servant dwell in the royal city with you? So that day actually gave him Zika. Therefore, zik lag has belonged to the kings of Judah to this day, and the number of the days that David dwelt in the country of the Philistines was a year and four months. Now David and his men went up and made raids upon the gesture rights, the gurus, and the amala kites. For these were the inhabitants of the land from of old, as far as sure to the land of Egypt, and David struck the land, and left neither man nor woman alive, but took away the sheep, the oxen, the donkeys, the camels, and the garments, and came back to Akshay. When Akshay asked, against whom have you made a raid today, David would say, against the negev of Judah, or against the negev of the Jeremy lights, or against the negative of the canines. saved neither man nor woman alive to bring tidings to gath thinking lest they should tell about us and say, so David has done. Such was his custom all the while he dwelt in the country of the Philistines and trusted David, thinking he has made himself utterly abhorred by his people Israel. Therefore he shall be my servant always.

Abigail Saul David 600 Men Two Wives Israel Egypt Carmel Today ONE Ashish Zika Akshay One Day Malcolm Philistines Judah Chapter 27 Jeremy A Year And Four Months
Rep. Chip Roy: Hispanics Are Flocking to Republicans

The Dan Bongino Show

01:44 min | 8 months ago

Rep. Chip Roy: Hispanics Are Flocking to Republicans

"Covered in my first hour How I've run for office I lost you one I didn't get it done Couldn't cross the finish line But you know when you run a couple of times you get the process kind of down and you see a lot of things other people don't get to see him I have not seen an electoral environment turn in the Republicans favor Like this since the Tea Party And I think what's about to happen in 12 days congressman I think it could be I want to get ahead of my skis here but I think it could be worse They're panicking over D plus 12 D plus 13 districts The Democrats Well you're exactly right I mean I think you can look at a couple of the bellwether races and you can see what's going on right The race is down in South Texas or a perfect example where you've got three Hispanic women running one of them is my dear friend Cassie Garcia Running against guys like Henry cuellar who am I like It's a friend of mine but still supports Nancy Pelosi and a radical left And Cathy's running on a strong border security message She's married to a border patrol agent She's strong on border security not afraid to talk about it And Hispanics are flocking in that direction If you look at Northern Virginia and you look at jasla Vega against Abigail bamberger another one where Abigail she's a friend of mine I've worked with her on Bing But again she supports Nancy Pelosi And what you have there is she's running abortion ads I mean they're so out of touch And so out of step with where the average American is right now in terms of what the impact is on their families with respect to inflation with respect to energy costs with respect to crime with respect to what's happening with fentanyl in our community And they're just way out of touch and that radical left is just getting I think that's going to shine on election day and I think it's going to be a big night for the GOP

Cassie Garcia Henry Cuellar Nancy Pelosi Tea Party Abigail Bamberger South Texas Cathy Northern Virginia Abigail GOP
Meet Yesli Vega, Challenging Rep. Abigail Spanberger

Mark Levin

01:57 min | 8 months ago

Meet Yesli Vega, Challenging Rep. Abigail Spanberger

"Well tell us the country in virginians about your race You're running against this phony moderate And the area that you represent and why you are the true blue conservative and she's a phony moderate Sure you know Mark I just stepped outside we actually have a Latinos Vega rally going on right now where we have over a hundred folks that turned out here tonight And there is no coincidence for why we're having so many people coming out to our events People are tired of what's been coming out of Washington over the last couple of years They're tired of my opponents double standards and her lip service and they're ready for change folks are hurting right now because of record high inflation because of the cost of fuel because of the cost of groceries And because they're seeing every single thing in their lives going up from crime to the economy to big hand of government trying to interfere with everything that we do And so we're really excited as we get closer to election day We have the momentum We're talking to voters about the issues that matter to them And we're excited because we're seeing a movement here and there's nothing my opponent or the Democrat party can do to stop it Whatever you do or would you like to represent Say that again What is the area that you're running in So the 7 congressional district begins in eastern Prince William county and then it has the staffer spotsylvania Fredericksburg culpepper Greene county Orange County Caroline county and king George and half a precinct in albemarle So it's a newly drawn district after redistricting this district is now 70% new to my opponent And I live work and play in Prince William county and I've been serving there as a county supervisor for the last three years I also had the privilege of leading the Latinos for young and coalition where we proudly delivered 54% of the Hispanic vote across the Commonwealth And so we've laid the groundwork and now we're starting to see people coming out like never before and they are ready to take our country back

Prince William County Mark Democrat Party Washington Spotsylvania Caroline County Greene County Fredericksburg King George Albemarle Orange County Latinos For Young And Coalitio
The First Real U.S. Election in 1800

Mark Levin

01:49 min | 11 months ago

The First Real U.S. Election in 1800

"And so what is this challenging elections Electors and The first real election in this country was 1800 That was really the first real election And as Smithsonian magazine put it so long ago but made it such a protracted affair was that state legislatures were elected throughout the year As these assemblies more often than not chose presidential electors you see what I'm saying The assemblies chose presidential electors The state contest to determine them became part of the national campaign In 1800 the greatest surprise among these contests occurred in New York A large crucial state that had given all 12 of its electoral votes to Adams in 1796 Allowing him to eke out a three vote victory over Jefferson The battle for supremacy in the New York legislature to hinged on the outcome in New York City Thanks largely to lopsided winds and working class wards where many voters own no property the Republicans secured all 24 of New York's electoral votes for Jefferson and Aaron Burr For Abigail Adams John's wife that was enough to seal Adam's fate John Dawson a Republican congressman from Virginia declared the republic is safe the Federalist Party are enraged and despair But Adams himself refused to give up hope

Smithsonian Magazine New York Legislature Jefferson New York Adams Abigail Adams John New York City Aaron Burr John Dawson Adam Federalist Party Virginia
Abigail Disney Sees a Coordinated, Strategic Plan Against the Corp.

Mark Levin

01:42 min | 1 year ago

Abigail Disney Sees a Coordinated, Strategic Plan Against the Corp.

"It's the don't say gay Bill where does that come from That is a lie It's propaganda but they keep saying it even Abigail Disney even Brian stouter They're a disgrace They keep pushing this narrative on MSL SD They keep pushing this narrative on CNN They keep pushing this narrative even though it's a lie like so much of what they say So here's Brian stelter with Abigail Disney and then my response Go ahead What is The Walt Disney Company actually And how do you feel when you see it portrayed as this child abuse and doctor nation cult Right Well what I'm seeing happen is pretty coordinated strategic plan unfolding And Disney seems like the biggest target because it's so woven into families And so if you can and by the way a coordinated strategic plan unfolding I hope so That's called we the people rising up Against what your corporation is now doing After decades and decades and decades a persuading us to invest a lot of money in your corporation either a shareholders are just movie watchers or attendees at your various parks Go ahead Is it somebody's in there trying to indoctrinate your child My goodness the paranoid imagination can run It's not about a doctrine your child either It's about exposing children to issues that they should not be exposed to That's what it's about

Abigail Disney Brian Stouter Brian Stelter Walt Disney Company CNN
"abigail" Discussed on Books and Boba

Books and Boba

08:06 min | 1 year ago

"abigail" Discussed on Books and Boba

"And hey, we're here with author Abigail hing Wen returning to book some boba to talk about her second book, loveboat reunion. Welcome back to the show Abigail. Thank you so much for having me. I was just telling Marvin behind the scenes when I first met you was before the book hit The New York Times list and you guys talked to me about how much work has gone on behind the scenes in the Asian American community for years and years and I definitely felt like I was the recipient of that work and getting the word out for this book. So I'm grateful for both of you and all the work that you've done. Thank you. I mean, I'm so happy that you're back. Especially because I was there for your book launch and it's just, I don't know, it's so celebratory just to see how far you've come and just how you have a film adaptation. That's so wild. So I'm really excited to talk to you more about that as well. Yeah, how has it been since we talked to you? I totally forgot that we talked to you before you book came out for some reason. Local Taipei is just always been out for me now. It's just like a part of the literary canon for Asian American literature. How is that right bin? There's been a ton of developments since then, we can talk more about your film deal later on, but how have you been? Yeah, so it's been incredible. So book hit The New York Times list. It was there for multiple weeks and I ended up going on this tour and it felt like an endless tour I went all over the country, New York, D.C., Philadelphia. I went to book events, and then COVID hit. So all my big events were canceled. They lost 7 major events, including this big book fest in Santa Monica. And so that was hard. I think like most authors, we all struggled at that point like how do you get word out on your book at that point? I think pandemic favored the books that already established and come in and the books of the booksellers knew. So I think it's been on the book side harder to get word out, but we definitely had to rely more on things like podcasts and online word of mouth and virtual events. But at the same time, the book was optioned for film, and so that was kind of underway. And I was writing book two, so I ended up going to Taiwan in October of 2020. I got a special Visa to follow precautions, went and did quarantine for two weeks, and then I was able to research, love about reunion and that came out just a couple months ago in January this year. I gotta say, looking at your Instagram while you were in Taiwan for filming, as well as reading the second book. Gave me a ton of fomo. Because of COVID, I usually visit my parents in Taiwan. Like once a year for the last decade. And so the last few years I have not been able to go because of COVID regulations, to even go to Taiwan, you have to quarantine for two weeks in the hotel and then another two weeks. I think they loosened it by now, but still at least three weeks of quarantine before you can even step foot out into the streets. And so for a normal working adult, that means it's impossible to make a trip back most. You just want to spend the whole time inside. That's right, yeah. For me, fortunately, quarantine ends up being a writing time. So I enjoyed it in a strange way. It's like the world is shut out. You have no you have all the excuses in the world for not accepting invitations because you're stuck in quarantine. So I didn't end up getting a lot of writing done with both of them. And how was it writing your second book? Because for a lot of writers, the second book is like the dreaded the dreaded task because you have all the time in the world to write your first book, but then there was usually a deadline for the second book. I definitely struggled. I think the hardest part is that book two is already set in some ways, like book one, you've established all these things that can no longer be changed because they're published in a book. With book two, I knew that I wanted to follow Xavier's story. I think for those who heard the history, I wrote book one 26 times, 26 versions from all four points of view of Sophie Xavier Rick and ever. And I ended up scrapping all that. We read it all from ever Wong's point of view and I end up having all this leftover story. So I wanted to follow the Xavier into his family situation. I knew his father and his relationship is a lot more fractious than even ever and her family. And yet he comes from a very interesting feeling. It's a wealthy Taiwanese family. It's been around for hundreds of years. And then I also felt like Sophie had a really interesting journey too. I found like a lot of my readers connected to her in some ways they were surprised how much they connected to her because she is the antagonist. She's the boy crazy roommate who is just out to get married at all costs and she does some terrible things to ever along the way. But in the end, she realizes she is, she has her own brains and she can go and do the things that she's expecting to marry well for instead. So in book two, she's doubled down at Dartmouth to be the best computer science student she could be, but she keeps getting her own way. So it did take me a while to figure out, how do we have the two stories together? What exactly was the journey? I even had ideas about setting it in parts of the Philippines or parts of Indonesia and then eventually it all had to get pulled back in and it became again a trip to Taiwan. I did love how the trip to town doesn't even come with a play until probably like a third into the book. And the entire time was learning, how are they going to bring this back to Taiwan? Is this going to be like a one year later type of thing? And it turns out to be a one crazy weekend type of story. Which actually surprised me, but it also makes a lot of sense because when you're young, these types of things, you just come together. Yeah. Yeah, that was fun, too, because you know I think about what is different about this particular story. When was it going to be set? Initially, what I was thinking about it, I was thinking of studying it in May, because there was a certain event that I was thinking about centering around, which I won't spoil because I may end up in another book eventually. But it ended up happening around the moon festival, and I realized that actually would be a good marker for them to all come together. And I liked that they weren't too much older than they've answered the first book. Sophie, David, really. There's still just a lot more for them to work through. And that intensity of having it all happened within weekend, I think was part of what made it fun to write. Yeah, and so your second book center is on Xavier and Sophia's dual narrative. And I guess you mentioned a little bit about why you chose these two characters, but I did find it really interesting and fun that the second book is kind of like the reception story for the two and tech in this last hot mess characters of the first book. Yeah, it's a second chance romance, for sure. That's right. So how was it developing that? The trick with second chance romances, there's a reason why it didn't work out the first time. So that is totally how I feel about second chance romance. So I'm actually quite skeptical. I usually feel like exactly what you said. There's a reason that they broke up in the first place, but with Sophie and Xavier, a big part of the reason why they didn't work out as neither of them were real with each other. Neither them really knew who they were, but Xavier has this really thick shell that he doesn't let anyone inside because he's learned to hide his whole life. He had a highest dyslexia from his own family and he can't read in this high performing world. And so that's just his MO. And same with Sophie, like she had this front, this perfect ride kind of front, right, modern perfect bride. And as she learns to just kind of be her real self and embrace that. And same with Xavier as he learns to let people in to let Sophie in, then they actually are able to come to a deeper deeper sense of each other and who they are together. Yeah, and what I love about both of these characters is they see the world in different ways than they ever did. And the way you wrote each character and how they see how Xavier sees the world and vivid colors and in art palettes is really interesting and also sounds really hard to do. Did you have a hard time kind of putting yourself in the mindset of someone who sees the world in a different.

Taiwan Abigail hing Wen Xavier The New York Times boba Sophie Xavier Rick Abigail Marvin Sophie Taipei Santa Monica bin D.C. Philadelphia Wong New York Dartmouth Philippines Indonesia Sophia
"abigail" Discussed on Books and Boba

Books and Boba

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"abigail" Discussed on Books and Boba

"And we are here for another great author interview. This week we have cooking when the author of love what reunion returning to the podcast. She was on a few years ago to talk about the launch of her previous book level type a mobile is the sequel and we're so excited to have Rebecca's man, she has a really good run between then and now. Abigail is our second boomerang in our show. And yeah, like just looking at the trajectory of debuting to getting the film adaptation to writing her second book, it's a lot. Yeah. We catch up on just like how she's been. What it was like, writing her dreaded second book syndrome, novel, and yeah, I was really excited to talk to her. Yeah, when we interviewed her for her first book, it was like a week before the launch of her of local Taipei. And it debuted on The New York Times Best Seller list and we take full credit for that. Oh my God. Just kidding, just kidding. We take partial credit. But I was really excited to read her second book. Love what reading takes place a few months actually after loveable Taipei. And then falls to the secondary characters from the first book Xavier and Sophie, who interesting enough were the closest thing that book had to antagonists in the first antagonist. So it was really cool to see their redemption arc slash second chance romance. Taking place over a weekend in Taipei this time. Yeah, so we talked about all about how she came up with her ideas for the book as well as catch up with the.

Taipei Abigail Rebecca The New York Times Xavier Sophie
 Biden puts focus on drug prices as he tries to revive agenda

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

Biden puts focus on drug prices as he tries to revive agenda

"President Biden will be pushing for legislation to lower drug costs during a trip into central Virginia today the White House says president biting in rural Culpepper Virginia is calling attention to the unacceptable cost of medications in December he said we're going to end the days when drug companies can increase their prices with no oversight and no accountability limiting the prices of prescription drugs is one of the more popular items on his domestic agenda president Biden will also be promoting the congresswoman from that district Democrat Abigail span burger is in danger of losing her seat in the November elections I'm

President Biden Virginia Culpepper White House Abigail Span
"abigail" Discussed on Forever35

Forever35

02:21 min | 1 year ago

"abigail" Discussed on Forever35

"Out in March and my critique partners Stacy leaves luck of the Titanic, which just came out in May of last year about 8 Chinese who are on the Titanic and were written out of history, so she's in your life into them given a space in the world. That sounds really cool. Oh, that does sound really interesting. Wow, okay. That's a great recommendation. Thank you. I got to get reading. Do you read do you read a fantasy in your spare time still? I actually end up watching a lot of movies now. A lot of movies and TV shows because I've been moving into that space. So I joke that it's research for me, but I'm secretly addicted. That's fair. That's allowed. Well, I mean, this has been so great to get to talk to you, especially you are doing this at 6 30 in the morning, your time. We should say. This is probably the earliest anyone has ever joined us on the podcast. So you get a special award for that. Thank you very much. I don't know, that's my pleasure. I really love what you are doing and I'm excited to have a chance to chat with you. So your book, your second book, the SQL to love boat Taipei just came out in the last 24 hours based on when we think this podcast is airing. Where can listeners find you? I mean, obviously your books are available everywhere in anywhere, books are sold. But where can we get more of your life? So I have a newsletter. I sent up here at a date. You can sign up on my website, Abigail hinge when dot com. I am also a social media pretty much everywhere. I'm most active on Instagram for the book world. So that's, again, Abigail hinge when everywhere. And yeah, thank you. I'm just so thrilled that this book is out in the world. It follows, as I mentioned, Sophie ha, the girl in tech, trying to marry her interests in AI with her girly interest in fashion. And Xavier yeh, who's another fan favorite as he's trying to get from under his controlling father's thumb. He's been forced to repeat senior year until he graduates, but really his plan is to get his trust fund that his mother loved him and get the hell out of here. So I'm excited for folks to connect with the stories and looking forward to hearing what my readers think. Well, congratulations, too. That's so exciting. Thank you. Today's episode is brought to you by calm..

Stacy Abigail Taipei Sophie ha Xavier yeh Instagram
GOP Leader McCarthy Spoke for More Than 8 Hours to Delay Passage of Spending Bill

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:43 min | 1 year ago

GOP Leader McCarthy Spoke for More Than 8 Hours to Delay Passage of Spending Bill

"Kevin McCarthy to his great credit gave the longest speech in house history yesterday. Trying to create the public media drum beat to try to have people start to actually care that the House of Representatives is about to embark on the most radical unprecedented? Public domestic spending agenda in the history of our country. Let's play cut 88 Kevin McCarthy. Nobody elected Joe Biden to be FDR. But AOC said I did, cut 88. It's no secret that this bill is too extreme, too costly. And too liberal. Just a few weeks ago, congresswoman Abigail spanberger said nobody elected Joe Biden to be FDR. AOC interrupts him and says, I did. That's that's what colleges create self centered individuals who are miserable. It went on last night where House Democrats started heckling Kevin McCarthy and saying I can't wait mister speaker and tells them not to lower their mask or they will get the fine play cut 98. After one party rule in Washington, the changed by executive order, I can wait mister speaker. They can finish their conversation. You can finish. No, you can finish. Don't lower your mask. You'll get fined. You're gonna get fined. I'm just warning you. Gentlemen will suspend. Kevin knows he's gonna be speaker next

Kevin Mccarthy AOC Joe Biden Abigail Spanberger House Of Representatives House Washington Kevin
The 'Moderate' Democrats We Need to Defeat Next Election

Mark Levin

01:39 min | 1 year ago

The 'Moderate' Democrats We Need to Defeat Next Election

"Tom milanowski Democrat New Jersey Lauren Underwood Democrat Illinois Sidney axe need Democrat Iowa Abigail spanberger Democrat Virginia Conner lamb Democrat Pennsylvania Carolyn Bordeaux Democrat Georgia Ron kind Democrat Wisconsin Lizzie pennell Fletcher Democrat Texas Hele Stevens Democrat Michigan Tom O'Leary Democrat Arizona Sheri bustos Democrat Illinois Matt Cartwright Democrat Pennsylvania Jimmy Gomez Democrat California Susie Lee Democrat Nevada Susan wild Democrat Pennsylvania Kim schrier Democrat Washington state Elise a slot Nick Democrat Michigan Stephen horsford Democrat Nevada Chris Pappas Democrat New Hampshire Colin allred Democrat Texas Elaine lauria Democrat Virginia Mike Levin Democrat California Charlie Crist Democrat Florida Peter defazio Democrat Oregon Tim Ryan Democrat Ohio And as they say the Amnesty provisions in the filibuster proof reconciliation package which only needs majority support the

Tom Milanowski Lauren Underwood Sidney Axe Iowa Abigail Spanberger Virginia Conner Lamb Carolyn Bordeaux Ron Kind Lizzie Pennell Fletcher Hele Stevens Pennsylvania Tom O'leary Sheri Bustos Matt Cartwright Jimmy Gomez Illinois Susie Lee Susan Wild Kim Schrier Stephen Horsford Michigan
"abigail" Discussed on Hearts Unleashed

Hearts Unleashed

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"abigail" Discussed on Hearts Unleashed

"Ask abigail anything. I really enjoy these episodes and funny enough. I think this is a repeat question. I might have answered this on an ask gal anything but i figured it is a year or more later and i probably have a little bit of a different answer. So we'll see all. I'm gonna wrap on it and then compare. I have three questions here today. Thank you to those of you. Who submitted and i have a little bit of like a combo questions. Lash answer to so the first question today comes in from gen english. The ceo of the gen life at the gen life dot com and she and i were jamming out in a call about started her. Starting a podcast. She is currently a productivity coach And that's me naming her not her naming her. She helps people get shit done. She's got the get shit done club. I actually just participated in one of the rounds myself. it's weekly accountability. And i've really loved it. I loved the community of it and the weekly check in and declarations of it so That's something that. I would totally encourage you to check out. And so her. And i were talking about starting a podcast and she actually message me about it. I was like we need to get on the phone about that. Because i love doing a podcast and it is a lot of work i do two episodes a week as many of you know. Two episodes a week for march through november like eight nine months of the year. I am podcasting and it's a lot of work. It's a lot of commitment. And so i wanna her questions specifically was if i wanted to start podcast like where would i start. And what supplies would i start with. So i'm going to answer that question. Really specifically i have this microphone. I'm kind of actually leaning. You might hear me leaning and looking. I was looking for the name of it. But it is located on Abigail gaz de dot com at the bottom. We have a shop tab. And i have all of my favorite goodies that i have so we have it linked there..

abigail Lash Abigail gaz
"abigail" Discussed on The Functional Tennis Podcast

The Functional Tennis Podcast

08:16 min | 1 year ago

"abigail" Discussed on The Functional Tennis Podcast

"Yeah i've spoken to a few comments. I mean i've had the privilege of walking with some of them are over the course of saltine tennis for example the the team for that was myself nick lester oven palmer and naomi cavity who were all very established commentators and i was kind of the new kids with their with the big dogs in our who knew what they were doing but they were really kind to me naomi cavity in particular has kept in touch and offered advice and let me use hers a sounding board and if i have questions like and nothing beats kind of hearing from people who've been there and done that and have taken the roads that you have already sar yard chats at a lot and they are me pete. Oranges has been really good to me as well. A lot of people will know pete. He's one of the big voices. Now i think particularly on the acp slide of plans yet. He's given me advice. I've done a bit of pulmonary tree with him and yeah. Hopefully as i keep progressing. I'll walk with more and more of these guys Yeah i respect for. I don't think people realize until they go to do it. That coleman tree is not so straightforward. Is it sounds obviously for people that go into. I mean for me. Y'all has come quite naturally still a long way to go but it is still is much easier to to listen to it than to do it yourself. And i have a lot of respect for the people that have have given me feedback and advice on who who teach me something new every time that i speak to them. Chris balas is another one. That's really looks out for me. Yeah i'm. I'm definitely still learning and grateful for the bits of feedback that i got along. The way just might be questioned for me on the head you not be repetitive. You know tink of different ways of saying the same thing. Because i know i list backed myself a podcast and you hear yourself saying words. So many times tried to put them out like so's one on and are very descriptive. It's trying to stop on. It's quite hard to do when you're on the job at the time when you're so involved watching the tennis that you forget and all of a sudden you go into repetition. Have you had to do courses or training for that just comes with practice and this is the big thing with with commentary. I'm not necessarily sure that you learn to do it. But as you do more of it you as you do it you don't. I don't think you take a course or something to become a common cesar Get on the mic. You do a match and you listen to other people. And that's that's how you progress at the end of the day definitely have had struggles with repetition and was that i use to death. Actually some of the players probably would giving me a bit of grief about an just ban. So of course there are was emphatic. I use them fats law. That's my favorite one at the moment. There's a lot of you got to be kidding. Me when someone has a good shot that kind of thing as these kind of things. That when i look back at matches the i've done i pick up on this. There was a time about a year. Ago where i was saying you are constantly and i listened back to the match and i thought good grief abigail. That's once every ten seconds. You just you take notes of that once you've taken north of it. You are more aware of it. So the next match. And i mean i nearly said it again. That is one of those things where at the end of the day. It's not going to matter too much but you want to keep it fresh. And you want to keep entertaining. Oh i think that's why it's so even though it's cringe-worthy at times so listen to yourself back because that's how you lawn. I think the biggest way you learn is a by doing and b by listening to what you have done an looking at what you can change for the future. Because i think there is some danger of just listening to other people and trying to model yourself on them then you become a carbon copy them and you. You lose your uniqueness and what you bring to the table. So i think the two best ways that you learn with commentary and my opinion is by doing and bu listening back true i think at the same podcast and here. You got. Listen yourself back because that's where you realize. Oh i still haven't learned you know you always on it. But i used to with ozzy open member driving a bit when it was on during the day and it had the country on the radio country and i i think wimbledon have commentaries well on the radio which i think is great because we all watch. Tv all day. Fortunately but what's the difference apart from the descriptive element of of radio. Do you one prepare radio over. Tv or preferred tv. And what are the major challenges in the differences. It's interesting because i've literally just done. Radio commentary for the first time. You mentioned that. I've just broken into atp. That's something i've been pushing for awhile. And i'd sids Cincinnati masters for tennis. Righty our last month. And it's a little bit of a culture shock compared to tv because with radi are you have to be high energy high intensity all the way along because you literally all the the consumer has. They don't have the picture they can't see anything else that's going on. They read everything from your voice. So you'll voice has to reflect at what point of the match. It is in our. If it's a key moment you have to share that. If it's a good shot have to reflect that. And you don't wanna leave too many gaps so the end of the day either because there's a lot of buzz on the background but they don't necessarily know what's going on so so with radar. It has to be constant constant constant all the way through the match and actually i did a week of tv strike after i did radar in august and immates. Tv feel sorry much more of a light job. I would say because i that following week after. Atp tennis radio. I had a week of league. And i was doing four straight matches day generally. Oh my are so i thought. Wow that's going to be intense but actually radio made it feel a lot less of a workload. I think with tv is more measures. Heads you've got to make sure that what you say is adding to the picture with radio. You are the one person describing with tv. Everything you say has to be adding to what the viewer is already seeing. They don't want to north That was a good backhand they saw. That was a good backhand. But why was it a good bag. You've got to elaborate. And that kind of thing. And i think with with tv you kind of set the scene. You give a background details. Radio people come to his show by show analysis. That's why at this point in time. That's my general view of it. As i say. I've not got as much experience radio at the mormon. I think i will be very at home with it. So the down the line a couple of other commentators said to me ahead of time that abigail. Up really good at radio because she likes to talk a lot. I took as a compliment. I definitely took more vacations to do. Well are yeah. I think the radio will quite suit me because you've probably walked sal. I don't really know when to stop talking. But i i do love. Tv as well. I was looking at moving into commentary at i think. Tv wants the big goal on radio is always to people. It's be- pretty tough job for one person like a horse commentator where you no one can work of the two works well for radio. Always car commentary on on radio when i started on tv. I was actually generally on my own for wpa matches sar. When i got to world feed coverage like team tennis on the french open. I had to get used to doing it with common sub. But yet radio's a big job. You have to do it on your own and actually. I'm glad that i was practicing at home ahead of time doing it. Completely all my arm because it meant the when you actually got doing it with someone else. It felt that easy outsider. Yeah it would be an intense job with with just the one person in the radio commentary booth nice and compared to somebody's played the tour. Some the who's coach players..

naomi cavity nick lester tennis Chris balas pete palmer coleman abigail ozzy Cincinnati sal wpa
Episode 52 My Relationship with Abortion and Planned Parenthood - burst 02

The Manic Pixie Weirdo

02:48 min | 1 year ago

Episode 52 My Relationship with Abortion and Planned Parenthood - burst 02

"Is gaping as a gaping hole in it. But that's not. That's not what we're here to talk about right now That's a different episode that we will cover at some point. Do not fear it really. It really affects those those socioeconomic groups and minorities allot those are the chew food groups. I guess that it will affect the most and who hot button issues. yeah so i was. I was about twenty. When i found out that i was pregnant. And i didn't find out that i was pregnant until the second trimester now. This is not true for every woman that gets pregnant. This is just happened to be true for me When i was pregnant the first time. I didn't show very much. I didn't it just kind of looked like i was getting a little bit of weight but i wasn't showing like my belly. Wasn't you know huge. I wasn't. I was definitely like eating more and iras lake more hungry I don't remember having any like weird cravings or anything like that My weight has always been like a really big issue for me We'll talk about that on a future episode as well but it never like it. Wasn't plainly obvious that i was pregnant. it definitely just looked like i had been you know gaining some weight which was normal. I later found out which is normal for For me my mom when she was pregnant with me Because i'm the oldest. She found out she notoriously has said that people asked her you know. Are you sure you're pregnant. Because she wasn't showing she just wasn't showing and i have met many many many other women who have had that same experience where you know your pants just kind of fit a little bit tighter and you feel like you're just kinda gaining weight. You're not you don't really know like unless you have a reason to now Or to suspect that that could be the case that you could be pregnant. You don't it's just not like plainly obvious. Let's just not something that you do and i especially. It didn't really occur to me to think that i was pregnant. Because i was on birth control I was taking the pill at the time. Ever this view. The don't know about the pill. I am not a huge advocate for the pill just because of my own personal experience of the pill You have to take it like every single day like at the same time every single day. And it kind of renders the birth control useless. If you like skip a day or you like don't take it at the same time and i was.

Brees Loveland Abigail Apple Texas South Alabama Bill
"abigail" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

07:01 min | 1 year ago

"abigail" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"So i get to get to have it. I get to feel it. I get to be with her. But then it's okay to let go. Yeah we did it. And it's a container but also it. It touches other people also as the hope that actually was kind of an amazing demonstration of something that i was going to read to you. Bela this was somebody. This is from a blog called the rabbis pen. Have you ever heard this. My crack producer lily found this for me. Spiritual reflections on bailiff deflect tones by a rabbi. I didn't. I couldn't find the rabbis name. Music is a language away. All right we'll take it with a grain of salt. Music is a language a way of communicating vehicle for bringing greater peace tolerance and humor into our own hearts and into the world. Music is a spiritual discipline and a great teacher. Great musicians like bailiff lake and the flick tones are also great teachers. Think of yourself. Everything of yourself. As a teacher i dunno. I know there are people that have that. Learn from what i do. And it's exciting to see people that have taken What i what. I what i do and built on it just the way i built on earl scruggs and tony trish trashcans so many people that i learned from. But i don't formally teach very much and and in the past mostly. Because i was just so busy trying to do what i what i've been doing. You know and but i actually love teaching. I think actually that active teaching and that spiritual discipline was also send you know in that music you just you just shared. It's like it was an embodiment of this. This person also said At the rhyming auditorium. Bela fleck took a few moments to honor one of his teachers later. Scruggs there was a palpable sense of reverence and holiness throughout the auditorium. As many of us understood the great love that emerges when true teaching and learning have occurred. Well there's a lot you can do with instrumental music. And and sometimes we. We tend to sideline it and think of it as background music or support for vocals a lot of times. I can't tell you how many times i've been playing with somebody for an audience and the singer sings and then as soon as we go into the instrumental part people start talking and doesn't matter who it is going to be with some of the greatest musicians in the world. It's like a a go to. That's not the main thing but you know go to india. You might have a very different experience of spiritual experience listening to music. Doesn't have to india wherever you wherever you hear it or even people hearing the great german classical music or chopin can have a pretty ecstatic experience through the works of human beings. But i think the the great ones are trying to access this feeling when they play and and the pieces that i've come up with it. That have a strong mood or that kind of a component. I couldn't explain to you what i was going for. When i was trying to write them. I might have found a sound that that expressed a feeling or mood that I tried to write a piece around. And i couldn't explain what that mood is even but there but if someone who listened to it would know exactly what i was talking about we Joined to a close. And we're gonna hear a little more music from you. I advocate one of. I often will kind of circle around to this question of What you've learned through the life you've lived about what it means to human. And how how. Perhaps that has evolved since your your early days things that you know now are believe now that we're experience now. That would've surprised you. Then i felt i feel abigail at. You've been really are about your wisdom. In the commencement address you gave a colorado college and also this beautiful. Ted talk that gave and i love for you to reflect on that question. I would also love for you to tell that story that you told in the ted talk The little girl because it seemed to be kind of a moment that crystallized that for you how you how you think about this big question of why why you're here and why you live your life the way do. I was in china after the the big earthquake in two thousand eight. I hope i'm right about that. The years are fine by now. I have a baby and they will continue to and with a friend of mine. We were making. David liang the shanghai restoration project. We were making a a record with the kids And this actually happened before. We came back to make the record. I went there just to see what i could do. Because i had spent a lot of time in sichuan My great teacher who taught me my tremendous love for china old lady wong is from sichuan and so i felt like i really had to go back to citronen see what was going on with people there and how they were recovering. Eighty thousand people died are the estimates and it was a lot more than that and a lot of people affected so i went around and joined a for a couple of friends who are doing a quick relief project and they said why. Don't you just come a music for for the kids at these relocation schools. They had been taken away from their families at at home because many of their homes were destroyed and they had the parents had to stay there and rebuild them so the schools move to other places and the kids were struggling so much they were not only taken away from their homes but they had lost a lot of members and they were living in these Temporary trailers in place. They didn't know at all with just their teachers their their their fellow students come play for the kids. And maybe maybe it'll relieve their. You know their their minds for a moment and just thinks music. So i did and had so much fun with the kids and at the end of my performances. The kids would always come up to me and they'd they'd say you sang for us now. We want to sing for you. You know and so most of them. I would listen to like ninety pop songs. Chinese pops on bill would it and it was very cute and fun But this one girl came up to me and she said Long bad year which means big sister..

tony trish rhyming auditorium earl scruggs Bela Bela fleck Scruggs lily india David liang lady wong abigail china Ted ted colorado sichuan shanghai
"abigail" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

03:39 min | 1 year ago

"abigail" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Has so <Laughter> lame. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Laughter> <Laughter> Sweet <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> your turn. <Laughter> <Speech_Music_Male> kahad <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> didn't <Speech_Music_Male> bring any tissues. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Male> They left leg. <Speech_Male> What <Speech_Music_Male> was the question again. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> What <SpeakerChange> is the banjo. <Speech_Male> Teach you about life. <Speech_Male> that's <Speech_Male> to do it. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Well you know. <Speech_Male> I don't know <Speech_Male> it's <Speech_Male> it's where <Speech_Male> i put my energy <Speech_Male> and i feel like everybody <Speech_Male> got a certain amount <Speech_Male> of energy in your life to <Speech_Male> devote to various <Speech_Male> things and i've been <Speech_Male> putting most <Speech_Male> of my energy into <Speech_Male> the banjo for <Speech_Male> most <Speech_Male> of my life <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> actually what's <Speech_Male> interesting. I mean i'm learning <Speech_Male> as much about <Speech_Male> life right now from <Speech_Male> having a child. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Abby and <Speech_Male> juno <Speech_Male> is <Speech_Male> great teacher. <Speech_Male> And i'm i'm <Speech_Male> what you call <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Taipei psychotic <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> musician. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I've lived that way up <Speech_Male> till now where i could. <Speech_Male> I could make music the <Speech_Male> thing the most <Speech_Male> important thing in the world <Speech_Male> and and <Speech_Male> and in a way. <Speech_Male> That's my job. <Speech_Male> My job is to <Speech_Male> and i know it's <Speech_Male> not make believe <Speech_Male> that the banjo <Speech_Male> and what happens with the banjo <Speech_Male> is like the most important <Speech_Male> thing in the world. And that's <Speech_Male> why. I'm <Speech_Male> that's what i do. That's my <Speech_Male> job. I that's the privileged. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Experience <Speech_Male> is just <Speech_Male> like a great physicist <Speech_Male> has to <Speech_Male> believe that's the most important <Speech_Male> thing in the world to <Speech_Male> kind of work he wants to do <Speech_Male> but once you <Speech_Male> have a kid all of a sudden <Speech_Male> it's clearly not the most <Speech_Male> important thing in the world <Speech_Male> and so there's a lot of growing <Speech_Male> up the comes with that <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Male> the challenges now <Speech_Male> are how to keep <Speech_Male> the commitment that <Speech_Male> i made this <Speech_Male> guy <Speech_Male> while keeping the commitment <Speech_Male> that i made <Speech_Male> to this girl <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> the guy who was the <Speech_Male> little guy. <Speech_Male> Yeah <Speech_Male> so the holy. <Speech_Male> The holy badger emperor. <Speech_Male> Yeah so <Speech_Male> that's a <Speech_Male> challenge but <Speech_Male> You <Speech_Male> know we're figuring <Speech_Male> it out together <Speech_Male> and i'm <Speech_Male> finding that it's okay not <Speech_Male> to wake <Speech_Male> up and <Speech_Male> go you <Speech_Male> know working hard music <Speech_Male> all all day <Speech_Male> and to stop and <Speech_Male> spend all morning with <Speech_Male> Watching <Speech_Male> this little kid full <Speech_Male> of wonder <Speech_Male> these things <Speech_Male> you know. <Speech_Male> That's <Speech_Male> the best i can <SpeakerChange> do. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Well <Speech_Female> it's great but <Laughter> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> it's been it's <Speech_Female> been a real joy <Speech_Female> and an honor <Speech_Female> to dive <Speech_Female> deeply into <Speech_Female> what you do and <Speech_Female> who you are and <Speech_Female> i'm glad you're on the world <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> thank <Speech_Female> you for making yourself <Speech_Female> available for this and <Speech_Female> thank you all of you <Speech_Female> for coming and now they're <Speech_Female> going to play some <SpeakerChange> music for <Speech_Music_Male> you do and <Speech_Female> who you are and <Speech_Female> i'm glad you're on the world <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> thank <Speech_Female> you for making yourself <Speech_Female> available for this and <Speech_Female> thank you all of you <Speech_Female> for coming and now they're <Speech_Female> going to play some <SpeakerChange> music for <Speech_Music_Male> us again <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> all right. <Speech_Female> This is an old <Speech_Female> song that was <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> recorded on <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> a porch in merle's <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and let south carolina <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> in the nineteen <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> thirties. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> A <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> the key. <Music> <Music> A <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> abigail washburne. <Speech_Female> Newest album <Speech_Female> is woo. <Speech_Female> Fey and abigail <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> washburne. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> It's a collaboration <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> with her longtime <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> friend. The renowned <Speech_Female> guchang player <Speech_Female> wu fei <Speech_Female> her <Speech_Female> <Advertisement>

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"abigail" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"abigail" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"That's kind of a century them where my mind went. Yeah let's let's and we got to do these state department tours. Us is usa which basically they call them propaganda tours but we got to go to india and bangladesh. We got to go to a lot of amazing places and at a certain point. I realized that we had like an ambassador status so I started cabling ahead and saying find me musicians. I want to get there. I wanna jam with somebody and and started They people would show up. We get to a country and get to play with these these people and we'd start out like what is what is this like abbie. What is why. Why am i here. Why do i have to do this when we start to play and the whole room would change. it was like almost the color changed from this dark to technicolor. You know like the wizard of oz you know when you landed is and so it was such an exciting thing that was part of what made me feel competent. That going to africa could be that way because it had that experience over over and over again and when the flood tones got the opportunity to do a trip like that to the pacific rim. We made it a point that every country went to somebody from the local culture would come on stage and perform with us and it broke the ice like like nothing. It felt so great to do but that was favorite part of the show obviously for the locals because we were celebrating their culture and we taken the time to learn something their music which was really Great thing we both came to the separately and it's one of the and then we found each other that That aspiration that very kind of american ambition you had to go to law school and make policy change the world. This is a whole other way in to the same thing at a different at a human level they let you have said and i do again believe you really said this that the first time you heard abigail music. You're listening in the car and you've got stopped for speeding. it was out out franklin. There was just so caught up and she gave me in fact i. It's not really the first time. It's been slightly sanitized story. But what the first time i heard her. It was at a party and she was playing these very very sad slow songs with a bunch of girls gathered around her and i was going. This is just not for me. You know it was really. It was really slow and it was beautiful. But i was like okay. She's good you know. But but then she gave me this. This cd at this party. And i started listening to it. And i had a completely different experience because the banjo is upfront. There was this group to it and she was singing like you just heard her with this. Ancient sound very connected to traditional music. And i just started driving faster and faster. Wow i really like this. I was even talking to myself. And then i got pulled over and had to walk the line. Well i'm going to do my radio thing now. I'm krista tippett and this is on being today with musicians. Bela fleck abigail washburne in a public conversation at belcourt theatre in nashville tennessee him. It seems to me. Bela that your story is also about kind of not as much as it's about traveling through places it's about traveling through genres kind of i dunno as old star trek lever. Taking the banjo or no banjo has gone before.

abbie bangladesh usa pacific rim india africa abigail franklin krista tippett Bela fleck abigail washburne belcourt theatre Bela nashville tennessee
"abigail" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

03:04 min | 1 year ago

"abigail" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"And she won. She wants but she was the only contestant in her age group but she finished she had a wonderful sense of humor as she was getting very old and and not remembering things and she'd get in the grandma loop where they say the same thing again and again you know did i order the omelette. I want the omelette. Grandma you've ordered four times You know she would laugh at herself. She laughed at herself until the moment she died. And we We love her so much. And so when. Juno was born which was just about a year and a half or two after she died. It was actually bela's mother who thought of the idea of great. If you're gonna write name yeah well and so think to this idea of reality and the truth in this music There's a story you told the first track on your new album. Which is your first or your first album together Is i've been working on the railroad. Would you sing in a minor key. But i love this. This story that you've told about how maybe this isn't true either. Correct me if i heard this on the internet or publicists rights alone so so that so you maybe you were traveling. Abigail your home. It's you know. And do know his banging on the table. Yeah and you got really about that which you know. This is a life lesson for other parents. Were not musicians because you thought. He's learning rhythm soon and banging in time. It was consistent time. Are you sure it's a fair question. But i mean what. I remember to somebody when i was learning to cross country. Ski in minnesota. Somebody taught me how to keep my pace by singing. I've been working on the railroad and the thing. I think a lot of people might think. Oh bluegrass music or folk. Music is not my music is not my taste and yet some of this music is like woven into our lives in ways that we don't ever don't even reflect on. Yeah i i. I don't think we'll let me put it this way. Some bluegrass music might not be your taste but some other bluegrass music might be. And if you just let the name bluegrass repel you because you just heard some bluegrass. You didn't like you'll miss out on a bunch of great music. And i think whenever we decide we don't like kinda music We're the one that loses because there's always something in every field. That's beautiful that that you would like. Yeah yeah and i it was just. It was kind of revelatory. Firming it to think about this when i was getting ready to talk to the two of you. This is not folk music. But the first thing i thought it was when we were learning baby. Cpr they taught us to sing staying alive. Actually stanley standard really does.

bela Juno Abigail minnesota
"abigail" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:13 min | 1 year ago

"abigail" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Abigail i know. You have a habit of bursting out into song spontaneous. Encourage you to do that tonight. Did you can dance anything that if you want to grab your banjo okay you know. We're we're i always start my conversation whether i'm talking to a physicist or banjo players they'd like a little bit about whether there is a religious or spiritual background your childhood and advocate. I'd like to start with you. You grow up in a few places chicago washington minnesota a little bit. I forgot that you were going to study than i. Oh my yeah. Well my grandmother who was in evanston illinois. Most of her life raised my mother. There unitarian universalist and i was raised from three to eleven years old in montgomery village maryland and the religious education. In that you you church. We actually went to everybody else's church. We learned about what it was like to go to temple or synagogue or mosque all kinds of different churches. And i was the kid in high school at instead of having band posters on my wall i had martin luther king jr. gandhi the united nations mural and instead of going to my senior prom. I decided to go to the united nations youth disarmament conference in canada. And i ended up coming back in time for prompt. Because a cute guy asked me but I actually did think that was more important. You know go to the un youth disarmament conference but So that's that was my my childhood as much as i should probably say and by the time i was leaving high school and going off for all the different adventures next chapter i i would say that i was I believe that my faith and my spiritual path was about cultivating myself for good action bela how do you think about the well. Would you think about the religious or spiritual background of your child. How do you think about that. Now you grew up in new york. I was raised a harmless heathen.

Abigail montgomery village evanston united nations minnesota martin luther king jr chicago illinois washington maryland gandhi un canada bela new york
What Is Going on With OnlyFans?

Savage Lovecast

02:04 min | 1 year ago

What Is Going on With OnlyFans?

"I was going to talk about the events situation at the top of this week. Show but the only fan situation seems resolved itself only fans is a platform where people can subscribe to content creators who then share exclusive photos and videos on the side. It's a site worth billions. Thanks to the sex workers and porn performer. The platform marketed itself to recruited when it first launched in two thousand sixteen and then a week ago only fans announced it was banning all sexually explicit content from its site because banks credit card. Companies processors were forcing them to they reversed course in a week. Only fans turned around and said a week later. Basically we hear you and announced that they weren't gonna ban sexually explicit content after all and would no longer be pivoting who. I don't know what what they plan to pivot to the week. Before last based tune teenagers doing lip syncs and cooking tutorials and other shit people can get for free on youtube and dick doc right now. How are you going to make money at that. But that was their plan a week and a half ago. What seems to have made the difference here. And what. I see as a sign of real progress the new york times washington post. Cnn daily papers. Npr mainstream publications went to sex workers and porn stars to get quotes about how only fans was doing to them. What facebook and instagram and craigslist had already done to them and how this being driven off the internet was making their lives harder and sex work more dangerous not a radical sex work not ending it just making it more dangerous. That's new and it made a huge difference. Abigail higgins has a terrific piece at the lily. Sex workers rallied together when only fans band sexually explicit content. They believed their voices are finally being heard. That's the headline. go read it. I'm not the only one who thinks that this new development reporters talking to sex workers about sex work is making a difference is creating some sort of seismic shift some

Dick Doc New York Times Washington Post Abigail Higgins NPR Youtube CNN Instagram Craigslist Facebook
"abigail" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

07:54 min | 1 year ago

"abigail" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"With. People in one embody myself and And and then who knew. I would end up marrying this guy flex place a lot of banja. So it's become my life. It's an amazing story. It's an amazing arc of the story. And i'm so curious about you at that time. Like were you really open to inspiration almost as a universal energy. Kind thing that you would you know. Give up something that seemed to be such an obvious career path like you had put all of this time into learning chinese and were going to become a lawyer like that seemed like a very strong a path and plan that you had in place like to stop this and to go. I'm going to have a crack at music and then for it all to just work out like this. Have you got a higher power of god connection that you that you live your life by is that is that a part of all of this. It is yeah. I mean i was raised unitarian-universalist which might mean something Someone listening but I was really focused on humanitarian humanitarian aspect of our divine Meaning and as i've gotten older i definitely continue to identify with the idea that there's this one unity of a tremendous there aren't just a bunch of separate realities of divine realities. I think it's all one one big piece. And that's the unitarian-universalist piece of it And i do. I speak to god i pray a lot i i would say i didn't do it then as much as i do now and i had children. I really needed someone to talk to. You know that wasn't human. And and so i started using the name god and i'm so glad for it It brings a tremendous amount of power. Because of the way it's it's been powerful. It's a powerful word evokes a lot So yeah i have a very very strong spiritual underpinning and i have very confused children. 'cause my husband is agnostic You know leaning towards atheism. So you know. I say a prayer to my children every night and their fathers like whatever. Let's go to bed but no. I definitely always had the sense that there there's greater power and i'm a part of something huge and a very small piece of it but everything i do matters and it has an impact and so if i can embody more and more in this is partly my social justice. Upbringing had mahatma gandhi and martin luther king on my wall you know that was my my posters in high school in the united nations emblem and So i was always thinking about. How can i be the change. I wanna see in the world happening. Be the things that will create the world. I want even very very very small way. And so i always thought to myself you know being able to be open to to the energy that makes us feel so alive and purposeful not shutting out because we have other ideas so when i started to feel that he in my body knew this was so special. I couldn't ignore it. I said this is. This is a sense of This is a sense of knowing. This is a knowing. It's a different knowing than our intellect. But it's a knowing that i need to. I need to pay attention to. And i would say it's knowing that's more connected to my divine nature Not that intelligent assistant find either but a letting go a letting go and surrendering to an idea. That isn't mind that wasn't my intellectual idea so i will say that. I mourned and grieved many times periodically throughout those first five. Six years. dedicating myself to music The the the loss of what i thought i was going to become and the loss of connections that were hard to maintain because i had not chosen the path of going to go into china to do what i thought i was going to do. So yeah there was a lot of grieving. That loss Ah simultaneously very exciting. Things kept happening in. That heat was just was just constant. You know inside of me. Yeah did that connect with your question. That's an amazing answer. I'm stunned by the idea that you would grieve what you had lost. Because that doesn't fit with. The kind of hollywood narrative of i went to the ibm. I was offered a record deal boom married. Bela fleck and now he's off fangio's you know but i think that's beautiful because it's it's incredibly human to say wow at i'm eight valence. Like in boom. We add all these fans expect like babies and there definitely are a lot of banjos involved in my life. We'll get we'll get to the baby's minute Listening to inside the banja verse in conversation with abigail washburne. That's trump into What it's like been off the road. I'm i mean. I'm i'm dad i got. I got an eleven year old son. Who partly delighted that. I'm at home the whole time and partly disappointed that he doesn't get sleep on my side of the bed while i'm away. I'm sure you know like you've you've toured with juno and but now you've been at home for over a year i a you nervous about going back out. Are you looking forward to it or you kinda going. Wow this has been amazing. I'd like to do this the whole time. All of it you know what about you. it's a bit of both. I am excited to go back. And i'm nervous about it as well. I've loved being at home but my wife always called the transition. When i'd come home from tour is a bit like you know. Bano used to stay in a hotel for two weeks entity turned into a human again now. I'm not like bono on a lot of ways but it was the first couple of days where bit hairy and then and then we got intuition. This was the same it took a while but then this topless. But i'm also excited to go back. That sounds similar. We have a little boy. Theodore has a disease that's very rare. Chronic liver disease and ever. Since we became aware of his illness. I think it was almost two years ago now. We became fairly hyper vigilant about doing the most we can to make sure he's okay and that was even before cova so when cova came along it gave us even more reasons to be worried people but So i would stand still still really navigating what it looks like To be vaccinated adults with unvaccinated children and one of them who's heights high risk so I particular and going to.

banja mahatma gandhi martin luther abigail washburne united nations Bela fleck fangio Bano ibm hollywood china bono cova Chronic liver disease Theodore
"abigail" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

08:05 min | 1 year ago

"abigail" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"Thought to myself when i go back to china. I'm gonna bring my old time banjo with me and share music. That i've learned share a little bit about the history of american american early immigrants on the eastern seaboard through this music And that's going to be one of my offering says a cultural offering a cultural exchange a sense of my own identity in connection to my native culture. Yeah so that's how it all got started. That's that's the origin story. Forgot you know. Have you looked into your your ancestral background. And i asked that question. Because you know i'm irish. And we we tour within the circuit in america and so if people who identify very strongly as irish and they've had the dna tests and the whole lot in there like i'm seventy five percent irish twenty percent this you know and it's a real. It's something that struck me about america. Because i grew up in ireland and everybody in my family is back. Has anybody knows r- in ireland so it was never a question of where you're from. It's like from ireland. When i went to america everybody would say well. I live in minnesota. But i'm from x. y. Ins ed and mike great-great-great-great-grandfather was from here and and that searching for identity was seemed to be a very very strong. And i'm have you looked at your ancestral roots. An have that has that played into your understanding of american culture. Yes so. I live in tennessee now. But my father said the family settled from mostly from germany in minnesota and the other side at my mom's side of the family There's more There's a little less clarity about where they were. I only know because of tweet twenty-three testing What what. My ancestry probably is. And i didn't know how much french i haven't me. So my ancestry is really connected through the the pig farming of minnesota back to germany and through You know rail building and guess what were they i the became small business owners really in missouri Batch of mostly french and some german. So no i don't. I don't have specifically any celtic Well i i don't not at twenty three and me has let me know but i feel a very strong connection to irish culture and maybe it just feels like just one of the warmest feelings in the world for me is thinking about irish music. Feeling that drive and beauty and the The balladry in my mind being there on you know soft days and eating brown you know just having a just the whole the whole thing is really special to me and i wish it was in my blood and i. I assume there's been intermixing at some point. But no i'm i'm not specifically connected. Irish industry whichever an awareness then with an old time music of the place of irish immigrants. We'll certainly there are songs that when passed along orally people say this. This came from. I singing tradition. Or this likely. There's a lot of Disagreement to whether it would be irish. Your scotch you know the. There's some claiming of things that goes on. That i can't i can't see through you know But no a lot of the music that i've learned. There's some kind of strong tie back to ireland or scotland. It's not quite as acknowledges much what would piece is english but notice. There's a strong identity identify identifying with irish scottish culture and west african culture. Although we're a little less connected in the community that i'm into what specifically those like the the different Aspects of the culture that were brought here other than what we know about the ban show. And it's it's Contribution there's also the goal of people and the early songs on the plantations that have become a major part of of The canon of music that we do so yes it does feel like what. I'm in my awareness. It's irish scotch and west african. See i would. I would connect very much with what you were talking about earlier in that and i. I'm the first irish banjo player. Why would have heard bluegrass. Like you. Know the straight up bluegrass. But when i heard old bella read are all about read singing. We recorded one of her songs and our first album for that reason which you did that. going to write me a letter and there's a there's an earthy raw quality that music that drew me and immediately and it just created layers in my own understanding of the banjo. That had never been there before. Oh neat yes. She's been a powerhouse for me to. I'm getting ready to record 'em for the second time my epitaph by her just beautiful piece Yes so but the idea that you hear something And i love the way you put it that it creates these new layers of topography in your mind about what it is that you're doing yourself with your instrument. Yeah i i think what you see what i've got from. You're playing is what i discovered old time. Music is that there's a death and the layered quality to the simplicity. Whereas before i would have always tell us i need to be super complicated and put in lodz roles and a hundred triplets in order for it to be banjo music and then it was like no this like two notes as magic yes. That's exactly what i was drawn to. Two and i think part of the magic and you know this well. The one of the main differences between how usually a bluegrass player would approach Their their instrument and how an old time banjo player would approach. Their instrument is Thinking more about tunings and open tunings in old time music and the idea that you actually played less and yet the Allow residents of the the full string to ring out more It's like trying to back in. You know this the ancient tones to come forward. Whereas i feel like bluegrass more of trying to push forward push forward with technical ability and performance ability and an old time. We're reaching the past to pull forward what should never be lost. The basic residents of the string itself. I love that that's really good. He should write that down really. You're listening to inside the bond jobbers in conversation with abigail. While i'm in a marriage that brings together in banjo. Reality those those two perspectives. Because i'm married to bela fleck. Who says berry forward pushing banjo player. Who says hey this. Banjos amazing connection to our past book. Look what it can do you know. Look what it can do going forward. And i'm more of a person that goes. Oh my gosh. let's reach back. Let's stay there you know that. That's my magic. Spot is being in this this the voices of the ancestors and that that sound of just a just the string itself ringing. You know So yeah he. And i are really interesting pair. We we do dwell in this space lots. That's probably why some vocabulary for.

ireland minnesota mike great america germany china tennessee ed missouri scotland bella lodz bela fleck abigail berry
"abigail" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

07:44 min | 1 year ago

"abigail" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"American ambassador's residence in dublin. A couple of years. Youn- baylor plate. And i was blown away was was christmas time. We were all dressed up my wife. And i my brother and his wife. We all got dressed up with big christmas tree. We got a photograph of the christmas tree in the basque. And you guys play and it was amazing. That was oh fun. We have the fondest memories of that I remember Kevin o'malley was the ambassador at the time. I don't even know there is a bessette right now to you. I think trump got rid of ambassadors. Half of the ambassador still button. I think one has been appointed. But i'm not sure that's worth looking into how else i'll find out by now but kevin o'malley's children were so thrilled about his appointment that they moved over to be with him as well and they were grown. Grown children so brendan o'malley. His son started a program called creative minds. And it was. He did a lot of really really cool outreach in connection work and was exciting so but but that that show and then we stayed there. We stayed there with them. And we you know cooked in the kitchen with them with bev and it was just a delight but you know i feel like i remember meeting you that night. Did we meet reduce. Yeah indeed yeah. I feel like we were introduced That night and when you were talking about being all dressed up and being from the tree of yes okay it was. It was fabulous job. I began just to set the scene. Like take us back right to the very start. I know your story. Because i've followed it and i've i've listened to a bunch of your talks and podcasts because i just i love your music but i love your energy and your soul around the music as well but i'm really interested to hear it again in your own words about how you came to the banjo because it's not the most sad straightforward route. Maybe now it's not Will first of all. Thanks for connecting. To what i do and now that i've been able to perform with you guys. Listen to your music. We listen to you all the time and you become a part of our lives so thanks for for being Being in the community. And i'm just proud to be with you guys with you so You know it is so funny i. The story now feels so far away especially after this year of covert and the way I had i felt a need to invest time so deeply in just being present in the moment in my family that Now talking about myself and my story and my path to my career in banjo music is it's anyway. You're you're waking me up so right now. You're you're helping to wake me up in a way. I haven't been Awake in a while. So i hope i hope i. I hope it comes back to me the most of my concerns this year. Been around making sure. I'm making balanced meals and Homeschooling the correct thanks to my children. being safe and trying to understand what that is. Because there's a lot of mixed messages about that country particulars of But yes so the my path to becoming a banjo player. I didn't play when i was young. I didn't grow up in a family of musicians or folk music. It wasn't until i went to university. And i started seeing friends and i was dating a guy at the time who was in a bluegrass them and started. Learning mandolin. And in a couple of friends formed a bluegrass bands. A bluegrass band for you know. They had never played it in their lives. But suddenly became enamored with it. And i so i ended up being the merch you know the merch seller at their shows and listening to a lot of them playing bluegrass and i did love it. I really love the community that came together around. I loved how it wasn't just performance music but it was jamming music. It was music. You sit around and play together which i didn't grow up with. I really grew up in suburban. Mainstream radio hit america. And i wasn't familiar with that so that sense of of a grounded community Gathering around this well of music. That's towed by this incredible ancestral line of rich culture and heritage leading back to to to the ground the fertile ground you stand on you know it just blew my mind and i became very excited about it now. Bluegrass wasn't exactly what i caught onto. I felt it was even though. There are amazing people doing at the time that weren't men. You know alison krauss. Alison brown A good handful of people out there doing their thing rhonda vincent i. I still didn't feel drawn to the aesthetic as much as i felt drawn to an aesthetic that came to me through the world of bluegrass which was old time. American string band music rooted in Sort of anglo appalachian traditions also fell in love deeply with Ignite the you can separate them out but the the african in the history of american appalachian music too but it often was segregated in our history of the recording industry so it needs to be acknowledged that When i say anglo appalachian i mean what happened to the music because of the recording industry and because of a racist a racist world you know a racist system that we live in But those worlds started to really come together for me Race culture the melting pot of american early american history and our continued history in that sense because the the old time banjo became this window for me into the history of america and our immigrant populations and the way our modern history came to be through through that kind of immigration. So i felt really strong strongly attracted to the old time. Appalachian string band Music because of what it taught me about my own native culture and the music that was made with because it was really more focused on that sense of community and The world fault tradition and Sitting in a circle and just playing playing and playing And and bluegrass felt a little bit more. Like a kind of a stiffer format that you had to fit into and So i started playing old time banjo but it it was. It was not before it was actually hearten. Honestly the biggest reason the banja really spoke to me at that moment in my life. I think i was a junior in at university. Third year was. Because i've been studying chinese for two years and i fell madly in love with chinese culture. I was spending all of my time. And my energy trying to learn chinese late late in life and learn more about chinese culture. And i people in china would ask me when i was over. There doing Foreign exchange programs like what. What is the american culture. what is it about. And i'd never been forced to think about that before. Not forced but i never been in position. Where had the perspective that my own culture would before into someone else and i would have to explain it so that was a wonderful. Wake up. Call for me as well was. What is your culture abigail in who who are you. Where'd you come from. What is your identity. How does it compare to to to this culture that you're falling in love with an in the east you know and so that was a huge reason that i ag- lamdan to this old time banjo idea and.

Kevin o'malley kevin o brendan o'malley malley baylor bev dublin Alison brown rhonda vincent alison krauss america banja china abigail lamdan
"abigail" Discussed on Bachelor Happy Hour with Rachel & Ali – The Official Bachelor Podcast

Bachelor Happy Hour with Rachel & Ali – The Official Bachelor Podcast

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"abigail" Discussed on Bachelor Happy Hour with Rachel & Ali – The Official Bachelor Podcast

"Actually kicks in. Take advice absolutely adore abigail. Since the moment we had her on happy hour the first time around which feels like forever ago she just is such a sweetheart such a kind soul so i really help nothing but the best for her. If anyone messes with my baby you have to always such a huge fan of her on matt season. And she just had that america's sweetheart five. I love the coming into paradise. She's like i'm not just this sweet little thing and she was like i don't want to talk about hearing loss. I want to see me for who i am and she was like. I like to have fun. And i'd like to go out and i'm like heliang role. We're multi-dimensional around. Yeah well actually. I remember who. I was talking to one of the girls who is friends with who lives in new york. Maybe natasha. i don't remember but they they were saying that like abigail. There's obviously there's so much more to anybody that's On the show like you can't get to know anybody really for who they are in such a short amount of time but they were saying like how great abigail is in real life and like she's just fun and she's probably and she's outgoing all these things and so. That's why i love when people can do multiple seasons so you get to know them a little bit more for who they are. But also that's what's great about having them on the podcast so i'm so happy abigail could join today. I can't wait to share with you. Have in the next coming weeks. We're going to have some great guests and tna or just going to have the best ethene time recapping this season. It's going to be a little nerve racking for us but a may have to start putting alcohol in my coffee recorded. This is called happy hour okay. Birth and bailey's in the coffee have a memorial. Tony put the orange juice in you know. Hey this is work. It's never too early to drink to live up to the name so you know if you do it. I'll do it. We'll do it together. I think that was our motto for going into paradise two so literally you. If i go down you go down. Thank you for joining me today again. Like this is going to be such a fun season to do with you. Think goodness for you think you've gone through this before. So you can kind of Give me pointers of what to expect for paradise with this area back. But i couldn't be doing this without my girl. So thanks tia huge. Thank.

abigail natasha matt america new york bailey Tony
What the Infrastructure Deal Means for Energy

Morning Edition

01:33 min | 2 years ago

What the Infrastructure Deal Means for Energy

"I'm David Brancaccio. Good morning to you. There is now a bill crafted to spend nearly a trillion dollars on infrastructure in America. And while it could pass into law that is not a foregone conclusion. The bill, drafted by a bipartisan team working over the weekend was unveiled last night. It isn't quite 3000 pages long and amendments are expected. Senate Majority Leader Charles Schumer expects a vote within quote a matter of days. Beyond the roads and bridges. Let's look at cleaner energy products there in buses. Hydrogen power charging stations for electric cars. Marketplaces Amanda FEATURE has more on that. Before installing a new electric car charging station. Jonathan Levy says his company Vico needs to know there's plenty of demand. We don't want to overbuild the charging infrastructure and not have the vehicles to be using it. That's where those federal dollars would come in to pay for new charging stations in, say, rural communities. Paul Bledsoe with the Progressive Policy Institute says that new infrastructure would also get more EVs on the road. That's really the only thing holding back people from buying electric vehicles now is concerns over charging the bill. Also funds pilot projects like carbon capture, but it doesn't do as much for more mature, clean energy technology. Abigail Ross Hopper is with the Solar Energy Industries Association. We had our time in the sun as a niche kind of science experiment, but that's over and what Ross Hopper says the solar industry needs to do now is deploy. Deploy, deploy. What would help get more solar panels out there, she says, are permanent tax

David Brancaccio Jonathan Levy Charles Schumer Paul Bledsoe Progressive Policy Institute Vico Senate Amanda America Abigail Ross Hopper Solar Energy Industries Associ Ross Hopper
In 'Stillwater,' an American Oil-Rig Worker Seeks to Exonerate His Daughter

Weekend Edition Sunday

02:08 min | 2 years ago

In 'Stillwater,' an American Oil-Rig Worker Seeks to Exonerate His Daughter

"It's a familiar story. The stereotypical American goes abroad crass and brutally honest, but with a heart of gold, who breaks all kinds of rules to save the day. But while the new movie still Water may wink at this formula, it has its own story to tell about America's place in the world. You're innocent, so we gotta keep fighting. It doesn't matter that I'm innocent Dad. It's not about justice about finding peace. That's Matt Damon as Bill Baker, a former oil rig worker who travels to Marseilles, France, to see his estranged Daughter, Alison, played by Abigail Breslin. She's in prison accused of the murder of a local French Arab girl, but claims to be innocent, and Baker struggles with the unfamiliar language, culture and legal system as he attempts to free her The movie is out now in theaters and its director is Tom McCarthy, who won the Academy Award for best original screenplay for Spotlight in 2016. I began by asking him if the real life case of the murder of MEREDITH Kercher, which sent American Amanda Knox to an Italian prison in 2000, and seven before she was eventually acquitted. Inspired this film. I would say the seed was there. I started the script 10 years ago, Really? And I was sort of fascinated with that case, particularly the idea of An American student being imprisoned and then ultimately focusing on the relationship between as you point out her and her estranged father. So it started there and worked on this first draft of the script with another writer, and I just got into a place where it just was straight up thriller. I just felt it lacked dimension and Maybe authenticity, and I sort of put it down. I made the decision is director not to pursue it. Put it in a drawer for about 67 years and I picked it up again and I re approached it sort of from Page one with two new French writers. And we really talked right off the bat with Tamar. But again, in the way Debray about exploring the sort of you know all the dimensions of this story, the human dimension of it. The thriller Dimension suspends

Academy Award For Best Origina Bill Baker Meredith Kercher Abigail Breslin Matt Damon Marseilles Tom Mccarthy Alison Amanda Knox Baker France America Debray Tamar
Native Americans Being Left out of US Coronavirus Data

Native America Calling

02:15 min | 2 years ago

Native Americans Being Left out of US Coronavirus Data

"The number of american indian alaskan native people who have died during the coronavirus pandemic may never be known. A group of native journalists found that health privacy laws and breakdowns in local state federal and tribal data reporting systems contributed as christine treatment reports. This concerns tribal health advocates. Who say the lack of data impacts resources for tribal communities reporters with the indigenous investigative collective made multiple public records requests for death records in an effort to find a reliable fatality count. Those requests were rejected citing privacy. The collective has found data problems exist. Nationwide as of june second the center for disease control and prevention estimates that more than sixty five hundred american indians and alaskan natives have died from covid nineteen the highest rate of any ethnic group in the us. That estimate likely falls far short of the actual death toll. The urban indian health institute in seattle washington is one of twelve nationally recognized tribal epidemiology center's director abigail echo hawk. Now we're showing as highly some of the highest Death rate is a gross undercount. That undercount leaves researchers and epidemiologists completely in the dark when creating practices and policies to deal with future pandemics tracking indigenous covid. Nineteen patients accurately would involve the entire health system including the indian health service tribal facilities urban indian health programs private clinics and other non ihs facilities elizabeth fowler. Ihs director says they're not tracking covid nineteen deaths because they want to avoid under reporting you relied and use a reported by ec that lack of good information can make things difficult for tribal nations. Caroline angus horne buckle with the national indian health. Board says nations need real time accurate data to protect their citizens. We're not capturing of impact and we are not capturing all of the death for american indians and alaska natives the truth. Pitcher is actually worse than what the data tells by

Urban Indian Health Institute Tribal Epidemiology Center Abigail Echo Center For Disease Control And Christine Elizabeth Fowler Seattle Washington Caroline Angus Horne IHS National Indian Health United States EC Alaska
Indigenous Fashion: The Politics of Ribbon Skirts, Runways and Resilience

Unreserved

02:34 min | 2 years ago

Indigenous Fashion: The Politics of Ribbon Skirts, Runways and Resilience

"Abigail echo hawk is here to talk about a ribbon. Dress a traditional symbol of healing. But it's not a typical ribbon dress. She's the chief research officer at seattle indian health board and the director of the urban indian health institute in march of twenty twenty in the early days of the pandemic. She reached out to her federal health partners to ask for some more p. p. e. so the institute could continue to serve the native population in the seattle area instead of receiving masks and testing kits. She was sent bodybags abigail ponti and joins me now. Welcome to the show abigail and so excited to be here. Can you take take me back to that moment. When you opened up the box with the body bags and what happened we had gotten noticed at a large box had arrived at our clinic. We ran downstairs. We hoping for mask and when we opened it up what we saw instead was a box of bodybags. It was absolutely devastating. I remember taking one of the body bags out of the box. In the toe tags fell out of the bag and instantly there were tears in my eyes. Because all i could think about was the elders. I had seen upstairs. Wanting to get tested of our providers were showing their own mass of our executive leadership team. Who had started washing the scrubs of our providers at our own homes in order to ensure that they had what they needed. And when we asked for help bodybags is what we got. What did you think about when you saw what your federal health partners had sent you. When i saw what they had sent us. I wish i had been more surprised. Unfortunately i wasn't as we look at. How the federal government in the united states has provided the treaty obligations for american indians alaska. Natives we know they haven't and in fact they have never fully funded our healthcare systems and as a result of that we've seen our people have high rates of disease. We've seen our people die. And when i thought about it it was almost the perfect metaphor for what the federal government has been doing to us for centuries and that is giving us the thanks to bury our people in and not giving us the resources so are can live. When did you get the idea to transform the body bag into a rib andress. I've been working in healthcare for really long time and it's hard i have seen people die. I've seen are people not receive the resources that they need. And sometimes i'll drive home from my work and just cry all the way home and so i've had to find ways of coping with the trauma that i experience as an indigenous person working native healthcare. And so. I use the cultural traditions. That i have been taught by my aunties my relatives by my

Abigail Echo Seattle Indian Health Board Urban Indian Health Institute Abigail Ponti Abigail Seattle Federal Government Alaska United States
OL Reign Land Bouhaddi and Marozsan on Loan From Sister Club Lyon

WNBA Nation

02:02 min | 2 years ago

OL Reign Land Bouhaddi and Marozsan on Loan From Sister Club Lyon

"The day we record this oil grain decided. They wanted to kick off the week with a bit of of a blast. Bit some fireworks to pretty awesome acquisitions or at least on loan acquisitions for the club which may not affect the challenge cup but will definitely affect the incoming year for oil rain I'll get over to you to give us some of the download on that okay. So this was big news. When leon got the ownership of of the rain we wondered what the implications of this would be is assistant vestments are. They're going to be recruiting opportunities. More money into the club. What is really look like right. As as of the day were recording. We saw some big news. That two of leone's players sarah body and a jennifer marijan are going to be playing for oil rain over the summer as soon as the season wraps up. This doesn't necessarily impact the challenge cup. But these are two of the best players in the world. Budi especially. I mean i would argue the best goalkeeper in the world This is huge for the rain. In the off season we saw some rain. Players go over to france and train with with leones team which was a huge benefit to them. But now we're seeing this as as this mutual partnership is talent sharing situation so not only. Are we seeing financial investment. Were seeing now. Some of the best players in the world coming to the nwa sell like we talked about this before. Steve about A lot of the american players. Like sam you is abigail. Kemper rose lavelle going overseas and leaving the nwf. But now we're seeing kind of the inverse happening. Yeah i think this is huge news. I mean the rainer ascendant as is but to get. This news is

Jennifer Marijan Budi Leon Sarah France Kemper Rose Lavelle Abigail NWF Steve SAM
Capitol Police Officer Killed in Car Attack Lies in Honor

Chicago's Afternoon News

00:32 sec | 2 years ago

Capitol Police Officer Killed in Car Attack Lies in Honor

"Capitol police officer Billy Evans, who died last week when he was attacked by a man who rammed his car into two officers at the Capitol. Evan's body lie in state I should say in honor at the Capitol Rotunda today, President Biden spoke at the service addressing Evans, his wife, You're gonna make it Holding each other together, most importantly but holding Logan and Abigail as tightly as you can. Because so long as you have them you've got Billy assed

Billy Evans Capitol Police President Biden Capitol Rotunda Evan Evans Abigail Logan Billy Assed
Slain Capitol Police Officer Will Lie In Honor In The Rotunda

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:13 min | 2 years ago

Slain Capitol Police Officer Will Lie In Honor In The Rotunda

"News. The veteran Capitol police officer who was killed at a security barricade last week, will lie in honor in the Capitol Rotunda next week on Tuesday. Today. Billy Evans, his family is remembering him as a warm, funny, caring man who relished bringing people together. Picture accompanying his family statement shows Evans with his arms wrapped round, his son and daughter dressed for Halloween. It says Evans most cherished moments were spent with Logan and Abigail having lightsaber duels and building with Lego. They recently finished the Harry Potter series, noting his great pride in being a U. S. Capitol police officer. The statement says, friendships Evans enjoyed with fellow officers were one of the best parts of his job. We hold them in our hearts as we know they acutely share our grief. Christi King wt open in and we are also learning that the knife used in the attack was bought the same day at a store in D. C. The owner of District cutlery in Union market confirming to us that suspect no Green bought it from his store. Shop owner Derrick Swanson, telling us Green was calm during the transaction, and no red flags were raised. Knife cost $300 and is considered what's called a delicate knife that you might see when it cover Turkey. Swanson says Using such a weapon in the stabbing could cause the blade to

Billy Evans Evans Capitol Police Capitol Rotunda U. S. Capitol Police Christi King Abigail Logan Lego Harry Potter Derrick Swanson Green Swanson Turkey
Capitol police officer to lie in honor at rotunda April 13

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:43 sec | 2 years ago

Capitol police officer to lie in honor at rotunda April 13

"Officer who was killed at a security barricade last week, will lie in honor in the Capitol Rotunda next Tuesday. Today, Billy Evans family is remembering him. As a warm, funny, caring man who relished bringing people together. The picture. Accompanying his family statement shows Evans with his arms wrapped round, his son and daughter dressed for Halloween. It says Evans most cherished moments were spent with Logan and Abigail having lightsaber duels and building with Lego. They recently finished the Harry Potter series, noting his great pride in being a U. S. Capitol Police officer. The statement says, friendships Evans enjoyed with fellow officers were one of the best parts of his job. Quote. We hold them in our hearts as we No, they acutely share our grief. Christi King. W T o

Billy Evans Capitol Rotunda Evans U. S. Capitol Police Abigail Logan Lego Harry Potter Christi King
"abigail" Discussed on Blackout Podcast

Blackout Podcast

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"abigail" Discussed on Blackout Podcast

"Why wouldn't you just go ahead and do it like you can. I know you're not afraid of failure. I am a terrible self critic. And a i just find taking risks like that really really difficult because on the perfectionist. I would never say a piece of arts finished in less. I think it's perfect. That's my gold standard. You would never show like a process photo like. Would you have like on my instagram. Oh oh halfway through a piece. Because i'm confident that it's going to be what exactly how i want by the end is but that's the way i operate like i'm not gonna put my name on anything. Either things like top quality right so with the say if i started a podcast i'm instantly kind of feeling like i can't find people to interview if i'm not good at what if i run out of energy and enthusiasm and i just told myself foul of anything but i feel like life is pushing me in this direction where you go to just do this and and part of the processes me facing some of these fears of mine but also when it comes to being three all of your life so it's obvious the obvious reasons why you can't make this. I'd like oh. I comic it or all these other. Things haven't really done any of them so it is okay to like not be this level. Good at those well. That's that's a really good way of looking at. It is just i struggle to look at it that way and i struggled to like believe that montezuma's him for something. We'll keep it going through the times where i feel like is not working writer. Book what would your out of..

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"abigail" Discussed on Blackout Podcast

Blackout Podcast

04:27 min | 2 years ago

"abigail" Discussed on Blackout Podcast

"I like to have it kind of emerging from the shadows but also a bit of light is well so some things that catching the light. That's kind of new new technique sore. You're totally me. I really don't believe this one though. When i think when it comes withdrawing like you can put you have to have eats in you really 'cause like even tribal one thousand dollars a moment of able to make this night. I don't think so. 'cause like i try to draw a line the same about music all look a musician and go and it's probably true that i've been della certain set of cards. That's my biology. My parents are both artists. I'm going to have a disposition towards being on. I can either take up or not. You still have to put the time in unavoidable But i think there's definitely certain talents like my kids now draw and they are kind of the best drawers in that class. Whatever and say okay. That code has been dealt to them as well by thing. We'll i'm starting to realize as i hit like forty one now is the i got this of cards. I feel a sense of responsibility to do something with them. I don't want to bury the talent as people say. And and what other cards are there like. What else do. I have a responsibility to actually use an not overlook and ignore because i'm at that kind of midway point where i done this for four years. I i got to be four. I got four years of being young. And now i get four years of being old. Which is whose idea was that. The anyway i do there. Is this benchmark where mike What else what else is there. I feel like. I need to take stock of the cards. I was dealt. What are you gonna do with them. A you an the hidden cards in the pack. And you won't find out what they are until you press through and so i'm also exploring that because i feel like with the all i don't know where else it could go..

four four years one thousand dollars forty one mike both artists night
"abigail" Discussed on Blackout Podcast

Blackout Podcast

04:22 min | 2 years ago

"abigail" Discussed on Blackout Podcast

"Woke to blackout. Podcast wagon to talk to amazing people that meeting things in today have lower. Thank you so much work around the blackout broadcast. So let's start with it. How do you get into making your like. How do you be stuff where you started. Probably at the age of three. When i was actually schooled it meant. I got to spend a lot of time doing whatever i wanted to do. Not ended up being sitting at the kitchen table drawing a eight hours. A day often. And i did that. I probably put in a thousand hours by the thomas. Fifteen so from three until fifteen. I was literally beavering away. Drawing non stop by never had any. My parents were artists by never had any lessons like formal art training. So i would definitely be an advocate for practice. Just put in those thousand hours so like your parents is. At odds is a pain draw. My dad was an architect an inventor and my mom was a more classic artists like oil colors and oh man peak news massive news. Totally different from my different. In fact i grew up on the kosovo and gauguin and artists that were far more colorful and impressionistic or even like abstract so. I didn't actually feel very comfortable about my type of it. Wasn't it wasn't a as celebrate because i'd grown up with my influence being more like abstract to than i would draw like love find detail but it wasn't what was around me so i almost felt like not one hundred percent comfortable not hundred percent proud of what i was doing because that was not why was surrounded with so it took me until i was thirty five because i had a fifteen year gap where i didn't do any all at all so fifteen. I'm mastered realism. I had that moment. Fifteen where i was drawing. I was drawing a drop of water on a goals arm. And i could actually draw what was in my head and it was this synergy..

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