19 Burst results for "Abby Wambach"

"abby wambach" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

Skimm'd from The Couch

06:04 min | Last week

"abby wambach" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

"Hey everyone. This . show might sound a bit different today because we're skimming from three different couches. . The scam is still working from home for the time being because of covid nineteen. . Today, , we have a very special guest joining us abby Wambach is here with us on skin from the couch she is a two time Olympic gold medalist, , a FIFA World Cup champion, , and a member of the national soccer hall of fame. . Also, , she hasn't slowed down in retirement she is now a New York Times. . Author and equal pay activists. . We I had the pleasure of meeting abby when we spoke to her wife, , Glennon Doyle on the show in March and we dragged her onto the podcast as well, , and if you haven't listened to that episode, , go check it out. . It's a good one abby. . Thank you so much for joining us today. . Welcome to skin from the catch. . Yeah. . Thanks for having me. . I'm so thrilled and honored to be with you all on three different couches. . Thou-. . Before. . We jump into our first question I have to tell you I was looking at our prep for this and there was one bullet in here. . That has really made me laugh as I have to share it, , which is that you used to have a special card that got you a free Burrito a day from AAA but it stopped working when you're retired <hes> that seems passive aggressive for sure to Poli what the F.. . Yeah. . So when I first got this card, , it was Gosh I must've been ten years ago now and you know like the gold cards portly for life like essentially my name is on it and you guys don't know how I go way back. . From the early days and I mean I would get a Burrito. . Day You guys we're both creatures of habits. . I respect this. . Yeah. . It was crazy and this is before we really knew how many calories were in each burrito. . Bowl that I would make or Burrito early days. . and. . So then yeah, , of course when I retired, , I was super excited to still be able to get one free Burrito a week for year, , but they never really checked up on it but then I think when I got a family when I married Glenn and attained. . That you know fifteen dollar meal. . Turned into a sixty five dollar meal or seventy dollars meal for the whole family and pull was like I. . Don't know if we're GONNA keep floating this for her so. . It was a good run while it lasted I'm sorry that you've struggled with that but I did make me laugh as read. . So, we're , going to jump into our very first question. . We'd like to ask everybody it just skim your resume skin my resume. . It's so funny because when you retire, , that's like that's essentially what I've had to do over the last four or five years of my life since retiring from playing on the national team, , and if people don't really know I played for a long time on our women's national team. . So Ski. . My life I'm the youngest of seven children I grew up in Rochester New York, , and I went to the University of Florida and played soccer there for four seasons where after I was drafted number two by the way just remember this folks you don't get drafted number one. . You can still succeed I was drafted number two out of college to go play for a team called The Washington freedom the best player in. . The world at the time. . Mia. . Hamm played on that team and it really changed my life because we were able to develop a connection that then transferred into me getting called into the national team and playing on the national team in scoring goals in the national team, , and then I had a pretty long career representing his country <hes> won a gold medal. . I want a couple of medals actually I won a fee. . For Women's World Cup. . World. . Cup. . I should say it doesn't matter if you're a guy or girl that's pretty awesome in my retirement I have kind of taken on this activism role that when I play ironically when I played I was a little bit more like just go and do my job and we were going to show our activism rather than talk about it. . But when you quit playing, , you gotta actually transfer that. . Because I can't play anymore I can't show it in the ways that I used to. . So I've transitioned into becoming a public speaker and an activist and apparent and wife, , and that is my skin. . Has a great skin? ? What is it like to be really good at something where young 'cause I have? ? No clue. . Yeah I mean it's confidence building you know I felt like. . Okay. . I know that I'm good at this thing over here but I think you know all of us have our little things right? ? Like no matter what kind of. . Place we grew up or family we grew up in or what kind of trauma we we experienced as a child because we all do some of US feel like we're unlovable my case in particular some of us were neglected. . Some of us were over parented like we all have problems inside of our family dynamics that for me really allowed me to and gave me the courage to propel in this kind of an individualistic career. . So when I was young I kind of was a very big risk taker. . I was a free spirit is what they called me, , I think that's what they call children who don't follow the rules as much as their parents want them to and I think that the other side of that coin is I was really trying to get the attention of my parents, , right. . So the very thing that might have felt trauma or hardship from in my childhood is the very thing that made me successful. . So I have to always remember that like as much as I as young as seven children. . As much as all of us wanted the attention of our parents, , I do think that kind of parent team actually shaped me and and allowed me to explore this competitiveness inside. . In this drive and this embiid to go after what I needed and what I wanted. . So I give a lot of credit to that form of parenting into that trauma

abby Wambach New York Times Oscar Mayer Weisberg Carly Glennon Doyle FIFA Bowl soccer Olympic
Abby Wambach: If you're not a good leader on the bench, you cannot call yourself a good leader on the field.

Skimm'd from The Couch

06:04 min | Last week

Abby Wambach: If you're not a good leader on the bench, you cannot call yourself a good leader on the field.

"Hey everyone. This show might sound a bit different today because we're skimming from three different couches. The scam is still working from home for the time being because of covid nineteen. Today, we have a very special guest joining us abby Wambach is here with us on skin from the couch she is a two time Olympic gold medalist, a FIFA World Cup champion, and a member of the national soccer hall of fame. Also, she hasn't slowed down in retirement she is now a New York Times. Author and equal pay activists. We I had the pleasure of meeting abby when we spoke to her wife, Glennon Doyle on the show in March and we dragged her onto the podcast as well, and if you haven't listened to that episode, go check it out. It's a good one abby. Thank you so much for joining us today. Welcome to skin from the catch. Yeah. Thanks for having me. I'm so thrilled and honored to be with you all on three different couches. Thou-. Before. We jump into our first question I have to tell you I was looking at our prep for this and there was one bullet in here. That has really made me laugh as I have to share it, which is that you used to have a special card that got you a free Burrito a day from AAA but it stopped working when you're retired that seems passive aggressive for sure to Poli what the F.. Yeah. So when I first got this card, it was Gosh I must've been ten years ago now and you know like the gold cards portly for life like essentially my name is on it and you guys don't know how I go way back. From the early days and I mean I would get a Burrito. Day You guys we're both creatures of habits. I respect this. Yeah. It was crazy and this is before we really knew how many calories were in each burrito. Bowl that I would make or Burrito early days. and. So then yeah, of course when I retired, I was super excited to still be able to get one free Burrito a week for year, but they never really checked up on it but then I think when I got a family when I married Glenn and attained. That you know fifteen dollar meal. Turned into a sixty five dollar meal or seventy dollars meal for the whole family and pull was like I. Don't know if we're GONNA keep floating this for her so. It was a good run while it lasted I'm sorry that you've struggled with that but I did make me laugh as read. So, we're going to jump into our very first question. We'd like to ask everybody it just skim your resume skin my resume. It's so funny because when you retire, that's like that's essentially what I've had to do over the last four or five years of my life since retiring from playing on the national team, and if people don't really know I played for a long time on our women's national team. So Ski. My life I'm the youngest of seven children I grew up in Rochester New York, and I went to the University of Florida and played soccer there for four seasons where after I was drafted number two by the way just remember this folks you don't get drafted number one. You can still succeed I was drafted number two out of college to go play for a team called The Washington freedom the best player in. The world at the time. Mia. Hamm played on that team and it really changed my life because we were able to develop a connection that then transferred into me getting called into the national team and playing on the national team in scoring goals in the national team, and then I had a pretty long career representing his country won a gold medal. I want a couple of medals actually I won a fee. For Women's World Cup. World. Cup. I should say it doesn't matter if you're a guy or girl that's pretty awesome in my retirement I have kind of taken on this activism role that when I play ironically when I played I was a little bit more like just go and do my job and we were going to show our activism rather than talk about it. But when you quit playing, you gotta actually transfer that. Because I can't play anymore I can't show it in the ways that I used to. So I've transitioned into becoming a public speaker and an activist and apparent and wife, and that is my skin. Has a great skin? What is it like to be really good at something where young 'cause I have? No clue. Yeah I mean it's confidence building you know I felt like. Okay. I know that I'm good at this thing over here but I think you know all of us have our little things right? Like no matter what kind of. Place we grew up or family we grew up in or what kind of trauma we we experienced as a child because we all do some of US feel like we're unlovable my case in particular some of us were neglected. Some of us were over parented like we all have problems inside of our family dynamics that for me really allowed me to and gave me the courage to propel in this kind of an individualistic career. So when I was young I kind of was a very big risk taker. I was a free spirit is what they called me, I think that's what they call children who don't follow the rules as much as their parents want them to and I think that the other side of that coin is I was really trying to get the attention of my parents, right. So the very thing that might have felt trauma or hardship from in my childhood is the very thing that made me successful. So I have to always remember that like as much as I as young as seven children. As much as all of us wanted the attention of our parents, I do think that kind of parent team actually shaped me and and allowed me to explore this competitiveness inside. In this drive and this embiid to go after what I needed and what I wanted. So I give a lot of credit to that form of parenting into that trauma

Abby Wambach Soccer New York Times Glennon Doyle Gold Medal Fifa Olympic United States Washington Bowl Glenn Hamm SKI Rochester University Of Florida New York
Natalie Portman among A-listers bringing pro women's soccer team to Los Angeles

TIME's Top Stories

04:49 min | 3 weeks ago

Natalie Portman among A-listers bringing pro women's soccer team to Los Angeles

"Natalie Portman among those launching women's soccer team in Los Angeles to highlight heroes that are women by an m peterson of the associated, press. Actress Natalie Portman and venture capitalist. Karen, Nordmann lead a group that will bring an expansion national women's Soccer League team to the Los Angeles area in twenty, twenty two. The team tentatively named Angel. City will bring the League to eleven teams. Louisville AFC will join the nine current. NWS L. Clubs next season. Portman. Nordmann are joined by gaming. Entrepreneur Julie Erman. The consortium President in the majority female group others involved include actors, evil Longoria. America Ferrara, Jennifer Garner and Ouzo a Deuba. Tech Entrepreneur and Reddit Co founder Alexis Oh Hainian the husband of tennis star. Serena, Williams is the lead investor through his firm initialized capital. Portman Nordmann and urban all have a financial stake in the team. I think it's so important to have role models and heroes that are women for kids both boys and girls to see, and it's just such an incredible sport in that it really is a team Sport Portman, said in an interview with the Associated Press. You see one woman success, and all the others are cheering her on because one woman success is the whole team's success among the founding group are more than a dozen former players, including mia a ham, Abby Wambach and Julie Foudy. Other female business leaders. Portman said she heard Wambach. A former US national team. Forward speak at a time is up event and started thinking about how female athletes are regarded in society. Then she and Nordmann met Becca Rue, the executive director of the US Women's National Team Players Association. We started going to games, and we just got so into it, and it was just kind of a revolution to see my son and. And his friends, these little eight year, old boys at the time wanting to wear their REPEA-, no jerseys and Alex Morgan Jerseys I was like. Wow, this would be a different world. It wasn't unusual to them at all. Portman said there were hints that the group was coming together last year when Portman Gardner Longoria and other celebrities went to a national team exhibition game at L. AFC stadium before the World Cup. The women also reached out to a local supporters group that has been campaigning to bring a team to Los Angeles. The plan is to bring on additional investors as the team takes shape. We knew that there would be a strong and passionate supporters group here to support this and from there it was about. How do we do this in the right way? How do we do this differently Urman said? The group is partnering with the La Eighty Four Foundation. A nonprofit formed after the nineteen eighty four Los Angeles Olympics that promotes youth sports. Angel City also announced its formal support of the foundations play the fund aimed at helping kids in minority and underserved communities. We believe these players need to be playing on one of the best stages in the world, but we also know that we have the power and the platform and the voice to make a meaningful impact in our community. Erm, said, and so it's important for us to do that from day one in the same way that we are building to put eleven incredible players on the field from day one. The NWS cell, which began play in twenty, thirteen was the first professional team sport to return to action in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic with the challenge. Cup, tournament, in Utah, the semifinals are set for Wednesday. The official name of the Los Angeles Club and where it will play are expected to be announced later this year. The growth trajectory of the NWS L. is incredibly exciting, but we also need to be strategic and thoughtful about how fast we expand and the communities. We partner with and W ESL, commissioner. Lisa Baird said in a statement Tuesday. We've long sought the right partner in L. A. Considering the NWS L. Fan base that already exists in the region and the massive interest in women's soccer in general.

Natalie Portman Portman Nordmann Portman Gardner Longoria Los Angeles Abby Wambach Soccer United States National Team Players Associat Los Angeles Olympics Los Angeles Club League Julie Erman Angel Louisville Afc La Eighty Four Foundation Associated Press Alex Morgan America Ferrara Partner
"abby wambach" Discussed on Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing

Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing

11:53 min | 2 months ago

"abby wambach" Discussed on Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing

"Hearing from people like Abby. Wambach David Chang. Bill Gates Mary. J. Blige Eli Manning and Katie couric. Well it was inspiring. The words are meaningful not just to graduate but to anyone taking on the world so for today's episode. Thought I pick up you inspiring lessons. I heard and commencement life lessons that can be applied to marketing and business starting some advice from X. Alphabets Moonshot factory and it comes from the captain. Moon shots himself astro teller for as long as I can remember. I've wanted to create an invention machine not an actual physical machine but a place where groups of passionate talented people can throw themselves unleashed an unfiltered at the problems. They care about most and emerge with radical solutions. That are ten times better than anything. That's been possible before I've always imagined such a place at the love child of nineteen sixties NASA and Willy Wonka's chocolate factory. I've been trying various iterations of this since I was in my twenties. And I'm now ten years into building a moonshot factory a place where we bring the audacity and them embodied by the space race to inventing in launching technologies. That could help the world's most pressing problems problems like food scarcity internet connectivity in clean energy born Google X. now just acts we've created things like self driving cars delivery drones and barely the healthcare arm of alphabet. What bothers me is the X. Shouldn't be the only moonshot factory? We need more many more. Not just big formal moonshot factories. We need millions more people waking up every day more creative more brave more urgent to find tech solutions to the world's biggest problems I know. There's lots of intelligence desire in resources being invested already. No one gets up Monday morning saying this week. I'm going to make a grandma progress. And yet that is almost exclusively. What happens and it doesn't need to be that way. We are all superheroes. The ability and aspiration is hair even if it's buried deep in some of us what's holding us back. As individuals and organizations is the strong gravitational pull towards conventional ways of thinking and behaving most of us have been conditioned by the environment around us not to fail not to take risks not to make anyone uncomfortable especially if that person is your boss so most of us ended up being too cautious too afraid rock the status quo or mess. Something up and the irony is it works. The other way around the most powerful and painful epiphany of my life was to stop putting my inner Weirdo. You don't get joy power money a sense of purpose. Whatever you crave by protecting yourself you get those things and you protect yourself. Best by unleashing yourself. Everyone thinks it's someone else's job to come up with the weird new ideas and take big risks being companies think radical thinking is for startups startup. Say It's the big guys who have all the resources. Universities do great research but aren't set up to build real world solutions governments get mired in short term problems and there. You have it suddenly. It's no one's job even when it should be everyone's job to help solve the problems of our time. I'm forty nine. I've had to create a special brand for myself is a useful crazy person because I'm supposed to know better so I need air cover for saying things that aren't normal. Your ideas are unfettered. Your perspectives are fresh. And you're being young gives you air cover for throwing out crazy ideas so go for it. Let them rip. You have another big advantage. You don't already know the answers and unlike the experts you know you don't know the answers. There are still lots of jobs in which experience saves a ton of time and hassle but when the answers to current problems are far over the horizon and all the rules have suddenly changed. Like we've just seen the experts. Believe they know the solution and just have to implement? It is why they will fail. Experimenting iterating and learning is the only way forward and doing that is a lot easier with your advantage. You can admit ahead of time. You don't have the solution upfront. For extremely complex problems like the world is facing. Today there are no answers. There is no playbook Astros says about embracing your inner Weirdo. It's advice we've heard on this program a lot whether it was shaggy talking about tackling music in a new way for Scott Hagedorn talking about new ways looking at data or even David Solomon the CEO Goldman Sachs talking about embracing his hobby as a DJ in his free time. Speaking of David in his commencement speech he shared a lesson. About time a commodity. You can't make more off. Here's how he learned to make the most of it. I've worked on Wall Street for over three decades. Our work involves at times array of valuable commodities stock spots gold silver oil. You name it but even a beggar. We'll tell you the most precious commodity of all time no matter how smart and creative you may be you cannot create more time and once you've spended. There's no way to get back one of the great lessons. My father taught me was the value of time and more important how to be a good steward of this finite commodity. I was a teenager frustrated that I couldn't fit into my schedule. Everything that I needed and wanted to get done. Academic sports friends rest of high school life so my father had me go through an exercise. I'll never forget with simple printed calendar. He had me right in each day's box what I needed to get done including eating and sleeping and how long. I thought I needed to do it. I protested of course but when I was done I realized that I still hadn't filled my day. There was more time if I spent it. Wisely gradually learned to be very intentional. With my time how I spent it what. I wasn't willing to give up a budget my time a lot. Tighter in the process discovered more of it. We're time to get things done to explore new things to do. What really mattered to me? To this day I make sure that even with a jam packed schedule of a CEO. I make time outside my day to day to be with people from different industries and with different backgrounds time spent fostering relationships with diverse people who enrich my thinking and challenge. My assumptions makes life a whole lot. More interesting it also makes me a better person and in turn a better CEO. I hope you'll be a good steward of the gift of time. Invested wisely and yourself and others with people who think differently than you do people you love people who love you some who challenge you and more than a few believe in you as we looked on social media for themes to cover confidence is one thing that always comes up. How do you build it for yourself? But also how do you infuse it? In your team's culture. Abby Wambach has bought sombat as two time Olympic gold medalist and fiba women's World Cup champion. She describes the moment she helped. Secure the World Cup Championship. And why believe in yourself is just as important as believing in the greatness of your team. I see my teammates running toward me from every direction on the field and from the bench. They're screaming and laughing and hugging I five in chest bumping and as they rush towards me each of their amazed faces asking. Did we just do this? Did we just save our World Cup life in the last second? What the Hell just happened? What happened is that we believed what happened is that we never stopped believing. There's a chance that the national teams loyal Fan Club. The American outlaws cheer from the stands. It has become the life blood pumping through our national teams veins. It goes like this. I I believe I believe that we. I believe that we will win. I believe that we would win. I believe that we will win graduates as you step out into an uncertain world. I WanNa to tell you why this chant should become the life blood pumping through your veins to. I believe you must believe in the I. You must believe in yourself. That World Cup played doesn't happen if each player doesn't step up and claimed her specific power and skill to deliver the impossible Christie. Krieger Carly Pino each had to believe she was good enough and ready to execute her part within the broader play. None of those women could alone control the ultimate outcome of the game but each was hell bent on controlling what she could control her part her moment. Her belief collective success is determined by individual accountability. The greatest teams are made up of individual players who each relentlessly believe in their own greatness graduates. In this moment. As you step out into the world you don't know what fields you'll be on how high the stakes may be. But you can know this for sure. There is a part out there that only you can play when the ball come. See you and it will. You will have to decide that you're good enough. No one else can decide that for you. Be Bold be audacious believe in yourself especially when no one else does and when the ball does come to you. When it's your turn to make a difference show up like our collective future depends on you because it does I. I believe I believe that we must believe in the we speaking of teams chef. David Chang has been a star in the restaurant scene for a while now. He cut his teeth with legendary Momofuku. And he's now an author and TV personalities well but in speech to young graduates. He made it clear that one of the biggest lessons he learned along the way is. It isn't always about you. Here's how he learned to take the focus off himself and think about his team's happiness..

CEO David Chang Abby Wambach X. Alphabets Moonshot NASA Bill Gates Mary Katie couric Willy Wonka David J. Blige Google Eli Manning Goldman Sachs Astros Fan Club Krieger Carly Pino Scott Hagedorn
"abby wambach" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

02:02 min | 8 months ago

"abby wambach" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

"Uh-huh you guys know. I'm a huge fan of war. Parker glasses they have the cutest frames quality top notch and to me. Maybe the best thing of all their glasses started just ninety five dollars that includes prescription lenses with anti-glare and anti scratch coatings. So if you need help picking your favorite favorite new glasses out. You just answer a few questions. If they've set up for you and Worby Parker will show you frames that are personalized to fit. Like your face ace and your style. If you have an Iphone X.. Make sure you download the worby Parker APP and then you can use their brand new virtual try on feature sure which is just like what is this world that we live in. You'll be able to see like the color the texture the size of each frame style. Right on your face just using your phone. Listen to what I'm saying to you. There are seven people that live in my house and six of us cannot see every single one of us have at least one pair of worby Parker's every one of us and it's so incredibly easy because you don't have to go anywhere like you get to pick out five different frames and they ship them to you for free. You can try them on at home. You mail them back for free and then boom they send you your glasses to order. You're at home trion glasses. Here's what you do go to war. Be Parker Dot com slash for the love. And you take the quiz so that you can find the perfect frame for you so one more time. It's WORBY PARKER DOT com slash for the love to order your absolute free free at home. Try on Pairs. You'RE GONNA love him already. Know that you are an eye shirty to like worby Parker's for life. Uh.

"abby wambach" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

03:59 min | 1 year ago

"abby wambach" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"This week's conversation is with the Abby Wambach you know, her name. She's made a dent in the sport world foreshore. She's a two time Olympic gold. Medalist FIBA World Cup champion and the highest all time international goal score for male and female soccer players, flat out. She's done it at the world stage. World-leading is joy to have this conversation with her in. She goes beyond sport. So she's used sport to understand the human condition understand her experience in sport and translate those insights to others. Now her primary lens is on equality and inclusion, she's the author of the number one New York Times bestseller wolf pack, it's a quick little deep read full stories in insights, and her point of view about how to help people become better, specifically women Abby is also the co founder of wolf pack and. Ever. It's a training program that is revolutionizing leadership development for women. She also sits on the board of together rising all women led nonprofit organization that has revolutionized grassroots philanthropy by raising over sixteen million for women families and children in crisis. Now in this conversation. We discuss everything from what drove Abby to be great how she's a justed to life after soccer, and why she cares so deeply about creating an equal playing field for everyone. So with that, let's jump right into this week's conversation with ABBIE, Womack, Abby. How are you? I'm so good. How are you, man? Great. So thank you for this conversation seem to you. I think that especially with people who you know, we don't do the same thing. But I think we admire very similar parts of the things that we do, and so much of it. There's so much overlap and I love the fact that you come at it from a totally different perspective. And there's so much to learn, there's so much to gain from conversations like this. So thanks for having me great. I'm so on your body of work speaks for itself. Like you have changed the game. You've influenced. Generation of people you have demonstrated courage through ability, and so not only are you extraordinaire on the field. But your life speaks to that. Same extraordinary ways off the field. So like before we get going legitimate. Congratulations on a life. Well lived in your only, you know, halfway through or three one quarter of the way through so, yeah, before we go backwards. What is next for you? When you think about the you know, you're not nearly halfway through. But what is the next phase for you? Look like. I think that that's been the question I have been asking myself since I I left the game. That's the hardest question to answer for, for athletes who've dedicated their whole lives this thing this one pursuit. I started a leadership company that I'm really proud of really excited about signing client clients right now in the corporate world to help women achieve high levels of success in the corporate world. You know, my belief system this is so bizarre because I'm very fascinated with corporate culture in how that needs to change in a lot of ways for us to really achieve any kind of level of equality that we really dream of. People don't think about it, but the amount of products that get put out into the world, the amount of ideas that you even have about the world are created through the corporations that you support that you buy that, that you participate.

Abby Wambach soccer FIBA New York Times co founder ABBIE Womack three one quarter
"abby wambach" Discussed on Meaningful Conversations with Maria Shriver

Meaningful Conversations with Maria Shriver

03:53 min | 1 year ago

"abby wambach" Discussed on Meaningful Conversations with Maria Shriver

"And I learned this at a very later age that when I go to speak. I need fifteen minutes by myself in the room, and I had trouble asking for it. I had trouble in this. Same thing going I need this and Blake. Yeah. But, but but you don't really need it. I'm like, no, actually, I really do need it. And then struggling to say what I need and feeling that it's okay for to need. Yeah. Got you know. I just interviewed Abby Wambach, right? Yes. She's got the new book wolf pack, and she there's a rule in there, which the old rule was be grateful. Just be grateful and do what they ask you to do. Her new rule is be grateful and ask for what you deserve. And she said that gratitude oath. Thank you so much for the opportunity, and I won't cause any problems. I won't ask for what I need. I'll let you know, you can pay me less than you're paying the guys speaking, you know, like just be grateful that someone is giving you the opportunity she said is just such bullshit. And what's interesting. Also, I think about that. And it also goes over. I think I've seen this in politics as well. The person may have that philosophy. But then the people around the person are also trying to might not share that same philosophy, and they want you to do X Y. And so you can see that in politics. The person may have a desire to be bipartisan. They may have a desire to be inclusive or be courageous invulnerable. But the people around that person want to get in the fight wanna be partisan wanna be negative. So kind of not only your own boundaries your own philosophy. But. The importance of surrounding team your team. And so like when I met you. I think one person working for you. Yeah. I think I was with my manager at the time. Yeah. And that was the new relationship. Just how we connected I. Yeah. And so you have built a team have and you have your siblings. You're just telling my sisters worked for so that some people might go. Whoa. I don't wanna have my siblings. Isn't that kind of is that strange dynamic, but the importance of building a team so that you can be in the arena, can you speak a little bit about how to build a team that shares your philosophy of protective of your boundaries. Yeah. No. I think I think about Ashley embarrassed. And I like we've all done enough therapy that we might sisters that we can we keep that stuff really clean. And we're really good at like, hey, here's a story. I'm making that let's circle back and talk through this. We're we're skilled that just because of probably all therapy. We've done. Yeah. I think I think if there's one message I give my team all the time is. We know who we are. And we make decisions that serve the work and not everyone that we're going to partner with is trying to serve the work that we in the way that we're trying to serve the work. So we're going to be mindful of that. And we don't jump on other people's timelines or agendas love it love it. We don't jump on other people's timelines Origen. We just don't do that. That's always a mistake for us. One of the things that really struck me in the special was how we should all over the people. We love the most. That's such a big subject. But I want people to hear it. Because so many people do make the person closest to them the person they rely on love the most they make their life the most difficult. Why the I think the classic answer is safety. We think that we can get away with mistreating people that love us the most. And so I think there's different ways of dealing with. Shame some people hide some people people, please. And some of us you shame to fight. Shame. And we most of us use all three of those strategies though. Shame shields. But unfortunately, we mow them. Shame storm in the shame storm. What she'll do you grab? Do you? Go into perfectionism. Do you go into people pleasing?.

Abby Wambach Blake partner Ashley fifteen minutes
"abby wambach" Discussed on And Especially You

And Especially You

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"abby wambach" Discussed on And Especially You

"Today's episode is about being brave and finding our voices you ready. Let's get into it. You know, when I was a kid a lot of the world seemed black and white good and bad, right and wrong. You get the picture. I thought that being brave with something you either were or weren't something scary would happen. And how you reacted in the next instant determined. Whether you were a brave person or a total scaredy cat. There's a fire and you rush into rescue your neighbor. That's bravery, right? But having a difficult conversation with a co-worker. Well, that's not brave or is it. I think of Glennon Doyle as an expert in exactly this bravery in the face of tough decisions we have to make every day. She's brave in her faith and her barrel. Essy's about motherhood. She's been brave in her recovery from addiction brave and sharing her story about divorce from her husband and brave and sharing her love story with her wife. The great Abby Wambach on tour. She went onstage with Abby to share some stories and thoughts about courage and finding our voices as young girls and has grown women. And of course, it really connected the dots for me and for so many women in the audience about our own experience. When I listened to Glenn, and I always find myself nodding, you know, just Ming. Coming the whole time. And when I'm not moving I'm belly laughing because she sue real about at all. So let's settle in for some of her truth and share some good laughs. So okay, we've got to kit. We've got three kids we've got three kids. Crushing? Rushing it. So we've got three kids for sure. Okay. Three kids. One's a boy and two girls. Okay. Until they tell us different. Okay. So it's actually really important, folks. Right. That's good. Thank you, baby. So the two girls the middle one her name is she is very much like me bless, her heart..

Abby Wambach Essy Glennon Doyle Glenn
"abby wambach" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

03:43 min | 1 year ago

"abby wambach" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"You want me to go first? Well, sure. No, I think that what what makes me feel despair is just how loss it feels like parts of our government feel to me. And what makes me feel hopeful is that I know that it won't last forever. Yeah. Well, I mean, I think for me, the despair and the the hope coming the exact same place, right? Like, I keep hearing all over the place. Like, oh my God. What's going on right now? You know, everybody's suddenly so racists. Everybody's so go homophobic, and everybody's so and okay. But like everyone's all the people have always been like that. It's just it's just that. Now, we can see it right and people are talking about. Now, it's at the surface. So like when you ask people who are actually have been affected by racism their whole life. When you ask people of color. They're not super surprised right now. Right. They're like, okay. So thanks. You just got to the party. Right. So so that's why I think the despair in the hope or in the exact same place like we can about this all the time because we give like destruction when she scared of it or too scared of apocalypse like who wants things to stay the same. Not me. You know, you know, we get so scared of the ends of the world, you know, as women the first the first story I ever learned about God. Okay. And being a woman was okay. So everything was great. And God put you to people in a in a in a garden, and no, no, I of one person that guarded that was Adam and then he gave birth to eve. Okay. So we're supposed to take that one on the chin. I right. Okay. All right. So men give birth to women. Okay. It's not what I've seen in my life. But got it. Okay. And then everything was fine until the woman wanted something. And then she went for it. And then all hell broke loose and everything was terrible forever. Thank you for joining us. Go in peace. And then we're like why are women so confused about what they want and food. You know, I don't know. She's won an apple what if she wanted to forgive pizza like this and. What I think about over and over again is you know, what that story does what every story. We learn about being a woman does is make us start to fear. What we desire? Okay. Women have to fear what we desire. What women want is bad? What women want is scary? Which makes us doubt ourselves over and over again what we want. We don't know what we want. We don't even know where we want to go to dinner. Who knows we don't know. Okay. But what I find. Talking to women all over the world. Is that what women want is? So good. That if women started to go for it power structures would tumble right? Sue, doesn't it make sense that every single power structure would have to make women doubt what they desire because if women went for the what they desired. The world would crumble and other worlds based on equality injustice in love and peace would have to be rebuilt in their place. Right. So what I want women to do is just cool for the apple and let it burn. Glennon Doyle, and Abby Wambach, thank you so much. Thank you for having. Glennon Doyle is creator of the online community, mama Sterry and founder and president of together.

Glennon Doyle founder and president apple Adam Abby Wambach mama Sterry Sue
"abby wambach" Discussed on This Movie Changed Me

This Movie Changed Me

03:43 min | 1 year ago

"abby wambach" Discussed on This Movie Changed Me

"You want me to go first? Well, sure. No, I think that what what makes me feel despair is just how loss it feels like parts of our government feel to me. And what makes me feel hopeful is that I know that it won't last forever. Yeah. Well, I mean, I think for me, the despair and the the hope coming the exact same place, right? Like, I keep hearing all over the place. Like, oh my God. What's going on right now? You know, everybody's suddenly so racists. Everybody's so go homophobic, and everybody's so and okay. But like everyone's all the people have always been like that. It's just it's just that. Now, we can see it right and people are talking about. Now, it's at the surface. So like when you ask people who are actually have been affected by racism their whole life. When you ask people of color. They're not super surprised right now. Right. They're like, okay. So thanks. You just got to the party. Right. So so that's why I think the despair in the hope or in the exact same place like we can about this all the time because we give like destruction when she scared of it or too scared of apocalypse like who wants things to stay the same. Not me. You know, you know, we get so scared of the ends of the world, you know, as women the first the first story I ever learned about God. Okay. And being a woman was okay. So everything was great. And God put you to people in a in a in a garden, and no, no, I of one person that guarded that was Adam and then he gave birth to eve. Okay. So we're supposed to take that one on the chin. I right. Okay. All right. So men give birth to women. Okay. It's not what I've seen in my life. But got it. Okay. And then everything was fine until the woman wanted something. And then she went for it. And then all hell broke loose and everything was terrible forever. Thank you for joining us. Go in peace. And then we're like why are women so confused about what they want and food. You know, I don't know. She's won an apple what if she wanted to forgive pizza like this and. What I think about over and over again is you know, what that story does what every story. We learn about being a woman does is make us start to fear. What we desire? Okay. Women have to fear what we desire. What women want is bad? What women want is scary? Which makes us doubt ourselves over and over again what we want. We don't know what we want. We don't even know where we want to go to dinner. Who knows we don't know. Okay. But what I find. Talking to women all over the world. Is that what women want is? So good. That if women started to go for it power structures would tumble right? Sue, doesn't it make sense that every single power structure would have to make women doubt what they desire because if women went for the what they desired. The world would crumble and other worlds based on equality injustice in love and peace would have to be rebuilt in their place. Right. So what I want women to do is just cool for the apple and let it burn. Glennon Doyle, and Abby Wambach, thank you so much. Thank you for having. Glennon Doyle is creator of the online community, mama Sterry and founder and president of together.

Glennon Doyle founder and president apple Adam Abby Wambach mama Sterry Sue
"abby wambach" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"abby wambach" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Surprised you at a meeting with the plan for your sendoff commercial. And that the message was forget me which made you really happy. Yeah. Yeah. I went in there. And I've done work with Gatorade for my whole career. I've been a Gatorade athlete at the time for. I guess it was fifteen years. And so when I walked in the offices, and they sat me down, and they showed me that they were gonna make this this commercial that was going to be my commercial, my retirement commercial. Well, first of all, I was very like honored, you know, feels like rarified air to be the athlete for campaign for for Gatorade. And then the messaging that they wanted to get across to the consumer was this forget me idea. And for me, I know that sounds so bizarre because most athletes are like ego maniacs and crazy, you know into themselves. But I really feel deeply that the legacy. I wanted to leave is making sure that I Emily leaving the sport better than I found it. And so often I hold the record for most goals scored for any person on the planet. And any gender you guys. And and so people ask me all the time. There's this actually this woman from Canada Christine Sinclair that. Yeah. She she will likely break my record within the next twelve months and don't say anything, Glenn because she's she's like, no, I don't want to bring your record. But the reality and the truth is, and I really drew. I really do believe this that especially women we are here to keep pushing each other. And if somebody breaks my record that means the game is better. That means the game is growing that means other people are achieving greater bigger heights than me. And that is the kind of legacy that I can actually wrap my mind around, and you can't find success unless you are willing to let it go when it's over. I'm Krista Tippett. And this is on being with Abby Wambach and Glennon Doyle, and I feel like coming from really different directions, the two of used this really kindred language. I mean, you talk about champ that we need a champion each other and Lenin us, which is sister ING each other. Yeah. Well, sister uses the best word ever. Okay. So love this. Okay. There's these. Carpentry, sports in nails, carpentry, right Jesus This one. Okay. So. So there's this thing happens in carpentry. Okay. Where the the the main the mainstay of building is a joist. And so every once in a while the Joyce starts to weaken because there's a load on top. That's too heavy. Okay. So when that happens, they say, okay, bring some extra boards, and they put an extra board to the right of the weakening joist. And if that doesn't make a strong enough, then they bring another board, and they put it to the left of the week noise. And with an extra board to the right and an extra board to the left. The joists becomes strong enough to with withhold any load. And you know, what that carpentry system is called sister ring. I mean, it's like the guy carpenters were like, oh, we can't name this brother, and that's like too much intimacy. Then. That looks more like what the ladies would do. But it's just the most beautiful to me example of how women's support each other right and for life because sometimes the load on our on us just gets too heavy to carry by ourselves. And the mistake we make when that happens is we think we've done something wrong. But we think we've made a mistake we've gone wrong somewhere because it can't be this heavy, but if we'd never had to ask for help because we couldn't carry the load anymore, then we would miss out on the best part of life, which is just sister in and being sister'd, right or champion each other. Go. Get the ball score the goal. Yes. And I'm using the language of me need to accompany each other. Which is just another, you know, in this universe of words. But also realizing that it's that's also tricky when we get for like, saying, forget me and is very complex. And you also have a story about coaching your ten year old daughter's soccer team and somebody asking you. So you retired. What did you retire from? So wait through the season..

Gatorade Christine Sinclair Krista Tippett Abby Wambach soccer Emily Lenin Canada Joyce Glennon Doyle Glenn fifteen years twelve months ten year
"abby wambach" Discussed on This Movie Changed Me

This Movie Changed Me

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"abby wambach" Discussed on This Movie Changed Me

"Surprised you at a meeting with the plan for your sendoff commercial. And that the message was forget me which made you really happy. Yeah. Yeah. I went in there. And I've done work with Gatorade for my whole career. I've been a Gatorade athlete at the time for. I guess it was fifteen years. And so when I walked in the offices, and they sat me down, and they showed me that they were gonna make this this commercial that was going to be my commercial, my retirement commercial. Well, first of all, I was very like honored, you know, feels like rarified air to be the athlete for campaign for for Gatorade. And then the messaging that they wanted to get across to the consumer was this forget me idea. And for me, I know that sounds so bizarre because most athletes are like ego maniacs and crazy, you know into themselves. But I really feel deeply that the legacy. I wanted to leave is making sure that I Emily leaving the sport better than I found it. And so often I hold the record for most goals scored for any person on the planet. And any gender you guys. And and so people ask me all the time. There's this actually this woman from Canada Christine Sinclair that. Yeah. She she will likely break my record within the next twelve months and don't say anything, Glenn because she's she's like, no, I don't want to bring your record. But the reality and the truth is, and I really drew. I really do believe this that especially women we are here to keep pushing each other. And if somebody breaks my record that means the game is better. That means the game is growing that means other people are achieving greater bigger heights than me. And that is the kind of legacy that I can actually wrap my mind around, and you can't find success unless you are willing to let it go when it's over. I'm Krista Tippett. And this is on being with Abby Wambach and Glennon Doyle, and I feel like coming from really different directions, the two of used this really kindred language. I mean, you talk about champ that we need a champion each other and Lenin us, which is sister ING each other. Yeah. Well, sister uses the best word ever. Okay. So love this. Okay. There's these. Carpentry, sports in nails, carpentry, right Jesus This one. Okay. So. So there's this thing happens in carpentry. Okay. Where the the the main the mainstay of building is a joist. And so every once in a while the Joyce starts to weaken because there's a load on top. That's too heavy. Okay. So when that happens, they say, okay, bring some extra boards, and they put an extra board to the right of the weakening joist. And if that doesn't make a strong enough, then they bring another board, and they put it to the left of the week noise. And with an extra board to the right and an extra board to the left. The joists becomes strong enough to with withhold any load. And you know, what that carpentry system is called sister ring. I mean, it's like the guy carpenters were like, oh, we can't name this brother, and that's like too much intimacy. Then. That looks more like what the ladies would do. But it's just the most beautiful to me example of how women's support each other right and for life because sometimes the load on our on us just gets too heavy to carry by ourselves. And the mistake we make when that happens is we think we've done something wrong. But we think we've made a mistake we've gone wrong somewhere because it can't be this heavy, but if we'd never had to ask for help because we couldn't carry the load anymore, then we would miss out on the best part of life, which is just sister in and being sister'd, right or champion each other. Go. Get the ball score the goal. Yes. And I'm using the language of me need to accompany each other. Which is just another, you know, in this universe of words. But also realizing that it's that's also tricky when we get for like, saying, forget me and is very complex. And you also have a story about coaching your ten year old daughter's soccer team and somebody asking you. So you retired. What did you retire from? So wait through the season..

Gatorade Christine Sinclair Krista Tippett Abby Wambach soccer Emily Lenin Canada Joyce Glennon Doyle Glenn fifteen years twelve months ten year
"abby wambach" Discussed on This Movie Changed Me

This Movie Changed Me

04:23 min | 1 year ago

"abby wambach" Discussed on This Movie Changed Me

"And I was so happy to be there in grateful and everything and as we turned and walked off stage. I kind of looked at both of those guys. And I thought while all three of us are walking into very different retirements and. That well and to be clear in one of the way you described that is that they they were walking away with fortunes course, and you your life of hustling was just beginning. Yeah. And I think that that for me. That's when the rage started to like come to the surface and courage her. It's always got ragent at you. I'm Krista Tippett, and this is on being with Glennon Doyle and Abby Wambach. And in in the book hero you that? The chapters are all ways people had seen you write and categories you'd sometimes walked into willingly. And and sometimes is that had been an armor. Right. So it was everything from you know, or how you've seen yourself. You know, we fraud tomboy rebel teammate, lesbian, manic depressive, captain leader, romantic hero, addict failure. And then the last chapter is human. Somewhere. You said I. You had created yourself all these categories that were both generated from you, and generated externally helps create you, but shut you off from becoming human fully human Glendon has said this a lot. You know, we're all kinda like Russian nesting dolls, and as we get older, we kind of keep putting on all of these costumes, and that's what I thought for me growing up. That's what I thought I had to do to mature to age to get wisdom is to put on all these different costumes and see which one fit, and I think that now having gone through a lot of my life in granted, I'm still fairly young at thirty eight. But. I realized that the more you can actually take those costumes off and get down to that little small immobile Russian in doll. That is like who you are your true true self that is like the humanity of all of us. And we all are in there, I visited very random, but I just want to share it because it was reading us thinking. Yeah, he ended with human. Which seems like the simplest most elemental thing of all. But is really the work of a lifetime is thinking about this. When I studied theology Paul Tillich wrote, the courage to be and he's called an existential. Est. Theologian I read it when I was older because I was I was emphasized when I thought that to be that being, but the current the book is actually about how the courage it takes right? The courage is the work. So there's a little theology for today. Okay. So. Yeah. Big life turning. I kept thinking of what's the down fluctuation point? But really more like earthquake. I think where your stories converge, and Glenn and you left a marriage. You had just written a book about repairing. Doozy. You guys. So the two of you mad and married, and here's me rushing through epic history again and are now co parenting, your three children together and actually co-parenting together with their father in a really modern family. We don't like living in the same house. It's not that same house. But you're working together. Right. Yes. Also, there's really been an volition of mama Sterry now, which came first the compassion collective or the love flash mobs. Well, they'll have flash mumps. Okay. Yes. So that started a long time ago in the compassion collective is really just a a group of writers who are my friends who joined together to help the with the love with our non so talk about what that is..

Paul Tillich Glenn Glendon Krista Tippett mama Sterry Abby Wambach mumps fraud Glennon Doyle
"abby wambach" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

04:23 min | 1 year ago

"abby wambach" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"And I was so happy to be there in grateful and everything and as we turned and walked off stage. I kind of looked at both of those guys. And I thought while all three of us are walking into very different retirements and. That well and to be clear in one of the way you described that is that they they were walking away with fortunes course, and you your life of hustling was just beginning. Yeah. And I think that that for me. That's when the rage started to like come to the surface and courage her. It's always got ragent at you. I'm Krista Tippett, and this is on being with Glennon Doyle and Abby Wambach. And in in the book hero you that? The chapters are all ways people had seen you write and categories you'd sometimes walked into willingly. And and sometimes is that had been an armor. Right. So it was everything from you know, or how you've seen yourself. You know, we fraud tomboy rebel teammate, lesbian, manic depressive, captain leader, romantic hero, addict failure. And then the last chapter is human. Somewhere. You said I. You had created yourself all these categories that were both generated from you, and generated externally helps create you, but shut you off from becoming human fully human Glendon has said this a lot. You know, we're all kinda like Russian nesting dolls, and as we get older, we kind of keep putting on all of these costumes, and that's what I thought for me growing up. That's what I thought I had to do to mature to age to get wisdom is to put on all these different costumes and see which one fit, and I think that now having gone through a lot of my life in granted, I'm still fairly young at thirty eight. But. I realized that the more you can actually take those costumes off and get down to that little small immobile Russian in doll. That is like who you are your true true self that is like the humanity of all of us. And we all are in there, I visited very random, but I just want to share it because it was reading us thinking. Yeah, he ended with human. Which seems like the simplest most elemental thing of all. But is really the work of a lifetime is thinking about this. When I studied theology Paul Tillich wrote, the courage to be and he's called an existential. Est. Theologian I read it when I was older because I was I was emphasized when I thought that to be that being, but the current the book is actually about how the courage it takes right? The courage is the work. So there's a little theology for today. Okay. So. Yeah. Big life turning. I kept thinking of what's the down fluctuation point? But really more like earthquake. I think where your stories converge, and Glenn and you left a marriage. You had just written a book about repairing. Doozy. You guys. So the two of you mad and married, and here's me rushing through epic history again and are now co parenting, your three children together and actually co-parenting together with their father in a really modern family. We don't like living in the same house. It's not that same house. But you're working together. Right. Yes. Also, there's really been an volition of mama Sterry now, which came first the compassion collective or the love flash mobs. Well, they'll have flash mumps. Okay. Yes. So that started a long time ago in the compassion collective is really just a a group of writers who are my friends who joined together to help the with the love with our non so talk about what that is..

Paul Tillich Glenn Glendon Krista Tippett mama Sterry Abby Wambach mumps fraud Glennon Doyle
"abby wambach" Discussed on This Movie Changed Me

This Movie Changed Me

05:18 min | 1 year ago

"abby wambach" Discussed on This Movie Changed Me

"I'm Christa tiff it, and this is on beings. Unhurt cuts up next might unedited conversation with author Glennon, Doyle and soccer star Abby Wambach. There is a shorter produced version of this wherever you get your podcasts. It is just such an honor to have Krista Tippett here, who of course, has not only with on being. But also through civil conversations work really helped us look at what conversation and dialogue can look like. And when I was when I was talking just before I let her know that in two thousand sixteen when her book came out, I think I bought it for every single person I knew and the thank you Jackie for introducing it to me and our staff at fidelity charitable at all of us would listen to her podcast on the way into work. And then we would meet in the morning to actually just have a moment of reflection to think about what she had shared with us. And in her book. I know she mentioned there is a quote that I loved which was our world is abundant with quiet him. Hidden lives of beauty and courage. And goodness. And I think the gap between she talks about the gap between who we are. And who we want to be? And I think this life of conversation that she has been living and breathing so beautifully. It's just a gift to all of us. So Christa thank you for being here with us today. Q thing. So I was at this gathering a year ago. Where was that a New York? Yes. And it's so great to be back, and I feel there's so many I I feel very held in this room. And I was so impressed with this group. And so many women I met people whose faces I recognize again people whose names I didn't learn, but it's wonderful to be here. It's wonderful to be here with two women. I so admire and have just been looking for the right opportunity to to to get them on the show, and this just felt like it. And I think there was going to be a big dazzling introduction of them because they are both forces of nature, and I'm just I don't want to spend a lot of time going through their exhaustig exhaustive bio so they're in the program, but Abby Wambach is a Olympia in Olympia in champion soccer player. Champion. Now retired from that which we're going to get to that. Because that's kind of we're very bizarre. I three you. I I know. And you're starting a business and. A force in the world. Glenn Doyle author. I don't even know how to scribe. One of the things you talk about. Now is yourself as a radical philanthropist. Is that right? Yeah. I think my sister made that one. Okay. Sounds good. Yeah. That's what we do history. Like it. Okay. So we'll get to all of this. I. I if you listen to on being, you know, that I I have a question that I began most conversations with and it is a I asked somebody to start talking about. How they would begin to describe the religious or spiritual background of their childhood and. I wasn't going to do that today because we have a theme for this for this gathering and for this hour, which is about courage, but then agian Glennon both told me that they're really disappointed because we're ready to answer. This. You're listening to her podcast, and what it is. I mean that is actually a magical question for almost any gathering because everybody has a story sometimes that stories about the absence rather than the presence of something. But also, I think that that part of our lives is where a lot of questions reside that we actually ended up picking up in following all of our lives. So you can answer. Whatever question you went to. But you know, what I think to focus a lens on courage, and I think this is probably wrapped up in whatever is religious and spiritual in that childhood in that earliest life what you learned and internalized about courage in your childhood. I think it's a really important question. Because there's so many different ways you can define courage, and for me, and there's no such thing as fearlessness courage is the presence of fear in going anyway at I think for me as a little kid. I was the youngest seven children at all kind of answer the question that I was prepared for..

Abby Wambach Jackie Krista Tippett Glennon Glenn Doyle soccer Christa New York
"abby wambach" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:18 min | 1 year ago

"abby wambach" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"I'm Christa tiff it, and this is on beings. Unhurt cuts up next might unedited conversation with author Glennon, Doyle and soccer star Abby Wambach. There is a shorter produced version of this wherever you get your podcasts. It is just such an honor to have Krista Tippett here, who of course, has not only with on being. But also through civil conversations work really helped us look at what conversation and dialogue can look like. And when I was when I was talking just before I let her know that in two thousand sixteen when her book came out, I think I bought it for every single person I knew and the thank you Jackie for introducing it to me and our staff at fidelity charitable at all of us would listen to her podcast on the way into work. And then we would meet in the morning to actually just have a moment of reflection to think about what she had shared with us. And in her book. I know she mentioned there is a quote that I loved which was our world is abundant with quiet him. Hidden lives of beauty and courage. And goodness. And I think the gap between she talks about the gap between who we are. And who we want to be? And I think this life of conversation that she has been living and breathing so beautifully. It's just a gift to all of us. So Christa thank you for being here with us today. Q thing. So I was at this gathering a year ago. Where was that a New York? Yes. And it's so great to be back, and I feel there's so many I I feel very held in this room. And I was so impressed with this group. And so many women I met people whose faces I recognize again people whose names I didn't learn, but it's wonderful to be here. It's wonderful to be here with two women. I so admire and have just been looking for the right opportunity to to to get them on the show, and this just felt like it. And I think there was going to be a big dazzling introduction of them because they are both forces of nature, and I'm just I don't want to spend a lot of time going through their exhaustig exhaustive bio so they're in the program, but Abby Wambach is a Olympia in Olympia in champion soccer player. Champion. Now retired from that which we're going to get to that. Because that's kind of we're very bizarre. I three you. I I know. And you're starting a business and. A force in the world. Glenn Doyle author. I don't even know how to scribe. One of the things you talk about. Now is yourself as a radical philanthropist. Is that right? Yeah. I think my sister made that one. Okay. Sounds good. Yeah. That's what we do history. Like it. Okay. So we'll get to all of this. I. I if you listen to on being, you know, that I I have a question that I began most conversations with and it is a I asked somebody to start talking about. How they would begin to describe the religious or spiritual background of their childhood and. I wasn't going to do that today because we have a theme for this for this gathering and for this hour, which is about courage, but then agian Glennon both told me that they're really disappointed because we're ready to answer. This. You're listening to her podcast, and what it is. I mean that is actually a magical question for almost any gathering because everybody has a story sometimes that stories about the absence rather than the presence of something. But also, I think that that part of our lives is where a lot of questions reside that we actually ended up picking up in following all of our lives. So you can answer. Whatever question you went to. But you know, what I think to focus a lens on courage, and I think this is probably wrapped up in whatever is religious and spiritual in that childhood in that earliest life what you learned and internalized about courage in your childhood. I think it's a really important question. Because there's so many different ways you can define courage, and for me, and there's no such thing as fearlessness courage is the presence of fear in going anyway at I think for me as a little kid. I was the youngest seven children at all kind of answer the question that I was prepared for..

Abby Wambach Jackie Krista Tippett Glennon Glenn Doyle soccer Christa New York
"abby wambach" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:18 min | 1 year ago

"abby wambach" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"I'm Christa tiff it, and this is on beings. Unhurt cuts up next might unedited conversation with author Glennon, Doyle and soccer star Abby Wambach. There is a shorter produced version of this wherever you get your podcasts. It is just such an honor to have Krista Tippett here, who of course, has not only with on being. But also through civil conversations work really helped us look at what conversation and dialogue can look like. And when I was when I was talking just before I let her know that in two thousand sixteen when her book came out, I think I bought it for every single person I knew and the thank you Jackie for introducing it to me and our staff at fidelity charitable at all of us would listen to her podcast on the way into work. And then we would meet in the morning to actually just have a moment of reflection to think about what she had shared with us. And in her book. I know she mentioned there is a quote that I loved which was our world is abundant with quiet him. Hidden lives of beauty and courage. And goodness. And I think the gap between she talks about the gap between who we are. And who we want to be? And I think this life of conversation that she has been living and breathing so beautifully. It's just a gift to all of us. So Christa thank you for being here with us today. Q thing. So I was at this gathering a year ago. Where was that a New York? Yes. And it's so great to be back, and I feel there's so many I I feel very held in this room. And I was so impressed with this group. And so many women I met people whose faces I recognize again people whose names I didn't learn, but it's wonderful to be here. It's wonderful to be here with two women. I so admire and have just been looking for the right opportunity to to to get them on the show, and this just felt like it. And I think there was going to be a big dazzling introduction of them because they are both forces of nature, and I'm just I don't want to spend a lot of time going through their exhaustig exhaustive bio so they're in the program, but Abby Wambach is a Olympia in Olympia in champion soccer player. Champion. Now retired from that which we're going to get to that. Because that's kind of we're very bizarre. I three you. I I know. And you're starting a business and. A force in the world. Glenn Doyle author. I don't even know how to scribe. One of the things you talk about. Now is yourself as a radical philanthropist. Is that right? Yeah. I think my sister made that one. Okay. Sounds good. Yeah. That's what we do history. Like it. Okay. So we'll get to all of this. I. I if you listen to on being, you know, that I I have a question that I began most conversations with and it is a I asked somebody to start talking about. How they would begin to describe the religious or spiritual background of their childhood and. I wasn't going to do that today because we have a theme for this for this gathering and for this hour, which is about courage, but then agian Glennon both told me that they're really disappointed because we're ready to answer. This. You're listening to her podcast, and what it is. I mean that is actually a magical question for almost any gathering because everybody has a story sometimes that stories about the absence rather than the presence of something. But also, I think that that part of our lives is where a lot of questions reside that we actually ended up picking up in following all of our lives. So you can answer. Whatever question you went to. But you know, what I think to focus a lens on courage, and I think this is probably wrapped up in whatever is religious and spiritual in that childhood in that earliest life what you learned and internalized about courage in your childhood. I think it's a really important question. Because there's so many different ways you can define courage, and for me, and there's no such thing as fearlessness courage is the presence of fear in going anyway at I think for me as a little kid. I was the youngest seven children at all kind of answer the question that I was prepared for..

Abby Wambach Jackie Krista Tippett Glennon Glenn Doyle soccer Christa New York
"abby wambach" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"abby wambach" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"The topic of the day was courage, and my conversation partners to singular admired women who have since two thousand seventeen been married to each other soccer icon, Abby Wambach is an Olympic gold medalist and World Cup champion Glenn Doyle entered the American imagination with the label Christian, mommy blogger, but she and her online blog base, mama. Sterry have transformed into something much larger a community of giving ready to respond when crises hit she ignites millions of followers through initiatives like love flash mobs as she says to turn heartbreak into action. What follows is a conversation about courage that is both serious and playful as it turns up in their lives apart and together from addiction to social activism to blended family parenting. I mean, going I talk a lot about this notion of despair. Sometimes she says that to our ten year old. Who has fallen down in a soccer game? She'll say no time for despair. I'm like. Kind of language are using real. This is a soccer game. Not a poetry reading. Trying to be nice about it. I'm Krista Tippett, and this is on being. Abby Wambach is the author of forward a memoir Glennon Doyle has written to New York Times bestsellers love warrior and carry on warrior, the power of.

Abby Wambach soccer Glenn Doyle Krista Tippett Glennon Doyle New York Times ten year
"abby wambach" Discussed on This Movie Changed Me

This Movie Changed Me

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"abby wambach" Discussed on This Movie Changed Me

"The topic of the day was courage, and my conversation partners to singular admired women who have since two thousand seventeen been married to each other soccer icon, Abby Wambach is an Olympic gold medalist and World Cup champion Glenn Doyle entered the American imagination with the label Christian, mommy blogger, but she and her online blog base, mama. Sterry have transformed into something much larger a community of giving ready to respond when crises hit she ignites millions of followers through initiatives like love flash mobs as she says to turn heartbreak into action. What follows is a conversation about courage that is both serious and playful as it turns up in their lives apart and together from addiction to social activism to blended family parenting. I mean, going I talk a lot about this notion of despair. Sometimes she says that to our ten year old. Who has fallen down in a soccer game? She'll say no time for despair. I'm like. Kind of language are using real. This is a soccer game. Not a poetry reading. Trying to be nice about it. I'm Krista Tippett, and this is on being. Abby Wambach is the author of forward a memoir Glennon Doyle has written to New York Times bestsellers love warrior and carry on warrior, the power of.

Abby Wambach soccer Glenn Doyle Krista Tippett Glennon Doyle New York Times ten year