17 Burst results for "Aaron Baker"

"aaron baker" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

05:59 min | 2 weeks ago

"aaron baker" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"Lab grown chicken gets a green light from the FDA by Aaron baker, Berkeley, California. In a major first for the food industry, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has declared that a lab grown chicken product developed by California food tech startup upside foods is safe for human consumption. Setting the stage for a new food revolution, in which the world's meat is grown and bio reactors instead of on factory farms. The November 16th ruling which comes after a rigorous evaluation period is the first and biggest of three hurdles that must be cleared before the Berkeley based company can sell its cultivated the industry's preferred term. Chicken and grocery stores and restaurants. But it likely paves the way for scores of similarly made products, ranging from lab grown beef to steaks, foie GRAS, and even cultivated mouse treats for cats. This is a watershed moment in the history of food. Said doctor uma valletti, CEO and founder of upside foods in a statement. We started upside amid a world full of skeptics, and today we've made history again as the first company to receive a no questions letter from the FDA for cultivated meat. This milestone marks a major step towards a new era and meat production. More than 100 companies are working on various iterations of cultivated meat, but they all start from the same basic principle. Stem cells are taken from the source animal, either via a biopsy from an adult animal, or from an in vitro embryo and are encouraged to multiply in a bioreactor filled with a nutrient rich broth. Once they differentiate into fat, muscle, or structural cells, they are moved to a larger bioreactor, where they continue to grow until they can be harvested. The process can take anywhere from two to four weeks, depending on the final product. Ground chicken, for example, takes less time than a complex stake, created with the help of a 3D bioprinter. Upsides chicken fillets fall somewhere in between, the industry is still relatively young, the world's first cultivated meat product was launched in 2013 when Dutch startup mosa meat introduced its lab grown beef burger to the world, with a $330,000 price tag, but companies are already eyeing supermarket shelves in the hopes that they will be first to market. Singapore is the only country that allows sales of cultivated meat, specifically chicken made by good meat, a division of the American food technology company, eat just ink. But the U.S. market with the highest per CAPiTA consumption of meat in the world is the ultimate goal for most companies. According to the FDA, upsides chicken will likely have company very soon. We are already engaged in discussions with multiple firms about various types of food made from cultured animal cells, including food made from seafood cells, the agency said in a written statement. Our goal is to support innovation in food technologies while always maintaining as our priority, the production of safe food. Human food made with cultured animal cells must meet the same stringent requirements, including safety requirements as all other food. The next step for upside and any other companies following in its wake is approval from the United States Department of Agriculture, which will inspect the safety of manufacturing facilities, as well as the cleanliness of the meat production process, much as it would for conventionally grown chicken. Finally, the meat itself will need to be inspected before it goes to market. Cultivated seafood companies, which are only regulated by the FDA, and do not fall under USDA jurisdiction could pass through the system even more quickly. This is a critical milestone toward the future of food, says Bruce Friedrich, president of the good food institute, an advocacy organization promoting plant and cell based alternatives to animal products. Cultivated meat, poultry, and seafood will soon be available to consumers who desire their favorite foods made more sustainably. Time toured upsides brand new Berkeley facility in March. To get a taste of what's to come, the laboratory and test kitchen are housed in a mixed use residential neighborhood. The building is most notable for vast windows that allow passers by a glimpse onto the factory floor where massive fermentation tanks are linked by a gleaming network of steel pipes and tubing designed to keep the nascent chicken fillets fed with a steady flow of nutrients. The windows are there to show that we have nothing to hide, said valetti, as he led a tour through the manufacturing process. Our process is clean, safe, and ethical. Can you imagine a slaughterhouse allowing a tour like this? Would you even want to see that? The tour ended with a sample of upsides chicken fillet. Seared on a grill and served with a simple white wine and caper reduction sauce. The most surprising aspect was that there was no surprise. The chicken tasted just like chicken should. Only more so. Most supermarket chickens bred for quick growth are bland, more a texture than a taste. Upsides chicken stem cells were selected for flavor. Their growth medium is designed to enhance both the taste and the consistency. The results are a firm meaty bite reminiscent of old fashioned farm breeds, a future food rooted firmly in the past. Now that upside has the green light from the FDA, with USDA approval soon to follow, it will also be a present reality..

FDA Aaron baker uma valletti upside foods Berkeley mosa California Bruce Friedrich good food institute U.S. Singapore Department of Agriculture valetti USDA
"aaron baker" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

03:16 min | 3 weeks ago

"aaron baker" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"Exclusive. We tasted the world's first cultivated steak. No cows required. By Aaron baker. There is nothing quite like the sizzle of steak hitting a hot cast iron skillet. First comes the heady aroma of caramelizing meat, followed by the smoke of charring fat. Juices splatter in my mouth automatically starts to water in and anticipation. Then my stomach clinches with guilt. As a climate correspondent, I try to avoid beef. The global livestock industry is responsible for more than 14% of all man-made greenhouse gas emissions in our atmosphere, nearly as much as road transport, aviation, and shipping combined. Industrial cattle farming is one of the biggest global sources of methane, a potent greenhouse gas that is 80 times more efficient at trapping heat in the short term than CO2. Cultivating the crops to feed the cattle industry, drives deforestation, generating even greater emissions. In order to lift our collective foot from the accelerator taking us to certain climate doom, the world resources institute an environmental research organization suggests that residents of the Americas, Europe and Oceania, limit their consumption of red meat to the equivalent of two burgers a week. Israeli startup, aleph farms, says it would be better to eat steak. Its steak that is a rich slab of meat grown from stem cells in a bioreactor. No cows or slaughter required. It's cultivated meat, which is the industry's preferred term, is not yet available on the market. No cultivated meat product has passed regulatory approval outside of Singapore. But the company invited me to try its signature cut at its facility in the hove it. Half an hour south of Tel Aviv. There, company cofounder Didier tubia, promised me a taste of the future in which a beautiful steak seared to perfection is no longer served on a bed of methane emissions with a side of biodiversity loss in Amazonian rainforests. Aleph farms like many of the more than 100 cultivated meat and fish companies founded over the past decade, starts with stem cells grown in a nutrient broth filled bioreactor. Each company has its own proprietary method for, prodding those cells to differentiate into proteins or fats, which continue to grow until they clump into formations similar to ground meat, at which point they can be harvested and processed and to burgers, sausages, or breaded nuggets. Aleph farms doesn't stop there. Instead, the company adds a few

Aaron baker world resources institute an e Didier tubia Oceania Americas Europe Tel Aviv Singapore nuggets
"aaron baker" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

03:15 min | 3 weeks ago

"aaron baker" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"Time exclusive. We tasted the world's first cultivated steak. No cows required. By Aaron baker. There is nothing quite like the sizzle of steak hitting a hot cast iron skillet. First comes the heady aroma of caramelizing meat, followed by the smoke of charring fat. Juices splatter in my mouth automatically starts to water in and anticipation. Then my stomach clinches with guilt. As a climate correspondent, I try to avoid beef. The global livestock industry is responsible for more than 14% of all man-made greenhouse gas emissions in our atmosphere. Nearly as much as road transport aviation and shipping combined. Industrial cattle farming is one of the biggest global sources of methane, a potent greenhouse gas that is 80 times more efficient at trapping heat in the short term than CO2. Cultivating the crops to feed the cattle industry, drives deforestation, generating even greater emissions. In order to lift our collective foot from the accelerator taking us to certain climate doom, the world resources institute an environmental research organization suggests that residents of the Americas, Europe and Oceania, limit their consumption of red meat to the equivalent of two burgers a week. Israeli startup, aleph farms, says it would be better to eat steak. Its steak that is a rich slab of meat grown from stem cells in a bioreactor. No cows or slaughter required. Its cultivated meat, which is the industry's preferred term, is not yet available on the market. No cultivated meat product has passed regulatory approval outside of Singapore. But the company invited me to try its signature cut at its facility in half an hour south of Tel Aviv. There, company cofounder Didier tubia, promised me a taste of the future, in which a beautiful steak seared to perfection is no longer served on a bed of methane emissions with a side of biodiversity loss in Amazonian rainforests. Aleph farms, like many of the more than 100 cultivated meat and fish companies founded over the past decade, starts with stem cells grown in a nutrient broth filled bioreactor. Each company has its own proprietary method for, prodding those cells to differentiate into proteins or fats, which continue to grow until they clump into formations similar to ground meat, at which point they can be harvested and processed and to burgers, sausages, or breaded nuggets. Aleph farms doesn't stop there. Instead, the company adds a few

Aaron baker world resources institute an e Didier tubia Oceania Americas Europe Tel Aviv Singapore nuggets
"aaron baker" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

04:40 min | Last month

"aaron baker" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"Crustacean decimation due to climate change driven cannibalization by Aaron baker. Snow crab legs, the pale pink centerpiece of any self respecting seafood platter are no longer on the menu. They are the victim of a massive population crash that led Alaska to cancel its 2022 Bering sea, snow crab harvest for the first time in history, as fishery officials announced the closure of one of the state's most lucrative harvests, the Alaskan snow crab industry is worth some $132 million a year. They said that the state snow crab population had dropped 87% from 8 billion in 2018 to a billion last year, further fishing could wipe out the population entirely. Officials suggested that a combination of climate change and some kind of crustacean health crisis might be to blame. Alaska is the fastest warming state in the U.S.. They posited that the warming waters of the Bering sea forced the cold loving crustaceans into increasingly small pockets of frigid water, leaving them more susceptible to hunger, disease, and predation. But that's only part of the story, says west Jones, the fisheries, research and development director, further Norton sound economic development corporation, a private nonprofit organization that represents communities in the Bering sea region and promotes fishing as an industry and livelihood. According to the marine biologists, he works with, the most immediate cause of snow crab death is one that even seasoned fishermen and scientists didn't see coming. A mass cannibalism frenzy. To understand what really happened in the icy depths of Alaska's Bering sea this year means going back to 2017 when fishermen started reporting an unprecedented population explosion of juvenile snow crabs. What is called in crabber speak a recruit. The population boom continued into 2018 and 2019, creating what Jones says was the largest recruitment event on record. Jones is something of a local Pisces historian. He can quote fisheries statistics going back 30 years in the same way a Red Sox fan might quote batting averages. At the time the young crabs were too small for a legal harvest, juvenile snow crabs take four to 5 years to mature, but there were enough of them for seasoned crabbers to start the countdown to huge halls, starting in 2022. In the meantime, Bering sea temperatures which usually hover around freezing were on the rise, spiking several degrees between 2017 through 2019. Unlike mammals who use less energy when temperatures rise, cold water fish and crustaceans speed up their metabolism. The faster the crabs grow and expand energy, the faster they have to replace it, says Jones, some of the crabs may have headed north into cooler Russian waters, but most seem to have stayed put. All of a sudden you have this huge number of little crabs coming up, eating themselves out of house and home, says Jones, then the water warmed, which meant they had to eat more. It was a double whammy, he says, and the results were inevitable for a hungry omnivorous species that has run out of its usual food source. They basically cannibalize each other. Snow crabs are only the latest victim of climate change up in the Bering sea area. For years the fishing industry has reported lower than usual catches of certain species, but rising temperatures don't necessarily lead to a steady decline into obsolescence. Just as likely leads to unpredictable boom and bust cycles for climate change winners and losers that have unanticipated consequences for creatures up and down the food chain. A population explosion of sockeye salmon south of the Bering sea in Bristol bay is the likely reason for the recent collapse of Alaska's lucrative red king crab harvest, which also cancel this year for the second time in a row. Meanwhile, the warming waters of the historically cold Bering sea have opened the door for Pacific cod, a predator of juvenile crabs of all kinds. It will be years before the Alaskan snow crab population recovers to harvest worthy levels, says Jones, and that's only if temperatures in the Bering sea stay cool enough for the cold loving juveniles, and climate change is making everything harder to predict. Scientific projections, he says, are based on what has happened in the past. But when you start seeing things outside of the range of what you've seen before, you don't know how that's going to affect something until it's happened. Like rising water temperatures, and cannibalism..

Bering sea Aaron baker Alaska west Jones Norton sound economic developm Jones Red Sox U.S. historically cold Bering sea the Bering sea Bristol bay
"aaron baker" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

05:55 min | 8 months ago

"aaron baker" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"This mining executive is fighting her own industry to protect the environment by Aaron baker. In her 16 year career in the mining industry, Rene grogan has battled hostile environments, arduous work conditions, and the perception that women don't belong at a mind site. Let alone in a mining company boardroom. But her biggest battle has only just begun. Getting climate conscious car buyers to care as much about how the metals going into their new electric vehicle batteries are mined as they do about their carbon emissions. Consumers don't generally know what their metal footprint looks like, says grogan. The cofounder and chief sustainability officer of California based impossible mining, a battery metal mining startup. But if you are driving an electric car because you think you are doing good for the world, wouldn't you want to make sure your car battery isn't actually making things worse? As demand for EVs rises, so too does the need for the metals that go into their batteries. Nickel, cobalt, copper, and lithium, among others, with land based mines already at peak production and dogged by allegations of environmental and human rights abuses, mining companies are looking to the Pacific Ocean, where trillions of potato like nuggets made up of nickel, cobalt, and manganese, are strewn across the floor of the clarion clipperton zone. Mining in the region could start as early as next year. Once the international seabed authority, or ISA, starts granting licenses. According to mining companies investing in seabed metals, the polymetallic nodules could be vacuumed up with minimal environmental impact. Marine biologists disagree, arguing that there hasn't been enough research on the complex undersea environments to understand the potential impact. More than 600 marine scientists and policy experts have signed a statement calling for a moratorium on undersea mining until more research is done. BMW, Google, Samsung, and Volkswagen, among others, have supported similar moratoriums. Grogan starts from a different place, a ban on seabed mining, she says, will only shift the environmental burden to land based metal mining, which destroys ecosystems while leaving a toxic legacy of tailings ponds and pollution runoff from refineries. A better alternative grogan argues would be to set a new standard for responsible battery mineral mining wherever it takes place. To power.

Aaron baker Rene grogan grogan international seabed authority Pacific Ocean nuggets California Grogan Volkswagen BMW Samsung Google
"aaron baker" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

04:37 min | 10 months ago

"aaron baker" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"Everywhere you get podcasts. The world's farmers need to prepare for serious cash crop disruption by Aaron baker. Climate change has its winners and losers. As global temperatures rise, some species will find themselves squeezed out of suitable living arrangements while others for a while at least will see new opportunities opening up. The same goes for what we eat and drink, a new study published in the scientific journal plus one zero in on how climate change will impact some of the food and drink we love most. Scientists at the Zürich university of applied sciences in Switzerland found that the ideal regions for growing coffee cashews and avocados will either disappear, shrink, or shift as global temperatures continue to rise. The future of coffee is pretty dim, at least if you are a fan of the more refined arabica beans, but avocado lovers and today's cooler climbs could find that by 2050 their favorite toast topping is a local product instead of an import, and cashews could become a cash crop for farmers in a wider range of countries. By looking at the ideal growing conditions for each crop, including soil quality, rainfall and temperature ranges, the scientists were able to map the locations where those conditions are currently met. They then projected the local impacts of climate change in 2050 on three different emissions scenarios, meeting the Paris agreement goal of less than 2°C warming since pre industrial levels, reaching two and a half degrees Celsius of warming and our current trajectory with no emissions cuts. And all three scenarios, coffee, arabica trees, fared badly, losing up to 50% of suitable growing areas in the major producing countries of Brazil, Vietnam, Indonesia and Columbia, which accounts for its 64% of global production. Other countries that are already growing coffee could increase production, but conditions there are equally expected to decline, however, they were not a focus of the study. Your coffee is at risk, says lead author and environmental scientist Roman gruter. I wouldn't say there might be no coffee anymore, but adapting to changing conditions will be necessary. Suitable areas for avocado plantations could see declines in today's major producers, such as Mexico, the Dominican Republic, Peru and Indonesia, together accounting for 58% of the global production, whereas the United States, Argentina, China and East Africa could offer ideal growing conditions for both cashews and avocados as those higher latitudes warm up. But the study cautions, warming temperatures alone are not enough, a changing climate and the potential new growing regions could mean a decrease in the rainfall avocados need or conversely too much rain for desert loving cashews. Meanwhile, farmers in areas that can no longer grow those crops, such as in Colombia will be the most affected. Avocados, cashews, and coffee may seem like a strange combination, agrees gruter, but they were chosen for the fact that they are important cash crops for small scale farmers around the world. They are not only important for consumers, but also for smallholder farmers whose livelihoods depend on growing these crops in many places around the world. They are all tree crops with long life spans, representing a significant investment of time and land for farmers that will have a hard time adapting to changing climates. It's unlikely that the crops will all fail at once, says gruter. Instead, the impacted farmers will experience a slow decline in yield or an increase in disease. Cultivating crops and climate affected regions might get more difficult, and it will need more effort to grow the crop, and then at some point it might just not be profitable anymore. Climate adaptation will be necessary the report concludes that could mean shifting the plantations to higher cooler elevations where possible enriching soils implementing irrigation strategies or breeding drought and heat tolerant crops, but doing so is expensive, especially for small growers who live from one harvest to the next. They really need alternative crops, says gruter. The responsibility is not only with the farmer, the region's agricultural consultants have to think ahead, it's really important in agriculture today to not only anticipate consumer demands, but also changing climatic conditions. It's not just coffee that's under threat, but the people who grow it too..

Aaron baker Zürich university of applied s Roman gruter scientific journal Indonesia Switzerland gruter Paris Brazil Vietnam Dominican Republic East Africa Columbia Peru Argentina Mexico
"aaron baker" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

06:05 min | 11 months ago

"aaron baker" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"Brought to you by Shopify, start selling today. Cultivated meat passes the taste test. By Aaron baker. Renowned Israeli gastronome Michel ansky knows her food. She's a professional taster and a master chef judge. So when she was invited to the world's first public blind taste test, pitting lab grown or cultivated chicken up against a conventionally raised product, she jumped at the chance. It was a historic opportunity, but she was also confident that she would be able to tell the difference. Surrounded by cameras and perched at a restaurant bar with two other judges and Israeli restaurateur and a food journalist. She sniffed the two samples, labeled a and B, placed in front of her. A team of lawyers looked on tasked with making sure that the tasting truly was blind. Even the chef who sauteed the meat in sunflower oil, no salt, no seasonings, didn't know which was which. Sample a was slightly darker than B, but otherwise, both looked and smelled the same. Ansky tasted from bowl a then B, then a again and furrowed her brow in concentration. They were both bland, she complained, lacking the fat that gives chicken breasts flavor. Both samples had been finely ground, so it was impossible to decide on mouthfeel, but she would bet her money and her reputation that sample a was the real thing. It had a richer, more chickeny taste. The tasting was hosted by the Tel Aviv based meat tech startup super meat at its in-house restaurant, the chicken. Behind the restaurant bar, a vast window looked into the working laboratory, where the company's cultivated meat samples had been grown from stem cells, fed on a broth of nutrients in large, stainless steel, bioreactors. The gleaming silver tanks stood no more than 20 meters away from the judge's forks. Hyperlocal at its most narrow definition. Only a few journalists and a couple of curious onlookers attended the tasting. But it marks a seismic shift in the world of food technology. Ever since 2013, when the first lab grown hamburger was presented to the public with a $330,000 price tag, alternative meat companies have been inching closer to a product that is just as tasty and nearly as affordable as the real thing. Good meat, the cultivated meat division of California based food technology company eat just Inc is already selling deep fried lab cultivated chicken nuggets to restaurant diners in Singapore and several more companies are promising that their cell cultivated fish steaks and even mouse for cat treats will be on supermarket shelves in the United States by the end of the year, pending regulatory approval. But for all the startup sizzle, one question remains would consumers be able to tell the difference and if they could would they still bite. Super meat decided to put their product to the test without the breading, deep frying, and sauces that are usually used to mask a lack of flavor or texture. A video of the tasting is linked in the text version of this article. None of the judges found either meat to be particularly delicious on its own, but then again, no one is going to rave about the flavor of a skinned unseasoned chicken breast either. There is a difference said one judge the Israeli restaurateur and chef yair yo safi. I wouldn't be sure which one is the conventional chicken B maybe. Ansky disagreed, sample B had less flavor, so that had to be the one grown in a sterile lab. She was so convinced of her decision that when super meat founder, Ito severe announced that it was in fact a that was cultivated. She corrected him. No, she said, a is the real chicken. No, severe responded with a grin. Sample a was grown on the other side of the window there, just a few days ago. And ski's jaw dropped. I was wrong, she marveled in front of the cameras and I am the expert. A day later I spoke to ansky on the phone about the tasting. It's one of the only times in my life that I'm really happy that I was wrong, she told me. In my heart I was saying hallelujah because it's about time. Ansky likes meat. She serves chicken to her family almost every day, but she also knows that meat is unsustainable in the way it is currently produced. Meat and dairy production accounts for around 14.5% of global greenhouse gas emissions, according to the UN's food and agricultural organization. Industrial animal agriculture processes pollute both air and water supplies, while emitting methane, a potent greenhouse gas. A new study published last week in nature food shows that high income countries could cut their agricultural emissions by almost two thirds by moving away from animal based foods, doing so could free up an area of land larger than the entire European Union. If this area were allowed to revert to its natural state, it would capture around 100 billion metric tons of carbon equal to 14 years of global agricultural emissions by the end of the century. While the report doesn't address elaborate meat products directly, they are a meat alternative that could help reduce factory farming. It doesn't stop at chicken, says food tech startups are looking into cell cultivated eggs and dairy products as well. It's as important as finding a cure for cancer because the thing that causes global warming and puts our lives at risk on this planet is the food industry. When we change the production, when we go from factory farming and from bloody slaughterhouse floors to fluorescent lights and laboratories, we will really be having an impact. Woohoo. 300 Shopify sales. How?.

Ansky Aaron baker Michel ansky just Inc yair yo safi Tel Aviv nuggets food and agricultural organiza Singapore Ito California United States UN European Union cancer
"aaron baker" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

01:49 min | 11 months ago

"aaron baker" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"Massimo bottura wants you to stop wasting your food. By Aaron baker, Aaron baker is time senior international climate and environment correspondent, covering the human impacts of climate change along with other topics. She lives in Rome and was previously times bureau chief for Africa based in Cape Town, the Middle East, based in Beirut and for Afghanistan and Pakistan based in Kabul. She started with time in Hong Kong in 2001. Chef Massimo bottura didn't bring his chef's jackets at the photo shoot, which is just as well, considering that simple chef's whites could never convey what this exuberant Bon vivant has become since opening the doors of his three Michelin starred two time winner of the best restaurant in the world, osteria francisca in mad na Italy in 1995. His culinary empire now extends from Dubai to Beverly Hills with a new hotel in Montana that serves as an extension of his own home, with walls hung with works by AI weiwei Damien Hirst and Tracey Emmett. He's the author of two books and one of the stars of Netflix's cult foodie docu series chef's table. But out of all those successes, Italy's most celebrated chefs as the Pinnacle of his achievements is Milan's repertorio ambrosiano and the 12 global spin off that have followed in its wake. At repertorio ambrosiano, dinner guests are greeted by name. They dine on fine China at tables created by the country's most sought after furniture designers, under works of art that would not be out of place in a contemporary art museum. The waiters are courteous and the chefs have trained under the finest restaurant tours in the world..

Aaron baker Massimo bottura osteria francisca mad na Italy Tracey Emmett Bon vivant Beirut Kabul Cape Town Rome Middle East Afghanistan Pakistan Hong Kong Africa AI weiwei Damien Hirst Beverly Hills repertorio ambrosiano Dubai
"aaron baker" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"aaron baker" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"Brought to you by <Speech_Male> audible. Cows <Speech_Male> are the new <Speech_Male> coal. <Speech_Male> How the cattle <Speech_Male> industry is ignoring <Speech_Male> the bottom <Speech_Male> line when it comes <Silence> to methane emissions. <Speech_Male> <Silence> By Aaron baker. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> One of the early <Speech_Male> attention grabbing <Speech_Male> announcements at <Speech_Male> November's cop <Speech_Male> climate conference <Speech_Male> in Glasgow <Speech_Male> was a commitment <Speech_Male> by more than 105 <Speech_Male> countries <Speech_Male> to join <Speech_Male> a U.S. and <Speech_Male> EU led coalition <Speech_Male> to cut <Speech_Male> 30% <Speech_Male> of methane emissions <Speech_Male> by 2030. <Speech_Male> The potent <Speech_Male> greenhouse gas, <Speech_Male> which is up to <Speech_Male> 80 times <Speech_Male> more effective at <Speech_Male> heating the planet <Speech_Male> than carbon dioxide <Speech_Male> in the short <Speech_Male> term, has <Speech_Male> often been considered <Speech_Male> the lowest hanging <Speech_Male> fruit when it <Speech_Male> comes to slowing down <Speech_Male> global warming. <Speech_Male> The cop <Speech_Male> pledges alone <Speech_Male> would slash <Speech_Male> warming projections <Speech_Male> by .2°C <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> by the 2040s, <Speech_Male> according <Speech_Male> to the United <Speech_Male> Nations global <Speech_Male> methane assessment. <Speech_Male> But that <Speech_Male> low hanging fruit <Speech_Male> is starting to rot. <Speech_Male> A new <Speech_Male> report produced <Speech_Male> by the fair <Speech_Male> initiative, <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> which is an <Speech_Male> investor network <Speech_Male> worth about $45 trillion <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> that's focused on <Speech_Male> the environmental <Speech_Male> social and <Speech_Male> governance risks <Speech_Male> and opportunities <Speech_Male> of intensive <Speech_Male> livestock production <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> shows that the meat and <Speech_Male> dairy industries, <Speech_Male> including <Speech_Male> livestock suppliers <Speech_Male> to McDonald's, <Speech_Male> Walmart and Costco <Speech_Male> is <Speech_Male> undermining <Speech_Male> cop 26 pledges <Speech_Male> on methane <Speech_Male> reduction <Speech_Male> by not tracking <Speech_Male> their own emissions <Speech_Male> and by <Speech_Male> failing to track those <Speech_Male> of their third <Speech_Male> party suppliers. <Speech_Male> Cows <Speech_Male> and other ruminants <Speech_Male> release methane <Speech_Male> as a byproduct <Speech_Male> of their digestive <Speech_Male> process, <Speech_Male> a single <Speech_Male> cow can release <Speech_Male> around 250 <Speech_Male> to 500 <Speech_Male> liters of methane <Speech_Male> a day. <Speech_Male> More methane <Speech_Male> is produced when the animal's <Speech_Male> waste is <Speech_Male> collected in holding <Speech_Male> ponds. <Speech_Male> A typical practice <Speech_Male> for large <Speech_Male> scale industrial <Speech_Male> meat producers. <Speech_Male> The 1 billion <Speech_Male> cows <Speech_Male> used in the global <Speech_Male> meat and dairy <Speech_Male> industries combined <Speech_Male> with other animals <Speech_Male> raised for <Speech_Male> livestock <Speech_Male> are responsible <Speech_Male> for releasing the <Speech_Male> methane equivalent <Speech_Male> of some 3.1 <Speech_Male> gigatons <Speech_Male> of <Speech_Male> carbon dioxide <Speech_Male> into the atmosphere <Speech_Male> every year, <Speech_Male> accounting for <Speech_Male> some 44% <Speech_Male> of global <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> anthropogenic <Speech_Male> methane. <Speech_Male> If the global <Speech_Male> livestock industry <Speech_Male> were its own <Speech_Male> country, it <Speech_Male> would be the world's <Speech_Male> third biggest <Speech_Male> greenhouse <Speech_Male> gas emitter, <Speech_Male> falling between the <Speech_Male> U.S. and India <Speech_Male> when it comes to total <Speech_Male> greenhouse <Speech_Male> gas emissions. <Speech_Male> According <Speech_Male> to the collar <Speech_Male> fair protein <Speech_Male> producer index, <Speech_Male> which assesses <Speech_Male> sustainability <Speech_Male> in the factory farming <Speech_Male> sector, <Speech_Male> the industry <Speech_Male> isn't making much of an <Speech_Male> effort to do anything <Speech_Male> about it. This <Speech_Male> year's report <Speech_Male> found that only 18% <Speech_Male> of <Speech_Male> global meat and dairy <Speech_Male> producers <Speech_Male> are tracking their <Speech_Male> methane emissions at all. <Speech_Male> And of <Speech_Male> the company's tracking <Speech_Male> their emissions, <Speech_Male> one in four <Speech_Male> actually saw <Speech_Male> an increase <Speech_Male> this year. <Speech_Male> The ambitions <Speech_Male> sat at <Speech_Male> cop 26 <Speech_Male> handed a big <Speech_Male> slice of <Speech_Male> responsibility to <Speech_Male> the food and agriculture <Speech_Male> sector, <Speech_Male> says Jeremy <Speech_Male> collar, <Speech_Male> chair of the fair <Speech_Male> investor network. <Speech_Male> We can not <Speech_Male> deliver the cop 26 <Speech_Male> commitments <Speech_Male> without addressing <Speech_Male> the protein <Speech_Male> supply chain, <Speech_Male> yet failures <Speech_Male> from methane <Speech_Male> to manure management <Speech_Male> underline <Speech_Male> the growing sense <Speech_Male> in the market <Speech_Male> that cows are the <Speech_Male> new coal <Speech_Male> collar set. <Speech_Male> The index <Speech_Male> now in its fourth <Speech_Male> year assesses <Speech_Male> 60 <Speech_Male> global and publicly <Speech_Male> listed animal <Speech_Male> protein producers <Speech_Male> worth a <Speech_Male> combined $363 billion <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> against <Speech_Male> ten <Speech_Male> environmental social <Speech_Male> and governance <Speech_Male> related factors, <Speech_Male> including greenhouse <Speech_Male> gas emissions, <Speech_Male> deforestation, <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> antibiotic use, <Speech_Male> and investment <Speech_Male> in

Aaron baker Glasgow U.S. EU Costco Walmart McDonald India
"aaron baker" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

03:12 min | 1 year ago

"aaron baker" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"How your post Thanksgiving diet could help save the planet by Aaron baker. As you tuck into your Thanksgiving dinner, the kick-off event, at least for Americans of the holiday season, spare a thought for the planet's carbon waistline. Food production is a major source of greenhouse gas emissions, accounting for more than a third of emissions worldwide, and a new study has given fresh insight into how small changes in the diet can have a big impact on food related emissions. And even if it doesn't inspire you to forgo the Turkey and trimmings, it serves as a good reminder that a post holiday pause on overindulgence might be just the kind of thanks, mother earth might appreciate most, not to mention your own body's health. Research published in the scientific journal PLOS one found that diets limiting meat dairy and processed food were not only good for health, but for the planet as well. Previous studies only looked at broad food groups, but this one assessed the greenhouse gas emissions of 3233 different foods, consumed by a cohort of 212 adult volunteers in the UK over three 24 hour periods. The report found that people whose intake of saturated fats, carbohydrates and sodium met levels recommended by the World Health Organization had lower greenhouse gas emissions than people who exceeded recommended levels of those nutrients. Meat, unsurprisingly, was the biggest health and climate culprit. Meat eaters diets clocked 59% higher emissions compared to vegetarians and men's diets overall contributed 41% higher emissions than women's largely because of their greater meat intake. But before you skip the Turkey in favor of pie, the report's authors note that desserts don't get a free pass either. It's not that confectionary is any worse than other dietary components. It's that we eat so much of it that it all adds up to a high impact, says the reports lead author Darren Greenwood at the university of Leeds school of medicine in the UK. While other foods, like vegetables, contribute to a healthy balanced diet, sweets have very little nutritional benefit. So it is an unnecessary impact on the environment. The report's finding support a focus on plant based foods, both for personal decisions on diet and nutrition and for public policy. But that doesn't mean a plate of Brussels sprouts for Christmas dinner. It's about being more thoughtful in your food choices and conscious of how they are consumed, says Greenwood. We can all do our bit by buying local produce grown in season. Maybe this year buy less, but better quality food. Don't cook more than you eat and try not to waste any leftovers. That way, we can enjoy the holiday and treat ourselves. Think of it as a gift to our children of the future. They will thank you for it. Eventually..

Aaron baker scientific journal PLOS Darren Greenwood university of Leeds school of World Health Organization UK Brussels Greenwood
"aaron baker" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

06:16 min | 1 year ago

"aaron baker" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"Count in your carbon footprint one meal at a time. By Aaron baker in Glasgow. At the cop 26 conference this year, there was a lot of grumbling among activists that official venues were serving meat, even if it was locally sourced meat. Animal agriculture has an outsized impact on global warming up to 14 and a half percent of annual global CO2 emissions, depending on which metrics you include. But in Glasgow, a serving of meat also comes with a lesson in carbon footprint economics. Attendees at cop 26 were informed of the carbon impact of their meals as they peruse the menus. At one restaurant, I was offered a choice between the traditional Scottish meal of haggis neeps and tatties stuffed baked sheep stomach served with turnips and potatoes, fish and chips, a pearl barley and root vegetable hot pot, or scotch beef ramen with sustainably sourced local seaweed. I was tempted by the hogs, 3.4 kilograms of CO2 because I've never tried it before, but the large carbon footprint made me pause. Was my curiosity worth the extra 3.3 kilograms of CO2, the haggis cost compared to the hot pot .1 kilogram? Overall, the food we eat accounts for nearly a quarter of global greenhouse gas emissions. The online menu helpfully informed me that according to the world wildlife federation, we need to get the carbon footprint of our individual meals down to .5 kilogram CO2 on average in order to reach the Paris agreement goal of limiting warming to 1.5°C above pre industrial levels. The carbon counts are provided by clamato, a Swedish startup that analyzes the carbon footprint of food items so that any food service facility be at a restaurant, a catering provider, the local food truck or a large corporate canteen can display the climate impact of their food offerings. Making climate conscious choices when figuring out what to have for dinner isn't particularly difficult or onerous, says Anton unger clamatos CEO and cofounder. The problem is that most people have no idea what the carbon footprint of their meal is to begin with. So how can they make an informed decision? Komato uses a life cycle analysis that looks at CO2 emissions from both production and distribution on an ingredient by ingredient basis to come up with a final emissions total for a meal. And while clamato only works with the food industry, unger says that carbon emission labeling would work with most products. Being aware of the climate impact of any consumer action, be it ordering a beef burger or buying a pair of jeans will help raise awareness and accountability for our own actions and the direct relationship between what I buy eat where and the impact this has on the climate. He explains. While the carbon count certainly engendered conversation at cop dining venues, it's not clear whether or not carbon labels would work in the wider world. A newly released survey of people living in ten countries including the U.S., the UK, France and Germany observed that a widespread awareness of the importance of the climate crisis has yet to be coupled with a proportionate willingness to act. Only 18% of respondents were willing to reduce their meat consumption, even though the vast majority recognized climate change as a threat to themselves and the planet. In part, that could be because it's very hard to understand agriculture's outsized emissions impact within the framework of personal choice. Consumers already understand that taking public transport is better for the environment than driving. But food has a lot more variables. How do you weigh the carbon reductions of locally sourced meat against imported vegetables? By providing a net carbon value Komodo and other companies like them can help climate conscious consumers make better choices. Metrics alone don't decide what we'll eat, a variety of factors from cost to mood to levels of hunger, and even the people you're eating with inform the decision making process. Knowing the full carbon impact of a grocery store item or restaurant meal could factor in as well as long as consumers are educated, says grant Reed, CEO of the Mars food conglomerate, which just announced its own commitment to reach net zero carbon emissions across its global candy snacks and pet food empire. Beyond the confines of the cop meeting walls, consumer awareness of the climate impact of their food choices is at an early stage, he says there's a much bigger consumer challenge than just popping a carbon footprint on the label, these labels are a good experiment, they're good steps in the right direction, but it's not sufficient, he says. If carbon footprint consciousness isn't high on the list of deciding factors, it doesn't matter what a label says. Another real-time experiment could come by the end of next year when the iconic Mars bar supply chain goes totally carbon neutral from cocoa plantation to shop shelves. Will customers care? Only if they know what's at stake, says read. Oh, for that lunch I was telling you about, I tried the haggis. I was in Scotland after all. It was a little disappointing, though, and I'm not sure I would be willing to expend my entire daily food carbon allowance on another version of meatloaf. Knowing that my culinary adventure was responsible for an extra three kilograms of carbon emissions made me more conscious about everything else I ate while I was in cop. For example, I opted for the mushroom risotto .4 kilograms for dinner and that vegetarian sausage roll, .1 kilograms for breakfast. Sometimes awareness of your impact is all it takes. Sometimes a target helps. And for now, at least clamato didn't fill me with any guilt by telling me that carbon footprint of a fine scotch..

clamato Aaron baker Glasgow world wildlife federation Anton unger clamatos Komato unger grant Reed Mars food conglomerate Paris Germany France UK U.S.
"aaron baker" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

05:37 min | 1 year ago

"aaron baker" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"Brought to you by audible. A methane pledge is the first good news out of cop 26. Nothing else will be as easy by Aaron baker, Glasgow, Scotland. Tuesday's announcement that more than 100 countries have joined a U.S. and EU led coalition to cut 30% of methane emissions by 2030 injected a welcome burst of energy into the cop 26 meetings in Glasgow after Monday's lackluster launch. Despite the fact that the world's biggest methane emitters, China, Russia and India, which together contribute 35% of methane emissions have not signed on. It's a significant step that could go a long way toward meeting the climate conferences goal of limiting global warming to one and a half degrees Celsius above pre industrial levels. Methane, which comes from landfills, agriculture, and the energy industry is the second largest contributor to global warming after carbon dioxide and is responsible for more than a quarter of current global warming, says Alyssa oca, senior climate scientists at the environmental defense fund. Cutting methane is the fastest, most effective way to slow down warming now. The pledged reductions alone would slash warming projections by .2°C, according to the United Nations global methane assessment. But while important, the announcement doesn't necessarily set the stage for a cascade of similarly game changing climate pledges going forward. Methane emission reductions from oil and gas production are the low hanging fruit of the climate crisis. Easy to fix with existing technology and easy to track. Methane is the principal component of the natural gas used for cooking, heating and energy generation. When it leaks from natural gas lines or oil wells, it is essentially a lost product that if captured could be sold at profit. Offsetting the cost of fixing the leaks, human activity accounts for about 60% of global methane emissions annually, and about a third of that comes from the fossil fuel industry, according to the international energy agency's 2020 methane tracker. Unlike carbon dioxide, which is a byproduct of fossil fuel combustion, no one wants to actually emit methane. It's just that up until recently no one noticed, or cared if it escaped into the atmosphere. No one except for climate scientists that is, when methane goes directly into the atmosphere instead of being burned, it is 80 times more effective at trapping heat than carbon dioxide over the first 20 years. Think of it as a cashmere sweater for the planet instead of a polyester blouse. When the sweater is removed, the immediate effects of warming such as melting the polar ice caps slows down. That has a global impact. When Arctic permafrost thaws, it releases more greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, creating a dangerous feedback loop that accelerates warming even further. Anything that slows short term warming is a long-term win for the climate, says Matt Watson, the EDF's vice president of energy. Methane is short lived but powerful. If you stop putting it in the atmosphere today, it will have a really big effect on temperatures even by mid century. And cutting methane emissions at least from fossil fuel producers is relatively straightforward. Leaky pipes can be fixed, valves can be closed and oil rigs capped with existing technology. It's not rocket science, says ako in our recent TED Talk. It's more like plumbing. According to the UN's global methane assessment up to 80% of measures necessary to stop methane leaks from oil and gas operations and 98% from coal could be implemented at no cost and could even increase savings from the methane is captured and sold. A new network of satellites designed to locate and measure methane from space can spot leaks with precision, providing an easy monitoring and policing solution for international bodies tasked with upholding emissions pledge agreements. All of this means that not only is cutting methane emissions good for the environment, it is a relatively painless ask, although the U.S. oil and gas industry is up in arms over the Biden administration's proposed limits. The risk is that the reductions stop with methane and countries and industries that are major fossil fuel emitters use their methane pledges as a fig leaf to make natural gas appear more palatable instead of something that will eventually have to be abandoned in pursuit of the one and a half degrees Celsius goal. After a decade or so in the atmosphere, methane breaks down, kind of like a cashmere sweater after too many runs to the washing machine, whereas that polyester blouse will still be going strong for centuries, which is why reducing methane emissions shouldn't be a stand in for cutting carbon, says ako. It's very important that we make it clear that reducing methane emissions is not a substitute for reducing carbon dioxide emissions. If we focus on carbon dioxide and forget about methane, wheelers are real opportunity to address climate change in the coming decades. But we can't focus on methane at the expense of efforts to reduce CO2. Both are needed. Even if methane is this year's low hanging fruit when it comes to global pledges, it shouldn't be discounted, says Watson. Any way you look at it, this pledge is a sign of profound progress, 5 years ago, methane wasn't even on the agenda. I've never seen another situation where an issue this important went from a complete back burner issue to the front burner almost overnight. Watson's comment reflects how deeply fossil fuel imagery has crept into our vernacular..

Aaron baker Alyssa oca environmental defense fund Glasgow TED Talk international energy agency EU Scotland U.S. Matt Watson Russia United Nations India China
"aaron baker" Discussed on Decibel Geek Podcast

Decibel Geek Podcast

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"aaron baker" Discussed on Decibel Geek Podcast

"And that's because of the people at listening to this show and the people that interact with us and other podcasters and people like rock. And ron i try to imagine. What would it be like garoppolo rock. And ron how awesome that must be. You know you see pictures of him. When he's like seventeen like man to hang on iraq iran at seventeen and go to a concert. You know amazing now we would've We would have gotten into a lot of trouble together. i'm sure i'm sure. I'm sure of it and well so let's Let's do you wanna go ahead and take care of business super late doing that but we ain't got no business well. We don't have reviews. But we do have geeks of the week. And i wanted to make sure i got those end. Yeah we definitely do have at least that you know rock and ron would want you guys to leave us reviews you know. I don't think i'm stretching. When i say that because i know ron well enough he would be to say that was wrong with you guys give these. Give these dudes some reviews. They need it and so last week and the week before we had pretty awesome stellar episodes for you. They were pretty great. Because i was there for both of them live. We had carmine apiece and vinnie apathy the week before everybody loved that it was live. From our studios here nashville. We had a great time doing it. And those dudes were awesome and then last week we doubled up when we did albums unleashed on david roths. While with the one. And only billy sheehan and greg. Bissonnette live on stage at rock and pod. I notice a lot to love and we had a great time doing it. Yeah so the people that loved it the most. They're the ones that took that episode when they saw it posted on facebook or saw it tweeted on twitter. And they took it and they reposted it. They shared it and they spread the word for us here. The desk will geek podcast and by doing that. They became honorary geeks of the week. And before i read off the less let me just say you've probably noticed over the last year. That adam cox who we tragically lost last year was part of our team always leads off geeks of the week. Well rockin runyon will now be right there with them so every week. They're going to be honored and they're going to be the first two weeks of the week. Amen gigs the week this week. Are adam cox rock runyon. Kristen shimbun. Bill elam aaron baker. Joseph capone j. Mike tyler john phillips brent tibet's rob web wayne gross pantheon podcast every mendenhall. Kevin william simon cat. David glenn markle and taylor mark and jerry. Bs session sitting spend with joke. He's rockford shea. Haagen mike parnell david..

ron david roths Bissonnette adam cox iran billy sheehan carmine iraq vinnie nashville rockin runyon greg Kristen shimbun Bill elam aaron baker facebook twitter Joseph capone Mike tyler brent tibet wayne gross
"aaron baker" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

05:51 min | 1 year ago

"aaron baker" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"By aaron baker heatwaves wildfires floods. If there's still any doubt that the summer of twenty twenty one is a turning point for a global awakening over the looming climate crisis. You can add one more plague of biblical proportions to the last famine. The southern part of the island nation of madagascar off the east coast of africa is experiencing. Its worst drought in four decades with the world food program. Warning recently that one point one four million people are food. Insecure and four hundred thousand people are headed for famine. Hunger is already driving people to eat raw. Cactus wild leaves and locusts a food source of last resort the world food program which is on the ground helping with food distribution describes scenes of unimaginable. Suffering with families bartering everything they have even cooking pots and spoons for the paltry tomatoes scrawny chickens and few bags of rice still available in the markets. The next planting season is less than two months away and the forecast for food. Production is bleak rights. Wfp spokesperson shelly. Talk all and a dispatch from the most affected area. The land is covered by sand. There is no water and little chance of rain. The wfp warns that the number of locals facing face five catastrophic food insecurity development speak for famine could double by october and the group has the responsible party squarely in their site. This is not because of war or conflict. This is because of climate change says wfp executive director david beasley historically famines resulted from crop. Failure disaster or pest invasion modern famines are largely considered to be manmade sparked by conflict combined with natural disasters or incompetence and political interference. Madagascar is facing none of those making it. The first famine and modern history to be called solely by climate change alone. It's unlikely to be the last says. Landry nicorette say the africa director for climate advocacy organization. Three fifty dot org in recent years. We've seen climate calamities hitting one country after another before. It was the horn of africa. And now it is madagascar. Tomorrow the cycle will go on may be in the northern part of africa the suhel or the west and unfortunately it is likely to continue happening because of climate change increasing temperatures are disrupting global weather patterns that farmers particularly those in the developing world relied upon for centuries monsoons have become increasingly unpredictable. Starting later than usual showing up in the wrong place or sometimes not showing up at all. This is wreaking havoc in places that depend on rain for agriculture. The southern part of madagascar a lush largely tropical island famous for its biodiversity has experienced below average rainfall for the past five years. Most people in the south depend on rainfed small-scale agriculture for survival but because of the drought rivers and irrigation dams have dried up. The wfp says it needs seventy eight point. Six million dollars to provide lifesaving food for the next lean season in madagascar. But it is going to take a lot more than that to help. The countries most affected by climate change able to adapt in ways that prevent future famines southern madagascar for example will probably need irrigation systems along with more drought tolerant crops and hardier breeds of cattle madagascar. One of the poorest nations in the world is unlikely to be able to afford such innovations on its own as part of the twenty fifteen paris agreement on climate change. Wealthy nations agreed to set aside. One hundred billion dollars a year in climate financing to help developing nations adapt but they have yet to meet that goal and twenty eighteen. The latest year for which data are available donors were still short. Twenty billion dollars but investing in climate change adaptation and mitigation pays dividends in the long run the world bank estimates that climate change could cause more than one hundred forty million people to move within their country's borders by twenty fifty in sub saharan africa south asia and latin america with severe consequences on economic development. Many others will seek to leave their countries entirely. We used to see our brothers and sisters in the suhel leaving because of conflict and looking for better economic opportunities but now it is climate change that is becoming one of the major drivers pushing out people who can no longer cultivate their land. Says new threats say. This is not only going to impact africa but also europe asia and america as well as people seek safer places where they can live. Madagascar may seem far away but the issues should feel close to home. Wherever home might be this famine in madagascar. The heat wave and america the floods in germany. This is an indicator that climate change needs to be taken seriously says nicorette say in the same way the world reacted through the pandemic and were able to get vaccines in less than a year if the world would have reacted in the same way when we started sending the first warning signals of climate change. The situation would be much better than what it is. now meet. lucy bella owner of fancy flowers. Business was slow until lucy received an email wedding date february fourteenth flowers only red roses. Valentine's day the most expensive day for red roses so she used her american express business card. Which gives you the ability to pay overtime with interest so she can buy those red roses. Now talk about love.

madagascar wfp aaron baker africa famines david beasley Landry nicorette africa director for climate ad Madagascar east coast shelly suhel saharan south asia paris latin america america
"aaron baker" Discussed on Decibel Geek Podcast

Decibel Geek Podcast

08:06 min | 1 year ago

"aaron baker" Discussed on Decibel Geek Podcast

"Podcast my name is aaron. Camaro joined an awesome friend. Kick ass co host chris. Zac what's going on brother doing. Good man how're you doing. I'm doing pretty great man. We had a lot of fun last week. I'm man fresh blood. People just came out of the woodworks and love those bands so much that we played last week. I love doing episodes like that. Yeah that was a lot of fun. We got to do more of that. It was great to play music again. Yeah i like that a lot and so we're doing our thing. Turn you on a new bands. You turn me onto a bunch man i. I'm really excited for the future of rock and roll with what we found last week but sometimes we like to go back and bring up something that we haven't done in a little while something that people really like and so this week. It's the return of beat. The geek help. You guys are excited for that. Chris gonna to take on two different opponents today. We're gonna see who can take down the geek if anyone feeling up to the challenge. Yeah sure go. Don't sound so enthused. I've just i. I've learned to be humble about it. Okay yeah that's good. So i guess before we get to the action we got to take care of our business and you guys know us. We're always looking and begging imp- leading for somebody to leave us. Some podcasts reviews. We work real hard on the show. We feel like we do a job for you so when we open up our little folder and we don't see there's any podcast reviews. It hurts us but nobody's hurting today. That's right because i've got two great ones right here first. One is an apple. Podcasts review comes to from right here in the good old united states of america. It's got all five stars on it just the way i like it and it's entitled. Oh yeah and it goes a little something like this. You guys rock. I feel like. I'm sitting with two best friends music. I love the dedication to airing the show faithfully. You make friday night at work. More fun keep going. And that comes to us from chrissy. Salem like right here in the states that's awesome and touching lives love it. Thanks so much. Always have a good time on friday nights. We're going to be doing something like that again this weekend or this friday night and next friday night non were non word. We'll keep doing that for you. Because you guys seem to be digging it and we know you'll love it because you give us the reviews for it. See how that works. Well that's great because here comes another one. This is a bad chaser review. Look their pink stars one two four five of them gotta love that all right. This one comes from a good friend of ours. This rob web and he says this the joy you guys brought to the podcast world over the past year in particular has been immeasurable. I'm sure there were plenty of people in isolation that you helped just by being there. On a weekly basis lifting spirits raising morale music is the great leveler that can be revered beloved and debated in equal measure and listening to a couple of friends creates such a warm. All encompassing vibe surrounding our favorite subject is an absolute treat. So thank you very much. Chris and aaron consider this a five plus star review. I'm ten years in in loving every minute of it. Take care and stay safe. Wow that one's going in the podcast review hall of fame. Yeah that's new. Start one because that's fantastic. Yeah that really warms my heart reading that i appreciate that robin and just hearing from you guys means a lot to us. It's not just an ego stroke although that is part of it but it is nice but it's not to know that you know that we're making a difference with some people were you know keeping you company during some hard times because you guys do the same for us as listener so we appreciate it. You know it's just like the hottest band landau. He says you know. They're trying to make the band that they always wanted to see. We're to sell. You're making the podcast that we think we would enjoy listening to you know so it's really nice to know that there's people out there just like us that enjoy what we're doing as much as we're enjoying doing it. Yup and our other favorite people the geeks of the week. These are the people that shared on. Facebook retweeted on twitter. The last episode. We did the fresh blood episode. Feel good about that man. We got a lot of great response to a lot of them. Awesome bands we played. Yeah all i wanna do more of that because like you know yeah. It's fun to spend a deep track from la guns but it's it is even more satisfying to turn people on a new bands. Yes so geeks. The week this week are adam. Cox pantheon podcast. Kevin williams the bakery podcast. Aaron baker john phillips kevin williams key keith rockford joseph capone rob webb. The rock and metal pross podcast. Jason bruschi. Hey simon. Cat david glenn. Jeffrey mendenhall mike parnell nelson spend with joe. Mark alden taylor. Mark and jerry sessions wayne cross desperately. Tv good old rock. And ron runyon anxiety to sending a lotto the rock spectrum the plug podcast and is always the murder or down. I'm leaving it that way to sounded good to me. We'll see how that comes back in the final edit. Oh man so. Let's get everything out of the way so we can get to the contests today. We're going to tell you about rock and pod real quick. That's coming up on august. Sixth through the eighth right here nashville tennessee at the hilton hotel. You want to check out the information on it. Just go to rock n pod dot com and you're gonna find everything you're gonna find a list guests that are coming. Everyone from jason bieler from saigon. Kick to anthony quarter from tora tora to billy sheen. From while he's billy sheehan in a bunch of stuff in it all rocks. because he's billy sheehan. He's going to be there cheese. Who else. Paul taylor from winger help. Chris argued friend drew. Forty iran kiel. Oh yeah ron keel. Dr walter walter egan and then of course the three comedians. That are coming. Courtney courtney cronin dole don jamieson from that metal show and craig gas You know and. I've got some more from some more coming up very very soon that i think are gonna excite some people right on. That's very cool. And i've been seeing on the facebook a lot of the announcements coming up for all the different podcasts. That are going to be there. And i'm excited because this year more than any other year. I'm seeing a lot of podcasts. That i don't recognize ones. That aren't in my realm yet because now i see him that they're registered for rock and pied. I know that's the kind of podcast. I wanna check out so i'm going to start checking out some of these podcast for the first time because we got more new ones than ever showing up rock and pied to be a part of it. Which is i think that's really cool. Shows the growth of podcasting and rock music podcasting in general so much over the years also quite a few like internet radio streaming shows are coming this year which is It's really becoming a thing again. And i think part of that is because of the copyright battle that podcast have to deal with us. You know if you get internet streaming license. You can play the music. So it's it's kind of becoming more in vogue to have some streaming shows now. Yeah we have a ton of a ton of new arrivals this year so we got some really cool vinyl vendors and we've got some. I'll be announcing more of the vendors and exhibitors. Yeah we're mixing it up a lot more this year we. I've never seen so much excitement for rock and pot as we have this year. It's been great very cool. man. I love it. I can't wait for that. One skin august sixth through the eighth nashville tennessee. Everything you need to know including getting your hotel discounts where you can be a part of the rock block with the rest of us. That are staying in the hotel so we all stick together. We can have breakfast together. We can have late night drinks together. We can hang out together all day. Rockin pod we can hang out at the show the night before we can hang out at the awesome thing that i got imagine. It's going to be happening the day after. There's so much cool stuff going on. We want to be a close in part of it with a skit in their nice and tight squeezed everybody and be a part of the rock block by getting yourself. A hotel room in with us and take advantage of that discount. At rock. N pod dot com. Do it.

Chris kevin williams Jason bruschi Kevin williams Jeffrey mendenhall Paul taylor Zac aaron Aaron baker chris Mark five stars last week billy sheen Mark alden taylor next friday night walter walter egan jason bieler joseph capone friday night
"aaron baker" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

05:29 min | 2 years ago

"aaron baker" Discussed on Pantheon

"Helping us do it. And some of our best friends are people that take each weeks episode whether we release the main post on twitter or we release it on facebook. We are still on facebook and twitter. All right good because a lot of people aren't. I'm not even going there. But if you take those original posts if you share it re tweet it then you become an honorary geek of the week at gigs of the week this week are adam cox bar pickard. The rock and metal profs podcast. David lynch Mike parnell just capone wine cross. Todd rogers nicktator from frontiers records. Shared at. that's awesome had some nice words force. I saw that Bill elam the bakery. Podcast aaron baker. Jeffrey minute hall. Simon cats sentenced been with joe kristin beck annually doug fox kevin williams and obscurity podcast. Steve are esto aguilar. J. should tom smoke. Pantheon casts keith. rockford kevin northern eladio. Jj mcelhinney vet halen and is always the move or food or an ice. I probably don't have to edit that one to fit. Didn't sound to me but okay we'll see you can always slide it back and forth though that's right. That's what i did last time inside. May's bonnie all right as guys know. We are part of pantheon podcasts. It's a pretty cool thing. They've got a just a shit ton of quality. Podcasts travis mentioned earlier. He thought all music podcasts socked. Well you know maybe. Check out the Awesome roster list. That pantheon's got together talking about Rock and or roll. You know there's one of our personal favorites good friend. Bj kahuna runs as show. And it's cool. He's back with pantheon. And you know there's a bunch of other shell allowed cast is on there. There's a bunch agree one so check out our podcasting friends you know we. We understand that up. They're having a real difficult time because they can't find no beaver well. They've always had a hard time finding beaver. Oh yeah yeah. They should be. Oh they'll be fine. Don't worry about those guys. And of course our friends over a.

Mike parnell Todd rogers Jj mcelhinney twitter aaron baker kevin williams joe kristin beck facebook each weeks David lynch this week one Steve Jeffrey J. travis kevin northern eladio halen keith. rockford
"aaron baker" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

08:33 min | 2 years ago

"aaron baker" Discussed on Pantheon

"Over. Twenty twenty has been the most awful year ever. you know. i just can't wait for twenty twenty one and now we're finally here but before we take that bold step into the future. We've gotta take one step backwards one more time. We're dipping back in one last time before we move on to twenty twenty because despite all the bullshit that we went through this year there actually was some really really damn good albums that came out. Yeah and i posted on facebook the other day that you know like the i. I came up with around eighty albums. That were You know that. I considered you know attention worthy to look into and then i broke that down to thirty five saul you know thirty five albums that i really liked and then narrowed it down to the top fifteen and as i know you did as well. There was a ton of great stuff released last year. I don't even feel like. I've even scratched the surface. I mean 'cause if you came up with that kind of list my list was probably half of that and then whittled it down but as always this time of year we do this episode at the end of the year every year where we look back and pick out our favorite albums that came out that year. And you know it's it's kinda cool because it's an adventure for me. Because not only. Do i got the handful of ones that i know. I love the ones that i went out and bought on the day they came out you know and the ones that i was so happy with but also it's a chance for discovery too because i actually go back and i know you do the same thing go back through and say what did we miss. You know what's out there that we didn't catch this year. I don't want nothing to slip. Pass me and actually got a few debut albums from new bands that i'd never even heard of before that we're gonna talk about here today. We got all kinds of good stuff for you. Yeah there's there is the whole gamut of stuff released last year you've got you know classic bands that we all grew up on releasing new stuff. You got supergroup. You've got new bands. You've all kind of solo albums from certain artists and Man there's a ton of stuff in you know. We'll we'll go through as mitch as much as we can You know there's some great music for you so yeah there's a lot to cover so let's get it on well before we get to it. You know us. We take care of that business. We'll do it real quick because we got a lot albums to talk about fifteen piece. So let's take care of that business right now and our business is reviews. Podcast reviews yeah. We like them from apple like him from facebook. We like from pie chaser and anywhere else. You can think of that. You can leave your boys. The desk geek podcasts. A sweet sweet review. We sure do appreciate it. We appreciate it so much that every single week. We're gonna read them on the show when they're really good and we've got a couple of really really good ones here today. Let's start off with an apple. Podcast review this one's five stars and it's hot and it's fresh because it's talking about the best and worst of seventies judas priest. That was fun. Yes sure was gosal some like this loved. The judas priest episode. I have to listen to every one of those albums very soon. I also have a hard time picking anything off those albums. I don't like great episode of the best music. Podcasts out there for sure loved hearing some music clips in there to always makes my commute so much better keep up the great work guys and that comes to us from paul smith. It's an apple. Podcast review five stars. Only nice appreciate that and thanks to julian gil for being a part of that episode. He was great contributor to it. Yeah he was. I really enjoyed talking to him. Man blew my mind when he talked about flip flop in the album around. You know how side be should. Actually it makes so much sense. And that it's a concept record. I never. I'll never hear that that. I'll stained class at the same way again. I'll never listened to side a first ever four. Neither all right. That's cool man. Yeah so much fun last week. Love that early judas priest we got one more. If you got the time. I got the ability. Let's read it right here. Oh my goodness. It's a facebook recommendation. We haven't had one of these in a while. it's been a few months. Let's a good one. And it comes to us from stephen gallen very and he recommends the desk geek podcast. Because chris and aaron are knowledgeable hosts they know all deep cuts of the bands that i grew up with and love. Great show with interesting guests and topics rock and ron is the best mascot ever and he brings his own liquor to the party. A sure does great show been trying to catch up on some of the older episodes. That's an awesome dacian right there. Thank you steven for taking the time to do that for us. Thank you paul. For your awesome apple. Podcast review gays kick ass. We appreciate you very much guys. Wanna leave us a review somewhere and here read on the show. Give them all the stars. Facebook apple podcasts pod. Chaser you name. It will read it. Yeah thanks for those and keep them coming. And wow i didn't realize rock. And ron was a mascot. But he's right up there with the san diego chicken in my book. He's all alright. God oh man another way you can help us out every time we release an episode such as the one. You're about to hear today. We always make the official announcement on twitter or on facebook. If you re tweet that original tweet if you share that original facebook post and we see it on there we say. Oh there's your name your amongst the many the many awesome people that love this show they share it. They re tweet it and they become honorary geeks of the week. Luik this week. Or adam. cox ralph era. Kristen shimbun john phillips david glenn simon cat keith raw for jobs to capone bill mike cornell jeffrey mendenhall sit and spin with joe the bakery podcast aaron baker nuala vargo. Tom smoke bobby. Valentine army jeff taylor doug fox josh hamilton in obscurity podcast. Hockberg stott kiss. Faq allen. The sean marvin carter. Jj mcelhinney northern vet. Halen sean. Cullen audio is always the food or do we nail it. Probably not as close as we've ever come. Yeah hey tom. smoke is back. that's awesome. I've been watching for him on the backs. Milk cartons have you. That's cool awesome. Names come up and they come and go all friends longtime friends new friends. we appreciate. Y'all thanks to everybody. That sports the decibel geek podcasts. We've each got fifteen albums man. we'd better get to it. Yeah there's a lot to go through here so i yeah. Why don't you go ahead and start us out all right so My number fifteen or a record of twenty twenty is tyler bryant and the shakedowns pressure. Know much about this banner. What i do know is that. I've heard good things about him. People that are in our desperately geek. Community have been talking about this band I went ahead and check them out earlier in the year and thought they were pretty good Do to hell of a guitar player. I really don't know a lot about them. Well they Started out in. Two thousand nine tyler. Put the band together at the age of sixteen. So he's kind of like a teenage virtuoso. Formed here nashville. i'll cool. I do not know that yup and the lineup currently consists of tyler bryant lead guitar and vocals and needed do based on the new. So there between bass players graham whitford and caleb crosby and graham whitford sounds familiar yes. He is the son of brad. Whitford era okay. Right on so a lot of talent in this band They recorded this record in tyler basement during the lockdown and he was gonna do it as He was gonna do a song and then that turned into an ep. And next thing you knew he had a whole record put together. So it's a it's an and that was kind of our wish earlier this last year when all this stuff started was i wonder how much material is gonna come out of this and we're already seeing the fruit of that Previous releases of this ban had kind of a sameness to them for me but This album had a lot more diversity on it and showed some growth in in our good buddy de hud. He's he loves this ban and he's always been pushing me to get into and The that kinda changed twenty twenty. I got more into him. So yeah but like the.

Facebook apple julian gil stephen gallen saul mitch paul smith tyler bryant Luik cox ralph era Kristen shimbun ron david glenn simon cat keith bill mike cornell jeffrey mendenhall aaron baker nuala vargo Tom smoke bobby doug fox