17 Burst results for "Aaron Lowery"

"aaron lowery" Discussed on BiggerPockets Money Podcast

BiggerPockets Money Podcast

07:41 min | 9 months ago

"aaron lowery" Discussed on BiggerPockets Money Podcast

"Time together alone time, so at the end of the year after we'd been totally stressed out all year working so hard, we would take a very nice vacation in. We'd have the vacation paid before we on vacation, so no matter what we did on vacation had the best time we knew we were coming back. Back, today, so that's very point for people, but what we would do on this trip is set aside a number of hours. Will we just sat down together in? We went through every aspect of our highnesses in. We set up financial goals for the next year. We set a personal goals for the next year. Like if I want to lose ten pounds it when it got rid now if I WANNA start exercising four times a week. It got down. If. We wanted to save forty thousand dollars before July I, got right now, and it was. We would look back so in this meeting. We look back at the year in. We'd see what do we do? How many of these things we accomplished in? It was pretty amazing. We accomplished every single year almost all of the goals for that year every year. We just continue to do that and I. Get something that really strengthens relationship because we're on the same page. We agree to what gets written now. If, I say I WANNA, save X. amount of dollars were x amount date in? He doesn't WANNA. Do that or heaping? We can do more. We talk about it, and then whatever we agree upon gets now so that's something that we do that I. Think has been incredibly beneficial to us. Even today we it. We were on a cruise ship one time doing that exact thing and I guess somebody was overhearing. Demands said he was quitting say. Marriage counseling, he said. That's one of the healthiest conversations I've ever heard. So fantastic I love that you know that's a recurring theme with many of our guests who are married, they have financial dates and some of them. It's every week. It's every month. It's every quarter. It's every year. It's whatever works for you. Being on the same page and just coming back to that. Hey, let's talk about. Make sure that we're on the same page that so powerful. Because what's the number? One thing that couples fight about its money, so let's take that fight out of the equation. There's a lot of other things you can fight about. Scott isn't married yet. He's going to get married in. All of these things, but you have to have regular money dates. You have to talk about your goals and I love that. Good job he's right. It sounds like you guys have been really on. The same page is entire journey from what I can tell from? This is how you'd characterize it. One hundred percent. That's as good a lot of a lot of couples. Aren't that we've? We've talked to over the last couple of years the earliest, not at first, not embarrassed. A very difficult place to be and we have friends that have that situation where one of them wants to save money in the other room wants to do nothing, but spend money or one of them. Hide things from their spouse that they like. There's not in our relationship. I mean I. Just don't see the point in it. It's that's sequel. There is no point in that that is the quickest way to divorce court, or at least fighting all the time court. Yeah, and what my husband and I. Don't have a lot of fights, but when we do fight, I feel like crap I don't want to hide things from him so that now we have an fight. Here's a tip, Scott. She will always find out whatever it is. You're hiding. Always going to find out so telerate when it happens if it's a thing or discuss it in advance, I think it goes back to them talking about money before they got married, they sat down. Here's all of my assets. Here's all of my debts. Here's my financial picture. What is Aaron Lowery? Calls getting financially naked with your spouse with your fiance. Have that money conversation. If you can't have that painful or apprehensive conversation with your spouse, you have no business getting married. Does the girl who never talked about money with her spouse before she got very. As I say not as I do. One thing and correct me if I'm if I'm. Wrong in this year, but one thing that sounds like. Is You guys? Just both had very good instincts about what you wanted and how to go about it, but you hadn't really like consumed a lot of formal knowledge on the subject. Perhaps like it sounds like dreaded. You read a book on this. Many years in the journey and discovered kind of what you could do with the 401k type is A. is that correct that is correct and I believe like we were looking at a long term vision. Great to have that it was more like we were looking at this next week the next step and just putting ourselves on a path to getting into a great place. That wasn't so that we had planned to retire. No no idea that I'd be able to retire early I always since I was. Older than forty it ahead. Nothing saved. I. Just assumed that I would be working out seven by DAD's in great health and you know I hope to be the same way. I just always assumed that I'd be working with my seventies doing something because i. Do think if you were to go back and then someone's listening who finds themselves in a similar position to where you were when you started out, you know when you got. Do you think if you had the playbook that you're sharing with with us right now at that point in time. Would you've been farther along today? That would have been. Helpful. Yeah I think that that's what I think is so awesome about your story as you guys just figured this out for the most part of on your own and grind it out and I think that's remarkably impressive, hopefully very hopeful for the person listening to this because they I think that they could, they can make a lot of the progress. You made and catch up even if they're starting from a farther behind position, maybe a couple of years further along than with the more you guys started out. know going going back to your story here. It sounds like you re read this book, and there is a big mindset shift. And what did that look like did that change your income how you're how you're approaching earned income how your coaching spending or how your coaching investing and business? Mostly how it changed more on mystic than anything else because before I just thought about retirement is needed this big pot of money and I didn't know how long I was GonNa live and I didn't know how long the how big a new debate, but when I started realizing. If you set these things up for you, had income coming in that was just an easier concept for me to grasp that if you had X. amount coming in and you it coming in perpetuity that you could get to the point of retirement. What was your plan? How did you go about approaching that? Well we kind of already had that. Yet the lot of quite a few of the plague pieces were in place and I think the second condo was icing on the was. The decision was made directly because of that. We didn't just stumble into that, so so, what did that look like? Was that a plan to buy it and pay it off some of the first one and we'll get you to certain numbers that he needed. Actually we. Actually, we have the cash for that one, so we paid cash for the on, but we had to scrape because we tried to get a mortgage, and you just can't always depend on the banks to do what they need to do. In a timely fashion, we had a date. We need to have those on, and you know for whatever reason the bank. Not Coming through for us, even though I kept calling in saying hey, what's going on with this? So.

Scott Aaron Lowery DAD
"aaron lowery" Discussed on BiggerPockets Money Podcast

BiggerPockets Money Podcast

06:49 min | 9 months ago

"aaron lowery" Discussed on BiggerPockets Money Podcast

"Time together alone time, so at the end of the year after we'd been totally stressed out all year working so hard, we would take a very nice vacation in. We'd have the vacation paid before we on occasion, so no matter what we did on vacation had the best time we knew we were coming back. Back today, so that's very point for people, but what we would do on this trip is set aside a number of hours. Will we just sat down together in? We went through every aspect of our highnesses in. We set out financial goals for the next year. We set a personal goals for the next year. Like if I want to lose ten pounds it when it got rid now. If I WANNA start exercising four times a week, it got now. If we wanted to save forty thousand dollars before July I got right now and it was. We would look back so in this meeting. We look back at the year in. We'd see what do we do? How many of these things we accomplished in? It was pretty amazing. We accomplished every single year almost all of the goals for that year every year. We just continue to do that and I get something that really strengthens our relationship. Because we're on the same page, we agree to what gets written now. If I say I. WanNa Save X. Amount of dollars. Were X amount date in? He doesn't WanNa do that or heaping. We can do more. We talk about it, and then whatever we agree upon gets. So? That's something that we do that. I think has been incredibly beneficial to us. Even today we do it. We were on a cruise ship one time doing that exact thing and I guess somebody was overhearing. Demands said he was quitting say. A marriage counselor. He said that's one of the healthiest conversations I've ever heard. So fantastic I love that. You know that's a recurring theme. With many of our guests who are married, they have financial dates and some of them. It's every week. It's every month. It's every quarter. It's every year. It's whatever works for you. Being on the same page and just coming back to that. Hey, let's talk about. Make sure that we're on the same page that so powerful. Because what's the number? One thing that couples fight about its money, so let's take that fight out of the equation. There's a lot of other things you can fight about. Scott isn't married yet. He's going to get married in. So. All of these things, but you have to have regular money dates. You have to talk about your goals and I love that. Good job he's right. It sounds like you guys have been really on. The same page is entire journey from what I can tell from? This is how you'd characterize it. One hundred percent. That's as good a lot of a lot of couples. Aren't that we've? We've talked to over the last couple of years the earliest, not at first, not embarrassed. A very difficult place to be, and we have friends that have that situation where one of them wants to save money in the other room wants to do nothing, but spend money or one of them. Hide things from their spouse that they like. There's not in our relationship I. Mean I just don't see the point in it? It's that's sequel. There is no point in that that is the quickest way to divorce court, or at least fighting all the time court. Yeah, and what? My husband and I don't have a lot of fights, but when we do I feel like crap. I don't want to hide things from him so that now we have an fight. Here's a tip Scott. She will always find out whatever it. It is you're hiding? That's always going to find out so telerate when it happens if it's a thing or discuss it in advance I, think it goes back to them talking about money before they got married, they sat down. Here's all of my assets. Here's all of my debts. Here's my financial picture. What is Aaron Lowery? Calls getting financially naked with your spouse with your fiance. Have that money conversation. If you can't have that painful or apprehensive conversation with your spouse, you have no business getting married. Does the girl who never talked about money with her spouse before she got very. He was I. Say not as I do. One thing and correct me if I'm if I'm. Wrong in this year, but one thing that sounds like. Is You guys? Just both had very good instincts about what you wanted and how to go about it, but you hadn't really like consumed a lot of formal knowledge on the subject. Perhaps like it sounds like dreaded. You read a book on this. Many years in the and discovered kind of what you could do with the 401k type is A. is that correct that is correct and I believe like we were looking at a long term vision Li great to have that it was more like we were looking at this next week the next step and just putting ourselves on a path to get into a great place. That wasn't so that we had that plan to retire. No no idea that I'd be able to retire early. I always since I was. Older than forty it ahead, nothing saved I just assumed that I would be working out seven by Dan's in great health and I hope to be the same way I just always assumed that I'd be working with my seventies doing something because i. Do think if you were to go back and then someone's listening who finds themselves in a similar position to where you were when you started out, you know when you got. Do. You think if you had the playbook that you're sharing with with us right now at that point in time. Would you've been farther along today? That would have been held up big helpful. Yeah I think that that's what I think is so awesome about your story as you guys just figured this out for the most part of on your own, and grind it out, and I think that's remarkably impressive, hopefully very hopeful for the person listening to this because they. I think that they could, they can make a lot of the progress. You made and catch up even if they're starting from a farther behind position, maybe a couple of years further along than with the more you guys started out. know going going back to your story here. It sounds like you re read this book, and there is a big mindset shift. And what did that look like did that change your income? How you're how you're approaching earned income how your coaching spending or how your coaching investing and business. Mostly how it changed more on mystic than anything else because before I just thought about retirement is needed. This big pot of money and I didn't know how long I was GONNA. Live and I didn't know how long the how big a debate, but when I started realizing if you set these things up for you, had income coming in that was just an easier concept for me to grasp that if you had X. amount coming in and you it coming in perpetuity that you could get to the point of retirement. What was your plan? How did you go about.

Scott Aaron Lowery Li Dan
"aaron lowery" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

04:29 min | 1 year ago

"aaron lowery" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"Valentine's Day is just about here. And wouldn't you know it? We've got a love story for you about prenuptial agreements prenups. No no I promise. This is a love story. Prenups of course are those contracts between engaged couples that specify how all the money and assets would get divided if things don't work out and despite their long-standing bad news connotation prenups are kind of trendy now millennials are actually requesting them from podcast. This is uncomfortable. Here's the remake race Aaron Lowery. And her boyfriend were walking their dog one evening when she asked him this question but felt super out of left field. I just remember saying that I thought prenups were a good idea. What did you think in that moment? Her Boyfriend Joe says he just felt confused. Probably the only time that I had heard a pre-nup was you know like celebrities getting them. And like when there's this massive amounts of money you know in a marriage. He didn't think people like them got prenups. He's a high school. Social Studies. Teacher in. Aaron is a personal finance writer. Who runs a brand called broke millennial? Meanwhile Aaron felt like pretty much. Everyone should get a pre-nup so my feeling on a pre-nup is that there is already laws and rules in place of how to split up assets. If you were to get divorced so I would prefer to be in control of that situation. As opposed to letting the state of New York decide for me. It was a compelling argument but JOE was still a little unsure. The saw that came to my mind was like we're not engaged yet and we're now having conversation about what's going to happen if we get divorced. It's not that I think we're going to get divorced just like I don't think our apartment's going to burn down but I still have renter's insurance. Aaron eventually convinced him and about a year later Joe proposed they celebrated and then they each hired their own attorney to draft a pre-nup. They decided if they got a divorce. What's earned during the marriage would be split fifty fifty but anything earned afterwards. They'd keep for themselves and that was especially important for Erin as a writer. She didn't want Joe to be entitled to a portion of her book royalties indefinitely. It made me nervous to think about how things would get split and divided in a way might seem okay under the eyes of State Law based on people who work to traditional jobs. But I'm self employed so I wanted protection. Every now and then prenups can also include some pretty wild clauses like financial penalties for cheating or protecting intellectual property. You know like a cool idea for an APP for Aaron and Joe. Things felt especially tense when they talked about hypotheticals like if one day they inherited money just the thought of that led to conversations like this. Well if I were to inherit money and that money got used to purchase a house. I would never allow you to be living in that house if we got divorced. The idea of some other woman living in this House with you that my parents money helped to buy goof. I still that. Just riles me up. I think that's the only time I got emotional. Truly emotional worry about that. Yeah they agreed that if either of them get an inheritance and used it to buy a car or a house. The percentage of whatever they contributed would go back to the person who inherited the money now. If we had children that might change this entire conversation that could change the whole thing and if that happens. They plan to update their agreement. You know get a post nup. I feel like I must have been really weird. And maybe even surreal like sitting down with someone you love you know. Serve imagining the details of a future with outcome data. That's why I think I had such a reaction to it all. This is a world in which we have gotten divorced and we're no longer loving each other and with each other ultimately crafting. The pre-nup cost them about four thousand dollars. Lawyer's fees for Aaron Joep. They're thankful though. It forced them to have really difficult money conversations early on and I don't know their argument for it is pretty convincing. Hey this is a way that if the worst were to happen we've made decisions when we're at this apex of our love. Roy and we we did. We did have arguments about this. But it's like well. Let's have these many arguments now while we're still totally in love. They've been married now for about a year and that pre nup is tucked away somewhere safe a lovingly crafted plan for the future. They hope they'll never need. I'm Marie mcleese for marketplace..

Joe Aaron Aaron Lowery Aaron Joep writer Valentine Social Studies New York Marie mcleese Erin self employed Roy attorney
"aaron lowery" Discussed on This Is Uncomfortable

This Is Uncomfortable

08:46 min | 1 year ago

"aaron lowery" Discussed on This Is Uncomfortable

"Aaron Lowery and her boyfriend Joe were out walking their dog. One evening when Aaron asked this question that felt super super out of left field. I just remember saying that I thought prenups were a good idea. What did you think when you WanNa talk about something big like you'll just sprinkle it in? I'm Mary a little bit just walking and having a conversation and then you just like what. Do you think about prenups. So prenuptial agreement or a prenup is is basically an agreement between an engaged couple about who would get what if things don't work out. How all the money and assets get divided in that moment joe says he just felt confused? They had been together since college. And we're just starting to talk about marriage but he didn't think people like them got prenups. He's a high school. Social Studies. Teacher and Aaron hiring is a writer. Probably the only time that I had heard. pre-nup was like celebrities getting them. And like when there's like massive amounts of money you know marriage. Meanwhile Aaron felt like pretty much. Everyone should get pre-nup so my feeling on a pre-nup is that there is already laws and rules in place of how to you know split up assets if you were to get divorced so I would prefer to be the in control of that situation as opposed to letting the state of New York decide for me Erin is a planner. She's always ready. For the worst case scenario she sleeps with a baseball bat next to her bed and when she leaves for an international trip she turns to her partner and says stuff like hey just in case something happens here is where I keep my will. It's in a fireproof safe. Meanwhile Joe he prefers living in the moment. I don't think that far down the line in my mind in this. Maybe my brain just trying to save me say listen. It's not going to become a problem. You're not going to let this become a problem. Joe Is also a bit more emotional like he was the first to profess his love. I just didn't know how and when to say it or if it should come out and then she's like I fucking love you. So when Aaron brought up the Prenup we kind of freaked Joe out the second info came to my mind was like we're not even gauged yet and you know we're now having a conversation about what's going to happen if we get divorced it's not that I think we're going to get divorced. I just like I don't think our apartment's going to burn down but I still have renter's insurance after that initial conversation Joe. Aaron agreed to put the topic on hold after after all day weren't even engaged but about a year later Joe proposed then they celebrated and then they each hire their own attorney and started. Drafting thing a pre-nup prenups are all about how the finances get figured out in a divorce. Everything from debts to retirement but every now and then they includes some pretty wild clauses like financial penalties for cheating or protecting intellectual property. You know like a cool idea for an APP basically. There's a lot to figure out the way. Aaron and Joe Approached. It was every few weeks they'd sit on their couch and talk through the terms of the agreement. If things got tense they'd walk away or watch. TV The biggest point of contention was over errands. Money Aaron makes more money than JOE and would be coming into the marriage not only with personal investments but her own business S. She's a personal finance writer and runs a brand called broke lineal. Because I don't work a traditional job. It made me nervous to think about how things things would get split and divided in a way that might seem okay under the eyes of State Law based on people who work to traditional jobs. But I'm self employed so I wanted protection as a writer. Aaron has one book and two on the way and she didn't want Joe's lawyer to claim that because the work was created during the marriage he's entitled to a portion of those royalties indefinitely. I started to get very defensive and territorial at the idea of what would happen after which I think is fundamentally had the knee jerk reaction. It's mine and what gives you the right well to Joe. It felt like he had a right to some of those royalties. Because he's a big reason she's able to devote so much time came to her business when she's busy writing he runs the household cooks. Dinner walks the dog and is constantly hyping her up. This conversation was happening while this was while while I was doing that emotional support so I think it was kind of like look what I'm doing. I'm doing all these things for you to write your book. Joe also argued that he's a character in a lot of her her writing since Aaron broadcasts a lot of her personal life you know so much of my likeness is being used in your blog and in your writing. And he's like I almost felt like well. It's mine too but explained that even though the royalties are just a portion of her earnings right now there may be a time when that's all she's making so if I'm not coming after your paycheck is it fair for you to becoming for mine. So in the end they decided what's earned during the marriage including royalties would be split fifty fifty but anything earned after a divorce there on their own with prenups everything is theoretical the intangible enjoyable future assets the potential children that supposed- dreadful second wife. You have to map out an unpredictable and probably very sad future at one point. They talked about the hypothetical of inheriting money. Not that they're even expecting that. But just the thought of it led to conversations like this while if I were to inherit money that money got used to purchase a house. I would never allow you to be living in that house if we got divorced. The idea of some other woman living living in this House with you that my parents money helped to buy. ooh I still that. Just riles me up. I think that's the only time I got emotional. Truly really emotional about that. In the end they agreed that if either of them got inheritance and use it to buy say a car or a house the percentage of whatever ever they contributed would go back to the person who inherited the money now. If we had children that might change this entire conversation that could change the whole thing and if that what happens they plan to update their agreement and get a post nup. I feel like it must have been really weird and maybe even surreal like sitting down with someone you love. You know serve imagining Asia. The details of future without them yeah. What's the painting? That's that's why I think I had such a reaction to it all so often was like and even when we talk about itself like this why why are we talking about this. This is this is a world in which we have gotten divorced and we're no longer loving each other and with each other ultimately ultimately crafting the pre-nup costs about four thousand dollars and lawyer's fees for some couples. This whole process can end up exposing pretty different values and visions the relationship and sometimes it's irreconcilable but for Joe an errand. They're thankful it forced them to have really difficult money conversations early Liane so I'll be honest before talking with them. I didn't know much about prenups. But my impression of them were not great. They felt like a bad omen or for proof that two people don't truly love each other but I don't know Aaron Joe are convincing. I think that myself in a divorce situation would not the best version of Erin and I thought hey. This is a way that if the worst were to happen. We've made decisions when we're at this apex of our love where we're going to be kind and generous to each other and we we did. We did have arguments about this. But it's like well. Let's have these many arguments now while we're still totally totally in love. They've been married now for about a year. And there's a copy of the pre-nup tucked away in that fire. PROOF SAFE lovingly crafted plan for the future future. They hope they'll never need them all right. That's all for this week's show but we want to keep exploring during the topic of marriage and money throughout this year. How has money worked or not worked in your marriage? You can share your stories with us at uncomfortable at marketplace dot org and by the way if you haven't yet please subscribe to our newsletter you can sign up for that at marketplace dot org slash newsletters. This is uncomfortable is as me and he McRae's Megan Dietrich Haley Hirschman Peter Balan on Roseanne and daisy. Placebos are intern Daniel Martinez Tony. Wagner is our digital producer. Ben Tolliday is our engineer editing by Sarah Kramer with help this week from Elisa Mills Attorney Eva's is executive director of on demand and depth. Clark is the the Senior Vice President and general manager of marketplace and our theme music is an Wunderle all right catchall next week..

Aaron Joe Aaron Joe Approached Aaron Lowery writer Erin baseball attorney Social Studies Senior Vice President and gene New York self employed Sarah Kramer intern Asia partner Wagner Daniel Martinez Tony Wunderle
"aaron lowery" Discussed on WSJ Secrets of Wealthy Women

WSJ Secrets of Wealthy Women

08:17 min | 1 year ago

"aaron lowery" Discussed on WSJ Secrets of Wealthy Women

"CEO of mine money any media on their financial journalist author of the true cost of happiness. So the very first thing you can do today pas the pod gas pull up a spreadsheet sheet. pull all of your numbers. That's really what provides the information to create the attack plan. This is secrets of wealthy women from the Wall Wall Street Journal Helping Women Empower themselves financially now Veronica Dagger. Welcome to a special edition of secrets a wealthy women. It's the time of year when a lot of us are thinking about how to get our money right so we're bringing together. Three top financial experts to help you find. The motivation. Shouldn't get in. Stay out of debt. Aaron Lowery Jill Schlesinger. Stacey Tisdale have all coped with death themselves and they say you can to you. Here are their top tips on how to handle your debt so stacey you had an experience with debt due to an illness would you share. Share that story actually. It was just a few years ago. I had a health crisis that actually ended up in job loss yes and I was in chronic and constant pain for about eight months it was pretty debilitating and Just had to experience a severe shift in income by going onto disability and at the time I did not have the bandwidth or the energy to make lifestyle changes to adjust to that shift an income and I We were all of my family was also an elder care situation where my father's healthcare was costing about thirteen thousand dollars a month and that led to a lot of cash flow paranoia so I took on debt which is a financial journalist. I had been in condition that it was a bad thing. My personal attitudes about it. We're changing but again when you're faced with that kind of financial anxiety. I don't know what was worse. The pain or the financial canceling Zaidi. It was you know rather debilitating so I had to Really match my message. I had been telling people to you know things like their self worth has nothing to do with their net worth and to make peace with their relationship with money through my work and now I had to do it. Oh my self. So soon I realized that the content that I knew how to produce and the the what I learned about the media business that I could sell my own content. I could do what media outlets had been doing for me an owner myself and that proved to be a you know just where the path was leading and then the opportunities and the cash flow followed and then of his able to turn that around. Erin you didn't have student loans yourself but your husband did and he said that that effected you emotionally. Would you tell us about that. Well I actually made my college decision. Purely based on graduating debt free so I say that I gave up going to my dream school in order to live my dream life because even eighteen had the foresight that that was going to give me a lot more flexibility once I graduated so to then fall all in love with somebody who had student loans and understand that that meant they were going to play a role in my life and essentially be a barrier to achieving certain financial goals. Quickly clearly. Yeah it was a process to kind of have a reckoning with that fortunately we were together eight years before we got married so I had a very long time to make my peace with it and going into our marriage I repositioned my entire thought process around it and I started calling them our student loans as opposed to his student loans and we he did start attacking them as a team. How much loans? He had just over fifty one thousand dollars when we got married so we had more previous to that. But that's what his debt was when I started attacking them with him and we got married in August of two thousand eighteen and we will be debt free in February of twenty twenty `grats. Congratulations Jason. Thank you Jill. How are women affected by credit card and auto loan debt? Well I mean I think that what we know is that the gender wage gap is pernicious in all aspects of a woman's life right. And so when you have more debt to pay off you are also then not contributing into a retirement account and because you have less money in general to contribute to any household budget item then and you are. You know the money that should be going to retirement is now going into debt and we know that women's retirement accounts are basically a third word of what men's are sometimes half sometimes worse than that so I mean I in some respects the there. I can't underscore enough. How parody in wages would go a long way in helping individuals and families achieve their financial goals and You know the other aspect of wage disparity that plays into a woman's long-term planning is that of course ever knows we have a longer life expectancy but when you don't earn earn as much money that also means you're not going to qualify for as large as social security benefit. It also may mean that you have to work later into your life and you know wall. Men have a higher mortality rate. They die before women women get sicker than men they have what's called a higher morbidity rate so you put this all together and you then lump credit card debt or any other kind of Higher interest debt than say a mortgage. And you see how so. Many women are feeling financially insecure. As we get later in life into their fifties sixties and seventies I think when it comes to things like that just to Echo Jill's point it's just everything's harder for women. I mean the. There's just reading. The American Association of University Women Found that women. Earning a bachelor's degree are going to leave college owing three thousand more three thousand dollars more in student loan debt than men for African American women seven. That's eight thousand dollars more. So what do you got you come out of college with more student loan debt and then you have a wage gap you have. I think a quarter of all university students. It's our parents. Seventy one percent are women so then you have those childcare cost so when I mean the deck is so stacked against women that of course you know when you look at the numbers you're going there's just higher levels across the board and again when you break those into socioeconomic differences between multicultural eighty cultural groups that gets compounded despite all of this stuff women control most of the world's wealth we control the majority of the world's wealth we control the majority of the investable assets here in the United States but when you look at the psychological and emotional toll that all of these challenges have left us we don't have that mindset so you know debt impacts decision making that impacts your health without University of North Western researchers finding that you have a higher low levels of anxiety high blood pressure a twenty percent higher chance of having a stroke when you have debt so when you look at all of at that women are carrying. It's very hard for them. To shift into the mindset to claim the debt that we to claim the wealth that we've created but you think we should really be proud of ourselves coming up advice on how to reduce debt from our personal finance experts. And you let him try violin because you love him and if you love him that much love love him enough to make sure he's buckled up and in the back seat find out more at NHTSA DOT gov slash therightseat brought to you by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the Ad Council..

Jill Schlesinger American Association of Univer Veronica Dagger Stacey Tisdale United States NHTSA DOT Aaron Lowery Ad Council Jason University of North Western
"aaron lowery" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

09:58 min | 1 year ago

"aaron lowery" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"Jeff yep you have to make time were you held drive you'll go crazy and you look and I I fortunately the song I heard this at a conference one time is a hundred years from now people care the size of your bank account of a car you drive all they will care about as it should be the difference in the life of a child and I inside these kids are growing up so fast if I it sure was a lot of pressure from the business but I made sure I took time off for the kids it was amazing and this is advice I guess I could give the other entrepreneurs the more time off you take the better business will be what if I played I think the time off for the family you for business owners Jeff you work with many of her devil's advocate on say but I need to be there I enjoy it I like it it's what keeps me going I don't need that break what would you say well I think that this this article to give him a little bit you need to recharge your batteries as good as you think you are there may be other ideas out there or just getting away from it and relaxing they open up your mind to absorb something new something different whereas if you do the same thing day after day you have no opportunity in my opinion of course for the foresee the trees yeah sometimes if you come back from a vacation you have a different perspective it is recharging batteries yes yep this is the article goes on to say I thought this was really good because it's a little he's the distrust reading this is I know you have some reasons and some of which are legitimate finances are tight we almost all small businesses run and lead ship come on this should be solely that you can't get away for a bit I'm even for a long weekend camping or something that would cost that much you could make the argument if it can't run without you it's not properly setup well that's we get into that a little bit how will things get if you are unable to get away because your business can't read without you that is already inside that you need to shake things up yep missed opportunities this is your ego talking if an opportunity comes in the door while you're gone there are plenty of ways to make sure it gets handled with or without you and I think that that's important the item recharge your batteries get your creative juices flowing definitely will make your significant others happy any give you my well deserve much needed break from routine getting things done ahead of time delay projects so you can't prepare yourself for this delay projects take a wait till after you get back speak with bigger busy clients let them know you're going to be gold when I was a one man band we would do that we call our top clients or send out a letter in advance I remember I had to I went to fill up with Erin admits a boy scout camp have you gave up told you had nothing with you nobody could reach me right no cell phone service ten days and I just let people know they thought it was great to them to let them know in advance is never to see that's better than Jeff the old email I'm sorry I'm out of the office that kind of thing you know if you don't tell them in advance of the just to the email that could have got some clients I think that you produce can get a lot of ticket just pausing work get away for a little bit all good things in there and talks about that you'll be better in a better position to make decisions on all the things that they're in talks about in his business report that ties right into that boss segment that tied in well Jeff good stuff and good advice for your business owners of the take just advice take a vacation even if it's three or four days of rest ended we can it makes a big difference chaff for you and for your spouse or significant others are kids or whatever ever the beginning of the program you said you're in Waukesha port Washington Madison your newer receding location you also said you're in Phoenix Arizona well the next caller is Bob from Arizona Bob welcome hi Bob how you doing I'm doing great good morning yeah good morning what's up are black my question if you regard to stretch ire raised and then you she character yeah if you develop any strategies to get around that or at that's a great point we're gonna talk about that a little bit it actually is one of the ways that the government is taking your money away ID Bob sounds like you're looking at my notes because the fed be where the irises I hear it here to money to the tax grab they're they're saying that it's you I'll I'll touch a little bit down at all twelve little bit more going to more detail in their sexy segment our wealth management preservation segment what Bob was talking about is that we did you secure act you could pass a bad IRA to a spouse and they could use that for their life expectancy no problem as it stands today if you pass of the area to a non spouse beneficiary they're gonna have to deplete the account within ten years so what can you do it I think some of the things that you could do first of all I wouldn't hesitate to do that anyway the other thing is that it's because here it still is a good thing if you can stretch it out over ten years instead of life expectancy that's still good we don't know what form it's going to be after the last time we interrupt because I think the house version that was actually passed has five years in the Senate was talking about can yeah I think it's more likely to be the ten years and then there are a couple of the things we're gonna talk about their wealth management session section either way it's five years five years is pretty much with this now we have to treat accounts for five years within five years so that's how it stands right now it was how to stretch you have to have the country within five years maybe that's for this little bit of confusion but none the less there are still plenty things that you can do if your objective is to get the **** of next generation the most tax efficient way deal could start converting Ross I iris to Rafael Reyes now go bump up to the tax limit right now even if you can't stretch it out over a longer than five years at least it'll be tax free to next generation says one thing that you could do start gifting now if one of your objectives because one of the objections with this is to give money to the next generation so you can start give to give now if that's one of the things that you're trying to do but you have to still developing little bit nothing is in final form seven has not voted out even though the house overwhelmingly approved their version of it I think they're only thirteen dissenters on the free hearing right Bob so I would dress up things that you could do especially if it depends on what your motivation this if your motivation is to get their **** so next generation there still is about eleven and a half million dollar estate tax exemption us you can still give a fair amount of money to next generation it doesn't have to be in the area for right all right thanks thanks for the call Bob okay thank you yes good question this is something new but obviously Jeff that he's talking about what to call again act it's is past in the the hospital not to send it yet and what they're trying to do is encourage people to save more for retirement it's setting every community up for retirement and hits with secure us we'll talk more about it but you know there are some really good really is but the intent is good save more is that the government's job to but they but they have to offset that and what their intent to offset it is due to get the money out of those plants if I remember correctly only thirteen percent of those plans actually goal beyond ten years anyway so it's not a huge percentage of the population maybe become popular now that you can't do it basically I just kind of coming out of left field draft in your experience are millennials who talk about all the time in this radio station or they start to invest a little bit more for that the ones that we see a saving quite aggressively now that they have jobs they hand some of a good paying job yes from two thousand eight to twenty probably about twenty twelve that was the case they live in the Paris based right the whole joke was and this is kind of backed during Obama's ten year we joked a member who live in employment as what isn't funny actually with no no no job because the kids were the assembly clients had that same thing but now they're late twenties early thirties and good job if you want a job there's a job out there were at full employment right now yep the ones that we see a saving fairly aggressively for retirement I think they they got a little scared when they didn't have a job that they they do but if they're not as irresponsible as you might think that they if they have a job a holy god to job you're saving early well I think actually it's parents with the millennials I know that in this building that I work with friends and families are that they're extremely Bellechasse is extremely pleasant nice bells excuse me in and they are the next generation but the very competent if I need help with computers are or tech questions I always go to Hannah or somebody on the staff yeah and they just look at me like I'm an old foolish man either give me that phone a fix it for you we have that their office to a lot of people appreciate that we have the next generation in place now for technical issues but also for just for planning issues they're already getting experience working with people retiring now and then work with the next generation as well the clients I think really appreciate that that if something happens to me that they don't have to go somewhere else we have the next generation and place you got it and you're right a lot of these guys are lies guys and women reason our office to the Indian heather all these smart and I am certainly wasn't that tie special that technology stuff I just as my daughters and they look and they give you the look in your list when we fix our computer I'll take care of it this is this I have ties into the Bolivia fee it's another USA today article Aaron Lowery talks but resetting your head can lead to better outcomes as he says invest don't save for retirement problem of but she says she's talking with a friend this is I don't invest you have a four one K. yes and she says well then you're investing the problem is that the language you use.

Jeff five years ten years thirteen percent million dollar hundred years four one K four days ten days ten year
"aaron lowery" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"aaron lowery" Discussed on KTRH

"And business schools chemistry department there should be a high demand Sally Adams newsradio seven forty KTRE what if you get again the whole debate over organic campaign in organic chem Campen pesticide Daria just think about that sure if you're the parent of a millennial there's a fifty fifty chance you're still helping them financially and that's going to hurt you in your retirement a new survey for money under thirty adult children still are needing cash to cover their cell phone bills their rent and other expenses man author Aaron Lowery it broke millennial dot com says that's because your parents won't cut them off at some point tough love have to come in and part of the reason kids tend to stay at home for longer periods of time tend to rely on their parents is because they can't so what what point are you going to draw the hardline custom off warning to you if your college grad does move home you need to set the guidelines what require them to do things like pay their own grocery and phone bills and help clean up around the house on a lot of parents to talk a good game but they don't really do it now no they raise these kids that's right seven thirty eight now Hey move over ketchup and mustard you got some real competition now hot sauce of now what are the most popular condiments on the market it's just really a trend that one more people are eating spicy foods and using for closing and trying to get a little extra kick out of their their sauces CEO Greg Figaro with Texas based Melinda's hot sauces people are tired of boring food I want to spice things up for new services are are green saucer sweet chili chili con I enter ghost wing sauce Figueroa says soon they're going to start making spicy Mayo and catch up so you can spice up even more foods John brewer newsradio some forty Katie are hand drawn the line a ghost chili tired of hearing foods.

Daria Aaron Lowery Texas Melinda Figueroa Mayo Katie Sally Adams CEO Greg Figaro John brewer
"aaron lowery" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

09:17 min | 1 year ago

"aaron lowery" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Back to jail on money you are back it's jail on money if you've got a financial question we'd love to hear from you just send us an email asking Jill Jill on money dot com asking Jill act Jill on money dot com all right so you know you heard that that little intro guys is if you have a question about investing we always get questions about investing it seems that investing is so concrete you know it's this topic that occupies a lot of our financial head space because maybe you have a retirement account through work or you hear about it are people like me go on the air and talk about new records for stock market indexes or something like that in the real critical aspects of how to become a good investor there are tried and true parts of the process and our guest Aaron Lowery who has just written a new book called broke millennial takes on investing is really good at explaining how some of these concepts basically interact with your real life so here is more of our interview with Erin Larry how do you bring this new generation of investors into the to the right frame of mind about what market returns are all about for me a big part of the conversation is this fundamental understanding that it's going to go down and you have to be okay with that and it's up and down you're gonna whether the ups and downs of the market it's just part of the process and also they are very inflammatory headlines in the media that our media that are completely without real contacts if you haven't done your research into the market for example I remember last year there is a big one about Dow Jones drops eight hundred points biggest drop in history well okay eight hundred points was certainly the biggest drop but it wasn't the largest percentage drop that had ever happened so it's making sure that you also know how to read between the lines on certain things so we did misconception one and we did misconception to what's the third misconception I would say that there is a misconception about how early you need to be getting started and that you can't play catch up very easily so a lot of people will think Hey you know I am twenty five things are pretty tough broke oneill status I was there I remember so you feel well you know I'm not so much going to focus on putting money away for retirement or any other sort of investing I'm just gonna focus on the immediate short term needs when I'm thirty five I'll be making a lot of money all of paid off my loans will be in a better situation that's when I'll start SO two problems with that one even if you double down how much you're investing ten years later you're not necessarily going to catch up with yourself if you had started at twenty five the other issue is life tends to get more complicated not easier so well yes you might be making more money maybe you paid off your student loans perhaps you got married if you bought a house maybe started a family and all those things cost money and I think lifestyle inflation in addition to all of this sense to happen too so while you might have more income it doesn't mean you still have a lot of money to put into your investments to try to play catch up it's funny I was talking to somebody who said to me I live paycheck to paycheck someone here at work I said you and your spouse make two hundred and sixty thousand dollars a year together and you live paycheck to paycheck he's like yep we literally had no money left when we come to the end of the month and I think that's shocking to people but it is exactly what you say this lifestyle creek this you know well now I have three kids and I've got three more mouths to feed and I think what they also mean is when they say paycheck to paycheck that they're both maxing out their retirement accounts which is great but the catch up part of it which they thought they would be able to do not close I mean they're barely maxing out so I think that's a great point in going through and writing this book what did you learn that you didn't know before about investing my goodness a lot and some of it was terminology I remember doing an interview at one point and the interviewee said basis point I said you know I'm gonna stop here here I hear that term all the time and I've never totally understood what people mean could you explain it and it was little things like that and the terminology and I also found it fascinating to get so many different perspectives on the same topic and how many people had different thresholds for when you should be investing if you have dead or if you should be investing I also didn't interview recently where somebody made the argument that even if you have credit card debt you should still be investing because of compound interest which I argued against but it's interesting how many different ways and perspectives of viewing investing exist did you learn something different about yourself and about how you view investing I still cannot bring myself to completely stop investing in a taxable account even though my husband and I are paying off student loans I really thought in the beginning that it was gonna I was gonna need to focus entirely on his student loan debt and I started writing this book right around the time that we got married and I inherited if you well not really my name's not legally on anything but that became a real part of my life and I truly thought you know once that happens I'm just gonna wanna put every extra dollar towards getting out of that debt as fast as possible we're gonna press pause I investing in taxable accounts and then it happens I can now just I gotta keep investing I also bought my first individual stock do tell I would did doing research for the book the plan was basically Hey this is some speculative money I can afford to lose but I feel like I should go through the actual experience of doing it in order to also even just dealing with an interface and seeing what questions was I was going to have to ask myself like stop loss limit by like all those kind of terms I had no idea what any of you do it through which organization I did with Charles Schwab okay so you open up a Schwab account and it's just in your name husbands not on it no how did you pick your first stock so this is kind of a weird story and I talk about it a little bit in the book my dad works in the lithium industry so I grew up understanding and learning about lithium the raw material that goes into both cell phone batteries and anti depressant medication real weird product and it's become a bit of a hot topic lately because of renewable energy in because of batteries and trying to store energy and test line all of that and I thought you know if I can invest in a lithium company I'm pretty bullish on the future of lithium so I did some research and that's what I picked okay one company one company I just did one company bought some shares had a set amount I was willing to put in just to test it out and see what happens and so far so far doing okay it was amazing at the beginning huge I'm run and then not as much so okay so after having this experience which is what a year itch but about it yeah you're not half okay do you wish you had done something different like take some of the money off the table did you wish that you had said let me put a limit order and that if I buy it at ten and he gets to fifteen I'll sell half of it did you have any of that in retrospect you wish you had done that in retrospect after seeing where it was kind of peaking in the run I had cashed out that would be another student loan payments the so have you changed any of your approach to the stock itself in other words if you put a limit on it so limited for everyone listening limit is you pick a point on the upside or downside we say if it gets to this point sell this position sell a portion of this position will you put a limit on this now I'm not going to I'm still kind of value investor about it and I it was a buy and hold strategy even though as an individual stock so I kind of mentally earmarked it for a few years to see how it goes and I would say if in two years its under performing then I'm gonna have to make some tough decisions okay also you're doing this in a taxable account and you have some retirement account where you could play with this so you don't have to worry about taking gains and worrying about taxes I DO and I could of but again book research as well I'm gonna cash is that okay I just wanted to try and a taxable account and see what I write a writer and I'm still up all right all right all right so okay next question for you in writing the book did you think when you started the process that investing was more mathematical or emotional I would say emotional just from book one because I think everything related to money is a hundred percent emotion obviously mast over it's a ninety percent because obviously math plays a role but the decisions that we make are pretty much purely emotional very rarely are we actually rational when it comes to our money and investing I think again just almost compounds the issue in a lot of ways because it feels.

Jill Jill sixty thousand dollars hundred percent ninety percent ten years two years
"aaron lowery" Discussed on The Business Builders Show with Marty Wolff

The Business Builders Show with Marty Wolff

10:36 min | 1 year ago

"aaron lowery" Discussed on The Business Builders Show with Marty Wolff

"Going. Thanks marty. This is Kelly how we guest host of the business builders show, and I am particularly thrilled with who had got on the show today. We've got broke millennial aka Aaron Lowery, who is author of broke millennial takes on investing a beginner's guide to leveling up your money. Not that I wouldn't be thrilled to have you on the show, Erin. But we both share the same publisher Archer parody and editors Lauren and Stephanie. So this is particularly exciting for me to have a kindred author on the show. Welcome. Thank you for having me, keeping it in the family here today. Exam. Exactly. So you like a previous business builders show guest who's actually mentioned in your book at page, two hundred four Jilan money. Jill schlesinger. You didn't set out to be a financial expert so share with listeners who may not know you how a liberal arts, major arrived at a career as a personal finance author while I needed to make money. So I guess that's the big thing taken that liberal arts degree, and putting it to good use. But I would say I'd have joking aside to me, it's the perfect merger of the fact that I studied, both theater and journalism, and I was asked all the time. What are you actually going to do at those degrees? And here I am creating the perfect blend of the two because I not only talk about money, but I go and do speaking engagements, in media, which is the blend of all of that theater. And then when it comes to personal finance, a lot of what I do is research focused and that kind of hearkens back to the. Journalism days and it's a very long story to the honest about how it all came together. But a lot of that had to do with the fact that my parents raised me in a household that was very financially literate, which is not terribly common and I'm very fortunate that my parents, talked about money all the time, and what you grow up around as normal, and within about a year of living in the quote, unquote, real world after college, I started to become very clear to me, how many of my friends did not understand how money works didn't feel any sort of control over it. And for the most part, even those who came from very privileged backgrounds, just felt very overwhelmed. And I wanted to do something about that, and it was two thousand thirteen. So at the time blogging was still slightly trendy and that's where it all began. Was it broke money, L dot com. That's awesome. Let me dial back. You know, we I think we should talk about the kinds of things that your dad shared with you, and your mom, and you've household, and on all of that, for people who are listening in, you know, may find themselves kind of going, all right? Got a kid going off to college or I've got someone looking for their first internship in my family, and I've never talked about these things. But let's dial it back to H Twenty-three when you were working three jobs beyond the hustle and passion. How'd you set yourself up for self employment welfare, self employment for me? That was a very well long process in the context of my short working life. I guess you could say, but I was twenty three when I was working while twenty two actually when I was working at the late show with David Letterman, which is no longer even a job because the show no longer exists. And then I was a barista at a low known mermaid logo d- coffee chain. And then I was also a babysitter. And I was working those three jobs because all of them were part time jobs, and I was trying to kind of bundle this together in order to just survive. And then I got my first real fulltime job. And that was working at a public relations boutique agency. And man, I thought I was rich 'cause I was going from twenty three thousand dollars to thirty seven thousand five hundred dollars plus than effects. Oh, I had health insurance ahead of 4._0._1._K. I was feeling good. But in tandem, I then started broke millennial and from that I started to also get opportunities to freelance, right? And I was still babysitting. So I was side hustling, in addition to my day, job amid age, gobble it wasn't a ton was enough to cover all of my necessary bills. So I just started to save all of the money, I made side hustling. And then that continued when I- job, hopped like millennial over to start up company, and that startup company worked in fintech. So financial technology in it was a financial product comparison website. Site. And that's where I really cut my teeth learning all about the ins and outs of how banks works and credit cards in different ways that companies can try to screw you over and how to know all the tricks in the traps, and I also continued to side, hustle, my entire time working there. So what I wanted to go out fulltime self employed. I had a really nice nest egg and a lot of runway prepared, but I had also been moonlighting in the job that I wanted to do as a self employed person. So I had really tested the business before I went out on my own knew that it was viable. I'm sitting here listening, I'm laughing. So my first career was in as an attorney, and graduate from law school back in nineteen Ninety-one, and I'm thinking to myself. Yeah. When you have that first job that really pays, I'm just gonna say shit. You remember that looks like burned in your memory, the number? Would you said Kay, and I was making, you know, twenty three thousand I remember my decision to move to Toronto versus sting in Vancouver was salaries. In Vancouver at the time were, let me think fourteen to sixteen thousand dollars for an article ING student, and it was thirty six to forty two thousand in Toronto with the same cost of living. It was not a big like not a big decision. I would take more money in a bad winter any day. So anyway, that was like I heard just Norton left there in the background mardi. Yeah. Well, I was thinking of you Kelly, one once us telling that story, you know, cook, because I know your story, so you're an entrepreneur, you went through that gauntlet. I guess I'll call it that so the book is for millennials. But can I dwell a little bit at this point in time? I guess, I'll ask do you see ongoing mistakes that typically young entrepreneurs make in terms of investing or saving or protecting what they have, for instance, I, I'd be willing to bet a lot of people don't even have an idea. So let's say what entrepreneurs starting small businesses. What common mistakes? You see people making, I would say there's two big ones. The first one is not actually testing the viability of your idea before launching into it. It's easy to get over zealous and excited or to just hate your day, job so much, you can't take it anymore, and you just wanna quit and try something on your own, and you need a good amount of runway for me. I think part of this as a risk tolerance assessment, I wanted to have at least one year of savings in addition to my retirement funds, so this was not being not having to tap, my 4._0._1._K or my IRA is in order to fund my life because I didn't want to have to pay the penalties. So I had a years worth of money saved up that if everything went sideways for me as a self employed person, I was going to be able to pay my bills and I had really simulated what the experience was going to be like, because another thing that I did towards I had an end date in my mind when I was going to give notice at my work, and about four months before that. I started to put my salary money into savings, and then lived off of the variable income. I was earning as a writer to just simulate the experience of what it was like to live on a variable income. So one of the big things to me is making sure you have a very healthy nest egg, and you tested the viability of your product, but the other side is retirement, I think, so often, especially when we're self employed. But this also is for people who are traditionally, employed, we either put off investing for retirement and notice the wording there, I don't like saying save for retirement because it's a misnomer, you are investing for retirement, and we put it off as something that can happen in the future. We'll worry about it in five years away about it in ten years, and you wake up one morning, and you either never started, or you never really took it seriously and didn't put enough money aside. And when you're self employed, you don't have the option of an employer match. You don't have those kind of incentives. You have to be putting enough money aside for yourself. And that is something that needs to just be built into the. Gratien of your business. I'm so glad you raised the our word because I don't Sem Amy Resnick who's over at pensions. And investments tweeted this, and it was some stats about Americans and lottery, in how eighteen percent of Americans are basing retirement plans on hopes they will win the lottery and that and that's eighteen percent of Americans but twenty six percent of millennials and even more ridiculous percentage. Actually believe this is a reasonable plan. How do you get through to those people who think that investing is risky, but buying a lottery ticket is a good retirement plan? There's a simple answer to that. The other thing too, that we're currently facing especially with specifically millennials. And I would argue some older jen's e as this sort of doom and gloom that there's no point in investing for retirement because the world's going to end before we get there. So that's the newest battle, I've been having to face in terms of talking to people about retirement, and one of the ways that I like to reposition that is your guaranteeing yourself financial apocalypse. So hopefully the world doesn't end and we live to a ripe old age. But if you don't invest for retirement, and you aren't setting anything, aside, you're guaranteeing yourself a financial apocalypse, because what are you gonna do when you get there and heaven forbid, something happened in your unable to work, or you have a health crisis? You have to be putting money aside. And as for the gambling slash lottery. Comparison to investing. I actually have a chapter in my book that talks about how investing is not gambling because I hate. That comparison I think we have to debunk it in order to get people more comfortable and a big thing is also making sure that people understand the language of investing. I believe that, that's a huge reason that it feels really acceptable to a lot of folks and once you start to understand the context of it, and the language of it, and especially the history of the market. He starts to feel a little bit more comfortable and while we're not in control of it. You feel a little bit more in control of yourself in your portfolio just to remind listeners. We are chatting with Aaron lower who is broke millennial in.

self employed Aaron Lowery Kelly marty Erin David Letterman publisher Jill schlesinger Vancouver fintech Toronto Archer Norton Stephanie attorney Amy Resnick Kay writer
"aaron lowery" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

03:49 min | 2 years ago

"aaron lowery" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"I wouldn't do that you doing everything you should be doing that. Your tax exposure. You don't shouldn't have such a huge tax exposure. On hundred thousand dollars of income. I I would open a I mean, you're doing you're doing the Roth IRA, which is great. And you keep doing that. But I think that at this point you start a non retirement investing account, and you make sure you don't buy big tax generating assets. That are in there. Cry. Wanda is a dedicated WC CO radio listener WC in the twin cities. And she says. We apparently did a terrible job at educating our youngest daughter that all things financial, and I don't see a way out of a near mass. I'm hoping to get my grandson off to a better start. I don't want him following in his mother's footsteps can you recommend any online workbook based financial program that we're you know, what go get my friend's book worth it or not worth it, isn't that? What Jack book is called Mark worth? It not worth it. That's a great starting book. You can also try what about Aaron Lowery's first book, which is called millennial broke millennial. Try broke millennial. That's another one. It's a good one to try there. There's a couple of good sources for you. All right here is a question from Agnes on building a house in a few months in lieu of maximum, my solo 4._0._1._K, would it makes sense to shift that money to the cost of the house. If the need arises I've got enough cash to get through about south three quarters to eighty five percent of the house building cost for the remainder. I could take a loan if my work if if my normal workflow cash flow can cover it. But I wonder if it'd make more sense to divert the retirement contributions that I would have made for about a year or two for the finishing of the cost. I've been maxing out my retirement contributions for ten years. And according to retirement calculators, I'm a little ahead of where I should be in my savings. What do you think? Mark. I'm thinking, it's okay. For Agnes to do that. I mean, I generally don't like that. But I think that there's a certain amount of risk of you waiting to see whether your cash flow can actually absorb this. So I think that I would I would probably make that decision. Craig listens to the program on WBZ N in buffalo and. So I heard part of your program about social security survivors, my dad passed away ten years ago. My mother's only been collecting her small share of social security does she have some claim to his which would be much larger. She should check with the social security administration. Yeah. That's absolutely of. Unfortunately, can't go back in time. You're not going to be able to go get what you should have gotten. But I would contact the social security administration per onto and see what you can do with that. Okay. Hey, mark. How about that all through those right through all those emails. My friend. Not bad right now. You wanna just do more and more? We're trying desperately to catch up and dig out, but we done a very good job. Especially considering that we got a ton of emails about the book and all those appearances I did for the book and a ton of emails about tax season. So I'm very grateful for all of you who right in please be patient. We do try to get to every single Email and answer your questions as quickly as we can they do sometimes pile up. You are listening to Jill on money. And if you do have a financial question give us a call now don't give us a call. Give us a shout.

Wanda Agnes Mark Aaron Lowery Jill Craig ten years hundred thousand dollars eighty five percent three quarters
"aaron lowery" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

04:31 min | 2 years ago

"aaron lowery" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"I don't see why you want to pay off your mortgage unless your mortgage interest rate is really high. I wouldn't do that. You doing everything you should be doing that? Your tax exposure. You shouldn't have such a huge tax exposure. One hundred thousand dollars of income. I I would open a I mean, you're doing you're doing the Roth IRA, which is great and you keep doing that. But I think that at this point you start a non retirement investing account, and you make sure you don't buy big tax generating assets. That are in there. Cry. Wanda is a dedicated WC CO radio listener W C C O in the twin cities. And she says. We apparently did a terrible job of educating our youngest daughter that all things financial, and I don't see a way out of a near mess. I'm hoping to get my grandson off to a better start. I don't want him following in his mother's footsteps, can you commend any online workbook base financial program that were you know, what? Go get my friend's book worth it or not worth it, isn't that? What Jack autres book is called Mark worth? It not worth it. That's a great starting book on you can also try what about Aaron Lowery's first book, which is called millennial broke millennial. Try broke millennial. That's another one. It's a good one to try there. A couple of good sources for you. All right here is a question from Agnes building a house in a few months in lieu of maxing out my solo 4._0._1._K. Would it make sense sense to shift that money to the cost of the house? If the need arises I've got enough cash to get through about south three quarters to eighty five percent of the house building cost for the remainder. I could take a loan if my work if if my normal workflow cash flow can cover it. But I wonder if it make more sense to divert the retirement contributions that I would've made for about a year or two for the finishing of the cost. I've been maxing out my retirement contributions for ten years. And according to retirement calculators, I'm a little ahead of where I should be in my savings. What do you think? Mark. I'm thinking, it's okay. For Agnes to do that. I mean, I generally don't like that. But I think that there's a certain amount of risk of you waiting to see whether your cash flow can actually absorb this. So I think that I would I would probably make that decision. Craig listened to the program on WBZ and buffalo and. So I heard part of your program about social security survivors, my dad passed away ten years ago. My mother's only been collecting her small share of social security does she have some claim to his which would be much larger. She should check with the social security administration. Yeah. That's absolutely of. Unfortunately, can't go back in time. You're not gonna be able to go get what you should have gotten. But I would contact the social security administration pronto and see what you can do that. Okay. Hey, mark. How about that all through those right through all those emails, my friend, not bad right now. You wanna just do more and more? We're trying desperately to catch up and dig out done a very good job. Especially considering that we got a ton of emails about the book and all those appearances I did for the book and a ton of emails about tax season. So I'm very grateful for all of you who right in please be patient. We do try to get to every single Email and answer your questions as quickly as we can they do sometimes pile up. You are listening to Jill on money. And if you do have a financial question give us a call now don't give us a call. Give us a shout about that drops a line asked. Jill Jill on money dot com. We'll be right back. Finding great candidates to hire can be like well trying to find the needle haystack. But not with ZipRecruiter. It's powerful technology. Actively fines and invites qualified candidates.

Jill Jill Agnes Mark Wanda Jack autres Aaron Lowery Craig ten years One hundred thousand dollars eighty five percent three quarters
"aaron lowery" Discussed on BiggerPockets Money Podcast

BiggerPockets Money Podcast

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"aaron lowery" Discussed on BiggerPockets Money Podcast

"Awesome we'll aaron thank you so much for taking time out of your day to talk to us about money and relationships i think it's really important to talk about money and it can be a difficult discussion to start but if you're already in love with this person there's a lot of incentive to keep the love going absolutely ambiguous so much for having me this was fun i think you are in this is great okay we'll talk to you later all right that was aaron lowery from broke millennial author blogger extraordinary and expert on finance in all things millennial in money related including relationships in getting financially naked that was very fun podcast i liked that one that is fun i did you see aaron smile like the entire time when she walks into a room she just likes it up she's the one of the nicest people i've ever met and she's just a genuinely caring soul yeah she nailed it when it came to talking about financial terms and somebody above her in the apartment above was doing some nailing of their own construction project so yes i've sorry for the wont be sound in the last fifteen minutes or so of the show because she had made arrangements with the landlord to stop working on the apartment above her for an hour and then they started right out on the dot they started back up again so i think we still got we could still hear very clearly the information she has providing so hopefully it's not too much of a distraction but we're sorry about that and we try to avoid those kinds of sound issues yes so yes i'm sorry about that too but yeah her her information is so helpful in so spot on you know i think it's really important it comes from someone in a relationship right now who does have a different perspective on money then her significant other so here's how we did it in this is how it worked for us and that's really helpful i thought it was great and i thought it was a great perspective and great way to phrase it obviously she knows what she's talking about so yes she's very very knowledgeable okay scott shall we say goodbye to our listeners today sounds good goodbye listeners good ball okay from episode twenty four of the bigger pockets money podcast this is mindy jensen over and out.

aaron lowery scott mindy jensen fifteen minutes
"aaron lowery" Discussed on BiggerPockets

BiggerPockets

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"aaron lowery" Discussed on BiggerPockets

"Awesome we'll aaron thank you so much for taking time out of your day to talk to us about money and relationships i think it's really important to talk about money and it can be a difficult discussion to start but if you're already in love with this person there's a lot of incentive to keep the love going absolutely ambiguous so much for having me this was fun i think you are in this is great okay we'll talk to you later all right that was aaron lowery from broke millennial author blogger extraordinary and expert on finance in all things millennial in money related including relationships in getting financially naked that was very fun podcast i liked that one that is fun i did you see aaron smile like the entire time when she walks into a room she just likes it up she's the one of the nicest people i've ever met and she's just a genuinely caring soul yeah she nailed it when it came to talking about financial terms and somebody above her in the apartment above was doing some nailing of their own construction project so yes i've sorry for the wont be sound in the last fifteen minutes or so of the show because she had made arrangements with the landlord to stop working on the apartment above her for an hour and then they started right out on the dot they started back up again so i think we still got we could still hear very clearly the information she has providing so hopefully it's not too much of a distraction but we're sorry about that and we try to avoid those kinds of sound issues yes so yes i'm sorry about that too but yeah her her information is so helpful in so spot on you know i think it's really important it comes from someone in a relationship right now who does have a different perspective on money then her significant other so here's how we did it in this is how it worked for us and that's really helpful i thought it was great and i thought it was a great perspective and great way to phrase it obviously she knows what she's talking about so yes she's very very knowledgeable okay scott shall we say goodbye to our listeners today sounds good goodbye listeners good ball okay from episode twenty four of the bigger pockets money podcast this is mindy jensen over and out.

aaron lowery scott mindy jensen fifteen minutes
"aaron lowery" Discussed on Manage Your Damn Money: The Podcast

Manage Your Damn Money: The Podcast

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"aaron lowery" Discussed on Manage Your Damn Money: The Podcast

"Christina is twenty six i think right twentyseven going on twenty seven something like member but goldman rishi and that results so she's four years behind me and she made a decision that was partially made on cost and i talked to kaelin when i met him and he was said the same thing like i picked the school based on what it would have cost me 'cause they gave me in state tuition his states wishing was the first thing from my mind when i decided to go to hampton university i did get a scholarship but costs in general was not a primary concern of mine we're probably should have been and there's another young lady who i met who her name's aaron lowery and she said she picked her college completely on cost she again i'm assuming holders i don't know exactly how she's younger than okay and so i think that's bubbling up to the top where people are like look man my sister said this yesterday a college degree is becoming just like a high school thing and nobody really truly cares especially after a few years as a professional where you went to school so just get the degree and keeping move in it basically make sure that when people are doing that control f search in indeed dot com wherever glass door whatever use that you meet the criteria that says you have a bachelor's the a bs and something right they do that control f finder right does this person have a college degree no throw the resume out this person have undergraduate degree yes add them to the pile keep it moving right to me it seems just that cut and dry like it's not even you know oh great this person went to ex school graduated from this specialized program last year applying for a job that is something super special then you know of course we care like if you're applying to medical school the school you went to where you ranked in your graduating class probably still matters the same that it did in the sixties you're applying to go to law school you want to work at a big corporate law firm where you graduated in your class probably matters the same way it did fifty years ago aside from that hyper specialized things.

Christina hampton university aaron lowery goldman fifty years four years
"aaron lowery" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

KTTH 770AM

01:41 min | 4 years ago

"aaron lowery" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

"It money with jill schlesinger the question paul or email any time eight five five four one one jill or asked jill at july money back you're back with jail on money this is the program takes a mystery out of your financial life eight five five four one one jill as our phone number or email address asked jill jill on money dot com and i am delighted to have a young millennial i if you're young are all be seem awfully young to me aaron lowery is the author of broke millennial stop scraping by and get your financial life together and we just learned a little bit about aaron number one she's ex pat lived in japan in china and as far as i'm concerned upstate new york also seems like another country to mesa that seems pretty much in that same i probably more at home in shanghai then in the nether regions of upstate new york negative okay your book is dedicated to your dad to your mom kaylin must be the sister who's peach the dog peaches my boyfriend ooh he he wants to know mark the producer wants to know what what's up with peach so peach i'm actually not gonna say his real name because i kind of respecting its privacy a little bit oh come on kenny help us sell this book or nod pizza was the monochrome created for him i started talking about our relationship a little bit online and he didn't want me to share his specific numbers as we can get into it later but he has student loan debt i do not so it's been a big talking point for me when writing about money and peaches actually what i do call.

jill schlesinger paul jill jill aaron lowery japan china shanghai new york producer kenny mesa
"aaron lowery" Discussed on KFQD News Talk

KFQD News Talk

01:52 min | 4 years ago

"aaron lowery" Discussed on KFQD News Talk

"It doesn't matter if you're twenty five or sixty five jill schlesinger is here to help you back to jail on money i'm so you're back with jill on money you probably never heard this song ever i mean we have already good for you like some old school aaron lowery is the author of broke millennial and she's fabulous she is a real live millennial yourself we just in the intro our voice of july money to this matter whether you're twenty five or fifty five or sixty five doesn't matter and in fact i actually thought that your book is so good for someone who says and give this book to my kid but it also forces conversations maybe you haven't had yourself as you're older right did you ever did you think about that at all when you're writing it like you're writing it for more than just the millennial i thought about it in a sense that maybe it will create conversation between parent and child because i think that was the greatest gift my parents gave me was talking about money at a young age and on that set me on the path that i am now and it naval me to be debtfree and to understand how to handle iron earned twenty three thousand dollars new york city my first year here in instilled in stress me out because i knew how many worked that's amazing so before we went to the break the question i asked you is how can parents grandparents friends have conversations with their kids to break through this idea that a millennial as you said you know doesn't really deal in cash society to digital currency its so many things that you know with a click of a button as opposed to take one hundred dollars a year in your pocket or your backpack do you break through and have the conversation that's meaningful to help foster smarter financial decisions for your kids there few different options i would say if you already at the point where your kid.

jill schlesinger aaron lowery york twenty three thousand dollars one hundred dollars
"aaron lowery" Discussed on Listen Money Matters

Listen Money Matters

01:56 min | 4 years ago

"aaron lowery" Discussed on Listen Money Matters

"Not starting over but not spending so much time up in the clouds yet aunt on this episode we have aaron lori who is the founder of brooklyn e dot com and the author book called brooklyn so high high like covers it's lowery lowery dang it i should ask for so i guess aaron lowery welcome to the show thanks for having me and say if you hear sirens and tracks apparently they decided today's day do construction outside of my house says the problem when you live in a city in and do podcast that's just what you deal with and now i your guys is pain because i it just move to a big city though i don't think going to have as many problems as you do andrew like p lights throughout earth strike by people dying in a street like probably once every other episodes like two pm and their people just like tanked wasted like singing outside our job have you ever been broken and i yes en route to a bills game so i saw in really full force of drunk people because i was a bills jets game yikes russia you had probably a similar experience i'm from iowa originally so kind of a sleepy town comparatively and the first time i ever came to hoboken to see andrew was on saint patrick's day so i get off the path and what i see is like a cross between like a day of the dead movie and animal house dislike the streets have people just like running through them a at least three ambulances pass me sirens blaring as a mock at andrews place like i guess this is were andrew lives that i don't think it's really fair to go to any city on saint patrick's day because it's always just the worst representation.

aaron lori founder brooklyn lowery lowery saint patrick aaron lowery andrew russia iowa hoboken