20 Burst results for "Aaronson"

Interview With Michael Close

The Insider

05:12 min | 5 months ago

Interview With Michael Close

"My guess is one of magic's lille leaving legends. He has a well-earned amazing reputation magic. He's an author creator former sultans pioneer niba publishing being amongst i realize how well using video and text together made such a wonderful learning experience and today while he's extremely busy working full us. It's michael close. Michael how are you today. I'm well thank you. Thank you very much for inviting me. What's your origin story. You have twenty four seconds. My home planet krypton was exploding and my father. Put me in a rocket and sent to cleveland. Ohio where i was raised by salmon marietta close and my dad was in industry. We moved around quite a bit ended up in fort wayne. Indiana which is in the northwest northeast. corner of the state of indiana there was a magic shop. they're owned by. Dick stoner who is still around in. An old friend bought my first tricks. They're probably when i was six years old and the bug bit and never really let go. I've yeah so it's about sixty two years now. I've been interested in magic people. Are i absolutely do There there were a couple of things there was a magic set called the sneaky. Pete magic set which i may gotten for my fifth birthday. I actually saw dick stone perform at my school. I think when i was five i still remember some of the tricks he did. He did hip hop rabbits. He did the ghost tube in that. Sneaky pete set and one of the things that was in there was the was it the trick of horace the old old creek where you sever the head of the horse with the and that was a little plastic version of that and then it's donors magic shop. I got the penny to dime with the little plastic block with the magnet inside that lives off his show coin and too little plastic. I don't know what you would call them. Columns that were attached to the bottom and a string went through and then you could slice through it and show that it was cut and then pull it back through again. Those were the first tricks that i own. And of course and of course aired nays. Because i want to seem like i was cool. Standard right verified bureau. Of course exactly right you know. Those were the those were the tricks. I'm going to use this podcast. A personal consultation. i'm sure there are many listens. They're in saint on forty. Nine between cup edgy. Since i was eleven. And i still haven't that stack an album and you're very well known for you. Men debt works helped me out two questions one. How should i choose which stack to learn and to what do you think in your experience. The best strategies. You've found the work best to actually memory. Well okay and we have a half an hour. I actually have done about of either forty-five minutes or an hour long targeted training video. That's on my website on this very subject. It's called demystifying the memorized deck. But i'll give you. I'll give you a very I'll give you a very short version. Which is your first step has to be to ask the question. How am i going to use this thing. Most people go memorize stack simply because everybody has memorizing stack. Now when i got interested in actually learning which was back in one thousand nine hundred ninety i had known of simon aaronson stack for quite a few years because he published it in the late seventies. I think and i knew exactly how i wanted to use the stack. I wanted to use it as an improvisational device to be able to sort of make up effects as i go i was influenced by that by burt. Allerton who had a trick in his book that used that and of course experiencing juan do his new monico sus improvised handling so i specifically knew how i wanted to use the stack and at the time the only stacks available really were one stack had not been published in english yet. I had simon stack. There was nicole. There was the ireland stack and i was good friends with simon by this point in time and so i learned that what now i learned to use the method he suggested which is a pneumonic method. One of course and people like what he aragon suggest every other way pneumonic and this is the third piece of advice. I would give you. Which is before you do anything you have to pay. Due diligence and due diligence in deck works and means buying at least choose me four books. Three or four books.

Salmon Marietta Northwest Northeast Dick Stoner Pete Magic Dick Stone Fort Wayne Cleveland Horace Indiana Ohio Michael Pete Simon Aaronson Allerton Burt Simon Juan
"aaronson" Discussed on ExtraTime

ExtraTime

05:47 min | 7 months ago

"aaronson" Discussed on ExtraTime

"We'll get to that in just a second, but I want to start with the news, take us through the process scouting and signing Brennan Aaronson what role did you play what stands out to you and and getting this guy in your team? While you know since, I've been here in Salzburg I've talked a lot with the club about a lot of the young Americans and and the guys that I think have had some potential to be fair. Brendan was really young when I was in MLS. So I didn't speak about him as much. I didn't know him as much and and the club came to me I and said Hey we've we've found this Guy Aaronson what are your thoughts on him and I said Yeah I knew him a little bit from when we played against them. Maybe two or three years ago in preseason down in Florida because he scored a goal on us in, we played three forty five minute halves and I think the game on a six four. But the the third forty five was a Lotta, the academy players from read a lot of the academy players from Philadelphia and I remember he scored a goal against us and then I started watching video and I was really impressed with what I saw. And this dates back probably ten, twelve months ago So the club kept following him kept cutting videos from his games kept coming to me and listen we think this. This kid has a lot of potentially he loves to play the way we think and and so then it just kind of gathered momentum from there and and it was really fun watching them in the MLS is back tournaments and seeing him continuing to get better and and even when I've spoken with Jim Curtain over the past months. He just says the the kid just keeps getting better. He's such a strong mentality. He's so driven to figure out how to grow every day. So we're really excited to have them here. I think he'll be a really good fit the conversations I've had with brandon have been really good. He's really mature for a nineteen year old young man and and that's something I think is always important when. You when you talk to these young players and when you get the feel after ten fifteen minute conversation like you're talking to a grown man that's always thinks such a good indicator for the potential of of the personality and the player we know there's a certain style that the clubs within the organization that's bigger than just of course, WanNa play when you see Brinson over the last ten months. Year after the scouts came to you, what are the things in your scouting report under? His attributes. You'd think really translate in are really at a high level. What are the things that you're saying as a coach these are places where we can. We can help you. We can make you better. Yes so the first term we use here when we look for players to scout are is rule breakers. So we look for the guys that are eager to to run eager to sprint eager to chase them to press. And the things that maybe a you know a lot of clubs don't really look for but things that we think fit our idea of intensity an aggressively playing, and so that part with Brendan is easy to see. Right he can run all day the ground he covers. You know when he goes to presque is it's not just because the coach told him that he should be pressing. It said he wants to win the ball he hunts Bali players. He finds ways to always make a an effect on a play defensively, and then when he wins balls, he wants to go to goal you..

Brendan Brennan Aaronson Guy Aaronson brandon Salzburg Jim Curtain Brinson Florida Philadelphia
"aaronson" Discussed on ExtraTime

ExtraTime

04:07 min | 7 months ago

"aaronson" Discussed on ExtraTime

"That means they think he's going to play at a top five club or in the premier were the numbers right now people players are being bought for is fifteen million and above because otherwise they. Don't make this investment. So that's what it means for him. Also means that he's GonNa get opportunities which we expected because Jesse marshes there, and we'd know him from his background, but it's good to be in short of that for both Brennan and for us soccer fans that he's GonNa get opportunities to play there I think the other thing is you talked about that pathway Brennan Aronson. Wasn't a youth national team got you didn't play Youth World Cup he just got called in for the Olympic. Qualifying if that were to happen. So what one of the things that I like about the MLS structure now is there's more opportunity to more players to get to a high level. This isn't project forty where there's three good players were going to get an opportunity to play teenagers. Mls Brennan Aaronson has an opportunity to go to Indiana University on a scholarship, which is one of the best soccer programs in the country got an opportunity to play you sell soccer before he went and decided i. Think. I can play for out philly pathway to get him there comfortably, and now he's gotten to lead his team. He may get the lead them to a trophy this year for the first time ever, and he said in his statement and leaving I had two dreams. One wants to play for the Union at this stadium where I went as a kid with my family and other was to play in Europe, and so he's got the opportunity to do both those things which is super cool. And it's just another opportunity to say like this structure can work. One WE WANNA see more teams to it and to it's great to see the teams that investment there'd be paid off because then they'll continue to put into it. I mean the structure works for Salzburg as well. I mean, this is what they've done. is to buy players like this, and then move monon and clubs all over Europe are I mean when you're producing players and flipping them to the likes of Holland is like you're you're GonNa have is on you for next young players to come through. It's IT'S A it's a perfect age for earns into goes one when you have a coach like Jesse Marsh who knows Jim Curtin quite well as former teammates with the fire That's.

Brennan Aronson Brennan Aaronson Brennan Jesse marshes soccer Jesse Marsh Europe Salzburg Jim Curtin Union Olympic Holland Indiana University
"aaronson" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

04:14 min | 7 months ago

"aaronson" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

"Might, need you know you might have to do a very exhaustive enumeration of you know all the different permutations before you were convinced that it was true. But what if there were some all knowing wizard that said to you look I'll tell you what just pick one of the graphs randomly then randomly promote it then send it to me and I will tell you which graph you started with. Guy And I will do that every single time. Right. That in. Okay. That's Y'all got it. Let's say wizard did that a hundred times and it was right every time right now if the graphs were ice more fiqh than you know it would have been flipping a coin. It would have had only a wine and to to the one hundred power chance of you know of right each time but you know so so if it's right time they now you're statistically convinced that these graphs are not ice morph even though you've learned nothing new about why they are so fascinating. So yeah. So so Sek all the problems that have protocols like that one but it has this beautiful characterization it's shown up again and again in my in my own work in, you know a lot of people's work and I think that it really is one of the most fundamental classes interest that people didn't realize that when it was first discovered. So we're living in the middle of a pandemic currently. How has Your life been changed or no better to ask like how's your perspective perspective of the World Change with this? World Changing event of a pandemic overtaken, the entire world. Yeah. Well, I mean I mean all of our lives changed you know like I guess as with no other events since I was born, you know you would have to go back to World War Two for something I. Think of this magnitude you know on you know the way that we live our lives as for how it has changed my world view I think that the failure of institutions you know like like like the CDC like you know other institutions that we thought were trustworthy like A. Lot of the media was staggering was was absolutely breathtaking it is something that I would not have predicted right I. Think I wrote on My blog that you know the I it's it's APPs it's fascinating to watch the movie contagion from a decade ago. Right that correctly foresaw. So many aspects of you know what was going on and you know a an airborne virus originates in China spreads the you know much of the world you know shuts everything down until a vaccine can be developed. Everyone has to stay at home..

Guy China CDC
"aaronson" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

05:38 min | 7 months ago

"aaronson" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

"That could have led to that answer, and then you know that's a complex number so that you know H- how could that be a probability? Then you take the squared absolute value of the result that gives you a number between zero and what? Okay. So I just I just summarize quantum mechanics thirty. Yes. But now you know what what is already tells us is that anything I can do with a quantum computer I could simulate with a classical computer if I only have exponentially more time day and why is that? Because if I have exponential time, I could just write down this entire branching tree and just explicitly calculate each of these amplitude right? You know that will be very inefficient, but it will work. Right it's enough to show that quantum computers could not solve the halting problem or you know they could never do anything that is literally on computer in touring sense day but now as. I said there even a stronger result which says, the FBI coupet is contained in peace space. The way that we prove that is that we say if if all I want is to calculate the probability of some particular output happening, which is all I need to simulate a quantum computer really then I don't need to write down the entire quantum state, which is an exponential object. All I. Need to do is just calculate what is the amplitude for that final state and to do that I just have to sum up all the amplitude that lead to that state. Okay. So that's an exponentially large. But I can calculate it just reusing the same memory over and over for each term in this sense to be in the season. Yeah. So what Out of that hole complexities zoo, it could be beekeeping what is the most? the classic captured you heart the most is the most beautiful class is just. Yeah I I used as my email address Bq p q polly gmail.com. Yes. Because Bq P. Slash Q polly. Amazingly, no one had taken it. Amazing. But. This is a class that I was involved in sort of defining proving the first theorems about in two thousand and three or so. So it was kind of close to my heart But this is like if we extended Bq P, which is the class of everything we can do efficiently with a quantum computer to allow quantum advice which means imagined that you had some special initial state. Okay. That could somehow help you do computation may be Such. A state would be exponentially hard to prepare. Okay. But you know maybe somehow these states were formed in the Big Bang or something and they've just been sitting around ever since right? If you found one and of this state could be like ultra power there are no limits on how powerful it could be accepted. This state doesn't know in advance which input you've got..

Bq P. Slash FBI
"aaronson" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

05:05 min | 7 months ago

"aaronson" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

"Five hundred of the five hundred. So how do you get Yeah, we're. Yeah. How'd you get more our? Okay. I mean just for starters, there is everything that we could do with a conventional computer with a Paulino meal amount of memory, David possibly exponential amount of time because we get to reuse the same memory over and over again k. that is called Peace Space Guy, and that's actually A. We think an even larger class than N. P.. P. is contained N. P. which is contained in p space, and we think that those containment are strict and the constraint there is on the memory the memory has to grow It would normally with the size of the process, right? That's right. But in peace base, we now have interesting things that we're not in an pe- like as a as a famous example you know from a given position in chess you know does white or black have the win. Let's assuming provided that the game lasts only for a a reasonable number of moves. or or likewise forgo okay and you know even for the generalizations of these Games to arbitrary size boards because with an eight by eight board, you could say that just a constant size problem you just you know in principle, you just solve it in one time but so we really mean the the generalizations of of Games to arbitrary size boards here or another thing in peace space would be. Like I give you some really hard. Constraint satisfaction problem like you know a traveling salesperson or a, you know packing boxes into the trunk of your car or something like that, and I asked not just is there a solution which would be an N. P. problem but I ask how many solutions are there okay that? Count the number of of a valid solutions that that that actually gives those problems lie in a complexity class called Sharpei or like it looks like Hashtag like Hashtag got which sits between N. P. and peace base. There's all the problems that you can do in exponential time. Okay. That's called. So And by the way, it was proven in the sixties that ax is larger than pink. Okay. So we know that much we know that there are problems that are solvable in exponential time that are not solvable in Paulino mealtime. In fact, we even know we know that there are problems that are solvable in N. Cube time they're not solvable end square time and that don't help us with a controversy between pianist..

Paulino David N. P.
"aaronson" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

04:01 min | 7 months ago

"aaronson" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

"Okay. But you know eventually. I learned this incredible idea of universality and that says that no, you throw in a few rules and then you you already have enough to express everything. Okay. So for example, the end or in the not gate can all or in fact, even just the end than the not gate or even even just the Nand Gate for example, is already enough to express any bullying function on any number of bits you just have to string together in off them. You can build a universe with Nand Gates, you can build the universe out of Nand, Gates. Yeah. The simple instructions of basic are already enough to at least in principle you know if we ignore details like how much memory can be accessed and stuff like that. That is enough to express what could be expressed by any programming language whatsoever, and the way to prove that is very simple. We simply need to show that in basic or whatever we could write a an interpreter or a compiler for whatever is other programming language. We care about like C or Java or whatever, and as soon as we had done that de facto anything express -able in C or Java is also expressing in basic. and. So. This idea of universality you know goes back at least to Alan Turing in the nineteen thirties. When you know he wrote down this incredibly simple pared down motto of a computer, the touring machine, right which you know he pared down the instruction set to just read a symbol. You know go right assemble move to the laughed move to the right halt change your internal state, right? That's it. Okay and anybody proved that you know this could simulate all kinds of other things you know and so in fact today we would say, well, we would call it a touring universal model of computation that is you know just as It has just the same expressive power that. Or Java or C., plus plus or any of those other languages have. Because anything in those other languages could be compiled down to touring machine. Now, touring also proved a different related thing which is that there is a single touring machine. That can simulate any other turing. Machine. You. Just described that other machine on its tape right and likewise, there is a single touring machine that will run any program. You know if you just put it on its tape that that's a second meaning of universality. For, saw the he could visualize knows in the thirties. Thank Thirties. That's right before computers. Really. I mean I don't know how I wonder what that felt like. You know learning that there's no Santa Claus or something. I. I I. Don't know if that's empowering a paralyzing. Because it doesn't give you any It's like you can't write a engineering book and make that the first chapter and say were done well I. Mean I mean right I mean I mean in one sense it was this enormous flattening of the universe. Yes. I imagined that there was going to be some infinite. Of more and more powerful programming languages you know, and then I kick myself for for having such a stupid idea. But apparently, girdle had had the same conjecture in the thirties. Good. Company. And then tour and then girdle read during paper and he kicked himself and he said Yeah I was completely wrong about that. But But you know I thought that maybe maybe where I can contribute will be to invent a new more powerful programming language that lets you express things that could never be expressed in basic right and you know, and then you know how would you do that? Obviously, you couldn't do it itself in basic right but but you know there is this incredible flattening that.

Nand Gates
"aaronson" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

04:57 min | 7 months ago

"aaronson" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

"It into two components that are only weakly connected to each other. So whenever we take our system and sort of try to split it up into two then there should be lots and lots of connections going between the two components. Okay. Well, I understand what that means craft. Do they formalize what how to construct such a graph data structure whatever? Or is this. One of the criticism I heard you kind of say that a lot of the very interesting specifics are usually communicated through like natural language they. Go through words. So it's like the details aren't always well, it's true. I mean they they they have nothing even resembling a derivation of this fee guy. So what they do is they state a whole bunch of postulates. Axioms that they think that consciousness should satisfy, and then there's some verbal discussion and then at some point fee appears right and this this was the first thing that really made the hair stand on my neck to be honest because they are acting as if there's a derivation they're acting as if you know, you're supposed to think that this is a derivation and there's nothing even remotely resembling a survey they just pulled. Out of a hat completely is one of the key criticisms to use the details are missing or. Not even the key criticism that's just that's just a side point. Okay. The the core of it is that I think that the you know they wanna say that a system is more conscious the larger, its value of fake and I think that is obvious nonsense as soon as you think about it for like a minute as soon as you think about it in terms of could I construct a system that had an enormous value of fee like you know even larger than the brain has but that is just Implementing an error correcting code doing nothing that we would associate with you know intelligence or consciousness or any of it. The answer is, yes it is easy to do that right and so I wrote blog posts just making this point the yeah it's easy to do that..

"aaronson" Discussed on Puty's World Cup Podcast

Puty's World Cup Podcast

07:54 min | 9 months ago

"aaronson" Discussed on Puty's World Cup Podcast

"Our guys welcome back. Sam's army episodes two point fifty seven great episode ahead we got a good interview with two kids you guys either no already or will know soon got met freeze and Brendan. aaronson of the Philadelphia Union Fun discussion that's coming up in just a little bit. But first, we have got some breaking news. To discuss No surprise about who it, who is going to be about I will bring in Mikey podcast Mr Mikey foul. How're you doing today Mikey? Honored to be on such a historic moment in soccer history. The this is this has some Gravitas does it's it's got me to write a blog about it which I usually just like you know previews and you know Guide League guides but I had to write something when the greatest of all time hands in like a legitimate transfer request gets confirmed by Barcelona because it feels like you know there's been a lot of the talk of the is messy GonNa leave you know for the last few years this is like actually for real like he he wants to leave no mom and dad's saddest down in the living room and we're going to be living in separate houses now. Right and we'll listen that doesn't happen yet. It doesn't mean it's going to happen. We'll get into that. Filed yet. But. They're splitting but they they dislike each other strongly right and it's better for everyone if. All. Right. So just to to set the stage. So messy has handed in a transfer request bars has confirmed that in basically the He can do that is because he is the biggest swing Dick in the world and he got into his contract you gotTA clause put in that basically says he can opt out after any season and just like go somewhere for free can is do that because he is like the best out of the clause say any season or June tenth while so that's the you know it does say, June. Tenth in that is the big big big huge hangup here here's that Barcelona is GonNa say he did not trigger the clause by June tenth therefore, he has to stay. For another season or if you leaves than whoever you know he goes to play for has to pay his seven hundred million Euro transfer fee. So you know that's a bit of a a bit of a legal hang up. Seven hundred millions have pay him fifty, million a year early, and I saw a tweet that new. England's New England patriots revenue in last year was six, hundred, million. Million dollars in this is like more seven, hundred, million dollars. So it's just crazy obviously the whole point of that. Clause was to make sure he doesn't leave you know unless he opts out at the right time so that that that sets up what could be a a real ugly legal battle This could go down in many different ways of this point. Obviously, there's a lot of not a lot, but there's a few clubs that seemed like they have the wherewithal that they could pay his basically his pay package, which is like a hundred million a year when you consider the his wages, pluses, image rights, and all this other shit the stuff that he was not paying taxes on all that for. Years I'm throw it to you I though. So how do you see this playing out? Where's messy GONNA play next year while the only smart way to go about this discussion because you said, there's so many different avenues is to look at what I consider. The most reliable source of information is Las Vegas. Okay no I really. That absolutely true. Yeah. So I look at the gambling odds of where he's supposed to go next year, right? Not a lot of thought in anybody's braid about. Barcelona for next season. I think it's really done. So I need to be hammered home to people. I believe it's really done. You are on a different page Geeky. Really interesting. On I feel like it's done. Okay and there's reason there's good reason for that and I will I will back you up on talk. It's a toxic place he's trying to it's them or him again and think he's at the age where they're not going to say him. Okay. Okay. So you think he's going so that leaves and I'm GonNa lay out the different teams here that are really in the running. So city is number one I think by far the most likely landing place they have of they've got pet they are motivated as shit coming off another season of disappointment in Champions League not to mention getting beaten the League by by Liverpool in you know they've got more money than God. Then you've got inter. PSG? Manchester United Interestingly. Enters in Liverpool, the other ones that have been thrown around the other two just throw throughout our newell's old. Old. Boys because. That's message childhood team back in. Argentina's talked about going plane for them at some point and then finally ls. which will get to that Noel bit start with the the real big swing index of the European situation. Where do you think he's going? So where do you think he's going? Well, that's the thing I'd instead of knowing anything about that I think we should just talk about what his what what motivates Leeann messy right At this point, it's gotta be legacy based at this at this point in his career. So what's best for his legacy? Where should he go? Right? What's the best narrative for him? enter in dethroning event would be would be really cool. Yeah. Great storylines there with Ronnie. Still that would be awesome. that would be really awesome. City with PAT does he just WanNa play with pat but then avenged that whole thing and bring a Champions League, the city that would be. Monstrous. So I think those that's why those two were the clear favorites, but would pep pep one him because then everyone sure you can't Ajay Veasley. Spend fine. He did the buyer and he's fine hear Ya but yeah, he ah, those are the two for me. Obviously to talk about it I have a friend who's a Boca Juniors Fan that's hell bent on Argentinian club because the release clause also says he can't play in Europe so like but if that's true, then I don't know it's a long long thing but. In Argentina to. See Him ending in Argentina. At some point, they don't have enough money. There's not money in the country Argentina right now to to pay him and my favorite this is my favorite i. put it on twitter earlier just hypothetically speaking narrative. Wise. If he just goes around Madrid kick the shit out of this Barcelona team allowed. That beyond even like the that that's what I'm rooting for. It I'm rooting for that in my heart so that you see Barcelona fans who switch and then both clubs decide who gets the root for WHO and it's that'd be fucking madness I would I would love that that would be my like sick twisted dream. If you were going straight, you know if you're believing the bookies, it sounds like you're leaning to city right now. I think I think. Yeah kill me now but I think he's going to be taking talents to Manchester Davidson read. Then I'll just stop watching the sport but. At least pep that that'd be interesting. A couple of people. So of the teams listed, I threw some teams out. So I didn't think pool there I don't think Liverpool would want to say they're not. They're the most balanced stacking team. You think they're gonNA pay the you know the amount of money that would take the message come in absolutely not has no interest at this point ever friend who said he would provide depth on the wing for them. Okay, okay. Manchester United Edward. He can't even tie shoot. Directly. He's not going to figure out how this is where he thinks is going united by the way really he thinks they. Will he listen if you really put Zaza head? He'd probably say Arsenal. So I'm throwing united out just because of Woodward UVA first of all..

Barcelona Argentina Liverpool Manchester Mr Mikey Champions League soccer Philadelphia Union Sam Brendan. aaronson Las Vegas England Europe PAT Dick Zaza New England Ajay Veasley Leeann Manchester Davidson
"aaronson" Discussed on Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

05:18 min | 1 year ago

"aaronson" Discussed on Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

"You now you know you either you know, see a complete breakdown of of the rules of quantum mechanics as right as you cross the event, horizon or else If you want quantum mechanics to still work, then you have to see a wall of ultra high energy photons that are so high energy that you just disintegrate as soon as you hit the event horizon, this is what is called the famous firewall and announced. Actually fallen into a black hole, but we this is one of the times we're. Physicists have a strong belief that we have empirical justification for namely that nothing special happens when you cross a black holes event horizon. That's right that's right, and you know in in some sense. You know you couldn't take the position that just you know. What happens in a black hole stays in a blackhall right. It could be any you know. It could be that like in that movie interstellar that you know you meet your. Relatives or something right you know, and and you know this just like beliefs about the afterlife. This would have no consequences that at least we could publish journal papers about here on Earth right because you know, everything is just inside the black hole. Okay, but you know physicists I think very understandably you know, have a have high aspirations right? They would like to describe even regions of the universe from. From which we can never receive a signal, okay, and you know at least classical general relativity you know has paints us very nice picture where you sale right past the event to rise in and nothing very special seems to happen now clear you die, you know after you jump into a black hole, but you're only supposed to die when you hit the singularity, right? You're not supposed to you know. So you know, you're supposed to have like another second, or whatever after you've crossed the event horizon, you're not supposed to die. Right at the event horizon, but This fire wallpaper was saying well from these. Assumptions. It appears that you would, and you know, and this was not just some some. You know completely You know formal question about say the structure of the State Space Ray what I liked about it is they said here very explicitly. Here is the experiment that would lead to the problem. Right and you know okay fine. It's not an experiment that maybe we could ever practically carry out within the lifetime of the universe, but nevertheless here's the experiment, and if you claim to understand this, then you have to be able to say what happens. If someone did that experiment right and and this was I would say that this. This was really the watershed thing that brought a quantum information ideas into quantum gravity. You know in a really deep way, and in particular you know a year later my friends Daniel Harlow and Patrick Hayden wrote an amazing paper about the firewall paradox where they said well..

Daniel Harlow Patrick Hayden
"aaronson" Discussed on Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"aaronson" Discussed on Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

"Whereas the classical belief, the best known classical algorithm takes time that grows like exponentially in roughly the cube root event okay. It's something It's something fancy called the number fields. Even, those the exponential. Count that as exponential and you know the I am sure that the NSA you know cares enormously. The exact free factors in that exponential and so forth, but we'll do. It will count that as exponential. But we don't know that there isn't a better one classically the issue that's right that's we absolutely do not know that, and and in fact we don't know. You know it could. It could be for all we know today. The P. E. equals beak up in other words, maybe everything that a quantum computer can efficiently solve could also be efficiently solved by classical computer right right, so you know what sure showed again. It's sort of relating are are different. You know a domains of ignorance, right? He showed you. If you wanted a general way to simulate quantum mechanics classical computer, then you would also have to invent a fast classical algorithm for factoring. And it is true we I think we do know that there are problems for which there is a quantum algorithm that has proven relief faster than any classical algorithm, but not in an entirely different complexity class is that. Is that right? Yes right so this okay, good good now now we're getting to something that is when I teach my undergraduate class. This is always you know one of the more subtle points. The but I'm glad you're asking about it. There is a thing called the blackbox model. Okay where it's sort of a different. Game different domain we are. You just asked the question. suppose that I have a black box that you know just evaluate some function for free right, and now I like like. Maybe it's a subroutine your. Inner, workings for example okay, and now I just ask. How many questions do I need to ask to this black box in order to learn something that I want okay, so you know as as an example I. I love you. Know playing a game playing the game with my seven year old daughter where you know, she show think of a number from you know one to one hundred and you know, and then I say you know is. Is it bigger smaller than fifty is bigger smaller than seventy five..

"aaronson" Discussed on Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

04:16 min | 1 year ago

"aaronson" Discussed on Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

"There's a there's A. There's a beautiful paper from a decade ago. That proves that Super Mario is P. Complete. Yes, you have to create these crazy levels with like these weird patterns of These Cooper's that you stomp on, you know that encode the logic problem, but you can you can. You can do that So but. You? Get the luxury I'm your trunk is a good is a good reminder, because even though we say N. P. Complete means super, duper hard people haven't put luggage in their trunk. What we mean is they have has their trunks have if you imagine larger and larger trunks and more and more luggage just becomes very unwieldy very quickly. That's right. That's right. What it what it is that if I wanted to? I could you know? Give you a very very hard time figuring out how to fit some luggage into your trunk like I, could even in principle I could design some you know. Millions of of boxes of different dimensions you know that would have the property that you can fit you know these boxes into your trunk and have it close, if and only if there is a proof of the Riemann hypothesis of it most Max, okay, or or or for example that in order to fit them in your trunk, you would have break them. Cryptographic Code I could also do that, but if someone shows. Put them in your trunk. You'd Beasley enough to be able to say that worked. It was easy to check. Exactly exactly. Yeah, so so so so there's these N P complete problems you know and it's sort of a priority. It didn't have to be that way, but you know this. Is this a substantial discovery rate that you know these most of these hard n. p. problems are actually all equivalent to one another in the sense that a fast algorithm for any one of them implies a fast algorithm for all the rest, and then there were a few outliers. Right factoring is one of the weird ones. Okay? That might be sort of somewhere in between A and B complete in some no-man's-land, besides the anthropomorphized in the personalities. Of tend to turn you into a mathematical platinum..

Beasley
"aaronson" Discussed on Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

05:51 min | 1 year ago

"aaronson" Discussed on Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

"Hello everyone, welcome to the Mindscape podcast I'm your host Sean Carroll. Here's a question of interest. How hard is it to solve the problem? That seems like a very important question. Right especially when we're faced with all sorts of very difficult problems, socially biologically planetary and so forth, but it's also a very hard question to answer in itself right. Like what do you mean how hard it is? What kind of problems are you talking about? Happily computer scientists have a very specific field of problems specific kind of. Of problems and they care a lot about how hard they are to solve, there's a whole field of endeavor called theoretical computer science. You can be a world leading theoretical computer scientists and never actually program a computer, although today's guest is not in that category, one of the things that theoretical computer scientists worry about is if you have a certain kind of problem. Problem like sorting a list into alphabetical order. How many steps does your computer program have to take to solve that problem? And how do the number of steps depend on the size of the list? This is the problem known as computational complexity and today's guests Scott. aaronson is one of the world's experts in this field in fact. I feel bad even saying this Scott. Scott as a computer scientists at the University of Texas at Austin who is not only one of the world's experts in theoretical computer science and computational complexity, but seems to be the world's expert in many different fields so today we're going to dive into things like he versus N. p.. This is famous problem about whether or not a problem that is easy.

Scott Mindscape University of Texas Sean Carroll Scott. aaronson Austin
Amy Aronson, Author of the New Book "Crystal Eastman: A Revolutionary Life"

The Electorette Podcast

09:51 min | 1 year ago

Amy Aronson, Author of the New Book "Crystal Eastman: A Revolutionary Life"

"I'm Jim Taylor skinner. And this is the electorate on this episode. I have a conversation with amy. aaronson author of the New Book Crystal Eastman. A revolutionary revolutionary life. And if you haven't heard of Crystal Eastman you're probably not alone. She was one of the Most Progressive Communists of early twentieth century and she was also branded. The most dangerous woman. In America Crystal Eastman was an uncompromising feminist. She was also an early advocate for workers rights and a self branded socialist and anti militarist militarist. The two other important facts about crystal Eastman's life. She helped to write the equal rights amendment crystal Eastman was also the CO founder of the ACLU. So one of my very first questions about crystal Eastman's life is why she faded from history. Why there's so little information about her? So here is author Amy Eareckson explaining why she thinks that is. I think the main reason that crystal Eastman has kind of disappeared from or is obscure in historical record is because of what really was kind of intersectional mindset an intersectional outlook in her activism. What I mean by that is that Eastman Smith involved herself in multiple movements in many of the major social movements of the twentieth century and believed that they were all all linked together and worked throughout her career to try to link them together all under one kind of vast emancipatory rubric? She she believed saved and she she recognized that there you know there were. There were commonalities. Among various forms of oppression and she she tried tried to kind of straddle multiple movements and bring them together in order to combat. You know all of those common sources of oppression and inequality At once so she spent a lot of time talking about socialism anti imperialism and also you know maternity and maternal ism with feminists earnest's. She spent a lot of time talking about feminism and pacifism with Socialists and with revolutionaries and one of the outcomes outcomes of this was that Eastman always seemed to be kind of straddling so many different movements at once that her voice often it seemed insurgent or challenging from within each individual movement. Many of her colleagues felt that they weren't sure where she stood because she was trying to straddle so many different movements at once because when she talked to save feminists about socialism. It seemed like a challenge from within. Yes in and so. This cut complicated her status and her stature within the the movements that she was affiliated with within the movements that that she she built her life on at the same time as her radicalism and her activism challenged her standing in the more mainstream same political and social environments where she was radical so she was already challenging to more mainstream views but because of that she you know she needed needed stronger a stronger sense of belonging I think clearer sense of standing within the protest movements the leftist movements that she collectively saw as her political home. And so what happened was she. You know kind of fell through the planks of history. She fell to the planks of historical. Memory she we didn't have clear consistent connections with organizations With a single organization right or a single 'cause she didn't have clear and consistent alliances this is or relationships to various mentors. who were recognized the things that that signal stature and make someone intelligible and make someone visible double in historical memory? She kind of challenged complicated at every turn and precisely because she you know tried to connect them All to a larger vision of change that they all shared and so in some ways it was kind of I think a tragic irony that her her inclusive vision seem to divide people and seem to divide people's loyalties but in other ways it's also kind of a fascinating story of how we tell stories as how and why we remember people that I think has a lot to tell us about our current intersectional environment for forming coalitions to pursue the same social change that she and others have been pursuing for a century. You know in counting so is it over simplistic to say that. She was possibly a victim of her own own prolificacy like she was so prolific involved in so many movements that she wasn't known for single thing or was it that and making some hostility because she was seen as kind kind of an insurgent and lots of these movements. I wouldn't say hostility but I would say that you know. She challenged people. She challenged. Organizational hierarchies and in leadership at you know in various organizations and so there were some leaders She had quite a run in with Alice. Paul for example Particularly after the vote was one John when the militant wing of the women's movement the National Women's Party was starting to figure out. Okay what comes next. It was in that period before the rise of the Equal Rights Amendment Amendment nineteen twenty-three that they were you know searching for okay. What's our next approach and Eastman wanted a very intersectional kind of transnational feminist movement and Paul wanted a much more focused targeted women's campaign? Just much like the you know. The suffrage movement that they had just successfully completed pleaded so for some leaders. There was that you know that sense that they were being challenged from a colleague For others it was the fact that you're kind of intersectional perspective active As well as her movement to the left after the Russian revolution seemed to radical and seemed to push the organizations that she was associated with in more radical directions than many of the progressive leaders in those organizations were comfortable. That's unfortunate you know. She reminds me of reading her story. And you know kind of the motion all day of it. And the Ark of her life. She reminds me of not Elizabeth Rankin but there. I can't believe I can't remember a name. The very first woman who ran for president. who was ooh Toria woodhall awesome? She's scared the crap out of people what it's just something about her demeanor. It's hard to tell from a book you know but just something about it. Just kind of reminds me of that similar kind of radical woman radical feminist. Get around that time. And you know crystal was just unafraid. she was so bold and she. She asserted her freedom. She really you know she. She claimed a freedom and claimed a world that even while she was trying to create it so she was an in kind of a kind of a real sense woman ahead of herself or ahead of her time. You know I know. That's kind of a cliche as historians. You know we're we're not really supposed to say that What struck me about her early on? You know what would I I think stuck with me From my graduate school days till almost twenty years later when I finally you know sat down to to try to write the book was the sense of a woman who was just calling ahead of herself and you know and in envisioning and reaching four And you know and actively demanding and trying to live live in a world that was much closer to mine than it was to hers. And you know I found that's just so compelling it's visionary I think she was a gripping person go find her story gripping because of that right she had some really really progressive stances and you know you mentioned a few feminism and she was also I think a socialist. She called herself a socialist right. Yes and she was four reproductive rights. Yes very much. So why was she branded. I WanNa go through the historical arch- of her life a bit later. But why does she branded the most dangerous woman in America. Well I need most of those claims about who came in her. Most radical or revolutionary period after the Russian revolution revolution in nineteen seventeen. She and her brother Maxi sman much better known than she is a radical writer and editor of the Masses magazine. The two of them together published the Liberator magazine which started in Nineteen Eighteen Shortly after the Russian revolution and it was called the Journal of Revolutionary Progress and it became very quickly the kind of center of reporting and information about revolutionary movements worldwide in connection with that period in her politics. Um which I can explain to you a little bit how. She kinda volved into that radicalism from her more progressive earlier activism in connection with that. She took very forthright arthritis very bold. Very outspoken stances in favor of the Bolsheviks and herself traveled to communist Hungary and she was the first the American reporter to do that and reported very enthusiastically at least initially about her hopes that the a similar revolution would come to the United States and would indeed sweep the world would become a global revolutionary movement. And of course this you know this kind of radicalism. She was not alone in it particularly on the left after the Russian revolution many colleagues from a number of different movements also celebrated revolution however You know it still was. That was not a mainstream extreme view. You know even on the left it was not a mainstream view was a radical view and It was very threatening to people especially in the the body of a woman and the voice voice of someone who was so afraid to speak about it. And the voice of someone who had such stature in more mainstream political political movements and more mainstream political

Crystal Eastman Eastman Smith Jim Taylor Skinner Amy. Aaronson Amy Eareckson Journal Of Revolutionary Progr Writer And Editor Aclu Paul Hungary Liberator Magazine Elizabeth Rankin United States Co Founder America President. National Women's Party Reporter Maxi
"aaronson" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"aaronson" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"With Larry Aaronson bestselling author with Steve, Forbes, and founder of retirement through design? Let Blair show you how the forte formula can give you the best of both worlds, providing lifetime income along with market participation in a stress free environment. Time magazine said it passed a lie. Lifetime income stream is the key to retirement happiness, for a sixty year old male or female, lifetime cash flow rates can be as high as twelve percent at age, seventy take back control of your retirement and get out of the Wall Street casino, called Blair now at eight hundred four nine nine sixteen fifty eight and he'll send you the information you simply need to know if you want to stress free retirement, that's eight hundred four nine nine sixteen fifty eight eight hundred four nine nine sixteen fifty eight or visit retirement through design dot com contractor license, ten forty seven seventy two one ghetto air conditioning, eighty years old. This year, eighty you can learn a lot in eighty years like what exactly like how to do things the right way, not the easy thing. But you and meet both knew that before we were twelve years old, you daddy, tell you my Pepo taught me, I'm trying to do eightieth anniversary at here. Okay. So why don't you do one of those hundred twenty nine dollars AC rejuvenation for just eighty bucks? That's what folks. That's what you oughta do. Zach inboxes thirty three percent off of price. That was already too low. Hey, are we celebrating or not? Yeah, we're celebrating Dan straight. We are, we will adjust your AC back to back respect so that it doesn't fight against itself that makes it work.

Blair Larry Aaronson Time magazine founder Forbes Zach Dan Steve eighty years hundred twenty nine dollars thirty three percent twelve percent twelve years sixty year
"aaronson" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"aaronson" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Down with Larry Aaronson bestselling author with Steve, Forbes, and founder of retirement through design? Let Blair show you how the forte formula can give you the best of both worlds, providing lifetime income along with market participation in stress free environment. Time magazine said it fast, a lifetime income stream is the key to retirement happiness, for a sixty year old male or female, lifetime cash flow rates can be as high as twelve percent at age. Seventy take back control of your retirement and get out of the Wall Street casino. Call now at eight hundred four nine nine sixteen fifty eight and he'll send you the information you simply need to know if you want to stress free retirement, that's eight hundred four nine nine sixteen fifty eight eight hundred four nine nine sixteen fifty eight or visit retirement through design dot com. The kids across the hall picking him snoring. Listen to Stephen Carey story about Z quiet. I can't control it. I would try not to try sleeping different positions. I'd say, well, let me try wanting the pillow up and putting it behind my head this way. Or I'm going to make sure I sleep on my stomach, or sleep on my side, and I consider the surgery as well, because I figured there's no way some product on TV was going to fix a problem that I had. And so we buy it shows up, I put it in didn't have any trouble falling asleep, and remember, waking up in the same bed and not having been nudged in the middle of the night, forgotten, when we went to the cabin that was not fun. The only time he's forgotten to take it on out of town trip. And I it was like stepping back into time. See quiet works for both men and women. Go to get Z quiet dot com and enter promo code sleep to say twenty percent. That's Z quiet dot com, promo code sleep to say twenty percent. That's Ghezzi quiet dot com. Promo code sleep..

Time magazine Larry Aaronson Stephen Carey Blair Ghezzi founder Forbes Steve twenty percent twelve percent sixty year
"aaronson" Discussed on ExtraTime

ExtraTime

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"aaronson" Discussed on ExtraTime

"Shoutouts whereas shadow Susanna gave him the love on Thursday. Doyle on Sunday. We got the mail on this. What up Jim anonymous, please give us your names that makes it a lot better here the union or fun to watch all caps. I've been waiting my whole life eleven that about three minutes after they went a fun. We're we're a lot of fun last year. I think in some ways we're more fun last year. Just because they were that flowing possession style come hell or high water. I mean, they scored eight goals in two games. That's all that's been players have scored goals dividend com has four casper should bilko has three senior has to burqas done with the Santos has to has to has to Monteiro has one Elliott has one which by the way was like eight or crouch esque bang foot. Take it down spin knocking home that man is not a centreback PICO Aaronson. I mean, they're they're spreading the wealth. Crouched the great centre forward that we just went with. Well, I mean because. Yeah. He's similar look for sure. Good moment beat across more in that goal, though. He's English up, and it's clicky Clack in brings it, Dan. I just don't Bullock. Yeah. They've they've washed one time in their last nine games. Charlie. You played for Jim Kerr. Yep. He's like he's come a long way. He has come a long way. I think Jim's biggest asset is his ability to be the nicest guy on earth because he literally is such a nice, genuine guy..

Jim Kerr PICO Aaronson Susanna Doyle Santos Bullock Monteiro Charlie Dan Elliott three minutes
"aaronson" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"aaronson" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"With Larry Aaronson bestselling author with Steve Forbes and founder of retirement through design. Let Blair show you how the forte formula can give you the best of both worlds providing lifetime income along with market participation in a stress free environment. Time magazine. Said it fast a lifetime. Income stream is the key to retirement happiness for a sixty year old male or female lifetime. Cash. Flow rates can be as high as twelve percent at age seventy take back control of your retirement and get out of the Wall Street casino called Blair now at eight hundred four nine nine sixteen fifty eight and he'll send you the information. You simply need to know if you want to stress free retirement that's eight hundred four nine nine sixteen fifty eight hundred four nine nine sixteen fifty eight or visit retirement through design dot com. Was just something different about Rowntree garden senior living community, you sense. It the moment you walk through the doors. There's joy here. Yes. At round regarding you'll find people engaged in all sorts of fun creative activities sharing delicious, chef prepared meals exploring beautiful gardens enjoying excursions to interesting locales exercising. Their minds spies spirits, put more than the activities and amenities. You'll find a close knit community of friends and mentors genuinely care for each other. You'll also find dedicated staff what they always have a smile kind word and you find joy in Brighton days and bringing comfort to people's lives. That's what makes Rowntree gardens more than just a senior community. It's a welcoming home what people continue to thrive in every season of life. We'd love for you to experience joy at Rowntree gardens. Enjoy the free lunch tour. Call around regards at seven one four five three zero ninety one hundred that seven one four five three zero nine one zero zero zero zero six zero.

Rowntree gardens Blair Rowntree garden Larry Aaronson Time magazine Steve Forbes founder Brighton twelve percent sixty year
Katie Aaronson, Arrington and Charleston discussed on America Tonight with Kate Delaney

America Tonight with Kate Delaney

01:17 min | 3 years ago

Katie Aaronson, Arrington and Charleston discussed on America Tonight with Kate Delaney

"Make a full recovery after being involved in a horrific accident south carolina republican congressional candidate katie aaronson completed surgeries on her abdomen and to repair a spinal fracture sunday a campaign spokesman says despite the complexity of the surgeries she won't have any neurological deficits or limitations and is expected to be out of bed and walking as early as a few days arrington was a passenger in a car that was hit by a wrong way driver on highway seventeen south of charleston friday night the driver of that car died arrington isn't giving up her congressional bid rob dawson fox news in thailand rescuers are planning a second attempt to get through a small flooded passage covered with sand and mud to gain access to a cave to search for twelve missing boys and their soccer coach the large chambers about two and a half miles from the cave entrance divers were unable to reach the group at dawn on monday the group entered the cave saturday the twelfth boys range in age from eleven to fifteen at least seven people are dead twelve missing after heavy rains caused flash flooding and landslides in northern vietnam landslides also interrupted traffic in some areas heavy rains are forecast to continue for the next two days floods and storms kill hundreds each year in the southeast asian country and.

Katie Aaronson Arrington Charleston South Carolina Rob Dawson Thailand Soccer Vietnam Two Days
"aaronson" Discussed on WIMS AM 1420

WIMS AM 1420

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"aaronson" Discussed on WIMS AM 1420

"Have to get to know each other again that they have to find other things to focus on and really listen to one another the newly empty nest can either be an opportunity for growth or for a marriage to fall apart it can be an opportunity to say okay we've done the best we can do raising our children and there is not much beyond that that we have and there has been a lot of studies about post children leaving thing that parents can end up in divorce the divorce rate increases enormously it's an opportunity also to reinvent your marriage and to strengthen your marriage and i urge those people who feel like the marriage is worth the inventing and working on to get in there and really work because the opportunities and the fruits of those labors are just enormous these days however there's often a complication just when parents have gotten used to being empty nesters many recent college grads have been unable to find jobs so they end up back at mom and dad's house called the boomerang children so they come back home so all of the sudden parents have a young adult a child in their house again and there has to be a lot of good communication going on rules within the family these young adults are used to being on their own coming home whenever they want doing laundry when they want to not want to so things have to be really clear it's really disruption when parents said down clear expectations and kids do to aaronson says having a boomerang child back home can be a wonderful experience but parents have to think about it be proactive and not just let it happen in fact she says that's the key to making the most of an empty nest maybe parents have a goal or a hobby they've never pursued maybe there's an activity they once loved but had to drop yes there's loss when the last child leaves but aaronson says more than anything else it's an opportunity to re craft life into what a parent truly wants it to be.

aaronson