27 Burst results for "Abia"

"abia" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

05:28 min | 6 months ago

"abia" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Susie, thank you very much. Susie Boyd's book loved and missed it was out in the summer, and the paperback will be available in the new year. The beer akram is a Pakistani disability rights activist. She's the founder of the national forum of women with disabilities in Pakistan and a leading figure within the disability rights movement in the country, as well as in Asia and the Pacific. And she's now been named one of the BBC's 100 women in 2021. She joins me now. I feel welcome. Can you tell me a little bit about your upbringing and what it was that made you want to become a disabilities rights campaigner? Thank you so much. Thank you. I think from our perspective, the civility is this at different lifestyle. And how we are bringing that obviously most difficult and challenging when I started the work because most of the women I would say before the medical based approach of people will not recognize as the human being. So for that, this has started the work in the disability sectors since 1997 and I thought they are not the only one in this world who are facing the discrimination and the challenges because of my disability because of the background in all, but it's really important to see there are 1 billion people with disabilities around the world. And 50% of them are women and girls with disability. And more than 80% they were living in the global south who were facing all the challenges and the discrimination in their life. And they were like struggling for the basic health education employment opportunities and during the disastrous response that recently in the COVID response we have witnessed like women with disabilities are the first one who are facing the gender based violence, sexual harassment. And they would like the completely ignored by the family members and people will bring that our daughters die before we die because nobody is going to take care of them. And they don't have the support mechanism by the state by the government or the locally organization that are not supporting them to how we can protect the rights of women and girls with disabilities. I think your question like I would say it's support and also the economic men and I of a lot of other women with disabilities from their everyday experiences has given me that power to work on the right of women with disability and collectively with sightseeing was we are working to make that more visible visibility of the disability in the overall development and how we can make their voices more visible and they can be included in the overall development. Appear your background, you are actually able to get a mainstream education, which I gather as something that is very often not available to disabled women or disabled anyone who's got disabilities in Pakistan..

Susie Boyd national forum of women with d akram Susie COVID Pakistan BBC Pacific Asia
"abia" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

02:56 min | 6 months ago

"abia" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"The other thing that comes through in this book is that it's really about it's about love, all different types of love unconditional love, that kind of nasty love that's difficult and people who are hard to love. It is clear something you're very interested in. Yes. And the idea that people may not seem to have earned our love, but they still deserve it, and I wanted to be very respectful to all the characters in the book. And obviously any book that's written in the first person, your very aware of all the other books that might be hovering in the air, Eleanor's story, for example, we never hear and her version of events would be completely different. There's quite a lot in the book about how feelings of shame stop us from full disclosure and prevent us from being completely honest, and that that's a sort of theme in the book. The other theme is friendship, old friendships between women and what happens as well when trouble comes to those friendships and Ruth's friends want very badly to help her, which I'm sure we've all been there, but they're not. They don't always do the right thing. No, I'm very interested in the sort of cadence of friendship what it can run to how elastic and how sometimes our friends can seem to do almost more than our family would be able to. And how they can utterly save the day on a Monday and on Tuesday, drive us completely mad, so I want it to have that in. There is a one friendship in the book that grows throughout the book and by the end of it sort of takes on enormous levels of responsibility and yet still isn't immune to petty jealousies and things that shouldn't quite happen and things that have to be ignored and that cause eyes to roll when maybe there should have been more courtesy and so I'm very interested in the rhythm of friendship. You said in an interview that you're very Freudian in your approach to writing. And I know that's appropriate enough as you're the great granddaughter of Sigmund Freud. But what did you mean by that? Well, I suppose whenever I create a character, I'm very aware of how that character would have been brought up how their parents would have been brought up going back and back and back and how how the children sort of build the adults in the book. And so I suppose I'm always, there'll be a lot of history of the family that will be in the back of my mind that won't actually make it onto the page. That you could be forgiven for thinking that this book is bleak. And at times when I was reading it over Christmas, it did seem quite harrowing. But there's a lot of humor in it too in the way that Ruth views the world. I mean, she's constantly giving it the side eye if you like, isn't she? Yes, she is. She's both deeply impressed and rather unimpressed with life and her best friend genius extremely sardonic to put it mildly. There's quite a nice bit where Ruth has to go to a lot of funerals in a row, which is pretty overwhelming. And Jean, her friend says, well, at least they're not as bad as weddings because the damage is already done. I remember that..

Eleanor Ruth Sigmund Freud Jean
"abia" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

03:49 min | 6 months ago

"abia" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"And then when the priest gave the sermon, it was all about grief, which was very, very powerful, so there was a sense of this occasion that was filled with threat and peril but also tremendous consolation and when I got back to London I wrote the christening scene in the novel as a short story and then that sort of all grew from there. And it ends up that Ruth actually brings up the granddaughter her granddaughter. We've talked a lot on woman's era by about kinship care when family members bring up a child that for whatever reasons can't be with their parents. What does the arrival of her granddaughter lily mean to Ruth? Well, I suppose I've always been interested in all the different ways of being a family and that two sisters with no other relatives can be a family and a grandmother and a baby might be almost a couple. And I wanted to create a baby that was really, really spectacular, a lot of there's a lot of talk about babies being the last straw and ruining your sleep and having in your plans, but life with babies when it's at its best when you're almost in a swoon at that hot little limbs or the feel of that curls on the side of your arm or I wanted to bring some of that in and the side of babies that can be almost ecstatic at the sight of a cotton reel or a mushroom and that kind of thing that that's a very powerful thing to be around and it's very powerful for the Ruth character who doesn't find life the easiest, but really gets a lot receives a lot from the child who does seem to know how to live life. There's an interesting thing in the children being brought up by grandparents. Billy Connolly writes about it. He calls them granny's boys. He's very funny about it. Obviously, he naturally is. And, in fact, he was a granny's boy himself. It's that idea that children who brought up by their grandparents are slightly set apart, they have a slightly different upbringing. Definitely in about granny's boys they always say that they have the neatest hair in the whitest shirts. But I think even if you meet a 7 year old now, who knows tons about flowers and birds there's a big chance they'll spend a lot of time with their grandparents, and I like that thing of the sort of generational mix up that a child might know the songs instead of knowing the songs from the 90s and the 70s might know songs from the 50s and the 30s and that suddenly they're a little bit out of step, and often they'll hold on to values of kindness and courtesy that might not be so in fashion nowadays. Ruth's daughter, Eleanor is an addict that's the reason that she can't bring up her own child really. You don't write much about her journey from being a bright loving child. We know she was one. Into the desperate woman that she now becomes. Why did you not write about that? Well, I wanted to keep all that at the edge of the story really because it's.

Ruth lily Billy Connolly London Eleanor
"abia" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

05:10 min | 6 months ago

"abia" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"She describes her scars. From my belly button down to my toes, I've always said that my scars look like scrambled up tights. They feel smooth and normal. But not normal to look at. They've got lumps and bumps. But it looks like you weigh in a corset. And then you're slightly bitter and so when you see wearing a corset, it just goes tight, skin in. Yeah. It's really tight on my hips because I've got the scars going around my hips as well. Nobody's questioned it when I was wearing jeans, but you can definitely notice it from the outline of the jeans. It does make me feel uncomfortable sometimes because you think all people are going to notice because you are all oddly shaped. But yeah, it does play online sometimes. If I'm going to card if shopping, people will stay at you. How did it happen? When I was about one, a non member of my family put me in the bath and my birth mom came in and saw what happened. She dialed in 9. So the path was too hot. It was really hot. Definitely for the baby skin. It happened at 9 a.m. and I got seen at 2 o'clock, which led into dehydration and also there is effect in the brain as well in the lung difficulty sometimes. So it's not just like your physical appearance. How has it been dealt with? Well, I gotta move from the situation from a birth family. Because that's the story of the day. So now I'm adopted with a meeting parents. They've taught me from the start, what's happened, would you call a scar, would you call a skin difference? What would you like to be labeled as because people do like to label? I like to believe it as a boon survivor. Because in all victim, but you are a survivor of what happened in the accident. And that you've come out stronger. And so what's it been like growing up with it? As a child, it's been hard because you get children will be nasty and bullying. Remember this one lad, and he said that I had zombie legs. And basically I should have died in the bath. I remember my first day of high school I did what a skirt. I wore a skirt with high socks and these horrible club hoppers. You call them. 1516. I started wearing trousers. So I had to just hide it all up. And then you get your two teenage stage and I went really quiet. I didn't have the confidence to talk to people. I had very close friends and that's the way I dealt with it. I hit myself as well from the world, and then about 1821, I decided I me and this is why I should do. And what made you decide that? Because it just doesn't happen overnight, does it? No. I had a lot of talks with people that I'm Friends with this adult boons club. And the children's bones club as well. And I hear the story from somebody else. I thought my lifestyle that everybody accepted you for who you are. And I was really nice because then you could show off your burns. You can tell your stories. You can encourage each other..

children's bones club
"abia" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

03:25 min | 6 months ago

"abia" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"He messaged me last night and he wrote, I am embarrassed to say this, but it is true that I am nearly starving. A high typical is this. I mean, this is this is an educated middle class man who was in Kabul. This isn't a farmer in a drought stricken province. What are you hearing from friends and contacts in Kabul? Yeah, and I think this is what's been most devastating when I was in Kabul just a few weeks ago. I mean, you see very educated middle class families. And we mustn't forget that in the last 20 years, 60% of the population have moved into urban areas. Most people rely on bank accounts and salaries to survive. This is no longer a society that's relying on food security from farmland. The salaries don't exist. I mean, I spoke to health workers, female health workers, and the one thing that the Taliban has done is allowed female health workers to continue to operate and function in the hospitals and the health facilities. I spoke to one woman in a Kabul hospital who told me I live on top of a mountain. It's now winter and it's cold. It's freezing cold. So I slide down the bottom to the bottom of the mountain because of the snow. When I get down to the bottom, injured because she tumbles over several times. She can not afford 11 cents to get the bus to work. When she gets to work, she says to me that she used to be fed at work, but she says, now they can't even feed us out our lunch. And I said to her, why do you continue to come? It's been three and a half months, four months that you continue to come to the workplace. And she said, if I don't come, these children that are suffering from malnutrition will die, the ventilators will stop. The hospital will be dirty and if we don't continue to clean it, the children will die. And just to give you a sense, the hospital beds they were about 35 hospital beds in some of these hospitals in Kabul in Kandahar and Helmand. Children as many as 75 or 80 are in those hospitals. I saw mothers sleeping on the beds of the hospitals and on the floors because they were at capacity. So this idea that 97% of the population now are below the poverty line or 23 24 million people are suffering from famine. It is evident right across the board. You see hungry people, not just suffering from malnutrition in hospitals, but on the streets. I mean, I was shocked, I've been reporting from their country for 15 years. And I haven't seen the scale of hunger and poverty, which was so evident right from the youngest of victims right through to the oldest of people, the most vulnerable of people. Everywhere, right across the board, people were suffering. It's a grim picture. Thank you very much indeed for talking to us about it today. Well, it's still to come, we're going to be meeting Pakistani disability activists whose championing women and girls and working to change attitudes and lives. Akron has been named one of the BBC's women in 2021. Now we've been talking two women about their scars in a Miller went to meet Laura, whose 29 she's a care worker from South Wales, and she's a bone survivor..

Kabul Taliban Helmand Kandahar Akron BBC Miller Laura South Wales
"abia" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

05:13 min | 6 months ago

"abia" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Were really shocking, 97% of people there, he said, would soon be too poor to fend for themselves. I'm just going to read you a few lines of what he wrote. He said, by standing aside, we've not just taken leave of the country. Historians will look back and ask if we've taken leave of our collective sensors. Well, at women's art we've been keeping across the situation, particularly with what's happening to women and girls and the BBC's yalda hakim joins me now yelled welcome. Thank you so much. It's about a hundred days since teenage girls were prevented many of them from going to school at the time, the Taliban said that that van was temporary for the girl's own safety and they cited security reasons. Obviously, the fear is that it's permanent. What are your thoughts? Well, indeed, I mean, the Afghan people have a reference point. And that is the rule of the Taliban in the 90s, when they said that they were putting a de facto ban on girls education and women going to work because of security concerns. Now, those security concerns lasted for the duration of the Taliban rule that was a total of 5 years. The big question has been for the last more than hundred days now, a 104 days to be precise. Why this ban on girls over the age of 12? Why, when they put out the statement more than a hundred days ago that all boys across the country could go to school and girls under the age of 12 could go to school, why then this ban on teenage girls? And this really has been the concern of so many young girls young women who are not just banned from school, but also public universities. Kabul university, for example, remains closed. Girls and mostly women can not go to work. So there are huge concerns. I was in Afghanistan about two weeks ago. And I traveled from cardboard down to Kandahar to Helmand right across the board. There continues to be concern from women's groups from civil society about the future of girls education as well as women. This feels like such a regression. You know, we were told that this was a new modern Taliban and there is a real concern as you say that we're heading back to the dark days of the 90s when women and girls were basically moved to the fringes of society. Are the Taliban actually saying anything about this? I mean, are they giving you any explanations? Well, I interviewed everyone from one of the leaders of the Haqqani network and you'll remember the infamous Haqqani network were accused of being behind some of the huge large scale attacks on civilians over the last 20 years. I also interviewed the spokesperson of the foreign ministry and also the international spokesperson of the Taliban. They continue to say that women have the right to work..

Taliban yalda hakim BBC Kabul university van Helmand Kandahar Afghanistan Haqqani network foreign ministry
"abia" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

04:03 min | 6 months ago

"abia" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Now is and what we should see is what about the rest of the entourage who facilitated the grooming and trafficking and abuse of these young women and what about all the powerful men that were provided with young underage girls to write what about them? Are they going to be held to account now? You mentioned that this is one in a series of high profile cases recently. Do you think they really have a positive impact? Do you see more women coming forward and stepping up to go through what is a very harrowing process because of these high profile show trials that we can call them up? Yes, I think they are an important signal. They're important signal, particularly if you've been abused by somebody powerful to know that this is not the coming forward can result in justice. So I think it is important. And I think we have seen increased reporting because there is an increase focus and possibility of justice. But it is an incredibly tough journey to undertake. And we should absolutely salute the courage of those that do come forward. And they do so not just for themselves, but they do so because they know there are other victims out there. And that is why so many women put themselves through what is an incredibly tough process to try and bring as rapists sex traffickers and abusers to justice. It's a very adversarial process, and we understand, of course, that when someone has been accused of very serious crimes, there needs to be a robust process to make sure that the right person is being convicted. But is there, is there a way? That it could be done that would put less of a less onerous burden on those women and on victims, whatever their gender who come forward. Yes, I mean, I think that the process is incredibly brutal and in fact we are certainly in England looking at a whole range of different sorts of measures that can make women feel less like the ones on trial. And that starts at the very point at which women report that they should be taken seriously and believed unless there is absolute evidence that they're not giving a proper account that they shouldn't be subject to scrutiny as though they are coming forward to report for some ulterior motive. They should be they should be supported and all the way through the investigation process. They should be given much more support and they should the focus of these investigations should very much be on suspects not on the victims and in finding ways in which to support and corroborate their evidence rather than that the whole case is based just on them and finding a way to try and undermine their credibility. Harriet was from the center for women's justice. Thank you very much indeed for giving us your insights today. Now it is a hundred days since many teenage girls in Afghanistan have been banned from going to school. The Taliban has been in control since August and American and British troops pulled out just days before. It's very difficult now to see those hard won rights and opportunities for girls that have been accrued over decades slipping away. Yesterday, former prime minister Gordon Bryan, who is now UN special envoy for global education, said, we're sleepwalking towards the biggest humanitarian crisis of our times in Afghanistan..

center for women's justice England Harriet Afghanistan Taliban Gordon Bryan UN
"abia" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

03:37 min | 6 months ago

"abia" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Diminished and damaged by the abhorrent actions of Ghislaine Maxwell. I wonder what you think this verdict means for women being believed. Well, it's obviously really important that there's been an outcome and that these women have been believed. Of course, we've been here again and again and again in the last decade. We go back to the savile case. The max earth thing. You know, the recent conviction. There are a whole series of cases where women are now beginning to be believed in some of these high profile cases. That's incredibly important because, of course, for so long, powerful men in particular have relied on their power and their ability to continue to abuse because they can pay people off. They can defend themselves because of their power. And so the fact that there's some degree of crumbling of that ability to protect themselves and their power is very positive. But we must forget that we still facing a massive problem in terms of the day to today prosecution and convictions of sexual offenses and it's a huge problem. And there needs to be, you know, the sort of resources put into this case put into prosecuting all the other men who benefited from the trafficking that Maxwell provided that Epstein facilitated. And of course, just more generally to sexual violence cases. Ghislaine Maxwell was obviously very well known. She was already the daughter of a former press baron Robert Maxwell and Jeffrey Epstein and Maxwell moved in the highest circles of American celebrity. So this was always going to be a very high profile trial. Do you think the fact that she is a woman is important? Because it may be that there are people who feel that a woman is less likely to have committed these crimes and indeed, the girls themselves actually testified that one of the reasons they trusted her was because of her gender. Yeah. Well, this is a very common tactic of traffickers and abusers. If they can use a woman to lure in other women, then they will do. Precisely for that reason that women that young women may be more likely to trust a female, that doesn't make her crime more upon than the crime of the men that actually abuse and rate these young women. But certainly makes her very complicit in that. But the focus of her as a defendant because she's female and the way in which she's monstrous as a female. In some ways, disproportionate to the way in which male abusers are focused on. So that is not in any way to say her crimes are not very, very grave. But when a woman steps out of line and behaves in this way, she will she will be the focus of extreme media attention a monster rising..

Ghislaine Maxwell baron Robert Maxwell Jeffrey Epstein Maxwell Epstein
"abia" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

04:40 min | 6 months ago

"abia" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Now, as you'll have no doubt heard on the news Ghislaine Maxwell has been fine guilty by a New York court of sex trafficking girls, aiding Jeffrey Epstein in his abuse of miners. We're going to look at what this means for those women who came forward to testify, and the wider impact that this case may have, will women be more likely to speak out? Will they feel more likely to be believed? We're going to have all the latest reaction this morning. We'll also look at what's happening in Afghanistan. It's been a hundred days since many girls were banned from attending secondary school by the Taliban in the country. And the country is also facing a real risk of famine. Author Susie Boyd will be joining me in the studio to discuss her latest novel, loved and missed. And in our series on scars, we're going to meet Laura care worker in South Wales, he lives with childhood burns, and abiy Akron is Pakistani disabilities activist. And she's going to be talking to me about how she's working to change attitudes in the subcontinent and beyond. Well, as ever, we are very keen to hear from you. You can text a woman's on 8 four 8 four four texts will be charged at your standard message rate. Do check with your network provider, for exact costs on social media, it's at BBC women's hour and of course you can email us through our website. Now Ghislaine Maxwell is facing the prospect of spending the rest of her life in jail after a jury in New York, find her guilty of grooming and sex trafficking teenage girls to be abused by the sex offender Jeffrey Epstein. The 60 year old British socialite was convicted on 5 out of 6 charges, she's going to be sentenced at a later date. The jury gave their verdicts after 5 days of deliberations. Damian Williams the U.S. attorney general for the southern state of New York hailed the verdict against Maxwell for one of the worst crimes imaginable. Facilitating.

Ghislaine Maxwell Jeffrey Epstein New York court of sex traffick Susie Boyd Taliban Afghanistan Akron South Wales Laura BBC Damian Williams New York U.S. Maxwell
"abia" Discussed on Your Grandparents Did What?

Your Grandparents Did What?

05:26 min | 9 months ago

"abia" Discussed on Your Grandparents Did What?

"So you can buy hyland's bella donna on amazon from. We're it's ships from germany. But you can go amazon right now in search bella donna and you can literally private eyelid. Louis put it in my car. It did not stop me. Did not say a damn thing. It wasn't like unexcused. Thank you know you could buy it so anyway. I started like i was just shocked. And other scroll down to read some things so quote. Why are people buying this. After seeing the safety warning answer sometimes. The benefits outweigh the warnings. No not in this case. 'cause the warnings are your baby could die early in a dropper like it sold for fever and teething relief question. That's that's not like okay. i'm getting chemo. Which like in the long run chemo. Might like fuck me up permanently or like wait outweigh. The warnings. Like the warnings are like your baby could have an unstable hurry. Your baby could die. Yeah die who give too much outweigh the benefits. The benefit of what teething relief. I'm sorry give him a god. Damn sophie the giraffe. This is sophie giraffe. This is this is the same people. Yeah i'm gonna fucking lance these t. Yes exactly next question. What do we instruction safer bella. Donna it doesn't say also. What are the ingredients answer. You take four a day. A doctor from india told me your eyebrow up so it says what is it like. Here's okay in. This is the problem with non fda approved like you know what's in tylenol you could like. I understand like you know they have a some sort of great railway What's wherever was for like patton on it. Yes yes but all those ingredients may not know the exact like the exact all the other not getting league trump bear recipe for it. Now get your. He already andrea cracked. And you're getting the amount of the actual amr ingredient. That's in. I guess but it literally someone from abia doctor. From india desert always people at the beginning coveted posting videos like this doctor says just take vitamin c. And then on google. That doctors Like their doctor engineer okay. So let's talk to a fucking md. Okay so next one is why is there a prop sixty five working on this wednesday slowly. Don't take this a like bubble and the answer was no one cares except left coasters who love regulations coast. Okay now these are from new. You're on amazon. The question those questions. These are the reviews. Okay this reviewing bella. Donna worked excellent at reducing my daughter's fever and getting rid of her bumps after contracting hand-foot-and-mouth disease and then in practice it is spreading everywhere. Thanks you uneducated. People vaccinated their kids for vaccine stub wrong. We don't care. I'm sorry anyway. I'm sorry sorry. First of all do we vaccinating for polio radical in this country. Polio is ratted. So we don't give i. we're not vaccinating for. Please get polio vaccine anymore. Okay yes so number one number one. They spelled vaccinating wrong. number two. I've never heard of the conspiracy. That hand foot mouth poli. I never heard that either related but also polio vaccine virus that sheds after polio vaccination. And then she was back to normal free days amazing. Thank goodness for homeopathic remedies..

bella donna amazon sophie giraffe hyland fever Donna germany Louis india bella abia patton fda mouth disease andrea Polio polio radical google poli
"abia" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"abia" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Then it's one of the most bizarre stories had so many bizarre stories in 2020, but people getting the seed packets in the mail. And thinking they're from Amazon. Or it could be from Amazon or eBay or somewhere else, and some people are planting them. It's like Would you do that? Would you set guys here's Here's a packet of seeds. I have no idea what they are. Let's go plant them. No, I don't think I don't think that I would. But you had to know somebody was trying to make a few bucks somewhere, and there is big money in third party cellars with with Amazon and writing. Reviews. There's all kinds of programs out there now to try to detect fake reviews. Although I'm not sure how good of a job those things do so. I don't know. But if you get seeds in the male, probably the best thing you could do, I would assume would be to throw them away. I can't imagine that people would actually plant them, but they do. Dave Yates is herewith Crimestoppers. Dave, you haven't You haven't checked your mail today. You have been getting any any unsolicited seeds or anything. Abia received anything yet? Well, it's Let's see. I haven't gotten any of that either. But I have been reading about that over the last couple of months. People get Yeah, It's weird. I just can't imagine. But you know you don't want it. That's the chance that I think you wouldn't want to take. It apparently is not some You know some foreign espionage thing, But why take any chances? Exactly your exact I would think. Well, Dave, I hope you had a great Labor day weekend and I know you have some some crimestoppers information for us today. Oh, thank you, Joe. On April, the 20th of 2000 for shooting occurred at the corner of Seasonal avenue in Greenwood in Louisville. The victim was standing on the corner with friends. And when the friends walked away from the victim, gunshots ring out. Mr William Cleveland Lay fatally wounded someone dressed in black was seen fleeing the area. Crime stoppers will pay $1000 in cash for information which leads to the rest of the person or persons responsible for this home, son. Remember when you call Crimestoppers. You will never be asked for your name in order to be eligible for a reward You must call Crimestoppers. First Crown Stoppers is still burning 38 years, Every metro Louisville Visitor website have a include are common and simply telephone father to feel you even have a 2 to 5. Victoria's always It's your call. And David. Guess we should point out because we have had all this are concerned about a space to the folks of crime stoppers. You are certainly looking for information on any of those unsolved crimes in the same, you know, the the same protocol applies here. People do not have to give their name They call they can give information. And they could be eligible for reward. So we want it. We want to make the point with all the things that are out there right now. Certainly you guys air are are looking for tips and certainly willing to listen. Absolutely our calls or answered by a person 24 7, and we will issue a code number and then that's how we will know you by. There's never any body asking for your name when you called Dave. I appreciate the update is always will look forward to talking to you again soon. Joe Joe. Have a great day, buddy. Okay, Manu to David Yates, keeping us up to speed from Crimestoppers. It's Joe Elliot in for Terry. It's news radio 8 40. Yes. From the train info dot com Heating and cooling Weather Center news radio. Wait 40 w h. J s traffic heading out the door this afternoon Traffic starting pick up around.

Dave Yates Amazon Joe Joe David Yates Louisville Joe Elliot eBay Abia Mr William Cleveland Weather Center Manu Victoria Greenwood Terry
Creating Value Creation in Healthcare by Innovating Thoughtfully with Ashim Roy, Co-Founder & CEO, Cardiotrack

Outcomes Rocket

12:11 min | 2 years ago

Creating Value Creation in Healthcare by Innovating Thoughtfully with Ashim Roy, Co-Founder & CEO, Cardiotrack

"Ashim. Welcome thank you. Thank you for the great introduction. I really appreciate absolutely as she now. Did I leave anything out of your introduction that you wanNA share with listeners? Oh sure actually what happened? Is that a sense. Mike Graduation Undergrad studies in India. I had left the country. I did my PhD in Australia. And then I stayed overseas. I've mostly had to Canada. Us and I came back to India about thirty years later. It was a different country. Fortunately I had the opportunity of that time to travel to some of the relates from where I live. I live in Bangalore India at the moment and within hundred kilometers. You see a larger rural territory. And what I realize a to my journeys in these areas is that affordable healthcare education financials visits Viennese significant barrier Afar many of the people living in those communities and I wanted to do something about that and I just wanted to grab back in and as part of my section now that's a really important factor. Ashim and so kind of gets us to the first question that I wanted to ask is. What got you into the medical sector to begin with right. You've highlighted why you're focused on what you're focused on today. The around the globe journey. That's brought you back home. But what got you into healthcare to begin looking at some of the challenges that are faced people living in rural communities in India and I'm sure similar conditions exist in many of the developing economies. What I saw was something interesting. I come from telecom background as you told your listeners and I have seen the effect of Moore's law being obliged into telecom industry and the computer industry where the you know the cost comes down every two years and the performance goes up every two years. I don't see that I didn't see that in the healthcare sector and I felt intrigued by the fact that healthcare solutions would be provided in silos. There there was no opportunity to bring innovation into healthcare industry particularly in a country like India and that was a challenge and I felt that if the light some of the principles of information technology and communication et CETERA. You would be able to bring down. The cost of the air be able to deliver better care to communities in the rural areas because people in Abia the journey taken care of that of infrastructure available expertise available etc. If you take a look at a simple problem not so simple for people living in the religious cardiovascular divisive which is very common in India and yet a cardiologist Available only in the top twenty five cities so. I felt that something had to be done and that brought me into the medical sector. That's awesome Ashim and you know what it's great that you identified. This need like you pointed out even developing countries. We do have that care gap and it's important that we start looking to different ideas and technology to bridge that gap and so I'd love to hear your thoughts Ashim on an example of something that you and your team have done to create results to address this really what it is. It's access right access to healthcare so love to hear your thoughts in any stories you have to share in that room. Some of the things that I T- I feel that healthcare the fundamental right of every citizen every every country healthcare leaders need to shift their attention from primarily from two more into primary. Care if you look at many countries today particularly where loved healthcare solution designed larger importance to primary care. I'll give two examples either the energies in UK our health services in Singapore. They probably among the best and dumps of health care being provided to the citizens of the country and there is a adequate not only liquid is really established network of from regulations etc and services available. And I don't see that in You know countries like India developing countries like India where there's a huge amount of infrastructure available in the urban centers in all from the place that I bear in Bangalore kilometer radius two mile radius. Then six major so I'm really lucky. In case something happens to me. I really love that. I will get good services wherever I go out. Not even fifty miles. Maybe thirty miles outside of the city and that situation changes drastically. Finding a cardiologist is a rare finding a specialist of any kind finding simple diagnostic capabilities which are taken for granted in developing countries like USA of will not be available and we address that yes so about very good question so let me kind of come to the main point that I'm trying to bring here. Is that to provide quality healthcare beneath you technology's innovation in healthcare designed or developing economies like India. V cannot use the technology that are available in. Us are many of the developing countries because they would be too expensive for deployment in a country like India. Just affordability what it would not be possible however deaths lots of things that can be done little things that can be done. A take a simple case of vascular disease. It's a chronic illness. It gets worse and worse over Peter. Time if a simple. Ekg capability exists at the primary care level in these rural communities. What happens is that all of a sudden diagnosed people early enough and early diagnosis always saves life. And it's always less expensive by no means struck at science is very simple solution and yet we don't have those kinds of solutions today and that's exactly what we are trying to bring to the non urban areas communities that are underserved. We want to provide those kinds of solutions. I think that's Great Ashim and and you know we recently had guest His name is Ronny Schiff. Ron He's over in Israel and his his organization. Global health is very much focused on the impact. That you're working to effect and one of the examples that he provided Much like your example is the technologies that exist in developed countries. Really have a ton of bells and whistles that aren't necessary for basic like an Ekg for example and. So what can we do? If we want to address the needs of the broader global population. This is a conversation really kind of at the government level hiring an address it right and so two ashamed point we gotta take a look at small shifts small things that could be done in order to make that type of impact and Ekg for example is one of those things that could be done. Have you guys? Ashim started any programs. Anything that's yielded results spar. Okay so I can. Thanks for pointing out that audience. That looked better. They looked in the western countries and to fit the budget of the blubbing communities and just to illustrate that in another way winning them. All I would like to give is everyone. Most of your listeners will be Miller Microsoft Excel. Did the street. I'm apologies of Microsoft and high tech. I use only maybe two percent of the capabilities. The Bells and whistles. That are there that I don't really use. Yep so that's either actually thing that can be done in health care and what we have done the EKG. There are expensive solution that are available which are suitable for. I see us. That's not the market that we want to go because for us. The diagnosis must happen at the primary level. Yes soup or hormone actually will reach the ICU. So we can provide bitty simple solution handheld solution robust solution that would work in the Are the other environmental condition that exists at the primary care level with. There's no air conditioning. In the impetus can go up to maybe Hainan. Vendetta night. The device has to work the condition but began take advantage off certain things that are actually coming on rice so fast that is amazing. Take for example. The smartphone be don't really need a printed paper to give the outward because it's basically going to do with it instead if that is available through an APP on android fallen which cost less than one hundred dollars. All of a sudden beheaded capability of displaying mation. That information is available. Honestly that can be sent to a cardiologist sitting hundred miles away or maybe the word and all of a sudden we have created the solution based on existing technologies around us and yet the solution as many low cost. Yep So taking. This example is a great way of doing things and so tell us a little bit about time when you tried one of these things and maybe you ran into some obstacles. Ashim. What did you learn from those obstacles the into lots of obstacles and I'm glad that we did because become from myself and my other CO founder. Both our technologies become from non medical background and as a result of that may fence that for not necessarily league correct. So I'll give you three or four examples of those are maybe towards suspending on Hammerstein. But simple one was that during the early testing of the Barak behead given the product to driver and he was driving around the whole day with the device and India's lady heart most of the year and His mom would get ready getting device at all and it could slip out of his hands on down so by the time he finished his trial two weeks later he was video blood ridiculous like sad phase and I spoke with him through a translator because I didn't understand his language and figured out that excelled on multiple times and has maybe ladies Saudi awarded and yet it's a simple feedback that actually change the way the product is now the actually have silicone rubber grip around. It is easy to hold very very comfortable. It doesn't slip out of the hand and more or less moreover if it falls down nothing happens to realize another one. I will tell you is. We made it incorrectly at all. Maybe we were due naive. At those days that taught that if the allow our device and the information from our device to travel from the primary care physician to cardiologists. Our job is pretty much done. The largest come on line provide guidance to the primary care physician. They will talk to each other. Everything's date and Beijing sticking. What he didn't realise is the whole imbalanced. The situation is in country like India. There are about sixty million people with cardiovascular illnesses less than ten thousand cardiologists so guess what every time the Tradition wanted to get in touch with the cardiology. They will be busy somewhere else. And so they won't get any response on the grady. The primary air from the relatives for maybe maybe never in some cases because the cardiologists is really the busiest person under the Senate. So what we had to we had to rethink our solution and desks spend meteorologist that interpretation if they want to deliver a solution that would work under all the circumstances than the solution has to be on the basis of a Machine Lynn. Either machine learning or AI. This interpretation that we can deliver to the primary care physician on time every time the dog area. And that's exactly what we ended up many so these are the market feedbacks that regard as Donald mistakes but in the end is actually overall with a solution.

India Ashim Bangalore India Australia Canada Mike Beijing USA UK Microsoft Bangalore Machine Lynn Ronny Schiff Singapore Moore Israel Senate
Sarah LaFleur Made 'Frumpy Pantsuits' a Thing of the Past

How I Built This

08:08 min | 2 years ago

Sarah LaFleur Made 'Frumpy Pantsuits' a Thing of the Past

"Back in two thousand four and American psychologist named Berry Schwartz published a book called the paradox of choice varies argument. And we've talked about before the show is pretty straightforward. He concluded that having lots and lots of choices has actually made us more anxious and less happy. I mean think about it do you ever get anxious at chipotle layer in and out burger. I'm guessing you don't because they have very few choices. Burger cheeseburger double cheeseburger Taco Burrito Bowl. Caissoti you get my point right. Having fewer choices actually decreases anxiety. Now imagine waking up every morning in agonizing over what to wear you go to your closet and you either hate everything in it or you can't decide what would look good and I suspect this is not a thought. Thought experiment for many of you. In fact this was how Sarala Fluor started her day every morning as she went off to a corporate job at a firm in New York and Sarah wasn't alone. The research is pretty clear. On average women spend a lot more time getting ready in the morning than men so Sarah decided to try and tackle goal this problem by tackling the closet essentially by coming up with a line of clothing that was simple and elegant without too many options that would speed up the morning routine closed. That were well-made looked great and professional and a more reasonable price but like so many of the founders of talked to Sarah a had this ambitious plan and not the slightest idea initially of how she was going to carry it out for starters. She knew nothing about the fashion industry three. She had no idea had a make address or a pair of slacks. She just knew what she liked but since she launched 'em'll floor it's grown into a business is closing in on one hundred million dollars. In annual sales and a lot of the companies designs are inspired by Suresh Childhood in Asia. Her Dad was an American diplomat. And for most of Sarah's childhood the family lived in Japan where her mother was from and Sarah grew up speaking both English and Japanese. It was tough. The the term that people use in Japan to describe biracial kids is half. I guess we say that to half Japanese half American but my parents always said you're not half your double w. both Japanese and you're also American and so I think they were really insistent on that fact but I think day-to-day basis like I remember. When I was in Tokyo I really didn't WANNA WANNA use my last name Lafleur? In Japan your last name really signifies whether you are Japanese or not so much so that you Korean Japanese people Chinese Japanese people they will change their. They were last name to signify that they are truly Japanese and so You know I kind of hit my American last name and then I would say simultaneously when I came to the US. I had the opposite experience. agreeance especially around college I went to a school that was incredibly preppy and that prep culture. I'd never seen before in Japan to me about about but your mom did she. Did she work the ashy. Did I mean really a huge inspiration. I mean I would say the reason I started my business in many ways goes back to my mom She is Japanese in Japan. And you know very very unusual person for someone of her generation. She worked through out out her life. continues to work today. She loves her job. She runs a business selling travel jewelry out of Tokyo which she started. Because I think in many ways it's it's tough being a diplomat's wife you have to move every three to four years and I think the communist option is that the wife usually gives up her career so that she can be the diplomat's wife if host receptions etc.. But she couldn't she always says. I can't wait for Monday. What excuse me like? How about us on the weekends but She just she loved going to work. And I think that was a real inspiration for me and my sister. We never assumed that we wouldn't not get jobs. That was the only thing we assumed samed. So I mean looking your mom as as this kind of inspiration for to entrepreneur did you. I mean I can't imagine As a kid you thought. I'm going to be an entrepreneur or did you mean Oh God no no not at all I mean she didn't hide how hard it was I'm trying to start the business with her friends. Having her friends leave the business all of a sudden out of nowhere financial struggles just hard personal all conversations that she was having with her business partners and I remember as a kid I would come down in the middle of the night to grab glass of water and I would see my mom sitting in the armchair with a light of her head sipping whiskey On the rocks and I just remember thinking how it is hard so so when it came time for you to go to college You went to Harvard's must've been you know a pretty good student. Yes and no I think I I never a fancy myself to be the Super Smart Person. I knew I was a really hard worker and my mom always used to say you know Listen Japanese Dodo crooked. Don't which means like you're the kid who tries hard and so I my mom meant that an encouraging way but I never in my mind like well. You know I'm going to be the smartest person in the room. I actually have probably never thought that. In my life I just knew that whatever I wanted to do it would have to be through sheer willpower. Sheer determination yeah. I mean I mean when you when you graduated. What did you think you you were going to do with your life? Did you think okay. I'll get a job and go work somewhere and figure it out I should take a step back and say it like basically from time I was in high school. I wanted to be a refugee camp officer. I wanted to be a logistics officer and I started researching refugee issues got really really passionate about it and I thought Gosh that's what I wanna go do in so the summer between my junior and senior year. I had this opportunity. Ah to go volunteer at a refugee camp and Sambia what you did this. You do this while you were still student. Yeah you know I think if I can point to one life changing changing experience that I've had that would definitely that would be the one. I mean this refugee camp points. I think like ten hours from Lusaka. Which is the capital of Abia so we would drive to the small the town? I was two hours away and I would buy random pieces of furniture layer and then we would paint building that we fixed. I mean it was. It was basic stuff it was it was basic stuff but I think I also think simultaneously I realized the powerlessness of of myself Really being in that space I would have people people come up to me just as I was walking back to the dorm where we were staying and he would say I would. I have AIDS. My my wife has died I I have one kid. WHO's dying is there any way you can help me? I mean this and this what just happened on daily if not hourly basis and it just fundamentally changes the way you see life life and I went with nonprofit organization and one day the leader asked me okay so we are were short on money. So we're going to have to make a trade off if we can either continue to buy lunch or we can continue to spend on fuel and I was looking at him being like wait. We have to choose between lunch and fuel what what kind of choices that like. Harry's to work like that and then I came back on campus senior year. I had all these friends who are coming back from. I'm their investment banking internships with five thousand dollars ten thousand dollars signing bonuses. And I couldn't believe the I that was more more than the money. I had raised all summer and it sparked some sort of curiosity I think for me and then a a mentor that I had been without the camp at the time she was someone who had worked written investment banking. And she said to me you know Sarah. It's it's never a bad idea to go learn how to work with the big boys kind of hit that expression big boys. Yeah Yeah but But I knew what you meant and And the money. I just couldn't believe that you could sign a piece of paper and you can have five thousand dollars in your checking account.

Sarah Japan Tokyo Berry Schwartz Officer Sarala Fluor Asia United States Suresh Childhood Aids New York Harry Lafleur Harvard Abia Sambia
Tesla stock rises after earnings and revenue top targets

CNBC's Fast Money

05:57 min | 2 years ago

Tesla stock rises after earnings and revenue top targets

"Out this huge move and Tesla stock is up nearly twelve percent after its own big beat air it is right now eleven percent. You're pushing six hundred and fifty bucks in the aftermarket. Let's get to fill bow with more for details Phil. Why is this stock up so sharply after hours great Q.? Four numbers and even better guidance. If you're a tesla bull there was very little to. He disappointed in when it comes to this report from Tesla. Let's talk about the numbers for the fourth quarter beat on the top and the bottom line by a wide margin earning to fourteen share versus the expectation of a buck seventy to share revenue coming in better than expected at seven point. Three billion dollars not bad. But here's the reasons got that. I think the stock is really taking taking off the guidance in terms of deliveries for two thousand and twenty now just for a point of reference remember they deliver just over three hundred and sixty thousand vehicles last year. Most most on the street were in somewhere between the four sixty five and four hundred and seventy five thousand as an expectation for two thousand. Twenty Tesla says it will comfortably exceed five five hundred thousand vehicles being delivered this year. A couple of other notes from the company's guidance when it comes to two thousand twenty and beyond model y production ramp has already begun out in Fremont California model y production that will begin in Shanghai starting in twenty twenty one. It is planning limited sales of the Tesla's semi this this year. So we will see it out on the road. And then you have. Tesla's solar in storage deployments to grow by at least fifty percent conference call starts at six thirty Scott curious risky lon multiple sound like on this call. There have been times when we have seen them post better than expected earnings. And he's been a little subdued. Will that be the case today. Always the call is is perhaps the most interesting part of Tesla earnings days. Probably doing a double take like everybody else feel thank you. We'll see what he says. We've back to you as as needed all right tim so so let the profitability is impressive And the guy the more important thing is what they actually delivering when you look at the margin comfortably exceed five hundred thousand the three sixty seven when they got it three sixty two four hundred and so you know that doesn't give me some sense that they're gonNA wildly beat when in fact they barely made their number at the bottom end of range but but again good good for them to five hundred thousand on. The guide is something that I don't think you get excited about your Tesla Bull. I think what you get excited about is the the profitability and six point three billion on the balance sheet and by the way. Get out there and raise do arrays right here at this valuation see never have to worry about capital then because as far as I'm concerned with all the growth that these guys are talking about they are going to continue to burn some cash. So why wouldn't you go out there and raise money here. This kind of moved. Oh in the stock is not getting overly excited just about a five hundred thousand number though it is about earnings. It's about cash flow. It's about large. It's about the guide it's the whole caboodle was not even a year ago. We were concerned that they wouldn't be able to raise money and that they might go out of business now all of a sudden they've got billions on their ballot shape and I think Tim Brinton a great point. If there's a risk to the stock is that Elon. Musk says hey you know what we should raise some money. Maybe we do a secondary out there. I think that's probably the risk on the bearer side. I'm not standing in front of it by any means really interesting here. I've been wrong in this thing for you. Know hundreds of points. I don't have a position in it and it's just you know. This isn't all out mania. I think it's really important to remember that I've seen very few like this. In my nearly twenty five years in the business make no mistake about it. They've gained the market capitalization of GM a company that does a hundred and forty billion dollars in sales in a matter of of months here. So it's a mania high short interest. We're just talking about most of Wall Street. Analysts are offsides on it. There's only nine by ratings like I think eleven holden in seventeen cells or something like that so you can understand that too right. I mean too many people they view at the same way you do. You're buying a dream. Well listen I think it's fair to say last June June when this stop when they reported their q two or something like that there are serious. Capital concerns right. They were missing their productivity levels. They were building this mass market car intense intense. There's lots of questions about why they bought in solar city. The prior year Lilly sounded like disaster. I mean that's where things so stocks the highs he might be out by the way six six fifty four the short interest in this name and the mania. Whatever you WANNA call it around it means that people are scrambling and and look at the the the thing I wonder about is seven point three eight billion when they are seven point two three billion last year when they had record sales this year so the fact is the yearly revenue number? KNBR isn't really that impressive. And it's a little bit confusing but but to be clear the most important thing to me is who someone's very bearish on the stock someone who thought that actually. They had bankruptcy issues at least to address that they're cutting back on CAPEX. They're cutting back every place that they could is that there's there's cash on the balance sheet and they have the ability to double that if they they went out there and really just put people on the sideline who are concerned about their burning cash. Say This company. And you're defense. You're not the only one who thought that war continues continues to think that I mean it's the truth. There still are a lot of haters on this name who think that fundamentally the company is never going to deliver on on. What the dreamers believe that? It's going it's more fuel for the fire. But the dreamers dream you see the last couple of quarters and I'm not GONNA pretend 'cause I've been right with everybody else I mean I thought maybe Abia chance from one seventy to fifty to seventy five and now here. We already your point six fifty so clearly wrong but you know the bulls will say the dreams. The bull dreams are now becoming reality right in front of our face. So it's hard for me. Look I get it. I get both sides of the argument but when I say prices truth this is what I'm talking about you. We can talk negative all we want here. We find ourselves at six fifty with a stock being one seventy seemingly only just a handful of months ago. But the TIM's point if there were Emmerick time to shore up about seat even further I mean a secondary makes it a whole lot of sense

Tesla Tim Brinton Bulls Phil Shanghai Fremont California Abia GM Musk Scott Lilly
What is the Vulgate?

5 Minutes in Church History

04:22 min | 2 years ago

What is the Vulgate?

"Last week on five minutes in Church history we talked about a high point in the printing of the Greek New Testament as we looked at the reformation reformation printer. Roberta's defense this week. Let's look at the Latin taxed and let's look at the official Latin text. It's known as the vogue eight we use the English word vulgar to refer to bad talk but the word vulgar was not always so pejorative or negative. It literally early means common. And so the vogue eight was simply the Bible in the common language of the people now. The Bible was originally written in Hebrew for the Old Testament. Commit Greek for the New Testament and little parts of the Bible. Our Air AMAC. But those were not the common or the vulgar language language in the fourth century AD. Latin was and the Church and the people of the church needed a Bible and their own language which at the time was Latin. So one of the Early Church Fathers Jerome led a team of translators to produce. What has come to be called the Vaal Gate. The official Latin text text of the Bible for well over a thousand years. This would be the Bible text for the Church. So let's explore it a little bit you for Jerome's involvement there was an old Latin text of the Gospels. Jerome simply called it. They to S- Latino or the old Latin addition addition and. That's where Jerome started with that addition of the Gospels and he made edits and he put it out round four hundred eighty addition started appearing others. There's an unknown to history. Started working on other parts of the Bible in the epistles under likely. Jerome's leadership is editor. And so we began to see early editions. The VOL Gate Bible published in those early years of four or five. Of course this is all pre printing press so this is all done by hand and there were more than sixty six books in the gate because it also included. The Apocryphal books will various edits. Were made to the. Vo Gate throughout the Middle Ages. Gregory the great while he was pope made a number of changes but the Vul- gate was considered the biblical text. This was the texts that wickliffe used when when he translated his English edition of the Bible. It wasn't a translation from the original languages but from the Latin Vogue eight the Latin vol- gate was the very first major book to come off of the printing press. This of Courses Gutenberg's printing press in fourteen fifty five and then along on came the reformation one of the key elements to the reformation is the renaissance cry Ad Fontes. There's there's another Latin expression and that simply means to the fount or to the source ad. Fontes you see the Vol- gate. The church's official Bible able at the time was a translation of the original. And so the reformers wanted to go back to the source to the original. Now I've said this before on five minutes instant church history. I'll say it again. In fifteen sixteen harassment's published his Greek text for the first time in fifteen sixteen coffee was introduced to Europe from Arabia. Abia and in fifteen seventeen we have the reformation so we can put the whole thing into a formula. Can't we greet New Testament plus a cup of coffee and the next thing you know you have the reformation so from our Greek and Hebrew texts from fifteen sixteen on comes the translations well as a response to the reformation. The Roman Catholic Church held a Church Council. It's known as the Council of Trent and it met from fifteen forty five to fifteen sixty three one of the many things to come out of. Trent was that the vogue eight which had been unofficially. Officially the Bible of the Church was now officially the Bible of the Roman Catholic Church. It was an remains the final authority so all matters of doctrine or dispute are settled by turning to the vogue eight. So now you know what the ball gate is. It is the Latin translation of the Bible. It came to us from the church. Father Jerome and four hundred. That's the gate. I'm Steve Nichols. Thanks for listening

Father Jerome Latin Vogue Roman Catholic Church Vaal Gate Official Vo Gate Early Church Council Of Trent Roberta Church Council Steve Nichols Gregory Middle Ages Europe Trent Harassment Wickliffe Editor
Officials alerting travelers after person infected with measles boarded flight at ABIA

Sean Hannity

00:21 sec | 2 years ago

Officials alerting travelers after person infected with measles boarded flight at ABIA

"Austin public health reports a person with a diagnosed case of measles was at the United Airlines gate in Austin Bergstrom airport a week ago people with measles also visited Chicago o'hare in the Richmond airport in Virginia the same day airports in Denver in Los Angeles issued alerts earlier this month CDC says this is the worst year for measles in more than

Austin Bergstrom Airport Virginia Denver Los Angeles CDC Austin United Airlines Chicago Richmond
Brutal Day For Trump From Congress To The Courts

Erin Burnett OutFront

06:03 min | 2 years ago

Brutal Day For Trump From Congress To The Courts

"Good evening I'm Erin Burnett out front tonight the breaking news it is a brutal day for president trump from Congress to the courts I explosive testimony from a key witness in the inquiry the former ambassador to Ukraine defined trump and the State Department's order to stay silent and as I speak Ambassador Marie you've it is L. Meeting with key members of Congress behind closed doors we expect her to come out this hour and the committee chair and ranking member to speak live here on C. N. N. so as we await that here is what we the ambassador pointed the finger directly at trump accusing the president of the United States of targeting her because she stood up for the rule of law and of course remember she refused to push team trump's conspiracy theories about Joe Biden well today trump tried to act like this was all nothing he said this she may be a wonderful a woman I don't know her but she she may be very much a wonderful woman I just don't know her she may be a wonderful woman he doesn't know her she Abia Wonderful Woman well unfortunately according to the very transcript that trump calls perfect professional end word for word he talked about Ivanovich to the president of the frame saying quote the former ambassador from the United States the woman was bad news and it isn't just in the transcript. He went off the wonderful scripted actually contradicting himself at the same question and answer session here he is at another point I heard very bad things about her and I don't know if I recall somebody gold but I heard very very bad things about it for me it does not good okay so trump's stumbling around there from one version to another comes after five setbacks today coming within hours of each other Democrats could be within reach of temp trump's tax return so this was a crucial court ruling a federal judge ruling against trump's lawsuit to keep those taxes under wraps another federal judge yet another lawsuit ruling against trump signature pet project the wall and then another loss in court three other federal judges just blocking trump's will making it harder for immigrants to obtain legal status trump's response pretending knows nothing about it we lost an immigration I haven't heard that would perhaps the best thing you can put on what was a very bad day first presidency is I hadn't heard that Pamela Brown is out front live outside the White House and Pamela look this was not a good day for the president that's right Aaron he is ending this week with a barrage of negative headlines I in a move viewed in this white all says an act of defiance the former Ukrainian ambassador a testified on Capitol Hill today that the president directly campaigned for her to be fired for Political Purpose says now Democrats claimed the White House try to block her from testifying but she showed up anyway now the president addressed or testimony he said that she may be a quote wonderful woman but he doesn't know her and then deflected saying it was a Ukrainian president who did not like her and then a devastating blow air in the president also lost several high profile four cases today earlier today he lost that court battle over turning over turning over several years of his tax returns to Congress his lawyer say they are weighing an appeal on that decision by the DC appeals court and then he lost some court battles on his signature policy focus emigration a federal in Texas ruined the President's national emergency declaration to build a border wall as unlawful and there's another defeat Aaron a federal judge today blocked a trump administration rule that makes so more difficult for emigrants who rely on public assistance to obtain legal status now I asked the president directly about this today he said he hadn't heard about the rules on immigration sure when I asked him this has been several hours after the royds came out but he did express competence that he would win and he pivoted to focus on all the judges he is put on the bench Aaron thank you very much and I'm GonNa go to Democratic Congresswoman Val demings who sits on both the House intelligence and committees congressman thanks so much for being with me so as far as I understand that the deposition with the former ambassador to Ukraine Marie Ivanovich is still ongoing and we expect it to end momentarily Mr Schiff Mr Jordan to come out and address cameras live so we're awaiting that but I know obviously your staff is in that room you have been briefed on what has happened so far so as far as you know did she say anything that furthers your impeachment case against President Trump will high air and it's great to be with you and let me just say this may be bad day for the president but it's actually been a good day for those of us who are in pursuit of justice in pursuit of the facts and who are involved in this impeachment inquiry my hat's off to ambassador your which who number one appeared today as you've already stated has been behind closed doors testifying all day long and there is no doubt that this is a career foreign service officer who took our old fair very seriously served admirably for our country committed to her duty and that really demonstrated itself today in her testimony the she's very courageous and today was no exception has she spoken directly or how has she been about what she was explicitly asked to do in terms of getting Ukraine to investigate Joe Biden and his son while I can't get as you well know into the details of her testimony what I can tell you is that she's been behind closed doors giving her disposition all day long and she certainly added very all you bold testimony she we would consider her a critical critical witness in our impeachment inquiry and I think she's added value and there's

Donald Trump President Trump Ambassador Marie Congress United States Erin Burnett Joe Biden Ukraine State Department Ivanovich
Overcoming Social Anxiety

The Chalene Show

12:46 min | 2 years ago

Overcoming Social Anxiety

"It shouldn't be surprised that so many of suffer from social anxiety or at least in some situations we've felt uncomfortable awkward nervous or even anxious even those of us who are really outgoing and love people and and love to be in social settings have certain situations where it can be uncomfortable so let's talk about the different types of social anxiety. I because you might not not even realized that's going on with you now. Some people can have social anxiety when they're around strangers or a big group of people people that they don't the people that they fear are going to judge them while others might experience social anxiety around people they know it certainly not uncommon to feel bill when were with someone in our family who just stirs up all of those emotions so let's talk about what social anxiety is it means. We're socializing right so that could be with family or can be with strangers. It could be an alarm setting can be in an intimate setting but we're socializing and we have anxiety now. If you break it down in those very simplistic terms you can understand how there are certain family members right like you around your aunt or your mom or maybe Abia sister that you don't see very often because you're estranged and it makes you anxious. The thought of spending time with them stirs up a little bit of panic or or nervousness or you just feel uncomfortable. That's an example of social anxiety. Social anxiety might be in the form of physical reaction so whenever I never someone calls upon you and you have to speak publicly maybe even at a dinner party or in a larger group your face will turn red and you'll feel flustered. Mustard your hands and palms sweat and you lose your train of thought your loss for words. Maybe you love public speaking like put you on a stage in front of ten thousand people and you're gonNA shine you feel confident and secure no self doubt but man you get off stage and you have to have a one on one conversation. Station was someone who was just sitting in the audience and you immediately feel uncomfortable. You feel nervous. You feel anxious. You feel like oh my gosh. Am I going to mess this up. Are they going to find find out that I don't know as much as I do or am I going to say the wrong thing my going to give them the wrong impression so the anxiety that's a feeling and feelings are are the result of beliefs feelings are not necessarily facts and oftentimes our feelings have very little to do with facts and everything to do with our our beliefs are feelings are usually a matter of our own perception and just to be clear having social anxiety is different or I should say it's separate separate from being shy or being an introvert or an extrovert remember being an introvert or an extrovert really is a matter of how you feel energized is. Some people feel more energized around. People and other people feel more energized when they're by themselves. I'm over simplifying things for this episode but generally speaking I want you to know that anyone can have social anxiety and you can have social anxiety that specific to specific situations just because you have social anxiety diety in certain social situations doesn't necessarily make you a shy person. It doesn't make you a bad person. It doesn't mean the you're insecure but it does mean that that particular situation makes you feel less secure and even a very confident individual can experience some some social anxiety or insecurities in that particular situation. I use myself as an example and try to use as many other people's examples here to today okay so that maybe you'll hear your own situation. It will give you some ideas of how you can solve this for yourself. I'm an outgoing person. I'm also what I consider an outgoing knowing introvert. I love being social settings. I love people but I also need a certain amount of time to be alone by myself. I need to daydream. I need to think obviously you've heard me talk recently a lot about my attention deficit disorder and you know because of that. I've learned different ways to kind of manage. My Energy and management management focus however even confident individual in certain social settings. I can feel insecure meeting. I feel uncertain written. I don't know what's going to happen. I don't feel good about how I might be making. Another person feels so for me. It's less about worrying that they're thinking thinking. I'm dumb or thinking that I'm not enough more so I worry that I'm going to disappoint someone that I won't say the right thing to make them feel feel comfortable or that. I'll say too much or that. I'm overbearing and dominate the conversation so it's a fear that I'm going to do it wrong. I'm GonNa disappoint someone for others that social anxiety might be a fear or a worry and anxiety that comes up around your physical appearance at Gosh. Maybe I'm not young enough pretty enough tall tall enough than enough all of the you know physical things that we often get an our own head over and we get in our head because we tend to tell ourselves stories stories and these stories. We attach our ego to them. We attach our identity to them. They become beliefs and with most beliefs what we we then do subconsciously is recreate situations where we can affirm our belief even though we're doing this subconsciously so say for example example. I'm uncomfortable when I'm in a very small group of individuals that I've never met before and I'm having all these insecurities. Gosh would whatever I say the wrong thing. Where if I don't make them feel comfortable would if they think I'm full of my so we're facing. I'm not nice where if they think I'm too talkative. You know all these things go through my head so if I'm feeling those things am invited to a party and I'm thinking those things right. That's my subconscious belief and I'm like that. I already start telling myself that I don't WanNa go. I'm already telling myself that it's going to turn out a certain way because I have a belief about the way it's going to turn out then unknowingly. I go to the Party and I'll do things that support a knowingly my belief so I might stay off to the side. I might show up late so that I don't don't have to interact. I might then leave early so I don't have to have that interaction and I might have as few interactions as possible and now I'm leaving that party or leaving thing that event and saying to myself see I didn't really meet anyone. It was very awkward and it was awkward because I walked in thinking of it that way and I I think Gosh I didn't make any connections with people so you see that's how social settings or social events are there awkward and therefore I have unknowingly created an experience that provides evidence of my false belief if say for example bowl you are the way you cope with your social anxiety. Is You cross your arms and you have this body language that tells the world like you. Don't WanNa talk to me because I'm going. GonNa say something really dumb. I'M GONNA stick my foot my mouth. I'm GonNa Forget what it was. I was going to say and I'm GonNa make a fool of myself so I'm going to avoid making a fool of myself by not saying anything but I keep saying this over and over my head like if you talk you're GonNa make a fool of yourself. You're GonNa Forget your words and then what happens you follow through on your beliefs chiefs because of consciously. We want to prove ourselves right. We don't realize we're doing this but it's important that we hold onto our beliefs even the false. I believe we have that. Don't serve US so truthfully. Step one is to just be aware that we are creating this this reality with our own perception. It's not the facts it's our feelings and our feelings are based on our beliefs so the best thing you can do is be aware be self aware ask yourself. Are Any of these things true now. Go goes up further and say. Can I be a hundred percent. Certain these things are true like say for example. You need ask yourself. Is it true that when I am asked a question or I'm in a social setting that people think that I'm an idiot or that I always lose my words and if you say yes that's true then ask yourself. Am I one one hundred percent certain that it's true and I doubt you'll be able to say yes so then you want to go a little further and ask yourself. Where did this come from. Why is that I feel this way. When was the very first time I remember experiencing this and what brought it on and that's just step one like understanding ending. What situations 'cause you social anxiety. And where do you think it stems from. Could it be that your parents labeled you. As shy or the your parents parents did all the talking for you. which gave you the belief that you couldn't handle yourself in social settings like so just dig a little further further in you may uncover you may not step two is to recognize the things you do as kind of security mechanism? Dr Doctor Allen Hendrix calls this your security behaviors. I like to think of them as security blanket behaviors because it's almost like you are wearing wearing a blanket over yourself when you engage in these quote unquote security behaviors an example that might be someone who is awkward when you you see them in the way that they don't shut up you know that's another form of social anxiety is that person who they can't handle a moment of silence silence so when they meet new people that Lula logistical a million miles per hour and their energy so high that it's just it's really uncomfortable well. No one else can get a word in they are afraid of silence who knows what they're really afraid of but that's their security mechanism right that's their security behavior behavior and it almost acts like a security blanket that they're throwing over themselves another example that might be that when you're in a social setting like again your face turns it's red and you sweat and you cross your arms and you back away from people right and you make certain that you're sending off the vibe or the body language that you don't want who engage or maybe your technique is to pretend you're on your phone. Not Make eye contact be unfriendly so that people don't talk to you. Maybe your security security blanket behavior is alcohol or recreational drug like maybe of take a valium or you take a glass of wine or a shot of vodka and you're doing back to mask your feelings you doing it actually to Numb your feelings and that's become your security blanket so it's like you're throwing a blanket over yourself self now. Here's what we do know about those behaviors as reported by Dr Ellen Hendrix by wish you got a great podcast about social anxiety Zayed's too. You might check that out. I read her book sometime last year of course now at the moment while I'm thinking about I can't think of the title of it but we'll look it up and we'll put it in the show notes. Dr Hendrik suggests that when we surveyed people who engage with those who regularly practiced these security pretty blanket behaviors that when they removed them when they just were aware of them and just didn't do the thing wherever that wasn't rambling or drinking before the event or being shy like whatever the thing is that you do when you're socially awkward when they literally just dropped it cold Turkey respondents respondents said that those individuals were much more comfortable to be around and it doesn't take doctor to figure out why that would be when we dropped the securities when we dropped the blanket now we can be ourselves. Everyone is more comfortable when we can be ourselves around and other people. You're more authentic. Authenticity allows us to trust people. It allows us to connect with people. It allows us to know someone. It's difficult to ever feel like we know someone who's not being authentic because we all have pretty good radar for that and when we're feeling anxious it's hard for us to be authentic and we have to be aware of these behaviors that we engage in so that we can drop them because I know I want to be someone that others are really really comfortable

Abia Dr Ellen Hendrix Dr Doctor Allen Hendrix Dr Hendrik United States Turkey Zayed Lula One One Hundred Percent Hundred Percent
Are the US and Iran already at war?

Correspondents Report

06:03 min | 3 years ago

Are the US and Iran already at war?

"But let's start in the middle east where tensions have been rising between the u._s. and iran could the u._s. Already fighting iran indirectly israel has struck hundreds of iranian targets in syria defense experts say it has recently expanded those operations into iraq with the blessing of the united states. Here's our middle east correspondent eric tort check. It was israel's regional cooperation minister sake henegbi. Who said it the knife you davos <unk> personal time for two years. Now israel spain the only country in the world killing iranians. He told the public broadcast dot com last last month. Israel has been heating uranium targets in syria way iranian troops of fighting alongside the syrian government forces of president bush allah saad israel says it also targets weapons shipments from iran to the shiite militant group hezbollah which also sent fighters to syria israel's air force enjoys always a superiority in syria and has an arrangement with russia whose air forces helping the syrian government that allows it to operate with relative impunity israel's israel's strikes at deadly for iranian soldiers hezbollah militants and occasionally. If assyrian soldiers posted alongside them all manning a defense batteries some some analysts say the strikes have severely constrained iran's attempt to entrench itself in syria and create a front line there against israel but recently israel's been attacking attacking iranian targets much further afield in iraq according to arab news outlets and domestic defense analysts iranian backed shiite muslim militias operate alright in much of iraq some came to fight saddam hussein others to fight the u._s. Military still more came late to fight the islamic state terrorist group. They've become a powerful entrenched iranian presence in a country that used to be iran's worst enemy. That's raised concerns in israel and the united states about about iran transporting ballistic missiles into iraq with a view to targeting israel and saudi arabia the reported israeli strikes targeted iranian basis which had received ballistic missiles smuggled in through food supply shipments and other covert means such as the new front in israel's ongoing quiet war against iran according to who'd you ari the middle east correspondent for israel's channel twelve one of the country's most experienced defense and foreign policy journalists as a result of one eighty percent of the campaign against the iranian military entrenchment in syria that that is very important now we see the iranians trying to compensate for their big losses in syria by establishing some some presence in iraq and israel will keep trying to demonstrate to them that the cost is going to be very steep sleep israel's attacks serve the interests of big players like the united states and saudi arabia which wants to counter iran's influence and regional ambitions the u._s. avoided military involvement in syria's civil war but ehud yaari says that doesn't mean americans disapprove of israel's attacks on iranian assets the trump administration prefers to if you want subcontract stopping the iranian expansion expansionists the movements <hes> do the israeli air force rather than do it with themselves. Always the cooperation author coalition may members the attacks on doubtedly have an effect both iran and syria have publicly acknowledged their impact although iraq has been silent about at the recent strikes inside its territory continued israeli strikes could be seen as another element of what the united states kohl's its maximum pressure campaign against tehran. It means the u._s. Supposing iran through economic sanctions and diplomatic pressure while israel takes complimentary military action even though attention has been dangerously high between the u._s. and doron after a tax on oil tankers and the shooting down of unmanned surveillance aircraft ehud yaari says both both countries would prefer to fight indirectly rather than risk open conflict. It is the real war that is. I think what we are seeing now. The kind of operations that the israeli air force is mounting the kind of reactions by the iranians. I think this is the real confrontation and it's not going to become an all-out flare other countries in the region of being much more cautious. The united arab emirates has taken steps to distance distance itself from its allies saudi arabia and even from the u._s. By sending delegations to iran and avoiding accusing the iranian military of attacking oil tankers his even though iran is threatening to further reduce its compliance with the international nuclear control deal at the heart of these current tensions european nations and its original neighbors have been reluctant to take any action in response. The debate about iran is not really about its nuclear program. If it was the u._s. would have remained part of the nuclear control deal. It's all about conflicts outside. Iran sport is the syrian civil war support for who the rebels fighting saudi arabia abia in yemen iran's funding and arming of hezbollah in lebanon and the aforementioned militias in iraq the u._s. israel and saudi arabia badly want to constrain constrain iran's regional involvement and it seems israel is the one taking direct military action to do so. It's something to bear in mind if you're concerned that a single misteps step in these tents times could lead to a war. There's already a conflict underway. You probably just haven't heard about it air torture reporting there from jerusalem.

Israel Iran Syria Iraq Saudi Arabia Saad Israel United States Hezbollah Middle East Ehud Yaari Eric Tort Davos United Arab Emirates Syrian Government Saddam Hussein Kohl Lebanon Jerusalem
"abia" Discussed on The Smoking Tire

The Smoking Tire

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"abia" Discussed on The Smoking Tire

"You can put a six foot long skiing. Six Lewis Abia right behind your next. Great goes straight. Yes. Yes, yes. But you'll be I don't want to live without my McLaren in my sees. I would say this the wheel in this photo of the wheels are bad. Also, whoever is like art directing clearance, press photos needs to go away. Look how it looks stumping, bro. It's like my bar. Mitzvah. Exactly. Exactly. Yeah, I feel a yellow a yellow four PR. No, there isn't une better. There's nothing better. Is that a Photoshop presented? Photoshop all All the the product. fine. He's fine. I hear, honestly, here's what I like I think you are, just as likely to take your McLaren on a road trip or to do an activity that involves some type of Queant as you ought to take it to attract writer. Yep. Like, if I McLaren missed I shit, you not if I had to McLaren my fucking skis on nothing. I would drive at skiing. I put snow tires. I bet it would be so fun to go. See it'd be great tree. And I take my nine eleven skiing skiing on eleven twice last year. Like there's no reason I'm totally pro this car. Like I said, they got whoever's are trekking does. That's the worst angle I've ever seen. The car looks like it looks like that. Straddles out for cars good-looking. It's highly pleasant looking pink is go buy stuff. I feel. Come on a good picture nobody because there's no good exit the Ron. This, this side profiles pretty good of the wheels are terrible. But that also you can get glassy pillar on this thing too. Yeah. But in Kashmir interior good fire suck. Yeah. No, it's, it's going. Here's here's my question. It's got traditional huge side Vince for intake. But then also like top vents on the top of the car. A high view. Well terrible. Yeah, you can see it right there. Yeah. So what are what are those feeding league breaks? See what I mean because when he is called nine hundred and fifty miles pile the rest of Ryan needs. He's plenty of cool. Yeah, it's just weird has two intakes. I think let's cold. I, I like all here's why. I hear on why if I remember this way, I'm going to try to remember this from the press presentation. And I think the reason it has side intakes is because in order to get the engine down far enough to have that.

McLaren skiing Vince Lewis Abia Kashmir writer Ryan six foot
"abia" Discussed on The Smoking Tire

The Smoking Tire

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"abia" Discussed on The Smoking Tire

"It again. Do it again. And Finally, I pulled him aside on my you've done, it's not gonna go any faster. And he's like, might it's you cannot publish three seconds. I'm like, there's no difference between two nine and three. But this thing, which makes seventy five less horsepower, whatever. Or like did it? It's just a marvel how far they've come. There's no six hundred elti is amazing. It's just not magic. No, the maJ. maJ. Yeah. Yeah. It's a it's a lover level. One hundred grand, that's two hundred and fifty they've not they've, they've, they've made a real disaster for themselves because I doubt the sentence much quicker. I'm sure if you put the seven twenty s on, on decent ties it would be close. I I here's my conspiracy theory for you. So they've never given us a seven twenty on our compound tires or always like, oh, it's not ready blah, blah, blah. I think it would be just as good as the Senate performance wise. And they want to have some headroom for the Senate out. I did GT the new car. I mean you were there with me, right? No person. I saw I've seen this gold, garn person. It was at the it was a Sunday. It was at the oh, it was it was behind curtains in the basement of the Peterson over the. I don't know. I mean what is what it's not? It's not GT. They're not really Gendis come ahead. I drove it. I, I wrote tripped across Iceland, and a five seventy Tomas what I'm saying. Seven twenty GT already. Well, you can you can put a six foot long skiing. Six Lewis Abia right behind your next. Great goes straight. Yes. Yes, yes. But you'll be I don't want to live without my McLaren in my sees. I would say this the wheel in this photo of the wheels are bad. Also, whoever is like.

Senate maJ. Yeah Lewis Abia Peterson Iceland Tomas three seconds six foot
"abia" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:06 min | 3 years ago

"abia" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Abia? We have little biographies of those executed. There are one or two murderers, and they're accused of serious crimes. One of them was accused of killing as Saudi police officer who happened to be his uncle. And according to the government statement that was radical Islamists who were had sympathies with the Islamic state ISIS, but the rest of them academics. Young activists professionals religious scholars and most of those almost fifty three prisoners had come from the Shia minority in Saudi Arabia, which Nieves in the eastern provinces of the country where the oil fields are this. Shia minority around ten to fifteen percent of the total thirty three million Saudis. Had been marginalized, and it had always been active in mobilization in order to get equality with the rest of Saudi citizens. So their execution comes as a shock to this community, but this community since two thousand eleven had lost almost twenty five activists who has shocked in the streets of cities like a and in the eastern province where the majority of this reactive unity live, how common is capital punishment in Saudi Arabia, particularly this use of beheading prisoners. In addition to beheading there was one case of crucifixion. According to the government statement after the prisoner was executed. He he was crucified. They have death penalty. Obviously is practised in Saudi Arabia. And it is on the rise. According to Amnesty International in two thousand eighteen that were almost one hundred and forty eight executions in the last four months, which is just beginning of year two thousand nineteen we have almost a hundred four executions. It's very very common, and it is worrying it is worrying simply because we do not have an independent judiciary in Saudi Arabia. That are no open court. Most of the prisoners would have had limited access to lawyers to defend them. And we are only faced with a government. Statement with very vague accusations and charges against those prisoners these vague charges. Make almost everybody, especially the international human rights organization and Saudi activists, very very suspicious about the fairness of these trials that led to the beheading and crucifixion. We'll be right back with more from Donegal were she'd visiting professor at the Middle.

Saudi Arabia Islamic state ISIS Amnesty International officer Nieves Donegal visiting professor fifteen percent four months
"abia" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

WAFS Biz 1190

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"abia" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

"I prefer to leave that to the experts. Anything north of seventy would be fine. Okay. When you talk about technology, and we talk about the sharing economy. Are you supportive of talks between curry an Uber? Absolutely. Absolutely. We are we want to see. Are we opposed to the discussions, but we if it ever happens? I think we're to it. Yes. Are there? New tech companies that you'd be wanting to be invested in the invested in a French company called Caesar. This music streaming. And we believe it's going to be the next. Spotify. What's wrong with this? Spotify. Nothing wrong. It's just too expensive. And anything else? So what music music music sharing, and we have actually increased our ownership in list from two hundred fifty about half a billion dollars. What do people misunderstand about Saudi Arabia and indeed kingdom holding who has been always like a closed country today? It's not. Has come and flip the coin and women are driving. Now. People are welcome to Abia tourism is giving bigger we plan to have thirty five million visitors by twenty twenty five. So I think I think the country is moving that. And we hope to be a part of this twenty thirty plan. Ourselves as kingdom holding and all the companies that we are invested. The west is skill is still quite skeptical because of what happened with.

Spotify Saudi Arabia Abia curry Caesar twenty twenty billion dollars
"abia" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"abia" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Things should start improving. Now, what happens we go through tomorrow that we do have winter storm watches up that's for the potential for accumulating, snow and ice. A winter storm watch Saturday afternoon through Sunday afternoon there are warnings further north parts of lower and mid mid Hudson valley. So you've gotta get to let's say all duchess county some points north so for the immediate area the Tri state. I'm looking at winter storm watches for now as precept starts tomorrow afternoon. Most likely a snow for everybody and then as we get into tomorrow night. So sleet, freezing rain there may be some icing so freezing rain for some Abia problems going to be a mess to travel tomorrow night. So my best advice is just he'll park it. Stay home ride it out. We're not going to see a bunch of the way of snow piling up. And either way it's going to be hard to measure with a sleet and freezing rain mixing in. And then we'll see the mixed precipitation probably end snow on Sunday. So thirty three thirty four is tomorrow night, Sunday, windy, colder with falling temperatures likely into the afternoon. Monday morning, Joe in the single digits so real cold for Monday morning threatening or slushy road services. They're going to freeze up rock hard and then sunny and cold low teens for Monday afternoon, upper twenties for Tuesday and milder by Wednesday with rain in the forecast. Now terms of cumulation, which is really what everybody wants to know. It's probably snow and ice accumulating around a one to three inches for the fibers Long Island parts of southwest, Connecticut, coastal Connecticut around Greenwich Greenwich, and then as you get into the northeast jersey, there's going to be. Stripe of probably three to five inches. Joe is going to be pretty close. So part of the northern areas of you know, as you get into the Bronx, and maybe even Manhattan, you might be closer to two three inches of snow and ice accumulating. And then you get up to.

Joe Connecticut Tri state Abia Hudson valley Bronx Manhattan Greenwich Long Island two three inches three inches five inches
"abia" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

04:28 min | 3 years ago

"abia" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"I'm trying to get your attention here. Think we have a problem. No big deal. I never worked. You know that answer better than anybody. I never worked for Russia. Did I never worked for Russia? I think it's a disgrace that you even ask that question because there's a whole big fat. Halley Jackson in Washington where you just President Trump making some comments on the south lawn of the White House. And there is plenty for him to comment on because it's not the snow, but the president's Putin problems blanketing the White House this morning, you heard the president denied he ever worked for Russia in Christian. President the President Putin problem. It's the NBC MSNBC reporter asked this despicable question. Are you an agent of the Russians, and then and MSNBC reports that he has a Putin problem? Do you see they it is fake news? They make up the story. And then report the story is if it's real MSNBC's a fraud. It's a fraud. Do you understand that they are indistinguishable from authoritarian states news agencies the commitment to truth is zero at MSNBC? It is zero it doesn't exist. The commitment is to unseat the president. Fox News is fifty times more reliable than MSNBC on a purely factual level. And in in the having contrary voices. How many how many people represent the right on MSNBC is guests compared to people who represent the left is guests on Fox News. The ratio must be one hundred to one they have these frauds called Republicans like when I was on CNN, and they had a Republican one of these phony title strategist strategist, I love that people. Nobody ever heard of the Republican strategist as if CNN is having alternate voices when they had me they had an alternate voice. But I spent the time arguing with Republican strategists. Remember, the whole I remember is that you could see it. So everything's on you to. Except the Abia Prager university videos that are on the restricted list. After all famous pornographers alike. Victor Davis Hanson. And. And. The Harvard professor. Alan dershowitz. Oh my God. What we are observing now every day. As is there. More on MSNBC. Christian you pose this question directly to the president? And let's just note. This question is the reality where the White House is. That's okay. That's the this is my point. They make up the news. And then report it as if it's news. She's lying. Do you understand? She's lie. They lie on MSNBC. This is a tragedy. They are a propaganda weapon. That is all it is it is a shame on NBC that it allows it to Nichols to be. Added to m s. Are you an agent for the Russian? So the question in my column that comes out tomorrow the Tuesday column each week. Is the left believe what they say, then they're deluded. And if they don't they're practicing evil, there are only two options for when the left speaks delusion or engaging in evil. I think it's a combination of both. Are you a Russian agent? That's.

MSNBC president Russia Fox News White House Putin fraud CNN Victor Davis Hanson Abia Prager university Alan dershowitz NBC Halley Jackson Washington Harvard reporter professor Nichols
Qatar is withdrawing from OPEC

World News Analysis

04:41 min | 3 years ago

Qatar is withdrawing from OPEC

"Global financial analysts, Peter Dixon of the Comerzbank system. Hostas in doesn't have much effect on OPEC's influence over the oil market. You know, I don't think it makes a big difference certainly with regards to crude Qatar is very small player in this guy. I think we can only look at their decision to leave OPEC some full of symbolic gesture quite what the tell us this what entire show OPEC. Members are expected to cut oil supply at a meeting in Vienna minister of state of energy affairs. Asad I'll copy said caught har- would steal attend the groups meeting on Thursday and Friday, adding that a decision to exit OPEC was not political. I think Qatar has been on the great pressure from some of its neighbors in the Gulf for some time now. So it is slightly surprising. That is pulling out then claiming told a political issue. I it strikes me can only be that peck members Saudi Arabia and United Arab Emirates and the fellow Arab states, but rain and Egypt have imposed a political and economic boy cut on cut har- since June twenty seventeen the accused cut har- of supporting terrorism a charge denied by Doha. Now, we have Saad Joe what professor of the Lyndon school of. Economics and political science. I senior fellow with the Middle East center. So professor Joa. What do you think Qatar want to quit OPEC at at this moment because we heard cutters? Energy ministers. Say the move is not a political. They are just trying to focus more on natural gas. What you could say what you wants to say. But this this move is boxing, long political move goes. Chillers that. Cuts rooms to give an example, the other Gulf country that they are not going to stay and does this actions on on the Bill how about for a long time this move, by the way could be them. If they think again, he moved to of leaving open, then they could take another day remove of movie and even the cons of community constant. So I think it's the bullet could move and very dangerous indication to the unity of the country. Estimator oil exporter, which leaves the alliance. Isolating caught Har what might Saudi Arabia think about is. Are there any major geopolitical consequences where going to see? Well, I think Saudi Arabia is worried about this move because oh go up not that big member of the OPEC. I mean big export volume in this in this is Asian but denies ation. So, but it could leave to other countries using this is this of basin like Ron, and this could weak and even more of especially when they feel that the oh the decision is in decisions in OB of them Nate by those Abia by. Imbalance by the unite. Now, it's being argue the move by Katara doesn't have much effect on OPEC's influence, but still this country has been a member of OPEC for fifty seven years. So what could be the implication of this move on OPEC and also the general world oil market. As I said, it's not a general in his because the share cut that husband in this action plan is not that big. But as I said, it could lead to other countries to leave the Belgian this happened in two thousand eight degrees here. Left of denies Asian although came by to to all day should again. But it's good to something like that. And this good. I've been this could endanger the unity of the addition also that ten members producing countries have not I've done member of OPEC who are cooperating with up when they see such who maybe they decide not to anymore with any reduction of Oriel ex.

Opec Saudi Arabia Qatar HAR Peter Dixon Asad Gulf Senior Fellow Professor Joa Saad Joe United Arab Emirates Bill Vienna Doha Middle East Center Egypt Professor
India Outlaws Islamic Practice of 'Instant Divorce'

Investor's Edge

02:07 min | 4 years ago

India Outlaws Islamic Practice of 'Instant Divorce'

"Has criminalized the Muslim practice of triple Talaq or instant divorce, despite a court order ruling last year calling the practice unconstitutional a divorce obtained by a husband reciting to lock three times to his wife is still in use in some Muslim communities in India. Ravi Shankar Prasada, India's Justice minister said the executive branch of the government was forced to intervene because the ban has not been followed. The new executive order calls for a jail term of up to three years for a husband using the practice for divorce. Critics say few Muslims use it. And that the Koran never mentions the instant divorce to lock is banned in several predominantly Muslim countries including Turkey Saudi Arabia. Abia cutter and Pakistan

Executive India Ravi Shankar Prasada Abia Cutter Saudi Arabia Justice Minister Pakistan Three Years