36 Burst results for "AWS"

Fresh update on "aws" discussed on The CyberWire

The CyberWire

00:53 min | 12 hrs ago

Fresh update on "aws" discussed on The CyberWire

"To connecticut incidents of importance surfaced over the weekend both had at least one foot in cyberspace in the first. Iran's natanz nuclear facility sustained in apparently deliberately planned explosion power outage sunday according to the new york times. Iran had just begun on saturday injecting gas into the new generation. Uranium enrichment centrifuges at natanz testing marked national nuclear day in iran. A member of iran's parliament said quote the blackout in natanz on the anniversary of national nuclear day is suspicious and may be due to sabotage while iran is trying to convince the western countries to lift the sanctions and quote while decrying the outage sabotage an act of terror even nuclear terror since natanz is a nuclear facility specifically one devoted to uranium enrichment iranian authorities. Did not immediately assign blame. Israeli media however unofficially attributed the incident to an israeli cyber attack and cited anonymous western intelligence sources as telling them that the sabotage had been a massad operation whether those sources were israeli or from other countries is so far unknown. The wall street journal reports that this morning. Tehran did the same and promised revenge against the zionists. So there's no longer any doubt about whom iran sees is responsible for the explosion. The washington post an unnamed senior. Us official is saying we have seen reports of an incident. The natanz enrichment facility in iran. The united states had no involvement and we have nothing to add to speculation about the causes and quote israel. Of course didn't and isn't expected to publicly avow any role in the incident. Cnn reading between the various lines thinks that israeli army chief of staff. Aviv co hoffy alluded to the operation in a sideways fashion. A few hours after a reported the explosion when he said in a speech that israel's quote operations throughout the middle east are not hidden from the eyes of the enemies and quote he added. They are watching us seeing the capabilities and carefully considering their steps and quote the natanz facility which iran maintains is a peaceful nuclear research facility but which many observers think as a nuclear weapons development. Operation has been subjected to cyber attack before these stuxnet tool widely believed to have been developed by two thousand nine and subsequently introduced into natanson. A joint israeli. Us operation disabled centrifuges at the installation. By affecting the siemens programmable logic controllers used in the enrichment process the other incident involved the arrest thursday of texas man whom the fbi says attempted to buy explosives from an undercover fbi employee allegedly intending to blow up an amazon web services facility in virginia. Bleeping computer says that the bureau identified the man's plans from posts he'd made in january on the my militia site. A third party also tipped off the fbi. That the suspect. Seth aaron pennsly- had communicated in a signal message and interest in buying c. Four the record reports c four is a kind of plastic explosive which uses rdx as its principal ingredient. It's a military explosive. That's also been used in terrorist bombings. The justice department said in a friday press release announcing the arrest and the charges that mr pendlebury explained in a signal message that he was planning to use c. four to attack amazon's data center which he felt would as he put it. Kill off about seventy percent of the internet of course to use c. Four one must get see for and one of mr penalties online contacts. One whom justice describes as a confidential source. Put mr pennsly- in touch with potential supplier. Who was of course. An undercover fbi employees according to the justice department quote in recorded conversations. Mr pennsly- allegedly told the undercover he planned to attack web servers that he believed provided services to the fbi cia and other federal agencies. He said he hoped to bring down the oligarchy currently in power in the united states and quote when he met the undercover employee on april eighth. Mr penalty picked up what he believed to be explosives. But which in fact were just inert materials. He had the undercover employee. Show him how to arm and detonate the phony explosives and he then loaded them into his car. At which point the fbi arrested him. Information from both linked in and clubhouse is being offered for sale in criminal markets in both cases the data appear to be publicly available and to have been scraped both linked in and clubhouse have convincingly denied being breached the data on offer appear to be with the media's users would have themselves made public and finally president biden will appoint nsa alumni to seniors cybersecurity posts. the washington post reports. Chris english will serve as national cyber security director and jen. Easterly will serve as a director. Easterly was among the nsa officials involved in establishing us cyber command. Almost ten years ago english has served for eight years nsa executive director the second ranking official in the agency as the first national cyber director a role created late last year by congress in response to recommendations developed by the cyberspace alarium. His role.

Amazon Eight Years Virginia April Eighth January Chris English Easterly Pendlebury Congress Israeli Saturday Texas Pennsly Iran Seth Aaron Pennsly Thursday This Morning First About Seventy Percent
Interview With Tim Jefferson Of Barracuda Networks

7 Layers

02:25 min | 6 d ago

Interview With Tim Jefferson Of Barracuda Networks

"Alright listeners. i'm here with barracuda networks. Is tim jefferson to talk about cloud. Security hello tim. How're you great connor. Thanks so Just to get right into it. What would you say. Your history is with cut security while my introduction to cloud security was back in Two thousand fifteen. I the opportunity of joining amazon web services in its early days back when it was only a four billion dollar business in was part of the original team that was tasked with working with the security ecosystem and helping them that are understand how their value propositions could apply to public cloud customers in particular airbase environments so there is a big pivot that a lot of the scared ecosystem partners had to do to. You know how their current solutions that were typically built for data centers needed to evolve and kind of re architect and rethink around what value they can bring the public cloud and ultimately how they had architect solution to be Well architect for those types of environments so that tend to be a big pivot for a lot of customers so it was great to see the industry evolve you know from the very mature data center. Well established commercial solutions in how they pivoted to the startups. That took specific Look almost from scratch around what they can do uniquely. And that's where some of the very first cloud security posture management tools kind of popped up way back in two thousand fifteen. So yeah it's been great to see the industry of wall during that period. Yeah so it seems that you were well educated on how to secure the cloud and you're also doing some educating to the companies that we're using. Aws yes it was journeys eighty s platform evolved. And you know those. Those platform solutions became more mature. A lot of them kept adding incremental security capabilities which again created more friction and opportunity at the same time for a lot of the ice vs s are called independent software vendors to kind of rethink what value they can bring to customers ultimately how they can leverage some of those native services and the telemetry that comes with them to bring you unique security value

Tim Jefferson Barracuda Networks Connor TIM Amazon
Microsoft Signs Deal To Outfit US Army With AR Headsets

Techmeme Ride Home

02:11 min | Last week

Microsoft Signs Deal To Outfit US Army With AR Headsets

"Essentially this. This broke yesterday. And what i called. It was the biggest news in the history of the ar industry which is not saying much since the air industry is relatively young but this is like a big bang moment because in one deal in industry can be validated and so the headlines would be microsoft Signed a contract with the pentagon to create one hundred and twenty thousand custom hollow lens. A our headsets for the us army and that deal could be worth as much as twenty one point eight billion dollars over ten years. The point that i made on the show was think of all of those moon. Shots that google has been investing in and this is not me being snarky in one fell swoop. Microsoft has essentially completely earned. Its money back from a moonshot that no one was paying attention to were. But this is a hardware moonshot. This is essentially if people have been thinking about a. r. n. vr as the next big thing to the tune of twenty billion dollars. Microsoft is like this is by the way a thing now so I this follows. Of course the the deals that microsoft has done with the pentagon in terms of their cloud computing stuff. But i'm saying and compared to the moon shots of google and comparing it to what amazon has done with aws and all the sudden amazon out of left field. Or i'm sorry. Microsoft out of left field has this whole pentagon arm of its business that depending on how you term it in terms of years something is worth thirty billion dollars so dialing back from the pentagon angle of it. It's just the idea that out of nowhere. The ar vr space in my opinion has suddenly been validated.

Microsoft Pentagon Us Army Google Amazon
Founder and CEO of Pinecone, Edo Liberty, on Vector Database

Software Engineering Daily

03:34 min | Last month

Founder and CEO of Pinecone, Edo Liberty, on Vector Database

"You've done a lot of work on machine learning platforms and question. I'd like to start out with is. What are the databases that get used with machine learning applications. That's interesting i mean. Depending on where on the cycle you are. So if you're in the collection inspection of the data some tools things like snowflake data bricks. I mean spark and later on For training usually are done. Non single machines collection machines are not really used by databases. But then when you get to production you usually use things like pops up systems in what we're building is a victim database that need select retrieve in score and rank things in real time and those are the kind of infrastructure that are usually involved in the different life cycles of machining product. You worked at aws on the very popular sage maker product. What did you learn about machine learning infrastructure when you at aws while a lot of learned a lot in the same time. The field itself changed a lot. While i was there. So i think the two main thing that changed were a machine. Learning has become a lot more mainstream. In engineers and machine learning infrastructure. Folks are expected to be a lot more machine. Learning and data savvy expecting to get stuff to the finish line which was not the case a few years ago it was kind of more like the data scientists doing data and another thing is that it's one thing to get a machine learning solution to work in production company that's ready for it and has been investing in it for years eh. It's very very different to that in a company that he's either just starting to flex those muscles or not even sure that they want invest in that direction and so we've seen customers pretty much across the spectrum and it's one of the things we're trying to do it at pinecone. It's really make the bar a lot lower for a lot of folks. Try to machine learning scaling in production and in. What ways are you trying to make that bar lower. Well one of the core difficulties that we seen deploying large scale machine learning is that michigan letting represents objects as high dimensional vectors. Those are just lists of numbers. I the embedding 's of texts or embedding of images or feature engineered us but in the end they'll all if the object that you're using his going into machine learning model than it's a high dimensional vector. That's what it is. You can't do math on anything. That's not numbers and so machine. Learning applications like recommendation or normally research eventually produce those hundreds or tens of or hundreds of millions of this high dimensional vectors. And they need to store them in search through them in retrieve and rank them and do that at scale and quickly in some cost efficient way in building. Something like that is hard. It's really hard in. Not only does it take a lot of time. It's also just to get right. Most companies either failed to get those spend years doing it. And so we take the distributed systems effort and the kind of core victory database effort out of the equation and companies only deal with the logic and the model and the application that they're trying to build and not you know not layer onto that effort yet another almost insurmountable effort of the distributed system underneath it

Michigan
Has the Pandemic Resulted in the Death of Privacy?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

04:37 min | Last month

Has the Pandemic Resulted in the Death of Privacy?

"Last year. Around this time we talked with. Amy webb futurist and founder of the future today institute about how businesses might respond to the pandemic and how things might change in the future as a result of such a big direction. Changing event one thing. She was really clear on. Is that most likely. The pandemic would accelerate the death of privacy. And now amy webb says. Yep that definitely happened starting in school one of the interesting thing. That's things that has happened over the past twelve months that we've really relaxed some of our feelings about privacy and security for a lot of people who were able to send their kids back to school. Those schools required downloading an application and filling out. Pretty private details about your children that ranged from where you've traveled to whether or not somebody had symptoms all of. That's attached to that child's name and it gets uploaded and there was no choice if you want your kid to go to school. Got to download this app to your phone. Which by the way. There's a lot of other personally identifiable information. That's that's attached to it and it's not like these apps for sending purely anonymous data back and forth. We're going to have to reconcile that at some point. And i here's like another interesting set of connections that i can make about the past twelve months multiple times. We've been in situations whether it was the emergence of the corona virus or the insurrection on the capital or the craziness and volatility in the market as a result of game stop trading in previous years our government institutions and our regulators would have stepped in and they would have stepped in to to mitigate what was happening and instead we saw companies stepping in either to provide services that the government couldn't or to regulate in some way one of the things that we saw happen as a result of the virus was something that i call a c. it's like a diaz except companies so rather than it being a distributed. Denial of service gobert denial of service And it happened again again. And i think we are now on a path where we have to ask given what we've just seen over the past twelve months. What role in the future to our institutions. Play and what influence do companies actually have on society. That you know. Maybe they've had for a while but we haven't been willing to confront and does that mean for all of us going forward so fair to say examples of a see dos would be for example twitter banning president trump robin hood shutting down trading when things got really relatively game stop. Aws and yeah. I mean we can. We can rattle off at this point a pretty long list and again our governmental institutions in this country. Were not set up to move fast and break things. There's one way to look at this last year at this time and we talked the virus felt like it was emerging. The problem is that we. We'd like a four month lead time and there just wasn't any action taken so in a way Everybody kind of dragged their heels and failed to make decisions and contingency plans at every level and in every type of business in every school. There's nobody seemed to be prepared. Even though we were essentially watching a slow-motion explosion happening and then in the aftermath of that we saw you know. I don't know there's no other way to to phrase this. I mean we saw a government leadership that just didn't have the chops we had people running the show. That just didn't have the experience. And i think that created this vacuum for google and apple to step in and try to build contact tracing systems and a year later everyday people stepping up to build corona virus vaccine information websites. Because it's been so challenging and there was there was no direction whatsoever and in the interim we've got companies making decisions about whether or not to allow people to do their business or to say what they wanna say. I think there's been a really profound shift that everyday people will start to recognize. That hasn't an apparent yet because we've been dealing with the crisis from day to day

Amy Webb Future Today Institute Gobert Robin Hood Twitter Apple Google
Vantage: AWS Console Alternative with Ben Schaechter

Software Engineering Daily

05:20 min | Last month

Vantage: AWS Console Alternative with Ben Schaechter

"You work on vantage. Which is an alternative. Aws console for people who have not works deeply with a. Could you explain what the role of the console is for sure so the console is used for a few different use cases typically for new people who are getting up and running with aws. They'll use it to explore services and for existing customers or people who might have infrastructure already. It's typically used for observability in debugging use cases. So they want to verify some resources or in a state that they think they are or that the resources are there altogether but those are typically kind of the main use cases that people use the console for you've worked in the past at. Aws what did you learn about customer use cases when you were at aws so at aws. I was primarily focused on container services. And i wasn't working on the aws console. But i think the biggest learning for me from there was actually in in organizational observation. Which is there's a whole bunch of different service teams and each service team decides to staff their console resources a little bit differently or at all and so. I think the opportunity that i suffer vantage was really having a centralized experience across all of the aws services whereas you know each individual service at aws has its own unique console experience varying degrees of investments and as a result of different experiences for each individual service console. Told me a little bit more about the problems with the console that you've seen over time. Yeah so there's a few problems that we typically hear from our customers so first and foremost for certain customers. It's just very difficult for them to see what resources they have. So when you log into the aws console. There's hundreds of different services and it's opaque to you which of those services your using and so first and foremost advantage does a really good job of just showing you what resources and what services you're using on top of aws. The second thing that people get a lot of value from from vantage is that we've done a lot of work on figuring out all of the various pricing details that can happen with resources on aws and the us console doesn't show very much or at all pricing information on her resource basis. They requires you to go into the cost explorer service. Provisional bunch of reports yourselves were as out of the box advantage will go ahead and show you. Hey here's what you're paying for these. E c two instances or these container services and so on and so forth without you having do any configuration whatsoever. Now building a solution to a problem that is endemic to a platform like aws. That's a tricky business to build. Because you're basically building on somebody else's platform so can you tell me about how you got the idea for building a alternative aws console. Yes for sure. So the idea. That actually has been germinating for a while. And i'll explain the story of how we arrived here but i've worked at another provider named digital ocean. And from my time there. What i saw is that you know people love digital ocean. Because it's really easy to get up in going on provision of services and after a certain period of time some of the customers would just reach a level of sophistication and have to migrate off so the developer experience was great but the underlying services didn't scale tremendously well and for my time at aws at saw the inverse problem where the underlying services were really fantastic but the developer. Experience was always very difficult. So you know if you're a large organization that needs to scale you can integrate all of these services but there's a lot of time being spent just learning the services how they work together how to configure things into the ideas started really simply is just what if we took the developer experience of digital ocean and applied it to the large public cloud providers. Aws being the first of which and in terms of business value. I think that there's enough features. That vantage can provide either now or in the future that provide a lot of utility to customers. There's two things that i think are not going to change for developers going forward. One people are always going to want easier ways to interact with their infrastructure. Which i think vantage can provide over the consul in two. I think they're always gonna wanna simplify their understanding of their costs. And where they're coming from. And i think vantage has kind of a unique product offering that allows it to really provide a companions the aws consulate may not do everything under the sun. The council provides but for the information that's locking their people are willing to sign up in pay for with vantage.

United States Vantage
What Will Amazon Do Next in 2021?

The Small Business Radio Show

05:29 min | Last month

What Will Amazon Do Next in 2021?

"The other day announced a new ceo. And so we're is amazon. Going in two thousand twenty one and how can small business owners actually participate hit. Help is jason boys. A season entrepreneur and nationally rise x. nationally recognized expert on amazon. He's considered the world's leading expert in dot com third party sellers. He's the founder and ceo of avenue seven media llc a seller group that harnesses the power of amazon for direct to consumer product brands. He's also the co author of the amazon jungle. The truth about amazon and the sellers guide to thriving on the world's most perilous e commerce marketplace jason. Welcome to the show. Thank you bury. Congratulations to you. Six hundred and twenty six show twelve years you know. He started with just one person. So tell me how you've been doing during this pandemic. Our business has been booming Amazon scott galloway came out and wrote a book about The pandemic amazon a company that was built for something like a worldwide pandemic and they've benefited greatly and frankly so's my business. Because so many small businesses that had regional brick and mortar retail store outlets that. Just shut down on him and folks were were kind of on the fence prior to the pandemic called and said jason get amazon tomorrow. Can you help me so our business has been. I mean we keep up very hits been it's been You know a bittersweet story. It's good news that our businesses doing great as results pandemic. But it's been a really difficult time for everyone. Any recession is always winners. And there's losers. But i tell you one thing jason happen. This year that i never thought could happen in relation to amazon. I couldn't believe they couldn't deliver in two days. Came buried i. I made some predictions in early october. That fda and amazon delivery network was going to break. It ended up not breaking but they broke the post office. They bury them with so met much volume that they literally couldn't couldn't handle it and you're absolutely right. There were very few packages that were delivered to people's doors within two day window within that one day window even still though what they did. This holiday in terms of ramping up delivery final mile warehousing added fifty percent of square footage and like four months. I mean it's historic area. It's pretty incredible what they did so just recently announced. Jeff bezos is going to step down. Ceo and there was a joke on facebook. That says well i guess he's fully invested 401k. Now that's why he's stepping down. But one predictions you have for twenty twenty one with amazon given a new ceo and the hopefully the winding down of the pandemic. Yeah well you know. I hope jeff vases is going to be okay with the pay reduction. Moving from fulltime. Ceo to just executive chairman. You think you'll be okay hope but yeah you look i. I don't think that amazon is going to miss a beat. You know the minute. The announcement came out which by the way was interesting enough announced around the same time as their blow out. Q four earnings call Historic in its own right Potentially to deflect which amazon's pr department is really good at About how great they have benefited in his really tough time for our country But look amazon's not going to miss a beat andy jazzy. Jeff clone bleeds amazon. Blew has been basically attached to jeff bezos hip for more than twenty years. He's an incredibly talented competency. Oh who took. Aws from zero to fifty percent market share in the cloud. Space according to gartner so He's incredibly talented. He will help Execute on jeff bezos division. Basil's we'll take a back seat behind. The curtain is gonna shove jesse in front of congress and answer. All those difficult antitrust questions and basis is going to work on what he loves doing which is invention and future technology. Whatever amazon looks like five ten years from now will have been developed from. Basil's mind so he's not going anywhere. He's just removing himself from some of the shall we say more uncomfortable task. It's going to land on jesse's lap in the next You know one to ten years. As i trust drums or are beating louder and louder. So let's talk about some of the trends that you've been discussing Tell us about how you think. Amazon is getting into healthcare. They are already in healthcare. I mean they're providing primary care for you know scores of their own employees tens of thousands of their employees they They famously removed themselves from joint venture with jamie diamond and berkshire hathaway recently In the rumors from within inside amazon at the reason they did that is because they were holding back and the amazon pharmacy group which spun up recently. we're saying we can't move fast you know. We can't move fast because we're being held up by chasing in berkshire hathaway. So i saw that. A lot of a lot of people in the press came out berry and said oh. This means amazon can't figure out healthcare. It's too difficult. It's too challenging. I didn't see that at all. I just saw that you know amazon. Saw this as cutting weight so that they can really focus on what they do. And that's innovate

Amazon Jason Boys Avenue Seven Media Llc Jason Scott Galloway Jeff Bezos Jeff Vases Andy Jazzy Jeff Clone FDA Basil Jesse Facebook Gartner Jamie Diamond Berkshire Hathaway Congress Amazon Pharmacy Group Berry
Interview With Kfir Yeshayahu

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

05:09 min | Last month

Interview With Kfir Yeshayahu

"Our guest. Today is kafir yahoo. Who's the senior vice president of products. Advair atone so high kefir on. Thanks so much for joining us today. One it's gonna be with you today the We'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners. Tell them a little bit about your background and your current role at their tone of course so under the product invade on of busy building. I will which is the alternative system for high as well as accompanying tools to really solve some of the toughest problems in adoption today. In general one of those challenges that were focused on is open holder tising. Ai which is a fascinating topic for me. Having started with data science many many years ago. I've seen how data science was done in some of the most sophisticated data organizations in the world back in the israeli intelligence community. And i've been living the sort of evolution mini revolutions fe. I ever since in loud companies like microsoft and has of groups in the and others before joining the verizon i managed devops oriented boorda in. Aws the amazon cloud so my perspective on 'em at all is coming from both sides from day iside and Devops and now. I'm saying that the dan's in the space who both the perspective of on itself. And i don't own business units as well as Without many customers of the iowa who are in various stages of the junk. That's really very insightful. Because we've been definitely spending a lot of time talking about machine learning operations. Emily obstinate model management. And all these things that have you have to deal with once. The model is as building. People tend to think of of sort of all the work that has to go into training a model making the model happen which is definitely a lot of work. No doubt about it especially even the data preparation even before even build the model right. That's a lot of work but now that you know these models are out there in the wild in in production people are realizing the challenges of keeping these models relevant and high performance. And just doing what they're supposed to be doing. So maybe you could talk to us about what you see. Some organizational challenges as they tried to bring machine models into production of course so different studies and surveys though talking about some little between fifty to ninety two why blamed but fifty two nine hundred projects. Don't actually make it phone. Put that to production regardless of where you fall in the way. It's a pretty sad ratio. Now what makes it even wolves. Is that a project. Take a long time to demand often six months to a year. And you know they'll be walked by Most expensive in the organization we invade have experienced the same thing in the past the first day i projects and applications developed by our business units to literally month to complete. Now we're looking at fox and the stakes were sometimes too high to even start. The border. don't going directly a question about challenges until recently. A lot of the buzz in the industry was about talent shouted. I think this issue is is going away. The market is is balancing itself and good talent is coming from all sorts of different defections into the will. it did not cheap way more accessible than before. The challenges didn't have shifted in my opinion from talent gaps to both insistent cups. And i'll try to gonna show that in four different buckets. So one of them is is portions. How do i estimate the ally often. Ai project how do i define the budget endgame. That's very different than than traditional software projects. Why d- projects the second bucket is integration applications and and solutions in genoa. Now this may sound of sideways from from but it's out of the whole challenge of production izing. How with to play with the application. This is interesting for me especially from extent point because naive. Boches don't always walk because of the nature of the modern. They'll give you one of many examples. Ai models often produce results with degrees eleven of confidence.

Boorda Yahoo Verizon Amazon Emily Iowa DAN Microsoft FOX Genoa Boches
Practical Outcomes of Cloud Adoption

Status Go

04:21 min | Last month

Practical Outcomes of Cloud Adoption

"So. I have the unique pleasure of getting to introduce ron and having a little chat here. So ron teeter. He's the head of engineering at job. He has over the past twenty five plus years taken many roles in software development engineering architecture at companies like disney and apt in. He's got a tremendous amount of experience on prem. And i would say probably someone who has as much experience as possible in cloud based on how early job bite adopted. Aws so really excited to hear about his journey. Ron join job by twenty thirteen out. That was when their cloud journey began. He was able rise up the ranks from a senior architect to the head of engineering. Now and so. I think he's got a really unique and interesting story to tell about how the adoption of aws has gone within job by his learnings along the way. I know he's going to help you. Guys see out ahead. If you're earlier on in your journey and i think most importantly which is i. It can be elusive. He's gonna talk specifically about the outcomes that came from job bites adoption of the cloud. So chris you kind of already Tied some pieces together. In terms of the fact that chris. I met ron as we were having conversations with a combination of existing customers and and other folks who are out in the industry and as we learned about ron's journey and as we were sharing some of the things that we were working on here at inner intervision. There was just such a strong tie between the lessons. He had learned. Oh man if i would have had that sort of thing. When i was earlier in our adoption process it would have made my life easier. But it's one of those things i think. Ron you are quick to point out but man. you don't know this until you're in the thick of it. Would you agree with that. Of course it. There's a certain amount of learning you get just by doing it. You're off Picking yourself up by your bootstraps as they say You we got into a situation where we did do too. Much outsourcing with another var right and that ultimately created a situation that we had to Take control over. And so it was a eye-opening what we didn't know Yeah absolutely so what ron's going to do is he's going to walk you through give you some background on his journey and then we're going to camp on. There's a couple of slides towards the end terms of lessons. Learned and the outcomes. Like i said and really also the way he views cloud so ron all hand things over to you and you can walk us through this journey of yours excellent. Thank you so much for inviting needed to share our experience with your constituents today really feels good to be able to get out an an share our experience and tell her story. Let me start by. Just doing a brief introduction to what job light is and we are People know that's in some of your customers. Our customers that job eight is a market leading talent. Acquisition software brighter. We provide solutions that help our customers recruit and hire top talent so that they can build their teams to accelerate their business in we can just passionate about innovation in this space. The company started in two thousand five with the intent to take a very manual paper oriented process and digitally transform it and we continue to look for those opportunities to to see. Where can we take this next. Great seeking job is something that everybody does. Everybody understands what it's like the a job secret and we know how frustrating it can be and our job is really to train that frustration out of the process and make it more successful. We actually

RON Ron Teeter Ron Join Chris Disney
How to Leverage Amazon to Grow Your Business in 2021

The Small Business Radio Show

08:19 min | 2 months ago

How to Leverage Amazon to Grow Your Business in 2021

"During the pandemic the use of amazon sword but so has small business owners selling their products on amazon. Here talk about how they can help. Your small business is carry kucic. Who is the of small business empowerment amazon. The small business powered team is focused on driving. The success of amazon's small business partners and works with teams across amazon deliver programs. Investments that support their growth carries a graduate of the university of florida's levin college of law where she earned a juris doctorate degree shows holds in history of english from covenant. College carry welcome to the show. Thank you so much for having me very so i could ask you. How did you end up being a lawyer from studying history and english extensive amounts of reading and writing. The really is i. You know when. I was In actually in high school had an opportunity to participate in a youth leadership program That included a track on the judicial system. And i just kinda got hooked on on everything that was involved in of course. Reading and writing is a big part to sorta leaned into those superpowers. I guess so. How did you pass from being a j. d. lead you to amazon and out small business owners. The phone question I do. I've today describe myself as a recovering lawyer. A my favorite time. Yes you know the thing that was fun for me about practicing law was you. You get to spend all day identifying issues in solving problems and so i really From day one enjoyed solving ambiguous problems. Where you had to figure out the root cause of whatever issue or opportunity was in front of you and then inventor way to the solution and so that took me from practicing law Up through a variety of roles on the business side where i've gotten to solve increasingly problems. focused on solving challenges For usually for others which leads to my my role today which is very good to spend all day everyday focused on helping solve issues challenges and make the world a better place for small businesses. I think a lot of people carry don't realize how many small businesses actually work through the amazon channel. Tell us about that So amazon in the us alone on amazon works with more than two million independent partners. They come in all shapes and sizes celena stores. They operate delivery service businesses. They use tools trim. Aws a build alexa skills. They published books with kindle direct publishing so amazon supporting small medium. Sized businesses is a fundamental part of our work there. It's a core part of what we do everyday. An extension of our customer centric culture. Our success depends on their success and our global head. Carrie i was gonna say in our in our store worldwide. We have over a million independent businesses selling in the account for over half of all products sold. And we've seen their sales continue to outpace our retail so we know that customers value them in this election they bring in an incredible way. The amazing statistic that over half of everything purchased on amazon is sold through independent third parties. Small medium sized businesses. That it's not really amazon. Really is the amazon marketplace right absolutely. Yeah the outlive sewing partners. The independent businesses bring those products role and bringing such a wonderful and diverse array of products across all categories. That customers enjoy now. Even i know most of us were surprised by covid. Nineteen who would know that once in every one hundred years right what happen last year but was my biggest surprise is that when ordered some from amazon. It couldn't get here in two days. I thought would never ever happen. Carry tell us about the challenges. They're really amazon. Face in the small business partners did during the height of the covid nineteen crisis absolutely right kobe. Nineteen created many challenges for small businesses. We you know despite it. We were encouraged to see that sense and through that time. Small companies have continued to grow with amazon. You know twenty twenty the number of us long medium sized businesses that surpassed one million dollars sales grew by more than twenty percents and more than thirty seven hundred surpassed him in sales for the first time. Which is just a really great business milestone for any prisoners owner. I'm those businesses have created an estimated one point one million jobs which is phenomenal. It's such an important part. Is you know what keeps our communities going and so we've seen as customers of increasingly shopping online on the past year. The businesses were using e commerce. House channel have continued to sustain grow. I'm in our commitment to supporting them. And adopting for the future has has never been more steadfast done a number of things both continuing work. We've been doing for years and new things. We did in twenty twenty to continue supporting them through that journey. And i think that's really the key role. The amazon plays a lot of companies have got into e commerce for the first time during covid nineteen and like all right. I'm gonna go set up a store. But they no incomes and i think that is really the key of getting involved in the amazon marketplace. Because you already have so many people looking for products right there absolutely One of my favorite stories. I think one of my favorite projects from twenty twenty was last year redesigned prime date support small businesses and we committed more than one hundred million dollars to help their growth over the shopping event through the holiday season and that included holding our biggest small business promotion. Yeah so during that promotion customers. Purchase dollars and products from participating. Small business selling on amazon. Ten dollars credit to spend on prime day. It's on a two week. Lead up to prime day. Small businesses included in that promotion generated more than nine hundred million dollars. In sales on prime day independent third party sellers had their two biggest as ever surpassing three and a half billion in sales which is nearly sixty percent year over year increase and even more growth than our retail business and then it also came with stories like the story of lia foods actually a seller based north aurora forty minutes outside of chicago and she makes african inspired spices but The fun part about her story. It demonstrates the power of selling on amazon and an event like prime day to find those new customers over to help those new customers find you. She shared that coming out of advent not only has she almost doubled her single day sales but her daily started trending upwards with all that new customer acquisition those stories. We really enjoy seeing so those who've never really men sold their price to amazon. What kind of rain moments are there. And what is it in a cost to market on amazon. Yes so our public schedule. So if you if any seller or someone considering becoming a feller looks online at those public public information fees range from eight to fifteen percent depending on product type and for business selling amazon. Really do that as a marketing cost because of the access to that three hundred million customers that it creates and then beyond the monthly in referral fees. everything's optional so sellers choose. What's right for their business. We offer as i mentioned a variety of services in programs than in its pick. What's right for you right so if you want to lean into advertising their options for you could choose what suits for your business if you want to move away from fulfilling your on products create more bandwidth for yourself to do other things there options to leverage by amazon into leverage the customer service support that comes without. So it's it's very much a choose your own adventure but each business owner can select the right fit for them and what fits their

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Jeff Bezos steps down as Amazon CEO

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:21 min | 2 months ago

Jeff Bezos steps down as Amazon CEO

"Amazon's founder and ceo. Jeff bezos announced this week that he is going to become executive chairman of the company and the new ceo will be andy jesse. Currently the head of amazon web services amazon is twenty six years old. and obviously it's massive and has ideas to do everything from package delivery to television production too smart. Microwaves to artificial intelligence. And obviously it's huge an incredibly profitable cloud business amazon's ambition and reach is legendary but with betas taking on a new role. Could that change. It's a topic for quality assurance where we take a look at big tech story. Stone is a senior executive editor for bloomberg. He's written one book on amazon and has another one coming out this spring. I asked him if amazon might start to focus more on the gold. Mine of its cloud amazon actually has kind of two of those gold mines. You mentioned one. aws the other one is advertising. And it's been this kind of quiet force gobbling up market share in online advertising. And you know for the last ten years. It's investors have been wholly on board with amazon not returning that money to shareholders not showing you know a big profit although they've been getting better in that regard but investing and inventing new things to the extent that its shareholders continue to allow that to happen amazon. Continue to do it now. jeff bezos. He's going to continue to be active in the big decisions and working on new projects and executive chairman. There's a role that carry some meaning. He's still going to be andy jesse's boss in many ways andy jesse seems formed in the same mould as jeff visas and yet. There are real critiques about the company's treatment of its workers it's wages its approach to climate not even with and i trust. Do we have a sense of whether jazzy might be more responsive to some of those critiques. Right are we going to see a softer gentler amazon. Like a tim. Cook to steve jobs. That's right and in some respects. Maybe chelsea's is while he's sort of cleaved from jeff bezos rib and a lot of ways. He's also different. I mean he's more politically active at the same time amazon. Aws under andy. Jesse sold its face. Recognition software to law enforcement agencies and only paused for a year. When the blm movement became very loud and vocal. So i don't suspect it. I much change particularly with a very loud voice on the board with a lot of sentiment changing. Is that not a good thing. Should jesse be more open to change. Will shareholders have less tolerance for business. As usual i think they're gonna have to start listening more to the voices not only of their frontline employees in the warehouses who do have some real grievances particularly amid the pandemic but to the contractor workforce almost kind of invisible constituency who tries to amazon vans and drop software packages like a lot of companies amazon kind of indulgence itself of this contractor workforce where the healthcare protections fifteen dollar an hour wage protections don't exist and so i think yes i mean they're going to increasingly if they want to get to that next level of growth. Have to listen to some of these concerns brad. Stone is a senior executive editor for bloomberg

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Jeff Bezos to step down as Amazon CEO, Andy Jassy to take over in Q3

WSJ Tech News Briefing

01:17 min | 2 months ago

Jeff Bezos to step down as Amazon CEO, Andy Jassy to take over in Q3

"Earlier. This week amazon said that. Andy jesse would be taking over as ceo from founder. Jeff bezos jazz. He's been the chief architect evangelist for the company's cloud computing arm amazon web service says ever since it launched in two thousand six. He helped build. Aws from an untested idea to a multibillion dollar business. Jesse's promotion is a sign that the company will be continuing. Its focus on. The cloud while amazon has strong position in the market are reporter. Aaron says cloud computing is becoming more competitive for many years. Amazon was really the only game in town. They pioneered this model of a cloud infrastructure platform player and there have been other players that tried to jump on board and lots of failed and really over the past few years. I'd say past four or five. We've seen microsoft really starting to grow quickly in that regard under sajjan adela. When he took over in two thousand fourteen he really refocused and put the company into serve cloud i mode and has really started paid dividends over the past few years and is now catching up to amazon. Quite a bed. We also see google nut growing as rapidly as as microsoft but certainly a viable player. Here

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Apple and Hyundai-Kia pushing toward deal on Apple Car

Daily Tech News Show

00:21 sec | 2 months ago

Apple and Hyundai-Kia pushing toward deal on Apple Car

"The korean newspaper dong ilbo sources say that apple may sign a deal with kia on february seventeenth to invest four trillion. One that's about three point six billion. Us dollars to set up electric car production at his factory in georgia the aim would be to introduce apple cars and twenty twenty four with an initial target of one hundred thousand vehicles per

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Jeff Bezos to step down as Amazon CEO, Andy Jassy to take over in Q3

Techmeme Ride Home

03:17 min | 2 months ago

Jeff Bezos to step down as Amazon CEO, Andy Jassy to take over in Q3

"He have probably heard by now that jeff bezos is stepping down from his role. As ceo of amazon will be transitioning to the role of executive chairman. This will happen in q. Three of this year at which point. Aws ceo andy. Jesse will become the new ceo of amazon bezos. Wants everyone to know. This is not a retirement in a letter to employees basis. Wrote quote as much as i still tap dance into the office. I am excited about this transition. Millions of customers depend on us for our services and more than a million employees depend on us for their livelihoods. Being the ceo of amazon is a deep responsibility and it's consuming when you have a responsibility like that it's hard to put attention on anything else as exact chair. I will stay engaged in important amazon initiatives but also have the time and energy. I need to focus on the day. One fund the basis earth fund blue origin. The washington post and my other passions. I've never had more energy and this isn't about retiring. I'm super passionate about the impact. I think these organizations can have amazon. Couldn't be better positioned for the future. We are firing on all cylinders. Just as the world needs us to we have things in the pipeline that will continue to astonish. we serve individuals and enterprises and we've pioneered to complete industries and a whole new class of devices. We are leaders in areas as varied as machine learning and logistics and if an amazonian idea requires yet another new institutional skill. We're flexible enough and patient enough to learn it and quote quoting cnbc. Amazon's chief financial officer. Brian ozaki said on a media. Call that the executive change was decided in consultation. With amazon's board of directors he said basis will remain very involved and have his fingerprints on lots of different parts of the company. Said jesse is a visionary leader who will bring his own skill set but that amazon expects a lot of continuity with the transition and quote. Yes the pr message from across the board is that basil's is still going to be involved with cool things at amazon things like new projects. New products strategic initiatives. that's very common for founders of these big companies. Say twenty years into them. Eventually you only want to do the fun stuff. Not the dirty stuff of running a huge operation day to day. Same thing happened. To larry and sergei at google they transitioned to their moon shots and other baths before drifting out the door entirely. I'll point out. That bill gates stepped down as ceo of microsoft. Thirty three years after the founding of that company amazon is only twenty six years old by comparison and yet gates was only fifty three when he retired bays fifty seven. I'm not saying fifty seven old by any means. But i didn't know that that was his age. All's i'm saying is if you're the richest man on earth depending on the day the sort of thing makes sense around this stage of life right. I also think it's worth pointing out as several people have been pointing out and as you'll hear again in a second that if we define the tech oligarchy as apple google amazon microsoft and facebook facebook is the only one of the big five to still be run by its founder. The rest are either in their second regime or even a generation or two beyond that

Amazon Amazon Bezos Jeff Bezos Brian Ozaki AWS Jesse Andy The Washington Post Cnbc Basil Sergei Bill Gates Larry Google Microsoft Gates Facebook Apple
Jeff Bezos to leave Amazon CEO post after 27 years, become executive chair

Techmeme Ride Home

03:12 min | 2 months ago

Jeff Bezos to leave Amazon CEO post after 27 years, become executive chair

"He have probably heard by now that jeff bezos is stepping down from his role. As ceo of amazon will be transitioning to the role of executive chairman. This will happen in q. Three of this year at which point. Aws ceo andy. Jesse will become the new ceo of amazon bezos. Wants everyone to know. This is not a retirement in a letter to employees basis. Wrote quote as much as i still tap dance into the office. I am excited about this transition. Millions of customers depend on us for our services and more than a million employees depend on us for their livelihoods. Being the ceo of amazon is a deep responsibility and it's consuming when you have a responsibility like that it's hard to put attention on anything else as exact chair. I will stay engaged in important amazon initiatives but also have the time and energy. I need to focus on the day. One fund the basis earth fund blue origin. The washington post and my other passions. I've never had more energy and this isn't about retiring. I'm super passionate about the impact. I think these organizations can have amazon. Couldn't be better positioned for the future. We are firing on all cylinders. Just as the world needs us to we have things in the pipeline that will continue to astonish. we serve individuals and enterprises and we've pioneered to complete industries and a whole new class of devices. We are leaders in areas as varied as machine learning and logistics and if an amazonian idea requires yet another new institutional skill. We're flexible enough and patient enough to learn it and quote quoting cnbc. Amazon's chief financial officer. Brian ozaki said on a media. Call that the executive change was decided in consultation. With amazon's board of directors he said basis will remain very involved and have his fingerprints on lots of different parts of the company. Said jesse is a visionary leader who will bring his own skill set but that amazon expects a lot of continuity with the transition and quote. Yes the pr message from across the board is that basil's is still going to be involved with cool things at amazon things like new projects. New products strategic initiatives. that's very common for founders of these big companies. Say twenty years into them. Eventually you only want to do the fun stuff. Not the dirty stuff of running a huge operation day to day. Same thing happened. To larry and sergei at google they transitioned to their moon shots and other baths before drifting out the door entirely. I'll point out. That bill gates stepped down as ceo of microsoft. Thirty three years after the founding of that company amazon is only twenty six years old by comparison and yet gates was only fifty three when he retired bays fifty seven. I'm not saying fifty seven old by any means. But i didn't know that that was his age. All's i'm saying is if you're the richest man on earth depending on the day the sort of thing makes sense around this stage of life right. I also think it's worth pointing out as several people have been pointing out and as you'll hear again in a second that if we define the tech oligarchy as apple google amazon microsoft and facebook facebook is the only one of the big five to still be run by its founder.

Amazon Amazon Bezos Jeff Bezos Brian Ozaki AWS Jesse Andy The Washington Post Cnbc Basil Sergei Bill Gates Larry Google Microsoft Gates Facebook Apple
Who is Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos' Successor?

WSJ What's News

01:01 min | 2 months ago

Who is Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos' Successor?

"We begin with the big leadership. Change at amazon as we reported last night amazon founder. Jeff bezos is heading off the ceo role. To andy jesse while staying on as executive chairman. Jesse is the longtime head of the company's booming cloud computing. Business are tech columnist. Dan gallagher has more andy jesse he is. He's actually a very long time. I don't know if they call them amazon. He's he's been coming for a very long time. He's always been considered a key. Tentative of jeff bezos. What had jesse's been doing it's been rained. The ws cloud business. Amazon's been doing a lot of other businesses beyond just retail but aws has been by far their most successful in the way that it's become you know not the largest portion of the revenue but the growing one and also their largest source of profits by long shot more profitable than retail. So he's had charge of that business and it's you know the i think his him giving the ceo world kind of says were. They think that's going to be going

Andy Jesse Amazon Jeff Bezos Dan Gallagher Jesse
Google Giving Up on Games? - Stadia strategy shifts

All About Android

05:23 min | 2 months ago

Google Giving Up on Games? - Stadia strategy shifts

"Google announced yesterday that it's going to be shuttering. Its in-house game development studio Which they first formed one year ago. It was called stadium games and entertainment. They did all this hiring for brought in all these big names to create essentially create exclusive. First party stadia games to be there in the library in combination with all the other titles that everybody recognizes And google announced yesterday that we're not gonna do that anymore. And i feel like there's a lot to dive into here at the same time. We saw twitter. That you were going wild with this stuff and we were just really entertained by by your thoughts on this so Thought it was a perfect time to bring you on to talk a little bit about stadia. And i'm just curious like right off the top. You've had a day to kind of think about this. What does this say about stadia that they're getting rid of this because it's easy to go into the realm of. Oh google just likes to kill all of its its things before it ever had a chance or whatever. Do you think that's what we're looking at here. Is this different. I think with anything. Google quote unquote kills you. Have you have two sides of the story here. You have the consumer facing side which is often that google gets rid of something that people used And then you have the internal side. Where oftentimes google ends up taking pieces of that thing and applying them somewhere else where they make sense You can look at google wave for example a really really really weird product. That probably didn't make sense for the mass market. But that certain people used and loved and that google took some ideas from an incorporated into google inbox which was then at the thing that people really loved in us and then incorporated those things from inbox into g mail. So google has a way of kind of devouring itself And it's projects. Like that. And i think that is unfortunately what's happening with stadium here It's unfortunate for consumers because it means that stadia as a subscription cloud streaming service. I agree with sean hollister at the verge and what he said. The days are numbered. Now this service won't live on definitely so google says it's still invest in sadia. There will still be third party game releases you know with. Other developers will continue to make games compatible stadia They didn't say if they expected to produce pace of adoption or if they expected to continue to meet their target of four hundred games and what three years or something like that. I forget what the exact timeframe so don't don't quote me. They're quoting myself. i guess. But it's yeah it's dud. i'm. I've said things online and they're having consequences So i think that really the thing that kind of hit the ball About this was the announcement that there was something. Downside games entertainment stadia. Sorry and that was their in house game studio. That is big news. I agree that it's important. But they sort of. I wouldn't say they hit the lead necessarily but they waited a couple of paragraphs to be like and by the way we're looking at say business model and we might kind of take that in a different direction. Maybe who knows And they kind of left with that. They didn't get much more specific other than the say. They wanted to share the stadia platform with partners. So what that to me means a being intentionally vague about it Be that it means. Whatever they're doing does not mean a positive change impact for people who subscribe to stadia. That's they're saying the opposite they're saying that other companies are going to benefit for bid from stadia more than subscribers. Likely well and to me. That's you know. I think everybody else ought for this after a little while to. It's an admission that they want to take stadia and turn it into a be. Your beat ee. Like cloud gaming business where stadia As as a little company inside. Google sells this service. This ability to stream your games to game publishers and developers who can you stadium platform and their hardware resources. Just as you would. Aws amazon web services to stream games to gamers. where google is just the intermediary. It's really just. It's an isp for video games essentially Not not in a lot of senses but insensitive. The service provider here. So i think that's where most people have decided. This is where stadium headed. And i think the reasons for that. You've got a few good ones one. It seemed inevitable if you look at the streaming space Our our senior editor ryan. Hey how to post about this today if you look at the streaming space things initially started basically content. Clearing-houses like netflix switch. Gobbled up all the rights to everything Gave you the right to play it back but over time. Netflix's understood you know these studios and these These tv companies. They are starting to understand how to do what we do which is stream video and streaming video became so easy and so scales service. These companies started climbing back. The rights their content. Because they're like. Hey why would. I put my show on netflix. If i'm cbs. And i can charge people ten dollars a month to watch all every star trek ever So the industry has like very provable. Moved in this direction in the last five or so years. Especially i think what google is doing is foreshadowing that Essentially like all cartoons ization to use a very Poor term of art of video game streaming

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Jeff Bezos to step down as Amazon CEO, Andy Jassy to take over in Q3

CNBC's Fast Money

02:00 min | 2 months ago

Jeff Bezos to step down as Amazon CEO, Andy Jassy to take over in Q3

"But we start off with a bombshell out of amazon founder. Jeff bezos is stepping down as ceo. He will become the company's executive chairman the stock higher in the after our session. Let's get straight to. Dj bosa with the details depot. Melissa bombshell indeed basis handing over the reins after amazon strongest year in terms of revenue and profitability but this is also a challenging time for the company. It's facing labor shoes as its workforce surpassed million employees last year. And of. Course there's antitrust scrutiny. Which isn't expected to go anywhere in fact just after. The news broke republican representative. Ken buck tweeting out quote. I have some questions for mister josse. He has of course been a key voice and tech antitrust debates now. I just asked to amazon cfo. Brian might expect from a jazz lead amazon and he said that andy brings his own skill. Set his a visionary leader in his own right and he understands what makes amazon such a special innovative place or south. Ski also said that. Investors can expect a lot of continuity because jeff bezos will still be very involved and he will have input on new businesses and product. Lines remember too. That bazo is still amazon's largest shareholder. So he's not exactly retiring here now. The timing the announcement may come as a surprise. Melissa but certainly not the man who has tapped to take over and jesse has been at the company almost as long as and he pioneered the cloud computing business years before rivals. Like google and microsoft. Even got started now in a memo to employees. Bezos writes that jesse will quote be an outstanding leader and he has my full confidence now as for earnings which was certainly overshadowed by that announcement they were very strong indeed. Interestingly though jesse the cloud chief he will be taking over as aws growth is decelerating and as online sales growth both north america and international. They're actually growing at a quicker pace than

Amazon Dj Bosa Melissa Bombshell Jeff Bezos Mister Josse Ken Buck Jesse Andy Brian Melissa Bezos Microsoft Google North America
Jeff Bezos, Amazon's founder, will step down as CEO

Daily Tech News Show

00:29 sec | 2 months ago

Jeff Bezos, Amazon's founder, will step down as CEO

"Amazon announced that jeff bezos will step down as ceo in q. Three and take the newly created position of chair. andy jesse. Ceo of aws will take over as ceo who has served a ceo since the company was founded in nineteen ninety four said quotes as exact chair. I will stay engaged and important amazon initiatives but also have the time and energy. I need to focus on the day. one fund. The bezos earth fund blue origin the washington post and my other passion.

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"aws" Discussed on AWS Podcast

AWS Podcast

03:46 min | 5 months ago

"aws" Discussed on AWS Podcast

"They're also getting these automated security checks that security hub is natively doing so the security checks that were doing associated pci or standard or foundational secure best practice standard. They're getting their sin as well. So yeah we have lots of customers at Side by side. The sam they barred buildouts their workflows into their sim. And we're just really feeding into that but we do have customers that haven't made investments in the sim. maybe there are smaller medium or medium sized organization. They haven't worked out the the big bucks for sim. So they are logging in to security daily basis in using our console in heavyweight so they're logging into security hub and looking at our charts in our finding cables. Identifying what are the highest priority resources are findings to address that day really using security out almost like a mini sim but focused on their eight up. Yes workloads and then the third use case i think is really exciting. Is really the future of security especially the aws issues and that is more oriented around. Deva sack ops style use cases so one of the big trends that i'm seeing especially with our our most sophisticated customers and in fact with our own internal aws security efforts if that we're really decentralizing security. So that is the responsibility. Not just of essential security team because security operation center but that security operation centers really acting as a campaign manager a router been formation and it is actually the account owners they. Aws account owners the devops personas the builders who are acting on the security and compliance issues associated with their accounts. So that's another way. That folks are using security ob- they're giving the actual count owners access to security hub so that they can lock again and take a more proactive stance and take more proactive responsibility for the security and compliance bear accounts. Yeah that's really important point because we have had a few episodes in the past talking about the fact that the earlier you can building security into your decision making in your development process the data one of the key things around that is providing information providing exposure to again. What good looks like what. The current studies half hour. We are from a tweet to make it better and this this is a really neat way to just get in the hands of the people who.

Aws
"aws" Discussed on AWS Podcast

AWS Podcast

03:31 min | 5 months ago

"aws" Discussed on AWS Podcast

"We are deploying them out into our foundational scare best practices standard and so customers that have are enabled that standard in a particular account will start automatically getting more more controls as they've gone through this vetting in development process so this is a form of active security in the with surveying what what good looks like but we're also taking inputs from things we're seeing in the field and things we're seeing in the general security domain and by expressing these rules we can prevent them in a broader sense. Exactly although i'd put a slight tweak on that really what we're doing here less about prevention immoral out accurate detection and if you want a fast remediation for things that we do detect on the prevention side. There actually is another service called control tower and control. Tower has a set of mandatory in highly recommended guardrails. The guardrails under the covers are actually service control policies and those are really about prevention those prevent certain actions from ever happening in an accounts. So you could actually have a preventative guardrail. And a security hub. Detective control for the same general concept and out argue that they're mutually reinforcing. The a detective control helps you be confident that the preventative guardrail is in place and still working properly. So as an example you can have a service control policy saying that s. Three buckets can never be made public and with that service control policy or prevented guardrail on plays a key. A user in that account should never be able to make those three buckets public but also have a detective control insecurity as reinforcement mechanism to verify. That is indeed true so it's kind of build some braces prevention detection to me. Those are mutually reinforcing concepts. But a little bit difference but dance your original question yes. We are taking a whole of inputs in terms of defining these security best practices in the army checks associated with them. Some of those inputs include existing configure rules. So we do use a lot of confi. aws can fig under the covers one of the prerequisites for getting full value out of security up. Is that you do go in. Turn on configure quarter for for your various resources. So we're using some existing can pick. Rules were also building new ones. We're also looking at other. Aws services like aws well architecture tool and trusted adviser grabbing content from them were looking at the existing public aws documentation. Savar services actually have really nice security chapters that identify some security best practices or grabbing those. And then yeah. We're working with our larger security Community in committee which includes Special slough shark attacks pro serve consultants that work with customers on a.

aws
"aws" Discussed on AWS Podcast

AWS Podcast

04:54 min | 5 months ago

"aws" Discussed on AWS Podcast

"Watts used handle. They move forward that way. Yes the first thing i just wanted to say. There is not an obligation or expectation to build on. Aws directly we hope. We hope we earned the trust and we show through the prototyping that the cloud is a platform for that disruptive innovation that they're seeking but ultimately the challenge sponsors will decide what will support the solution that they're creating but part of that commitment that we're looking for you know as we talked about previously. We want them to want to solve their problem. It's not just a good idea. That might have. But i actually have a real problem that i'm trying to solve and we will try to provide prototypes in ideas to solve that challenge. And if we do then we can provide a lot of different ways to save. We build a prototype. They're very interested in it. You know one of the things we do during that prototype phase is we provide the kicks with aws. Promotional credits for the challenges. So we make sure cost. Isn't the reason why they're not building a prototype suit to the challenge sponsor. There's no cost even for the cloudy. Even if it was a data lake or a machine learning exercise one example is would be one of the university of british columbia. Cove related challenges. It's a big high performance computing workload. We provided the credits for that because it was a validated and approved challenge that they were committed to solving so we take that cost out. But you say there's a production opportunity or taking it to a solution deployment. We can facilitate introductions to support that project we can help the actual challenge sponsor and their technical team if they have one through our training and certification program we can provide connections to are aws pro. Serve or internal prototyping teams. We have a big library. I guess of saying of technical partners within the aws partner network of consulting partners or if depending on the challenge wiki even provide a connection to any other group or program with an amazon. Who might be able to help so what we try to do is help public sector organisations find the right path. Forward wants to challenge engagement process concludes and when we say conclude we've developed a prototype published it open source on the kick website and we're socializing it throughout our networks and our customers networks but the prototype is not a full production solution. So i wanna make sure. I make that clear. We don't have expectations that the students are building full productions but prototypes that test. Out the idea and so we will provide the technology expertise and support the success of the vision of those challenge sponsors public sector organisations once..

Aws Watts university of british columbia partner
"aws" Discussed on AWS Podcast

AWS Podcast

04:58 min | 5 months ago

"aws" Discussed on AWS Podcast

"Designed for ability such as making your services stateless, implementing, throttling, chilling, retry. Gal. All that was talked about on the White Paper, but you're no way to review your workload against those best practices. But now you do because we've added that such that. So, it makes it more more complete than ever the more consistent. Yeah. Yeah. So so when you think about designing infrastructure nebulous, what are some of the the real focus areas that you when you talk to customers you see customers basic. What are they doing to be successful when we think about reliability? A White Paper full of best practices right. So it's all there. But but when you think about taking a step higher level higher, what are we really aiming for a lot of it comes down to deploying redundant resources to fault isolated locations and when you think of fall isolated locations in aws, you should naturally be thinking about availability zones for folks that don't know availability zones. We have multiple availability zones per US region when. You're in an aws region, you're gonNA multiple availability on there and availability zones, our fault isolated boundaries so that if you deploy something to one availability zone and something happens a fault occurs there, it's guaranteed not to cross over into another availabilities so they're isolated. But at the same time they're connected to each other through all travel agency links to play across multiple availability zones and treated as a single logical data center. So gives you. A really nice way to be redundant and impulse isolated locations at the same time. So that's you know that's your number one go to, but we've expanded upon that in the white paper we start off talking about availability zones but we also talk about you might want to be in multiple aws regions. I actually think that most workload needs most reliability needs to be met in a single region using multiple vail buddies. But there are some reasons why some workloads into multiple regions and we talk about that and then we go..

aws
"aws" Discussed on AWS Podcast

AWS Podcast

07:52 min | 8 months ago

"aws" Discussed on AWS Podcast

"Love and a welcome back database podcast some issue with you. Great to have you back and Andre by very special guest talk a bit of hardware. Tonight I'm joined by Jeff on the hill. WHO's a principal business development manager he at the EC two. two-time. Welcome to the podcast Geoff. Thank you. It's great to be here. Thanks for having me a pleasure. So we're GONNA. Talk about something pretty cool today on that. When it was announced got excited about it. It's something called Abyss Graviton. Specifically we're GonNa talk about the address graviton two and so let's start with a what is it and why should customers care about it Sure. So grab onto is the name for an aws in house developed process. So people familiar with process today probably familiar with the terms Intel amd as factors. Zeon. An epic as brands aws in this case is the process of vendor and gravitons is the brand of the processor. So this is really an extension of something that aws has been doing for years, and that is investing in purpose built ships to increase the efficiency insecurity of our service offerings. So. One example of that that's been around for a number of years now is the Nitra system. So this is a combination of dedicated hardware security chip and then the hyper visor, and this allows US collectively those technologies they allow us to offer a secure cloud platform. And virtual instance performance that's pretty much indistinguishable from metal. So we're innovating on behalf of customers all the way down to custom in house design ships. To gravitons is really an extension of that. The NITRO platform itself allows us to offer a broad array of easy to insights. And grabbed onto a process of how is the sixth generation of RC for instance families. And so how does it compare to the first generation because we're on number two now that's always nice to look back and say, well, what's China since Lynn? Yeah. So we introduce you I generated at reinvent the end of two thousand eighteen. And it's golden life was really to provide choice. So Kennison EC two a abroad and Of EC two instances to customers to make sure they can pick the right tool for the right job. The first generation. Gravitons. Allow them to lower the cost for scale out type workloads. But as customers experienced that they wanted to run a broader array of workloads, he wanted more capable instances. So grab onto really takes to the next level and kind dials it up to eleven if you will. And it adds to the core count. So let's go four times number of chords the caches a twice as large as five x the amount of memory. Sorry the memory, bandwidth. And overall that provides a seven x better overall performance versus the first generation. The allows us to have instant sizes up to sixty four. US. We can split up to Harper Terabyte of memory on the memory optimized instances. It's got up to twenty five gigabits of network bandwidth and nineteen gigabits of storage bandwidth. So, this allows us to address a much broader range of. Use cases than we were able to do the first generation. And fundamentally these are all about providing customers with increased performance low cost. So they offer the best price performance within their general purpose compute optimized a memory. Hope to my families. And I think it's important that. The second generation with we've changed the naming convention to more reflect what it's about, which is giving you choice of your CPU talk within those those EC two family. So whereas the first generation, we had the ones that was kind of its own category. Now, it's really pot the MC and US maybe help us. gave us the secret decoder ring on that one. Sure. Yeah. It's good. It's a question. We get quite often right it's like the first Jan was a one wisn this one, eight two. So with first generation, aws gravitas on, it had a fairly narrowly defined purpose in life, right? Offer cost optimization for scale out. And it was a great part and we have a ton of customers that are using it and they'd been able to save money but with graduates onto this significant leap forward and capabilities as reflected by the very fact that we're leading six generation of instance families with it. and. So the standard family name for general purposes m today's he have him five. Compute optimize family is C. C. Five and then have memory optimized which is Today. So the decoder ring here is essentially. Is Still General purpose six sixth generation of instance family, and then the G. Designator on the in there is to indicate that it's the gravitons to. And so with that, you end up with essentially and sixty C. Sixty for compute optimized and are six chief of memory optimized. Exit makes it a lot easier to kind of differentiate and see what feet now speaking with I have these compared to the six instances often because there are one or two of those. One or two. Yeah. So, fundamentally the. The portfolio folio is is broad and deep by designer a the idea there is to ensure that we have choices for customers and we can bring pretty much any workload and deficiently in the cloud. So there's a lot of x eighty six based since as I mentioned before Intel named D this provides additional options for customers so. It's innovation specifically by AWS targeted from years of running cloud based workloads in optimizing specific. So that at right so. You know there's a lot of X86 is not gonNA change any time soon, but there's a whole array of workloads. If you're looking at Lenox open soul space workloads, they're easily portable between different pictures and then with the grabs onto processor. In the specifications that we have there, we can offer up to forty percent better price performance for our customers. Again, where match for those workloads, right you're not going to run everything on grabbed onto when you can this significant aforementioned price benefits to be had. So speaking of some of those performance benefits let's let's get out of it. Let's talk numbers. What are some benchmarks? You can share some third party testing when the rubber hits the road what is Gravitas to? Sure. Yes. So we publish them benchmarks themselves at Reinvent Twenty nineteen when we announced the graphics onto processor itself. Those are out there and various articles, but just to quickly summarize so. SPEC in two thousand seventeen, which is a industry benchmark that runs a whole pile of integer based workloads. Grab onto able to demonstrate forty four percent better performance per vcu for that benchmark. There's a complimentary benchmark called SPEC IF P which. The Pierre's essentially floating point and grabbed onto their delivers twenty five cent floating point performance. We also looked at a couple of real world workloads. Benchmarks at a great but they tend to be. A directional indicator. Proxies for real workloads. So we look to engine X., which is a popular low balance in tool and web server. We were able to see twenty percent down in performance. And meme cash cashed, which is a kind of an in memory caching solution, open source software, and they we saw forty-three percent better performance, but also low Alesi on those exit. Accesses relative to x eighty six. A couple of other examples were meteoric coating for H. Two, six video. We've got. Some data out there about the inference on these processes to and arm limited themselves had done some. Eda Performance analysis where they saw up to fifty better price performance for. Details.

US Intel aws EC Andre Jeff principal China business development manager Lynn Pierre
"aws" Discussed on AWS Podcast

AWS Podcast

07:08 min | 11 months ago

"aws" Discussed on AWS Podcast

"I am so thrilled to be here. Simon thank you for having me. Thank you for coming on board. It's been a long time goal for us too heavy on the podcast because I think you have some perspectives. That are going to be super interesting for at least is and I'm fortunate that you go way back to the very very start but I think there's some stories to tell here and I guess maybe let's start with the stock. Is it e joined? Aws to lead public sector back in twenty ten which has twenty twenty nine feels like an eternity ago. What was your motivation and vision for what I could do for public sector. What what were you thinking at that time? Well you are correct a desk. Same White Dog ear pressure which is for the folks who don't know that it's seven years for every one year or so. It would be ten times ten times seven says some days. It feels very much like it's been that long but at the same time it's felt very very fast because technology news at the speed of light. It really is amazing. What we done at eight of yes over the last ten years to respond our customers and their needs that ten years ago will over that now but when I first met Andy Jesse I I like to tell the story because when I met Andy we really talked about how governments around the world made. The opportunity had the same kind of innovative in modern technology. If any start at pad is any small business or individual so we really talked about how? Aws can help transform and bring this new type of technology into government. Help them move faster. Have that agility. They needed respond to the Citizen Services. And also just a couple of things that I always talked about then active at Simon with Martine. But Andy and I talked about one early on which was making the world a better place and it may sound a little A little naive to say that that we really did have a conversation about with the right technology offering the right solutions to our government. Our citizens our children are students out there. We could really help. Make world a better place and then later on when I got my team. And renting we kind of added on top of Alabama Amazing Amazon leadership principles. We always talked about in public sector that as a team we were paving the way for this district of innovation to make the world a better place and I would say now more than ten years in. I'm you know we have a lot to do steel but I'm very pleased at the progress we've made the response of our customers and partners and how we had been able to do really amazing things you know. Better faster less-expensive. With our technology to do just those things pave the way for disruptive innovation around the world and really truly helped to make world a better place with the things that we're doing with that technology with our customers and partners and I think it's interesting. You mentioned that you think that phrase is often overused by expect one of the things that I'll have to say when when candidates are interviewing tanks. I mean your team as well Is We do the kind of work that you're really happy to talk to someone about Q. Bet To say hey. This is what I do what? I work with For for your experiences. A citizen like wow. That's really interesting so this this of that genuine at put that he's really really relevant to what customers are doing. Yes truly is and the thing has been for me really interesting out starting and building. This business is the individuals that we that we brought on board and really have been the building blocks on top of hour and as and cloud services are the individuals that are serving our customers and partners every day that had such amazing passion for going out there and really helping them do the things they do and and get through it and I joke a little bit but I do like to say that you know doing work in the public sector is not for the heart. Really have desire. Yeah I mean it's true right yet Kevin. Desire in and a lab for going out and doing these things that can really help your government which fat the way helps the citizen services efforts. It helps everything from your election process to be better to the way you distributor collect taxes to the way you demonstrate education Where are the schools? Where are the hospitals? Where are the parks safety? Disaster-management I mean it can do all of those things to help citizens So much more in their families so being government you do actually help the people of every community and I think that is what the individuals we've hired at work with our customers and partners really have a passion for doing and what are some of your favorite stories are examples of how governments aren't proving that citizen experience using what things are really bad at you. Well there there are so many really really great ones but one bed is kind of. It's it's IT'S A. It's an older story. I'll say because we did it really early but I've told it but I'm GonNa tell him because I think it kind of demonstrated something we were able to prove out very early on that fast today in a crisis were analyst Nineteen is helping in ways. We didn't even think of then in the story. I'm GonNa Tell. Real quickly is in twenty eleven. We started getting a lot of researchers may deaths telling us at a were using cloud computing to do their research and that Cloud helped their research go. Further faster and was a lot less expensive in they. Should you know store? Use that compute power in knowledge and analytics are dead but they said when they got grants from the government that the grants were many times the Hell outta restrictions around them which you had this show that you were buying servers. Because you didn't show you. Were writing servers They thought you were actually doing to research. And so we we had I not interesting out today. But we've worked really hard over the years to change that and we many interesting things with many get prevents now around the world with one of the things we said in two thousand eleven is it. We could put some data sets on eight of US an open. The map where people could take advantage of a crowd source on their those data sets use them for their research for their education program in Into independent investigation. So what we did. We took a data set back. Then which of Sainsbury outdated today. That was the first one thousand Gino which was the first really Matt Genome. Which if you go.

Andy Jesse Aws Simon Citizen Services US Sainsbury Alabama analyst Kevin Amazon Martine
"aws" Discussed on AWS Podcast

AWS Podcast

11:11 min | 1 year ago

"aws" Discussed on AWS Podcast

"I had the data center is ending or my data center physically. Won't be here and it's months and I need to move out. I'd like to get to this cloud thing and would really really like explorer you partner to help me get there immediately. After that is the next phase called deep the actual migration phase where we take the things that we built planet we built up and into implemented were. The rubber actively starts at the road is where the bits into get incorporated into the infrastructure. Where we start writing automation in treating everything as infrastructure as code in the sense that if something were to break and go wrong we immediately flooded and continue forward from that point forward and in most instances customers are none the wiser in a positive way because the whole idea with cloud is treat instances and ask as disposable piece of equipment. Next phase is more typical that is analogous to what a lot of people think with managed service providers running operate. This is keeping the lights on effectively. Making sure that everything hums along just the way that it's suppose you and inevitably if something were to break we have Go and help you fix. It established a root cause and then before as year is that of the optimization face is really really important because more and more customers are asked of. Aws Anderman service providers. Please help me do this better. You got out of the data center a six months before it closed we got onto. Aws everything running great. My developers are bugging me about wanting to do something Cobra Navy's if we would like to get off of Oracle of our EC. Two instances are great. They're super expensive. Kelly writes helped me save money or help me try the next new thing in effectively. What this does create supply wheel to start the process again and so two. Customers ENGAGE IN MS P. What's the you sort of talked about those phases but is it a case that I just don't have the capacity capability in house or choose not to have it is it is it a form of outsourcing? Help US contextualize little bit. Sure Harry it can be both to be quite honest. It can be a center if I am a development shop and all I do is write really really good code and I had a staff of very talented individuals like write code. But I don't have a system operator SYS admin type of individual to help me fix the things when they break that would actually be up and tastic Use CASE TO LEVERAGE MINUTE SERVICE PROVIDER. So that my job as a customer is just right really good. Coding continued doing the best possible job that I can. Nb doing writing that code versus trying to Muck my way through the aws console or light to build things and try to troubleshoot them when they break up. Typically what we also do see is irap experimentation or one of the learning things about the aws cloud is being able to be super last on demand and get going with with a crazy idea at any point in time. What a lot of partners are reporting to us is that their customers are coming up and saying. Hey we have a problem or some customer constituency that wants to see this feature. It's GONNA TAKE US eighteen months to get you hardware up an account to do a proof of concept. If this works we can continue forward as is due account for discussed references workload or application or project and then use that as proof point to win the partner additional business based off of the good the good deeds and the outcomes of that customer engagement so if the car a performance boost for an organization had you. Knicks Jin pays compare or differ from traditionally myspace. Let you ask because it's actually something that comes up quite a bit By way of virtue every validated Smsp is a next generation MSP. And by that. I mean a very very healthy emphasis on automation One of our partners in the program this he put it best during the reinvent twenty. Nine thousand session called delivering customer. Value Your next-gen manage services. He averaged next-gen embassy in. Aws is putting a very heavy emphasis on silicon over carbon and by that union. Automate everything to the point where you can't and continue iterating improving gathering information analysis. So that when you do have touch point with the customer. It's something that is I value in Cuba. Almost like a paradigm shift in to concentrate a white glove. Type of approach with the added benefit of having the preponderance of information logs in history of everything happening for the customer account readily available. And by that I mean instead of the traditional thought of an ms key where something breaks you put in a ticket. Somebody goes looks at it. They said well we just turned off and back on again. Worked here what? You're more likely dispute with the next generation. Minute service provider is okay. Well you're EC. Two instance at runs your Apache web APP. It was constantly having memory leaks in high view. We wrote some automation to restart Problematic Auxiliary Service on another instance. It you never thought about. It looks like this. Automation has resolved that issue. Either way it also kind of looks like you're not doing things that are highly available all tolerated. We should have a conversation about. The idea is to continue further optimizing and ensuring that the customer workloads as they run. It continued to do so in a proactive manner. I E reactive manner and you can only really do that if you value automation you treat things disposable as much as possible and of course. Yang going education evangelization to the customers to understand why it's important to go do these in the past where we would think about sort of throwing people at the problem when Sim throat would imagine what the problem absolutely. Yeah IS AUTOMATION IS CHEAPER. In almost every instance then leveraging human beings to actually go into what thing and a good example of this is. I remember at a data center I share very very frequently. I can in my early days in my career everyday at eleven pm. I had to restart one hundred and twenty six servers. One at a time one would come back up. Wait five minutes run. Some checks move the next at the time. My manager did not lead automation. He did not understand the value of automation and every day for seven years. That was job starting to love it since it was horrible. It was probably the most horrid thing you could imagine because there were the dull moments and lots of spare time once. I got tired of doing it myself and I wrote the automation to do it. Anyway that's completely separate story but what I'm getting at here is is what the customers want. They want the automation. There's no point in having somebody like myself sitting there looking at him monitoring dashboard waiting Break let the automation take care of things that can be done okay high. Cpu is this Apache. So yes. It's the patchy demon still. Yes is websites though responding. Yes okay. It contains preceding down at a set of steps to really understand what it is. It's broken so that if is a real thing that is important your human can actually go and take a look at that important thing risk spending an hour trying to figure out what it's not now. You mentioned the reinvent talk The last year and initially there was some some interesting data from an ovum. Study talks about customer challenges. Maybe unpack that a little bit force because I think one of the things to always understand. Is that the solutions on the combat when problems exist and it's important to understand what the problem is how customers thinking about the problem demand. Sure so look what. We're seeing universally in that That omb research is customers are really perturbed days with it. Security data privacy in fact each of the ten top challenges that these customers are facing have to do with security on this list. You don't break support on this list. You don't see monitoring you you don't see things like Is asked recovery ask you know just because these things are inherently expected of the type of a providers at these customers are are seeking things like it security governance regulatory things Organizational X. Instead of using the public cloud for some of the most Since if or mission critical type of applications eases the things that are ranked chief long the challenges of these customers and so based on those challenges. What a what a customers wanting from a best practices approach. What is what is good. Look so good. Looks like they're effectively. Looking for a high at one point could have been considered a hybrid and must be With a bit of systems integrator but more and more as marquis begin to mature and the next generation service providers starting to mature overseeing is that they're quite literally looking for a next generation. Aws MSP by that. I mean the the top I of the top eleven things that these partners are our customers are looking for an partner. They're all effectively. The same sits integration application development. It'll transformation application management application hosting. It's effectively calling e exact same thing and then even further down the list you still have. Things like infrastructure modernisation application modernization professional surplus effectively customers in the market telling US WE WANT AN MS. That can build a something fantastic. That'll help us innate. A get to the point where we can continue to grow in evolve our business and focus specifically on business outcomes of throwing technology our bodies at the problem and after you've done that lease run it for us so it's not just the bill. The bright faces will that often his pilot pilot puzzle. Absolutely it will. We're seeing this part and parcel to many next generation. Msp's disrupting the market in a sense. Where if I'm a traditional US integrator and I do a great job of building things eventually. That customer is going to ask are asking questions of. Can you run this ricky maintaining? Can you support this in largely the answer to that is no or if it is yes? It's on a potential Time materials basis. It could be a small pot or a group of individuals that are dedicated to this customer but will receiving as you managed service providers are becoming more and more S. light in nature. East estimates are starting to gravitate more and more to of orders. So he talked about it'll Alaska verve Amos as it exists but how do new partners become and Adebayo misplayed locked splits.

Aws US partner Aws Anderman Alaska Msp Cobra Navy Problematic Auxiliary Service Knicks Jin Kelly Harry Cuba Sim throat Yang
"aws" Discussed on AWS Podcast

AWS Podcast

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"aws" Discussed on AWS Podcast

"If this data sync automatically handles many of the tasks related to data transfers it can slide and those aggressions or been Yati operations including running are instances handling encryption managing scripts network optimization and data integrity validation. In fact I'm having flashbacks to US past. You can use data to transfer data at speeds up to tin. Tom's faster than open source tools and Bill The team has done some particular customers on this one. Yeah pretty siding siding product and a lot of people don't realize this is one of those products that day Shilton. Aws as a whole it runs behind the scenes all over the place accelerate great that we use internally to move data through throughout nobility zones at regions inside aws and so we've made available to customers. So they can take advantage of the low goes way to accelerate data over a network. Where where you have a client side and server side environment we manage or he would make that easy one we've done today is enabled this status thing task scheduling Which leads you schedule your transfers between NFS S. three and get past these. He's like that on prem and that's important customers or just regular synchronization that occurs and you have a lot of customers. That are very excited about that. But another thing of course. That's pretty exciting. As we needed a a sixty eight percent price reduction to make it easier for people to move data in and out of eight of the US so your costs are flat. Laczi of zero point zero one to five dollars per gigabyte. It's cheap. It's one point five cents. It's getting getting so small. It's almost to small tomato now. It's like every time I talk about.

US Aws Tom
"aws" Discussed on AWS Podcast

AWS Podcast

02:18 min | 1 year ago

"aws" Discussed on AWS Podcast

"Oh adopting the same model to help them break down barriers and accelerate their clouded option one of the things that really fascinated me better than the nab example as many interesting parts of it was the way they were to enable their own internal workforce as well as maintain the capability during that ramp up period right because often we get stuck in a common fast so I try not my people but it's going to take me six months plus to try not my paypal because it got to look after as well how did you how did you break that logjam good question. We were deeply embedded in the in nabs migration teams so it was not just. I should say that where aws professional services shines shines really well is also when we work very closely with our partners so we did have a partner who is very close to to the team and we were embedded both pro serve of and the partner was embedded in the custos teams as part of delivering this outcome so there are multiple delivery teams or as we refer to it as Dodos who specifically helped break down barriers we will embedded within the NABS organization within the asset teams as well to help accelerate the migration we helped to all the way from the initial design deployment and and there was also a partner who who helped operate the environment once it was migrated and the other thing. I'd say is that NAB also used. Aws managed services which is which helped break only simplify the operations of these workloads when he was migrated to aws cloud and it was interesting because that's a a managed services as a service offering services service uh-huh and and really the goal that was not for the for the NAB to us at long term it was it was that was the bridging tool that was a lever take to get them to where I need to get her. Yeah Yeah exactly so nap saw that as a stepping stone it wasn't the only target platform that we helped them migrate these applications to they also had a a native aws platform that day themselves had managed with a partner and so the we we worked with them specifically on this project to help accelerate the migration where we found that some of the I guess some of the delays or the polls were around operations and this is where aws managed services helped bridge that gap and it was that steppingstone to to actually accelerate the migration so we'll put some links into China with the national striving tells that story 'cause it's best to hear it from the person doing it. Let's maybe step a little bit broader and talk about what he's ideas person. What's that old man so professional services is part of?.

partner Aws professional services aws NABS China six months
"aws" Discussed on AWS Podcast

AWS Podcast

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"aws" Discussed on AWS Podcast

"Welcome back to the editors podcast sunless with great heavy me back. I'm joined by special guest in studio as it were. I'm joined by Geary snus because a practice manager here at adequate professional services welcome to the PODCAST Garish Moaning Simon. I'm and thanks for having me pleasure magic a long way. We're both Melvyn Melvin Boyce absolutely not to I think the studio that we record cordage is not even two meters away from where I sit so it was a big stretch today now now if at speed gears tell us a little bit of Baso yes so I've been with aws special emphasis for about two and a half years now. I'm a practice manager of a Melvin Practice Kit. Aws My role is I lead our application and modernisation in migration practice so it's all about helping our customers on their cloud journey and both migrate and innovate in the aws cloud so the topic of this podcast Coskun economy to fault because you WanNa really touch on what he's locked to to work at racial services in particular but also the what you doing -plication Baden is Asian Toronto talk show tell us a little bit about the the practice of application modernization of what it means for our customers issue so the the application modernization and and migration or as we like to call it now the am to practice has been set up to help customers not just migrate to the aws cloud but also realize the benefits a lot quicker acre so we found that many customers already on the journey to the cloud many customers have already started migrating workloads to the cloud and our role is specifically to help customers increased the velocity and also to modernize in the cloud so to leverage high level services and actually move away from old gods services all databases to modernize the applications locations that may not may no longer be supported and also to actually to leverage all allow high level services and to be able to innovate a lot quicker in the cloud so really really this award customers Roskam for us. We started at Clad Janney. We were along the way but we wanna go faster and then the question is surely others have done this. What can you share here with us and it sort of came from that. Didn't it yeah exactly what what we found is. That customers had already learned how they need to migrate to the cloud. They've they've built out their business cases. They've done their discovery and they're on board with the cloud journey away. They've found that they've stalled not actually gone as fast as they can is because they haven't really leveraged the true value of of automation they don't really understand the best way to to operate the environments in the cloud as well and that's why we've come in specifically to help them with highly prescriptive in specific a fake guidance tells him accelerate and to operate their workloads in the aws cloud so obviously we'd love to share things through through the customers and through the experience of customers tell us tell us on on your favorite migration and modernisation stories yeah sure well we would've seen reinvent two thousand eighteen believe and also at aws summit in Sydney earlier earlier this year in two thousand nine hundred where the National Australia Bank was fairly open in public about how successful the aws cloud migration Jenny has been with the help of our APN Qian partners and also aws professional services so this was a really challenging project for us when proserve brought into to help nab or the National Australia Bank with their cloud migration journey we started off by doing a fairly challenging project where we were looking at helping the Customer Migrate Thirty Applications and these these business Jason and production applications thanking Africa banking applications exactly in the financial services industry. This can sometimes seem like it's extremely challenging and that's why pro serve IRV. Aws Professional Services were brought in to specifically help.

aws cloud Aws Professional Services practice manager professional services Melvyn Melvin Boyce Janney National Australia Bank APN Qian Sydney Toronto Roskam Africa Jenny Jason two meters
"aws" Discussed on AWS Podcast

AWS Podcast

04:39 min | 2 years ago

"aws" Discussed on AWS Podcast

"Of the US certification exams, and our cohort that finished in June. We actually have students who've passed AWS certification exams, which is really just wonderful for us. And the first class actually has been prepared in mind to be delivered to high school students, and we've delivered now to high school students, you know, all over away in east LA as well, as you know, to Santa Monica high school students who was part of a summer tech boot camp that was geared toward high school students and boy high school students seed, you'd be amazed. They really really eat it up. They see the effect of. Amazon in their life every single day. And now with this kind of classic kind of spear behind the curtains, and sort of see how Amazon actually does all the incredible things. It's every day for all of its millions of customers. And it's been really really great. We we developed a set of courses and thanks to Amazon we got some wonderful industry partners that we're working with who validated. The course content for us to make sure we were sharing course objectives. That were the key core services that customers currently use. And sometimes I like to say it's sort of like swallowing an elephant, you know, it's a very large platform with lots of features. And it's very difficult swallow in elephant except in small bites. And it's been remarkably successful. It's it's completely reinvigorated are computer science curriculum. And we've got hundreds of students now enrolled in the fall, we have almost three hundred fifty students enroll, and that's just here. SM? See we're the lead college in this nineteen college consortium group in the south land. And so there's we're helping other community colleges. Do the exact same thing, build these classes developed the curriculum attract students to try to feel that that equity gap that Tricia was talking about as well as the job and skills gap that is so large in this space. And so it's very exciting all around to see the the effect of that on students and our partners. And and for the college as well spent testing, it's great to see that motivation of the hospital as well for those students who are kind of hungry to Lynn, I think one of the interesting things about this muddles because of course, it only services and lending is cloud. Bice is it puts how much low would print requirement on the schools and sales to have equipment oil on the old is it computer labs and all sorts of very specific things that cost hundreds of thousands of millions of dollars. Whereas narrowly as long as you have some form of bicyc- key. Board mass rain a little bit of incident. He can kinda get Xs stolis that. Yeah. And you know, AWS gives us great services. So we're actually running not only these classes, but other also core computer, and technology classes, we're running those in the cloud with AWS. And so it gives us a great benefits. And actually now that we've got these courses going I've got other faculty members that are just dying to get their course in abled with AWS their programming students can run workloads in the cloud. And it's you know, it's the future. But it's really here. Now in our students are taking quite quite some advanced ship. It's fantastic. And what what would you say? Some of the the listens lintel tycoon is that you'd want to share with other educators globally who who might be in a similar situation to where you were few months back. Well, you know, I can't speak highly enough of all the team from Amazon that have helped us we've we've been working for about four years to get where we are. And amazon. Has just been, you know, the most wonderful partner they've really helped us tremendously not only with the aid of US educated. So many other arms of the company that we interact with their local staff has actually helped us to, you know, find local industry partners. And that local business engagement has really helped our program to mend Disley on to try to stay grounded and focused in what the current needs in the college and in industry, and so that that's been really really great. And I have never experienced a program like this where not only is the industry partner, and the the, you know, people like Amazon, but Amazon customers have been extremely giving and supportive of this project and the excitement of students is just off the charts. So I just really never been with something as successful as we we through the classes in the catalog and put him in the schedule..

Amazon AWS US Bice LA Santa Monica partner Disley Tricia Lynn four years
"aws" Discussed on AWS Podcast

AWS Podcast

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"aws" Discussed on AWS Podcast

"So with respect to gdp are it's guarded he's actually covering more fundamental aspect of security so it's applicable to gp are in the sense that you know guard duty is a easy way to continuously monitor all of your database accounts and resources for militias or on authorized behavior in a catches things like instances that have been compromised so virtual machines that have been compromised which can lead to data issues data security issues or even more importantly account compromise or even insider threat so what is happening in my account with respect to my resources who's in my count what are they doing what's the behavior look like in are we to accurately detect militias or authorizer suspicious behavior that will lead us to stop an attack or a misuse or miss configuration that could lead to you know data exposure really distilled it down to a binary decision cardi's either on or off that's it we do a lot of the heavy lifting it's a single click or api call within anita bs account and then everything happens behind the scenes so where we start consuming all the meta data within an account so things like aws cloud trail bbc flow logs dns logs so many of them admitted data societas within account that's kinda pre instrumented into aws as a platform you don't have to deploy any software hardware to manage maintain anything in its really unabridged to the count there's nothing operating the account itself so you know it's we're about disrupting sensitive workloads are slowing down development or application teams they all can still operate as if you know it is it before guarded he wasn't able but yet the security team can keep an eye on what's happening where and then again guard duty with its vance analytics machine learning able to detect anomalies or or malicious or unusual suspicious behavior that would suggest the potential either attack or again a misuse what's something people may not know from the outside not being on an aba service team sure i think the most common mistake or just misinterpretation of the services you know the industry.

aws
"aws" Discussed on AWS Podcast

AWS Podcast

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"aws" Discussed on AWS Podcast

"For each loop and just at a rate over each region and then passed that region parameter into the appropriate command so all of the eight as partial commands have a region parameter on them uh so you can specify it on each in vocation to one of the ap eyes or just like with awac ally you can also set kind of your your global working region if you tend to you know primera lear predominantly work inside of the single region for sure what about some of things like credential management things like that of a severe some different approaches you can take in the sea allow with price falls it said sitra what's is there an analogue in in the pasha world yeah one of the things i really appreciate about all of the aws sdk is is how consistent they are with respect to how they handle credentials the dot net sdk does have an additional encrypted credential solution on top of the typical profiles that you're accustomed to but in general most of the sdk is pretty much all work the same whether it's python or java or power shell in this case and so it does have support for the credentials file now by default of course it is going to look in your eight of year your home directory under aws slash credentials but if you have a different file path maybe a custom pat bile system path to your credentials vile you can also specify that using the set aws credentials command and you basically just tell it where the file path is and then what the name of the.

primera aws
"aws" Discussed on AWS Podcast

AWS Podcast

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"aws" Discussed on AWS Podcast

"So soothing you have to specify a third command which is the actual commands that you wanna call within that service but with power shell you don't have to prefix everything with aws and then the service name every single command is actually a first class citizen inside of the powers show a can of name space so stop easy to instance is a you know globally available command that's exported by the aws power shall module so you don't have to worry about saying aws and then ec two or aws and step functions you don't have to worry about remembering in a which service it belongs to you just think about the task that you want to accomplish bets really nassir becomes argus very so explain a true win it's a big shared amongst others because of course automation is only useful if you share the card with of faithful to take advantage of a what a bad some regions so what you're one of things on the sale law you get used to produce is if you don't sit euregion region wrought you're going to be issuing commands and not seeing results vehicle by should be hata's ah a past show component tree handle regions yes of the region support in power shell is objectoriented just like everything else so there's a command called get aws region that's exported by the aws power shall module and this is going to spit back in array of objects that represent regions so each of the regions has a couple of different properties one of them is the the short name the you know the the u s dash west to or us urge eu west one and then you also have the longer region name things like ohio were ireland and things like that so you get these rich objects that have all of the properties available you basically just say i want the region property or i want the name property to get the or proper name of the region uh so it's a it all the data's they are you just kind of reference it as an object so it's it's pretty cool you can just do a four each loop in eat over each of those so if you're doing kind of global automation you have resources across all the different regions it's very easy to just reticent.

aws ohio ireland
"aws" Discussed on AWS Podcast

AWS Podcast

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"aws" Discussed on AWS Podcast

"But bliss be pico on something a little bit more complicated namibia rejoin you want to talk to us about our old friend the data like and how we can do it with that serve as a city with service sure yeah so the deal exlusion we put together the with there is a lot of interest in the community about does aws solutions team have an answer for how to build a data lake and so when we did that we use again a surplus architecture him so you will see a common theme whenever we can go surplus we will so a lotta use of s three as a website and a delay could self has its own uri and that serve out of s three from there we use cog neto for authorisation authentication authorisation like sign up sign in so you can could export control who has access to the data lake front end from there the the the web pages which actually run locally they will be calling epi gateway gan that was in these serveral assesment chandler were doing it again uh the authorize her is is using lambda in api gateway and then from there we use a bunch of micro services so in the data lake solution we have the ability to search the data lake we have the ability to upload things into the data lake we have the the idea of packages and these micro services are all sort of brought together in the uri and once data is referenced either in our daily solution we allow customers to point at data in other locations with within us three or you can upload things directly into the bucket which is behind the daily itself then when you want to get the information out you end up putting things into a cart it's has a cart like experience and then you say check out and it will cut a manifest file for you which is there.

chandler the deal aws
"aws" Discussed on AWS Podcast

AWS Podcast

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"aws" Discussed on AWS Podcast

"So that's a solution review can read it lot essays use it until their customers but on a beside that or alongside that we also created a solution called the the cross account manager knowing that we had already weighed in on multiple accounts so then the solution separate from a solution brief is where we offer the cloud formation template which will create or affects changed a state within aws for our customers and we build on all solutions are built with native aws services you know that's nice of you want to have the answer deployed into your account you you would use a solution if you want to get smart on an idea you would use the solution brief and that's a great deliniation because as sort of conceptual ids enemies actionable things that you want to do than announcing his if you want to push that button to get get something happening in your account you can maybe it will do first before we dive into some specific examples is all talk about some of the topics that that we cover so if we look at the least of different solutions on the answers in the different categories recover we include things like a cap management big data configuration management devops infrastructure management logging media and entertainment migration mob all networking security and whip up occasion so a con a something for everyone they assad is actually a huge amount of content but we're going to dive into a few specific examples in a little bit of depth i think the first one we're going to talk about was some civilised image ch'ng image handling our should size so let's dive into that one showing yeah a short simon so uh dissolution as a sudden illness immense on it auditors the customer business usga said on image manipulation so a lot of customers in media and imaging industry day they were really benefit out of out of this illusion so they they are looking to drive engagement using images this illusion would.

account manager aws configuration management simon cloud assad
"aws" Discussed on AWS Podcast

AWS Podcast

01:41 min | 4 years ago

"aws" Discussed on AWS Podcast

"And so they have been using a leveraging aws primarily windows on aws in that redesign of the customer experience um and they told us you know we're investing in the next generation of learners which i loved 'cause i love continuous learning and their accelerating that innovation because they're on aws and i love that example um because first of all there such a great customer but i love the fact that they're redesigning the said that students can learn faster faculty can teach better and really are putting all their systems on a dip yet said that they can innovate in a more clean fashion as well it is exotic particular dispose of letting me so much has changed be lost ten fifteen years and will continue to change in the future thing many visa because you provide us oregano zimmet things are changing have to change at one of these we know that innovations you need you need space to operate in innate often extra resource but am i only be temporary to experiment so the ability to spin of environment quickly trust something at tested validity or not then move on his home is becoming table stakes in terms of the technical and opinions of innovation we would you say i completely agree and you know it is that the ability to innovate the ability to create a culture or an environment that enables innovation but also than to have the technology that facilitates that makes it easy to do i think is is so incredibly crucial.

windows aws ten fifteen years