35 Burst results for "AW"

Cavani Disallowed Goal vs Tottenham

ESPN FC

01:01 min | 6 d ago

Cavani Disallowed Goal vs Tottenham

"Kick things off by welcome into the show. Don't actress anne anne frank leboeuf. We're wondering where to start today. And then stephen nicholson's in and goes against pretty much. Everybody said on yesterday's show and he said it was the right decision to disallow cavani. Go in the spurs yesterday. The floor is yours. Stevie as much as beautiful between paul byrne cavani truth is if a player strikes another player in the face. a scenario makovsky. No question is using these right arm to defend off these opposition. Which is fine if he sees them in the army. Catch him in the shoulder. These are all things that we all accept because as a contact sport. However you're allowed regardless of whether you mean meena on. Aw you're not allowed to catch it opponent in the face and mccormick catch them in the face and nobody has said he didn't catch him in the face but why is everybody saying. It's not a foul.

Anne Anne Frank Leboeuf Stephen Nicholson Cavani Paul Byrne Cavani Makovsky Spurs Stevie Meena Army Mccormick
The future of drone delivery in urban areas

Electronic Specifier Insights

01:40 min | Last week

The future of drone delivery in urban areas

"Hello and welcome to series three of the electronic specify insights podcast. Today we will be speaking to ills. Aw c o of airways who are provider of management systems for a manned traffic management and drone fleets the company's counting psychic pa in the world's first mesh network drug delivery test which is underway in harrow. Which is just outside tel aviv in israel the of this program is to showcase the new technology to come one of the main barriers skating up commercial drug operations namely the limitation on the number of drums back nominate operate in urban areas. So hello and welcome to the podcast. Hello joe hill. Thank you for old excellent. I think stuff off the perhaps. Tell me a little bit more about and weighs in the work that you guys do. And also role with the company so The and co founder. William was founded by ex israel air force personnel. Basically we bring vigneault. How on how to manage namic aerospace's. That's what i did in the reserve and we founded the to bring division you know. Let's a scalable. Jonah perations in autonomous environment over the urban skies. And what we hope to do is to take what we know on. How do you manage you know and complex environment of Era vacation in how you take it and for phillips within your other drawn technology that the now with emergency no everywhere around the globe. That's what we're planning to do. And that's what we actually doing them. The pilot Obviously will expand.

Harrow Vigneault Israel Joe Hill Namic Aerospace Aviv TEL Air Force William Jonah Phillips
Bobby Brown Sr. Wants Justice for His Late Son

The Breakfast Club

00:49 sec | 3 weeks ago

Bobby Brown Sr. Wants Justice for His Late Son

"Brown and kim ward are looking for justice for their late son. Bobby brown junior. Bobby brown junior died from an accidental overdose of alcohol. Cocaine and fenton all now. According to a statement from the family he said my family continues to more my son's death street fenton. Aw has taken the life of so. Many people. Unnecessarily and bobby junior another victim. He also described the opioid crisis out of control. He said those supplying this lethal drug should be held responsible for the death and destruction that it causes now has his mom said he was not into drugs. Even though in the autopsy says he had a medical history of alcohol cigarettes and marijuana use. She said that he was easily influenced. And this is a situation where he associated himself with the wrong people. My son has gone and those who contributed to his senseless deaths. Should be held accountable.

Bobby Brown Kim Ward Fenton Bobby Junior Brown
Uri Bram on Being Remotely Functional

The Small Business Success Podcast

07:25 min | 3 weeks ago

Uri Bram on Being Remotely Functional

"One of the things. I'm always curious about is. When did you first notice you were growing beyond what you could manage like on your small team or as a solo preneurs for someone. When like when did you first notice. You're going to have to expand beyond that. I think that is a really interesting transition. Because i you know i sort of realized that i was at ninety percent capacity. I realized i was may be coming towards one hundred capacity. I realized that it was maybe two hundred and ten. Thank you know. I always took pride that. I on every email and whenever subscriber right to end i would go above and beyond try and look after them and make make make sure that they felt like a human. Was tuscany reading announcing dino and yet another thing about emails is the thing that it was just like going for other one of the other night. It never ends the nuclear inbox menu. Wake up in the morning and there's like another goodness. Oh i think we will traumatize and so i realized on the a little too late that it got out of control and the problem was the Big restructuring the has to happen between a sort of china and an organization. I mean the easiest part of it is just a you know we go from having all the knowledge and information about business in my head and i know edrich and i remember it thankfully at the time But no one else has any idea how anything so we started out as working with a few freelancers graphic design. Obviously that simple enough. You know you. Just say hey. We'd like this beautiful draw a picture. Thank you very much. And yeah i think at the moment when i realized we needed to expand into an organization and a team and it was already too late because it actually takes quite of work to then and make business legible. Which at that moment you longer have time to do. Because you're trying to do the work. That is something. I wish i'd started sina. So what would you say are some signs that solo per newer out there right now. Listening could see in their own business. And say i should be starting to think about that already. What should they be looking out of. They make that jump. It's a really great question. Obviously one of these things that it's always going to be a matter of discretion and you know sometimes people jumped to five people often higher too early on then w ovation so they can't fulfill in always Already challenge on the other side of me. I think that when you realize that you are doing tasks that don't really require your skillset so for me. It was realizing that a lot of the things i was doing. I enjoyed them. And i like them. Because i had gotten good at them. Actually it needs to be meeting them. It didn't really take expertise to the simplifies and i was procrastinating from the heart attacks by simple tasks what ingredients today with handoff. They simply tasks. But i think as set it is very hard. You have this vision of how well you do things right You think you're doing everything right and when you had something over. It's never going to be done the way you did it. Maybe it's going to be done better but you think it's done better. You think it's not quite right. I think at the moment. When i realized that yet these tasks within the business that i was during repeatedly and didn't require like you know my specific expertise at the moment that i think you start thinking. Hey can i organize the system. Either like to unite like sas has improved so much and has made. This is like aw possible like that. Identity can get handed like the right technology. And then others can be hindered Another member of the team. Yeah i definitely agree with that. It's so funny. Everything you just said was like a mirror from my one on one with my manager really liked to do are the things that probably you're going to have to let go of to keep expanding at least that's what she keeps telling me and i have found that she's been right every time she reminds me of that. But it's really tough to let go those things that you really like doing and i think you have a certain level of Confidence and excitement. Because you already like become an expert at those things that you should probably be delegating out to your point that maybe are not as much strategy but in the day to day but they're also hard because that's why you fell in love with the track. He did right because those are the things that you really enjoy in. That's how you kind of got into stuff so it's always interesting to me in the corporate world. You know you end up. Having to give those up in as a solo per newer. You probably have to give them up to in order to grow your business right I always say that like all business problems emotional problems and that's not actually true. Like many are not a lot of my are about me about my psychology about figuring out a way around myself and mike hangups and whatever it might be and i it's it's kind of funny to realize that the best thing you can do for your business unit realized realize have kiss reflection realized the things holding you back and just solving problems actually is really good for businesses. Well yeah buddy. Go things and not being a control freak. They're all things. I'm working on every day at. I feel like you're right. Those are those motions issues that could be holding you. Back is keeping hanging onto things a little too long. I do think you are right. That people sometimes higher too quickly. But i think what you're saying. You said a couple of things that really stand out to me before we move onto a new little section here. But you mentioned that one if you're realizing you're doing one hundred ten nine hundred fifty percent every day you know. You're probably starting to outgrow needing just yourself and the other thing was really about letting go some of those things that you really liked doing but you can't. You can't scale by doing those. Every day and focusing on things the areas you need to expand in so. I think both of those really stand out to me for someone who's out there. Sola preneurs right now feeling. Some of those things might be time to start making the plan. Oh that's the other thing you said that stood out to me so three things actually because we talked about by the time you need it. It's too late to make the plan because you're too busy so i think if you're a solo pure out there and you're feeling like you're overworked. Every day i mean every every silla preneurs going to feel that way but if it's getting excessive and if you're feeling like you know you are doing the day to day in it's just drowning you. It's definitely you might be already passed the time to make a plan. So are there any like where in your experience he said. You kind started the planning a little too late. So where do you think someone should start planning before. They feel like that like what what's their signed like. Hey start making span into a multi employee organization. Yeah i. I'm going to say that this is not actually a signal in itself but an example for me. That was really salient. Was when we started using helpdesks of. I used to get support just to my personal in box and way way way too late i set up proper support software just in modern held stuff and at first it wasn't such a big change. I i like. I was still dealing with emails. Am i was just doing it from a different client and then slowly you kind of learned over like tools within it and you're like oh i can do snippets and our hey. I can get reminded. An owner is actually like much better than for the main thing. Is that it. Lets you hand off smoothly like once. Stop ramp-up unanimous situation. If you want to bring someone new on board like you're working with a system that is built for that and the initial like transition tick a week way to But if i was doing that we transition in the middle of a crunch time. I would have been absolutely friday. Was only by during that transition in. Advance that unite. The whole thing seemed possible.

Edrich Dino Sina Mike Hangups SAS China Buddy
Supporting pupils with ADHD in the blended learning environment with Ellis Seddon

Emma & Tom's PGCE Podcast

09:54 min | Last month

Supporting pupils with ADHD in the blended learning environment with Ellis Seddon

"Today i'm joined by ellison who's a student teacher on our secondary religious education program. Hi l. s. that thomas. Thanks for coming today. You've carried out a piece of literature based research for your lead partnership school who we can't name because of the terms of the ethic approval for the research project but this school and they gave you a topic to look into because of interest to them for their own kind of school development. So what was that topic that the school gave you said topic was an kind of split into three parts. They gave us a choice of either looking at vulnerable learners. And whatever that might be whether it's saw or more able and talented excetera ben. They said we could do a study on blended learning on how we teach in a blended learning environment or the third option was to combine those two together. So how do you help. Specific categories of vulnerable learners within a blended learning environment. And given the time that we're in to me that was the one of most interested. That's the one. I counted -able so vulnerable learners in the blended environment. And did you need to narrow that down tool anymore to make it manageable. Did you come from a subject tangled. Did you have to do anything with that topic. Once he picked option three from the hat yes exactly yeah so we had to narrow it much further because obviously vulnerable learners and such a white category and we a recommended that we could narrow that down to a a subject specific points of view a religious education point of view in my perspective in my work in my literature review after a loft inspiration. I actually didn't do that because going through the research i felt like it was applicable from what i knew to a wide range of topics so i didn't feel like bringing it down to a religious education spending was going to bring it was going to enhance it that much more but what i did do was never the butler winning side of things down to adhd specifically and. I did that in all honesty. Because i had an interest in learning more by. Adhd i'm really have a worked with many students with adhd. I didn't know too much about it. So i thought this was going to be a prime community within my sinement to try and understand. Adhd a little bit more given so pregnant and use it. Mapping it onto not blended learning environment saint tyne fascinating. Okay so you got your choice of adhd you justify your choice of looking beyond your subjects harry so then you were able to go out and search for literature and you had to pick six sources that will kind of help get a handle on that topic area so it might be a bit of a bit of a big question to ask but can you talk a street the six sources that you ended up with and so broad sense of what they were saying yes absolutely each so the one thing i should really mention i is that when i started this literature review trying to marry up trying to find resources which spoke about adhd within blended learning environment. There was next to nothing if not nothing at all and so it was a bit of panic. Could bit of a worry at the beginning. But i pushed through. I decided to do in. The end was focused on a selection of literature which focused on adhd specific late at some literature which focused on blended learning specifically. and then. i drew my own conclusions between those two. I'm using a variety of websites and sources as well to try in a match up in a meaningful way and i started by actually looking at the. Adhd you k charity website and there was a really interesting on on quite lamesa. Statistics on eighty nine percent of teachers teach or have taught students with adhd and yet sixty three percents of teachers feel that that training and of understanding adhd on supporting adhd students is a par inadequate So that was quite alarming statistics. So i started from that before. I took a deep dive into more literature. Adhd and blended learning specifically. That was loads of resources. When i looked at them separately. But i'll try and go through on now. My six down spitball. I'll just say best that. I looked into these articles mainly online because of the situation wherein they were mainly searches. Either through google laura our our learning platform at cardiff matt and i prioritized terms. Which article twits mentioned engagement mentioned. Adhd additional learning leads blended learning online learning hybrid learning excetera and the scope for narrowing down. Those obstacles was quite slim. Because as i said the amount of articles that looked at them together that what many of them so narrowing down was quite slim but i prioritized any which kinda did mention allen's on blended learning in one with was the best the easiest way to get more of a focus on my first article which i came across was by how graham relatively recent to the two thousand seventeen on it was titled learner engagement in a blended learning environment and it was a conceptual framework. And this what date. It had a huge skype through research. It had a thousand dollars. Coups chapters and other articles of engagement instruments have engagement. And what they really really. Interestingly came up with they spoke about the inconsistencies at the term engagement itself and then how that gets even more complicated when you transfer into online learning but they came up with indicators of engagements and that was what was really fascinating about this obstacle. We talk and teaching about. How can we. How can we facilitating gauge. How can we increase engagement. A little bit better argument was actually before we do any of that you need to know what the indicators aw. When do you know when your students are engaged. So that was what was really tickly interesting about this. And why recommended it to my league partnership school. They came up. With a whole framework within not they had six indicators of cognitive engagement and seven indicators emotional engagement which i thought were particular interests but within the cognitive engagement. One was based on attention. Which obviously i ate pricked my ears up because oh is robert. Because it was specific to eighty can be specific trade hd and what they aim to do is show you. What the indicates attention within within cognitive engagement by might look like and what you can do about it to understand it and enhance a little bit more now. Within this article on some of the things i thought were a little bit etched. Maybe for example under the intention indicator they said about how you might want to track rain whites or movement and it's not really sure that's going to be possibly the most affluent secondary schools around the country. But the undestanding is that you need to know when your students are engaged. Not indicated first before you can change your teaching style to enhance that facilitated and so it was my suggestion that maybe we could look at using. That's marks of teams with google cross. Rooms trying see when they are most engaged. See what the data. It's like really take a deep dive into that than students are engaged to take up over the second article most cattle again. It was a twenty seventeen obstacle a written. Interestingly was all about the motivations of adhd students so it was titled what motivates individuals they hd it was a qualitative analysis specifically for the adolescents. Point to the so what they did. They hypothesized that there are qualitative differences between motivation attitudes between students with adhd and their typically developing peers. And so they did this study which was largely in a more clinical environment. And that was one of my Concerns i suppose one of my hesitations about the article because they students were interviewed. Sorry the children were intimate in a psychology clinic. That was seven all those order. Which from a psychology background. So my argument was that if you brought in somebody from a different background to maybe the confidence in having no analysis response by us we may have a little bit more confident. That was different backgrounds. Connecticut election is still a valuable valuable. Be such an what they found was the rule. The motivation axe cheats. And this is interest. Day-today life it's not necessarily at school but additional attitudes between students with adhd and students non adhd rudely of very very similar. But there were two very distinct difference is which were really interesting. Adhd perspective the first one was the students with with adhd had a very specific aversion to the slow passing of time to time going slowly was just an absolute. No no for them. They just couldn't stand it on the second one was that students who didn't tough. Adhd also cased venue in having familiar and predictable tasks to toss it. They've done before they know how they works. They know what's expected of them. That value did not appear in students with

Excetera Ben Ellison Adhd Thomas Butler Harry Google Skype Matt Graham Allen Robert Connecticut
Pfizer vaccine more than 90% effective against symptomatic COVID

John and Ken on Demand

04:02 min | Last month

Pfizer vaccine more than 90% effective against symptomatic COVID

"Pretty good news from israel about the pfizer vaccine couple of things came out today. The pfizer vaccine has been shown to be very effective against the uk variant. Remember all the scares about the variants more than eighty percent of israel's covid nineteen cases are from the uk variant and that country has put. Its real statistics. That's what they call real world data because they've been giving people as you know on a per capita basis. Israel's like tops in the world for vaccinating people you heard biden say the us is given out more vaccines and everybody but we're talking about a percentage of population. That's another misleading statistics. Newsom tries to pull that one to write the pfizer vaccine. There's so far. Ninety four percent effective at present preventing what they call a symptomatic spread. People who don't even know there can page so if you have the pfizer vaccine and you manage to get covid in your nostrils. The vaccine is ninety four percent effective at. You're not spreading that vice to somebody else right. That's that's why. I'm saying if you have the vaccine. It doesn't matter the size of the crowd. You can have twenty thousand people staple center. Everyone who comes in shows their vaccination certificate. You get in because no one's going to spread. Nobody's going to be spreading anything. This is a good time to play this audio. Because he did mention the beloved. Dr fauci dr fauci was on cnn yesterday. And even the cnn host was like wait a minute why can't people have been vaccinated traveled because they've been still arguing and arguing mending that even if you're fully vaccinated you don't travel right now. Let's hear how he explained this. Cut one the. Cdc is carefully heading in that direction of you know when we when when dr end ski made the announcement a day or two ago about the fact that when you have a couple of people to three more people in a family setting both of whom vaccinated even if it's someone from another friend that doesn't have to be a member of the family. That was the first in a multi step process that they are going to be rolling out there being careful understandably they wanna get science that want to data and then when you don't have the data and you don't have the actual evidence then you've got to make a judgment call and i think that's what you're going to be seeing in the next week. She she little by little more and more guidelines. Getting people to be more flexible. The first installation of this is what can vaccinated people do in the home setting. Obviously the never gonna be what you're asking now travel about going out getting a haircut. What about doing things like that. Yes that's all known. We're not waiting for you enough for this guy. We're not waiting. I'm not waiting for the government to tell me what freedoms i have. I have them already. He's full of it remember. He's full of it some of the time he told us. Aw don't worry. We don't need masks at the beginning. Well he lied because he didn't want to run on masks. He wanted to save them for the hospital workers. Okay so he tries to quit. He's trying to say there was what i just recounted in this story about the pfizer vaccine and the real world data from israel that it's effective and it stops spread and it stops you from getting sick and it's working. I think he's done a. Cdc is acting like well we want to see real world data on how effective vaccine is before we jump in and just say sure go anywhere. if you're vaccinated be with other vaccinate people you find a masks and you know what he doesn't have an answer to. It doesn't have an answer to. If you're you're in a room with two people why can't you be in it with five or ten or twelve or twenty. There's because you can't that's why it is an answer. That's why it's dead that that that bat saw jabirjabir.

Pfizer Israel Dr Fauci Dr Fauci UK CNN Newsom Biden CDC United States
Creating super-human voice assistants with Nikola Mrki, CEO of PolyAI

VUX World

08:41 min | Last month

Creating super-human voice assistants with Nikola Mrki, CEO of PolyAI

"Apple for a while and then you win and create polly ai. What was it specifically the kind of took in that direction. What was it that you enormous in wasn't working either necessarily broadly speaking invoice technology. What was it that you saw wasn't quite right. In what problem did you think you could solve by by creating paula. I absolutely so What i think the challenger creating a horse assisted. Level thrive people through any of these media kardashian mobile phone speaker. Second thing it's different. Hotter product has many uses. The finish quality and other food is very different. People inside cleanable the to clear those the ottawa Negative while we're kind of like you know the future Know say amazon charged enough to have On every two will not when you aggregate fact their fifteen thousand equal working at alexa do actually as long as someone who worked on this before it was as huge as opulent as it is today. You can't help but things have not achieved back much when you know like the few scenarios that he knew any of these technology despite music you know setting larssen timers asking you questions when playing board games navigation of exiting but overall. It's really not that overwhelming. There wasn't hope that this would be the next thing after mobile really. it's kind of growing. It's growing the read. The say laptops grew up in the ninety s and the group right in compound. Interest is miraculous dion here with a laptop. But it's definitely not exploded in the way to save the iphone. Did even though. I think many of these companies that would now you hear these very articulate narrative Directly to shop is enter. Be really materialized when we have a are in vr blindly. Those are all things that will build into insomnia clear where He conditioned from the ecology by co founders through our senior research team. We were all brought up by. Crm's steve is less cambridge professor. Almost one of the guy had species mission for years. Was the leading person. Pushing hidden markov models. We wanted only way. You'd bisbee shirt mission until these learning got an and really as a matter of ernst and they were more efficient methods previously Westchester kangaroos he sold three counties As he you know supple the see that since two thousand six hundred billion dollars bermudian six Missionaries are twenty thirty years. It is impossible for measuring that you can have a sophisticated conversation with us. But see sorta developing formalism the models these errors is waste recovered specials severe to really bring converse in to the understanding. So that you're able to really elevates something we really awesome A few people in the company that there are similar problems leader in the battle management decided save depending on. Both the of the user might have met Sheet metal wall seats available shop inventory or reservation book and so on. Yeah i mean when when when you think about what has been built in where you go. Silence made sure to make progress. The most isolated followed that as scientists Both saw its customers. There's a lot of data. There's a genuine genuine. Consumer eve right at All these fools and interestingly i land look you go into a large People customer experience with people bought line of the cio's and they all really end up on with your yard also. And if you haven't done this before we ever all happened so you are brighter citizens. We were the city when we had a lot of success for us. Few years is really a shame of systems that are incredible airless. Some of the most sophisticated thought An employee narrow the bird. They're not here and talk to you about anything we can talk to you but meeting life but you know you want to book a table and you really or schedule. Data's choosier through the evening. Not after learning must really complex stuff. The the more by the customer service is are actually able to evaluate the systems breath. And how he florida track assistant done and that. The second problem is blake all frustrated. Leave users fears to Speaking we choose our battles but out we're able to perform the most human agents quite often we beyond to be probably won't really into application just until how do mean by outperform humans in in what respect to outperform. So that's your accomplice crush on the on the one hand just reaching characteristics. Aw a support. Asians or human didn't make them popular the audio voice. Speeders your other understand. The user meets all jeering answer. It didn't constraints where it is more narrow occasions where eagles Now when he reforming hugh. If i stayed in my last elections naza were. Wade's speakers Are you paying and quickly. Say that my vote is was that might or bamberg for the for scherzer. God's actually slow surprise a matter of fact but now we're able to mav performed see humans wanting to actual research the school of cool still understand really talk to the salsa just beating the baseline but there are very few most sectors so well we've been there for long enough to receive a very product where they're hundred about it like sizes of all those questions even though the answer because it's more bright they how the answers. They're connected to social system. The answer changes you know media the people because they straightaway. Don't get tired whatever language you need them to use Something's the edged. Change the So there are many hours which museums are falling like. We speak a few languages. You know we don't know the answers. We will startle both codes and in many of these many of these problems we have transactional but really currently functional assistance in place authors.

Polly Ai Larssen Westchester Kangaroos Kardashian Paula Dion Ottawa Apple Amazon Insomnia Steve CIO Blake Scherzer Florida Hugh Eagles Wade
Abbott ends Texas mask mandate, opens businesses '100 percent'

The Michael Berry Show

02:42 min | Last month

Abbott ends Texas mask mandate, opens businesses '100 percent'

"Me giving update from texas yesterday one thirty in the afternoon central standard time. Our governor greg. Abbott made the following statement. I'm issuing a new executive order that resents most of the earlier executive orders effective next wednesday. All businesses of any type are allowed to open one hundred percent that includes any type of entity in texas. Also i'm ending. The statewide mask mandate now immediately. The mayors in the county judges of the liberal counties like houston harris county. They have had one hell of a year. They've been on the news every day. They wear their masks and they say these are bad times. The end is coming. But we're we're protected you and it's been a great time for them. I mean we've got a black mayor. We've got a woman hispanic county judge and the national media is just loving it. They've wanted to win over texas and look at look at this. They even look right. We got every all the boxes checked. Aw and every day they hide behind that mask. Close the businesses down. We're all in this together and people are just furious. Well instead of getting applauded for his statement. Greg grab it our governor. Who's a power grabber. He's been insulted because he could only give us back that which we already had. Any should've never locked us down in the first place. We're not vermont. We're not grateful for whatever government gives us isn't california or new york. We're texans were texans and one hundred eighty five years ago. Texas were under siege. At the alamo. And we never forget that fiber of our being our sense of independence. Government is not our friend. It's not our comforter. It's an impediment on the way to where going so when he made that announcement. I didn't cheer. I didn't thank him. It was about time

Texas Abbott Harris County Greg Houston Vermont California New York
Are You Smarter Than A Toilet?

Wow In the World

04:13 min | Last month

Are You Smarter Than A Toilet?

"Okay ready to go. How are we getting their guy. That is used scared me god. Did you hear getting the gang back together. We're like harry run and her miami. Obviously harry sorry. Dennis really love for you to come but for taking guy roz yellow bananas scooter. And you know. It's only got seating for two people vote and a giant pigeon. Aw plus we need you here to spy on the neighborhood and watch out for danger. I guess yeah. We promised bring back a souvenir. Dierk many yoga. I think we have a little problem. Why what's going on. Well i kick it the banana scooter to start. It seems like the battery might dead. Maybe the banana is overweight. You know according to popular fruit and veg mechanics magazine. Overripe produce is the number one problem with perishable transportation. Know what happened to have your rollerblades handy do you. Oh boy. Do i know almost reggie got to ride gadfly dennis. Thank you still got. Tripling is the banana scooter. All the way down to the convention center. No problem indie rollerblades. Four oh come on you to hand you reggie. The entrance is right over there. What what what what i wear. Welcome to the bathroom showcase. Are you considering bathroom remodel. Yes i am looking to build a bear tuba lazy river in my bath. Tab and my buddy guy over here is tired of pooping in the kitchen sink. Mendy danny house. Well actually. It's a solar powered energy efficient. Modular in oversized debbie doll dream. Well i think that it's just super and i believe we've got some lovely compact laboratory options that you are going to a door. Come with me right this way but what what what what look at this of this place mindy now over here to the left you'll see be during the latest in portal body technology. Oh i think you mean florida party right. Yeah as in portable potties not poor tongue or tau you see traditional porta potties. Need to be transported to a location but but let me guess portal. Transport i bingo. Oh it's like the rollerblades of toilets now that something. I can get my behind behind once properly tested. These portal policies will be able to transport poopers through time and space past or future time. Travelling toilet signed me up. I want to see inside. Oh please don't go in their bodies bigger than your new house guy. Rise please sir. The portals are highly unstable. They have access to urine and feces from all of human history. Do i just flush myself to another car. What no sir please. it's just a prototype with. It's still in beta testing.

Harry Run Roz Yellow Bananas Dierk Veg Mechanics Magazine Reggie Mendy Danny House Debbie Doll Dennis Miami Harry Mindy Florida
Protests Persist In Myanmar Even As The Military Tightens Its Grip On Power

The World

06:49 min | 2 months ago

Protests Persist In Myanmar Even As The Military Tightens Its Grip On Power

"Saying they'll hand over authority to whomever wins. What they're not saying, though, is when that election will happen. Huge protests are still happening across me and marred by day and by night when police come to neighborhood searching for protesters to arrest Residents turn out banging pots and pans. Many people just want their democracy back. But Myanmar's ethnic minorities say this uprising needs to go much further as the world's Patrick win reports When Stella Naw was a little girl going to school in the hilly northern part of Myanmar, she learned all about the greatness of the Burmese, the country's dominant ethnic group. She learned about their ancient kings, how they built Golden temples and had mighty armies. That was fine. But what about her ethnic group, the kitchen with more than a million people, mostly living in the mountains? Well, the textbooks didn't say much about them at all about the kitchen people with about two lines. We were just learning as we were learning about some people who were extinct, already not totally extinct, the school, said. The kitchen where farmers who like to do this neat dance Stella says that was about it. We were nothing more than some cute people with not much history. This is how the country's military rulers who are all ethnically Burmese tend to see minorities as people who should just assimilate. Get out of the way. But in Myanmar more than a third of all people are minorities groups such as the Sean Kitchen Corin kn mon, wiry, kind Chen Rohingya. It is a very diverse place yet the army has been trying to colonize their indigenous lands for decades. Often brutally even blasting villages with fighter jets. I asked Elena, who is now a political writer and activist how her people the kitchen tend to feel about the army. Disgust, fear they feel disgust set off the military for all the human rights abuses that they have committed against the community members. Two weeks ago, when the general sees total power in a coup rolling tanks through major cities, including the Heartland where most Burmese people live, Stella gnaw and other minorities were like Yeah, looks familiar. I even have someone asking me how do you feel to lose their freedom? All of us sudden, like I never felt like we had the freedom to begin where, right? Myanmar is now in the throes of a huge uprising at people's uprising, with doctors and students and factory work per person. Strike everyday people standing up the tanks and riot cops and rarely has the whole country. All the racial groups been united United in anger at the military. For Stella. Naw, it feels pivotal, like okay, now, maybe we're all on the same page. This is an opportunity, maybe to help them understand a bit, but also, we can really hope and expect too much because they are so focused on releasing freeing often Sergi Aung San Suu cheat the most popular political leader in the country ever. Especially among the Burmese majority. She's backed by the US and for the past five years on sense, UCI has shared power with the Army until the coup That was the status quo. What many minorities are now telling their Burmese brothers and sisters is let's fight for a real democracy because that status quo For many, it was miserable. It's a village on fire the village once home to Rohingya Muslims following an army purge about three years ago. The army has violently driven more than one million Rohingya out of the country. Years. Nay Sandlin, a Rohingya activist, You know military is the one who committed the genocide against the Rohingya. So we have no reason to support this military coup. But he does say that for his people. The coup doesn't change much. Many already live under an apartheid like system. For example, most Rohingya can't vote. And, yes, he says, some Rohingya refugees did enjoy seeing on Sans Souci get ousted after all on San Souci did go to The Hague in 2019 to defend the army against charges of genocide. Niece. Unwin says that celebrating was just a knee jerk reaction. We informed them. This is not the right way to enjoy detention off society. We have to support the public movement, even if we don't want to support heart or the whole party. They take the long view. He says that the army will never change its ways. But maybe in the future elected officials might begin to stick up for the Romanian. So now in refugee camps, you can hear this growing in survivors of genocide, beating pots and pans in solidarity with Burmese protesters. Nation. Lin is even seeing Burmese people who never stood up for the Rohingya saying Sorry we should have done something they realized their cruelty off this military. And they have the sympathy for us. But like Stella, non, he knows racism won't just go away overnight. This racism is deeply rooted in the country, so it will take a lot of time to change. Only they don't have time. This mass resistance is happening now. And Stellan Aw says it needs to become a more inclusive fight, not just for democracy, but to get the army off. Minorities backs once and for all. That's what brings kitchen people out on the streets in her hometown machina. You see fewer protest signs about Aung San Souci, and more that say, Abolish the Constitution basically overhaul the entire system. But this is how security forces responded to that. Over the weekend, Paul getting a boat, a barrage of rubber bullet, Maybe some real bullets seemingly fired in the air. No confirmed casualties That's from a Facebook live stream. But the army keeps blocking the Internet nationwide, in part to keep the world from seeing these crackdowns. What's clear is that resistance is becoming very dangerous for everyone. That's why Stella Naw says the only solution is to stick together, so we need to work together for this country to work and not become a failed nation, which is already on the way Myanmar's minority groups know quite well, she says that this army will not back down easily. For the world. I'm Patrick Win. Francis Cyber Security Agency says several French entities have been breached in a hacking campaign. They say the G R U

Myanmar Army Stella Naw Chen Rohingya Stella Stella Gnaw United United Sergi Aung San Suu Nay Sandlin San Souci Patrick Elena UCI Sans Souci Unwin Stellan Aw Aung San Souci LIN United States
Your Pathway to a Successful Business Exit with Blake Hutchison

Entrepreneur on FIRE

01:35 min | 2 months ago

Your Pathway to a Successful Business Exit with Blake Hutchison

"Let's just dive right in. What is flip breakdown. this business. so flip is a marketplace. The interesting thing about that is it's so we have is. We have sellers that he's akin to every other marketplace. You'll guests will be familiar. With and your listenership will love things like airbnb et cetera. And so in. Our case marketplace is about digital real estate not about physical real estate. It's not a bad shops physical shops. It's not about land it's not about apartments condos and homes it's about digital real estate so that is websites ecommerce stolz apps sas businesses online businesses. Anything that is digital anything that he's generating revenue laced in most cases generating revenue and therefore has some value attached to it sellers or owners operators of those assets list on flip and they can then tried with the world's largest of buyers looking for that digital real estate so really cool spice obviously on trend given all of the things that the world has gone through over the last twelve months a bit mole. So that's flip. Aw and way growling fun and we see incredible success stories every die of small business owners who've started something they're passionate about. They've got it to a size and now it's ready for somebody else to take it. I've i am extrapolate even greta value from it. It's a really really exotic spice.

Greta
New evidence that U.K. coronavirus variant spreads more easily has scientists really worried

The Von Haessler Doctrine

00:41 sec | 2 months ago

New evidence that U.K. coronavirus variant spreads more easily has scientists really worried

"Well, Yuki UK researchers now say that the covert variant first detected there appears to be undergoing some worrying new genetic changes. It may be starting to look more like the variants first found in South Africa and Brazil, meaning that the vaccines may not be as effective. Those variants are starting to show up here in the U. S. In fact, we reported Monday that 19 people have been infected in Georgia in nine counties with that UK variant. But Dr Hellmouth Aw, brick says mask and social distancing can still protect us coming clear that the virus can learn new tricks everyday. They're spreading as fast as Plane can fly. The UK has already stepped up measures to control the spread of the new

UK Dr Hellmouth Brazil South Africa Georgia
We Thought he Got Lost in the Woods

Horror Fictional and True Stories

05:24 min | 2 months ago

We Thought he Got Lost in the Woods

"You go down to the woods today yes shaw for a big surprise especially feel the protagonist in tonight's story so nice of you to join me around the campfire again. You know how much. I enjoyed it when you come home. Cheers me up. No end to have company around fire. Wow tonight story is horrific tragic sad scared coming. Awesome story to go something like this. Tonight's story doesn't take place on the land by the area surrounding it c- he wasn't just the land. There was evil. It was the whole damn area. I feel disgusted with myself a writing. This and i've been writing for about three days trying to figure out the best way to convey the horror get laid off my chest. It was spring hand in the woods. Spring is very colorful and noisy. Everything's blooming killing you with allergies and all the animals shouting out. They once again. We had a few spring showers and the temperature was rather mild topping at around seventy eight for the whole season. Thomas was a seventeen year old boy. Who like most kids in my area liked to fish out of a big creek. Aptly named big creek at the center of the conglomeration of small towns big creek ground through the woods for about thirty or so miles and was almost white enough to be colder river. If you're familiar with the spring river it was about half as wide as that is widest point. I always imagined that if they hadn't code a big creek they would called it a little river anyway. Thomas was the best fisherman of his soul. He was older than my brother of whom i was young. But we all still hung out despite age. Differences thomas tommy loved the outdoors. You know the expression you can take out of the woods but you can't take the woods out of the man that was tommy in a nutshell as with most kids in this area. Tommy a dropped out of school about a year prior to help around the fall. Yeah this town was really backwards. But that didn't hinder friendship. In fact told me was one of our best friends. We'd met told me about a year after we moved to the land and initially i thought he was. An astle. affects meeting was well. It ended up in a bad way for me. And some unfortunate ambassador. I've always been able to see things. Glimpses uv bad things to come. I get this from my mother about that. And i meeting with tommy a two completely separate stories. The point is thomas was one of half assed friends. He and my brother went to school together for a few years until tom decided to drop pounds. I know calculus and chemistry and stuff. I'm educated without a diploma. He'd said one day as we met it out fishing spelt. My brother and i looked at him flabbergasted. So tommy drought and spent days working at his uncle's palm fishing with us camping. Modding of the dut roads on which we live. Tommy was always full of energy and was a very excitable pass. He had a passion for wildlife and woodland's and conservation which was something that threw me for a loop when he dropped out. He told us that his uncle was trying to repair. The damage is done that he needed help around the farm if they wanted to enjoy the simple things in life such as eating and having clean water his uncle was not a nice man in fact it was a miracle that tommy was even able to live with him as he'd been convicted of doing something very nasty with two floating. Niro girls back in eighty three was part about it as if it needed to be. Wise was the fact that they were his nieces. he'd been sent away until ninety five whereupon he was released on good behavior after that he just kind of melted into the woods. Living off an inheritance raising told me hated his uncle and his uncle hated tommy. Many with a nice wet thomas would just can put his favorite sites about a mile down from fishing sponsor. Tommy often told and showed us the signs of his abuse such as cigarette burns in the middle of his back missing teeth. Aw teeth that were broken. In half

Big Creek Tommy Thomas Tommy Spring River Thomas Shaw TOM Niro Wise
Overcoming Sin Through the Power of God (Genesis 20:6)

Pray the Word with David Platt

05:16 min | 3 months ago

Overcoming Sin Through the Power of God (Genesis 20:6)

"Genesis. Chapter twenty verse. Six then god said to him in the dream yes. I know that you have done this. And the integrity of your heart and it was i who kept you from sinning against me therefore i did not let you touch her. There's a ton wicked talk about in this chapter when abraham journeys into the territory of a Lack the king of dharar. He takes sarah. And there's a lot that goes on here. That abraham does that obama does the whole point in this verse. That i just read it when i want to draw attention to as we pray is god's saying to Malek i know you've done this integrity of your heart in other words. Not defiled abraham's wife and it was. I god says who kept you from sending against me and the picture here as chapter twenty verse. Six is what we see all over the bible. The only way you and i can resist. Sin and overcome. Temptation is by the power of god. This is why jesus teaches us to pray lead us not into station but deliver us from evil because he knows that laugh to ourselves we will wander left to ourselves. We will send left to ourselves. We will turn from. God's good ways to own evil and wicked ways and yvonne wicked is the right word anything apart. From god's good ways is evil and wicked and this is what we are all prone to do in our sinfulness which is why we need god's mercy not just at one point in our life when when we put our faith in jesus and we ask him to forgive us of our sins we enter into relationship with him through faith. But it's not just that moment when we needed mercy we need his mercy at every single moment in the beauty is god promises to give us numeracy every single morning every single day all day long every moment and so this is the christian life a life of moment by moment dependence on the merc- and power grace strength love and help of god. Who said that one more time. This is the christian life. Moment by moment dependence on the mercy and grace and strength and power and help of god and the beauty is he has put a spirit inside of us to give us all those things and every moment as we look to him lean on him and trust in him not just at that point previously in our lives but as we trust in him moment by moment all throughout the day. So god we look to you. Now we lean upon you now and all day long today as rely our heads on our pillows at night as we wake up the next morning. We need your new mercy every morning. We need your numeracy every moment. God we confess right now that none of us can stand against sin and temptation on our own. None of us can experience the good life the abundant life that you have created us to live designed us to live called us to live we are aw prone to turn from your ways to our own ways so god we pray for your help right now and repre- that you would help us to be cognizant of our need for your help and your mercy and your power at every moment all day long today tonight tomorrow all that we do we say based on your word and john fifteen five jesus weekend do nothing without you it is you who keep us from sending it is you who keep us in us so we pray keep us close in every way we need you and every moment we trust in the help and the mercy and the power and the grace in love and the strength all these things that you promised to provide for us through the presence of your spirit in us.

Abraham Malek Yvonne Sarah Barack Obama John
Testimony Under Duress with Brian McLaren

The Bible Says What!?

05:56 min | 3 months ago

Testimony Under Duress with Brian McLaren

"Today. Special guest is the author of faith after doubt brian mclaren. Welcome to the show. Thanks great to be with you. Michael appreciate you coming on and sending me the book that's awesome. I always love getting books from the gas. Really fun the honest with you. Though man i was a little disappointed. There was no No autograph for you know. We'll have to try to remedy. That somehow awesome good. I like those special notes that they send me. Those are fun so does a little bit about your book. Well i was a pastor for twenty years and my life as a pastor. I had so many folks come to me over the years with their questions and doubts and things that just didn't make sense and Sometimes their questions really sort of the united my own questions and So i've always been interested about the intersection of pay out. Especially i grew up in a super conservative religious background. Where it wasn't real. You know ask asking questions and acknowledging that weren't really allowed so I left the past some years ago. And i i still speak primarily to pass pastors and i would say that hardly a week goes by where i don't hear from several people who tell me their pace falling apart or you're having serious doubts about this or that element of it and it's surprising how many clergy are also in that situation. So all that interesting together to say this is. This is something. I've been struggling with for a long time and Maybe something. I could help others with interesting. So do you think it's it's a good thing to doubt. Let's put it this way. It's a bad thing to just believe something because somebody else told you. You have two more threaten you with some punishment. If you didn't say that you believe honesty's important and stout important on a doubt in and of itself won't get us to where we need to go but faith without any doubt. is I think it's pretty dangerous. It among other things it sets us up to be exploited. It sets us up to the Ripped off by con artists because then con con artists. Were they they tell us to believe what they say and put son has been where Where we end up being manipulated manipulated by our ninety faith. Yeah scary stuff. A lot of cutler's out there and get you in you know you just go follow the group. Whatever the group does here drink this cool eight. It'll be great. do what what. What's a little scary is those kinds of Those kinds of connor artists exist in the world of religion and in the world of business and in the world of politics there hammer. unfortunately religious communities can easily become aggregate For people who want to believe and and then they become aggravates for people who can be manipulated. So that's why. I think it's important to help Christians and people of other religions well but for me as a christian especially how christians and especially i have a soft spot in my heart for pastors. Since i was one for so long to help passed a better job on helping people honest with their questions and doubts interesting. Kinda wanna go back to something. You said there for a minute. You said punishment if they don't say that they believe it. So do you. Do you find that if if if you don't believe something a punishment for not believing that is wrong or shouldn't be done a well. Maybe i maybe. I can explain it like this. I'm one of the things. I wanna the insights really that became clear from within. The book is how faith isn't just an individual. Aw an individual experience and doubt is not just an individual experience but because we belong to communities that are often bound together by agreements to certain creeds doctrinal statements or agrees that our social life is really wrapped up our doubts as well and And so what we end up experiencing a lot of its experience is that were part of a group and we just raise an honest sincere question and then people realize this is a question that our group is not allowed to ask and so The punishment might being new won't be allowed to be a small group leader anymore. Because we don't trust you anymore because you admitted that you have this question now. Probably a lot of other people that question through but they just hadn't admitted it or it could even go farther where people are at the face the possibility of excommunication and and there's not just the theological dimension that but that often means separation from family and friends. I in the beginning book. I tell the story the young man who came to see me he was a pastor. He he dared to question what most of us would consider an extremely esoteric doctrine of his little church and And he was kicked out and among the people who kick about were his parents and his gra- one grandparents so you can imagine how devastated.

Brian Mclaren Michael Cutler Connor
What Is the Patriots' Plan at Tight End?

Greg Bedard Patriots Podcast with Nick Cattles

04:40 min | 3 months ago

What Is the Patriots' Plan at Tight End?

"Second question i had foil is regarded. These tight ends that they drafted in the third round as a fan of them. Going after two tight ends. Because i just. I was hoping that it was going to go back to the kind of offense like nam doesn't gronk were your and it. Obviously that isn't happening but it's almost it's almost like a redshirt of the two of them. This year. I think they have one. Catch combines the between the two of them was going into the season with them. So limited on getting offensive snaps. Was that planned or was it more based on their health or was it more based on that this belgian just wasn't seeing what he thought he was gonna see leading up to the draft. Stop yeah i well i think number one you earn and sort of what you see on the practice field. You know ossie was okay to start camp I would see either of them. Blue anybody away. And i know there have been some injury issues but i don't really think that's been much of a factor i mean you know you look at back in two thousand and ten when they had gronkowski and hernandez people kind of forget that hernandez was the one who hit i him he was he was a decent part of the offense from the gecko that year. We're gronk was really more a blocking tight. End do a little bit. By the end of the season he was catching touchdown passes and becoming more of a force and so guys have their own path. And it's all brian what they show how they get the offense how they execute stuff like that from people that i've talked to around the team. It just with devon. Aw siasi good for about two weeks and then tom for every nfl rookie. There comes a point in time when they realized the. Nfl is hard that these guys are good. That the coaches are tough that being a pro and having to wake up every day and do a day after day and sore body and all this stuff like it sets in like it's a profession and some guys look at it like You know. I'm not having a whole lot of fun anymore. This was like when you know when. I went to rutgers and i was playing on the baseball team. You know my second. I could come back from his hand surgery. I had but i really wasn't having that much fun anymore in kind of wanted to be more of a college kid so alice sort of left the game but these guys they realize it's it's a profession in some of them rise. Some of them love it some of them rise in say okay. I like this i can. I can meet the challenge and push through and some guy sort of shrink in from people i've talked to. That's been siasi. Here has not been a lot of mental toughness behind the scenes. I think you can see some of it in his play on the field in terms of just as body language when he's on the field donkey i think he has more of a chance. I think the consensus. And i know. Albert brewers working on something about ballot. Check in his drafting. And i think he's gonna talk about these titans because we've been chit chat and back and forth The past couple of days but about how like everybody says like dalton kimes overdrafted Qian's been almost like a big puppy where he's kind of all over the place and you think he wants to be there. I think he loves football. So i don't really worry about him. It's when he's going to get it. And i think once he gets it and he gets his role and they create more of like a crash jensen type of role for him. I think he's gonna flourish. And i think he's going to be a weapon for this team. Aussie i don't know what kind of future i don't know if he has any future here to tell you the truth and i think the patriots Fell into a trap. And i don't know if this was by design or just bella check being bell check. But what tom we're not idiots they certainly are idiots. We all knew the deal at receiver in tight end and so for belgium to come out of this draft trade out of the first round. Give up like a kenneth murray or whatever you wanted to do there and then take three defensive guys would your first three picks like when there were tight ends. Probably that you had rated higher there that you just passed on and all of a sudden you're scrambling it looked like to get off siasi and dalton keen like. That's problematic and to me. It illustrates sort of the personnel problems that they've had last four five

Gronk Hernandez Ossie Gronkowski Albert Brewers Dalton Kimes Devon Rutgers TOM Brian NFL Alice Baseball Qian Titans Jensen Kenneth Murray Football Patriots
Show 6a Comedy via Radio, Music, & TV  Redux  Aleck, Kaner, & Goldthait - burst 2

Standup Comedy "Your Host and MC"

01:57 min | 4 months ago

Show 6a Comedy via Radio, Music, & TV Redux Aleck, Kaner, & Goldthait - burst 2

"One album or yours. Dez gainers the top forty. How long george benson stumble into walls on quay cores rulli nelson. Maybe i should have loved you and could have maybe longer than i would have with. You always online nerves. The rolling stones Aw that's all i remember. That's good laugh georgia. Proper blew my son last night. That's why i drive right through the red lights. Glock must be slow to people that understood that a

Rulli Nelson George Benson Georgia Glock
Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

Scientific Sense

59:58 min | 6 months ago

Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we explore emerging ideas from signs, policy economics, and technology. My name is Gill eappen. We talk with woods, leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest. Scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation. Be Color a wide variety of domains red new discoveries are made. and New Technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new ideas affect society. And help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation. V seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide unaided content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do. A companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense. Dot. com. And displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense dot net. If you have suggestions for topics, guests at other ideas. Please send up to info at scientific sense. Dot Com. And I can be reached at Gil at eappen. Dot Info. My guests today's facade John. WHO's professor of Law and society at Griffith University in Brisbane Australia. He's also adjunct professor of law at Queensland University of Technology and Research Associated University College Under Center for Blockchain Technologies, he who suggests on the Bloomberg professional globalization of law and the technology in law. But come John. Hello. Thank you. Sure. Yeah. So I want to start with one of your recent people, professions and expertise hog machine learning, and blockchain redesigning the landscape of professional knowledge and organization. In invite you say machine learning has entered the world of the professions. The different impacts automation will have huge impacts on the nature of work and society. Engineering architecture and medicine or early and enthusiastic adopters. Other professions especially law at late you say at in some cases with leptons adopters. could you talk about you know sort of the landscape all? Of Law, profession and. They today in terms of opting these technologies. Certainly Louis interesting because it's a very old profession is. Often considered one of the. Original traditional professions along with medicine and the church. And in a sense law has used different kinds of technology might say I mean does it? Based around writing. And then the printing press and So on yet that. It's always being based on a craft. A skill which the individual person is that enables them to do, whatever is quote if you like and. said, there's never been a lot of room for any kind of automation. Certainly, the has been space for using. A people who are not fully qualified as low as about as paralegals, people like that, who will do a lot of repetitive work document checking and things like that and so on. But what will get into now is the situation where automation through machine learning. There's other kinds of artificial intelligence. is able to start constructing documents example contracts. Check dollop a documents for particular clauses and things like that mature they're up to date and this incense is. Replacing now, the kind of work that noise will do. So I think in some ways more more of of the profession of law is gonNA be subject to automation, but distinction I would many because I think it's quite important here is that A lot of what lawyers do. Is actually quite. Active that that that that the drafting contracts overtime or or they're reviewing documents to some sort or another or they're getting through particular. Negotiation. And so you know a lot of it is the same, but they build up the expertise through doing these same kinds of were over and over again and What we're now finding is that instead of having young lawyers coming in and doing what you might call the grunt work of checking documents and going through discovery applications where he goes through the size boxes of evidence to decide. which are the appropriate documents you want the emails, the invoices order, this sort of stuff that is the kind of work which is lending itself to automation. And, and so that his taking away a lot of the work which is used for trading purposes with young lawyers and is just doing it much quicker. will quickly I mean More efficiently in many ways and probably expensive much much expensive a Lotta. This work is being outsourced to you know legal process outsourcing India or Philippines South Africa places like that. So yeah, that's that's right and so in some ways, the group of lawyers who do the work which requires the skill, the judgment. Is Reducing in some ways. That pool is getting smaller. Yeah Yeah it's it's interesting. The the distinction that you make between automation. And in my job and let's call it decision making right which is you know a lot of work in the business side of this. So for example. in the nineties in large pharmaceutical company So you think about you know rnd. People might think it has really complex selection of programs that design of them, portfolio management, risk management, all those decisions. Genuine companies be say well, senior managers with lots of experience and intuition make those decisions really well right and so that's statement would automatically implied that machines can really do much there. But what we find in the mid nineties says that is systematic analysis of data make those decisions. Don't better. Actually, I've Tom to humans humans. Always seem to make decisions. These are typically bonding the decision. So if you go back and look at it, alternative experiment has not been wrong. So we have no date to say it was a good decision at typically. So human scaffold, fifty percents of making good decisions So do you know just throwing a coin or letting monkey make those decisions so? Yup We found that even complex decision making that humans hold. you know close to their you know kind of domain I'm not necessarily. So we have machines That could do that much better than I. Don't know there's an analog of that in in law I I. Think The may be actually I mean Two three years ago the royal. Society in England decided to arrange a working party on machine learning. One of the things that they put together a a roundtable on machine learning professions resolved to talk about that night and I talked about the history of professions in technology and. and. I think one of the peculiar things that came out to in relation to law is that law. Has always been a sort of on its own. If you think about medicine, for example, medicines always had the teacher hospital institution that sort of straddles the academic quilt and the practice walls and brings those people together and as a result. INCORPORATES loss of, scientific, work. Engineering work as well computing work and things like that. And that's been the first teaching hospital king into existence in in the French revolution in Seventeen eighty-nine. A long history of that. If you look at law, there was nothing equivalent to that whatsoever and there is in fact, actually a big gap between what academy does on what the practitioners in your do so that As a result as before law has come to this a quite late but what we are. Finding I think is that Certainly the management consultancy finding is that because of the nature of a lot of what goes on in legal office a remarkable amount of it can be automated. So what we are getting now is companies setting themselves up to do this automated work. So. We have companies which do nothing but contract our instruction formation sort of company. The typical lawyer would would say to a client Do you WANNA contract classes. Yes I want this for this. And loyal galway draft contract back with it, and then in the con- comes back against as I need another contract, you go through the same process. which is good for the lawyer but not necessarily good kind. What we're finding now is the company's not can think of a few of them that will, in fact, go into the company's show order contracts. Let's see the entire. Corpus of contracts you've got there and they will analyze them. And basically say, all right. We can create a new contract in automated way fairly easily it may need some modification according to special circumstances but on the whole, it's fairly standard and and they can do that INNOVA systematic world meaning the contracts are reviewed that checked. If they're going to expire marketing, you want an unable just the system will cope with that if you're. Yeah. So yeah. No No. No so I was just going to say yes. So that the distinction you make, you know in terms education sort of systematic graduate level education that because as you say, it is low in one sense of soft proficient. You say in called professions like made it to text reengineering this team has a strong concern ensuring that expertise applied in the public interest when as low little bit different from from bad and economics in some sense sort of in the same same vein we have now made economics at really odd. of mathematics you know north of analytics there. Whether they are actually useful from policy making perspective is left to debate but at least it has been an attempt to make this make economic video hard. So so I don't know A. Fascination has been in in law I very much that will happen in law. Oh there things are beginning to happen I mean let me just boob. At. One example I learned in that workshop that I mentioned the Royal Society held. With somebody from the engineering profession talking about. The difference in skills between people who above forty I'm below forty he said. If he he was about Forty Years Austin design an aeroplane, takeout pen and paper Pencil, and paper and. I don't know anyone under forty could do that would know how to do that go onto a computer program undecided there. So you can see that the incorporation of technology into the academy through to the actual. Occupation. Than phones and things is is already a standard and they're in law. It isn't law. As you said, it's still very much a soft skill although I will argue that there is a difference between the way nor is viewed in different parts of the world. So in the United States A law is I think more tilted towards the sciences. So low in economics is one of the big things in the. US. So you got a lot of people working in the of lower economics who might go onto antitrust work no competition work and things like that which across a lot of economics, mathematics and Statistics and so on. In, say a Europe Australia and so on. Law is more allied towards the humanities. And the classics. So it doesn't have that kind of scientific underpinning in that way. So anything that's going to change in these parts if you like is going to be something that's going to be imported from outside. And is going to have a very dramatic impact when whether it does An and I think that's yet to happen. I don't think there's been sort of Cambrian explosion. If you like in in law, the will be one I'm sure but but law has an advantage over engineering economics or the other areas you might. That's With the nature of the rule of law and absent justice is since law as a a way of ordering society is absolutely crucial to everything else. Then, Law and lawyers will say will look you know we have a special status here is different amid leave engineer. We certainly want to make sure bridges stay up. We don't want down but we can design different kinds of bridges. We can design different kinds of legal bills, but they're also the fundamental rules If you want to you know if you're an engineering company and you want to build a bridge in a different country, you're going to have to do it on the basis of the legal rules, which will be just vise by the lawyers according to the country's there in so on. So in in that was what? I might put in a special category if you live. Yea. Yea. Let me let me push NBA John. So. The. The conference that you mentioned you know the Internet is under forty and engineers at. So so one could argue you know from an engineering perspective could argue e- It sexually dangerous. To not use machines to build aircraft the goes you know all the technology that cap today actually help us make the trap lot safer. granted. If you sit down with a blank sheet of paper and Pencil, you might get the principal right. But, but the technology has advanced so much that you really have to use. Technology to do so in some sense, engineering is pushed back. that. I argue this myself then they were naive engineering school. I had a V exposed at my daughter bent to school. She used the same physics book. Twenty, five. meter. I argue that that is sort of backward because data speed no need for an engineer to really learn Newtonian physics anymore because it is prescriptive, it's deterministic can make machines, learn it very quickly and so why spend all? Right. So so then you know if you think about the the law field. I wonder if there is a senior argument that is to say Dan and tape really good lawyer casts lot of intuitions dot expedients to crap something Contract or a discourse, but then maybe the machine scan actually do it even better We haven't really tested that hypothesis yet. Right be almost have this idea that humans are always dominant. Or machines but that the not be true as technology lancers. So what do you think about that in the in the? It's a very important point actually because the. American bosses. being modifying its ethical rules recently to say that lawyers have a duty and obligation to keep up to date with technology. So we already know the technology is now a an important part and I have to say when when I say the word technology, I mean this at all kinds of levels from what you can do with Microsoft word for example, it strays plug ins all the way up to artificial intelligence IBM, Watson, or something like that So that if if lawyers become. A. Uses of technology whether this small firms or big firms or what have you a under the Aba now they they actually have an obligation to make sure that they are up to date. They can't just say we didn't know what we were doing. So I think in that respect, there is a there was a move. The other move that is taking place is actually the push from from the clients. Now, this you have to look into ways one is with corporate clients. The corporation seen US lawyers have to use noise if you'd like want their work done. PHILOS- money on Chiba they wanted to more efficiently They don't want the best piece of work every time they want something that works and they want officiant. UTA A and so on. So it was interesting I think a few years ago. The General Counsel Cisco. Actually made a speech. Saying that he expected his. Lawyers Law firms who worked for the company to be reducing their fees year on year. Now, that's the opposite of what lawyers normally do, which is to raise them year on year. So say that that's one push which is. Very profound push now, coming from the client himselves who are using the beginning to use their procurement departments in in the companies and things like that to help purchase legal services the other aspects which is just as important in this is if you look at the role of lawyers and individuals. So if you is what access to to legal services, it's expensive lawyers are not cheap they charge our money We don't know how to judge the quality of their work and so on. because. There was a credence which we just know that So. On this is where technology can begin to step in and provide services which are. Efficient and often quite. what very well for the individual saying that this. Technology can be seen to be improving access to justice a Lotta people. Yeah. Yeah yes. I want to come back to this. John. I think this is a very important point. So bent on put has a lot of uncertainty. Uncertainty maybe not not the right term, but it's called deterministic. It shows beatty ability and so the determination of quality it's not as easy as hard media India nearing or. Right business economics legal all sorts of well foreign that category and the application of technology sort of a different different meaning there but I want to touch on one of the things that you say in the paper, and that is you mentioned this before and that's about training training the next generation. So you savior regulating bodies professions are involved in the collection and reproduction of knowledge intended to be used by the entire body professionals, and so there was an expectation here that you know seeing it professionals. Is Providing the wisdom that knowledge mission to train the next generation now in a technology driven. regime. discuss vacations right. Our expert is going to be a computer engineer in the future. And so so how does that work from from cleaning and knowledge Asian will I think this is This is a crucial issue in it's one which the profession hasn't. Really. Got To grips with yet I think because you think of technology in terms of Predictive analytics a document review and things like this most law schools are not preparing students for this they may be a a a a causal to on some aspect of technology, but it's not something which lawyers themselves are learning. So I think what is going to happen is we're going to find a blending of skills occurring. So law firms will be sense having to bring in a range of technologists who perhaps have. A scales a straddle, both sides of the lines, the lawyers like this too I think I think we're going to find an avangard Who will begin to develop skills that allow them to talk to both sides of the line, the tech people and? Below people if you likes and there will be people who will acquire develop these skills as well but that's that's still some way down the line I didn't think we're anywhere near there yet, and part of the reason for that I think is that you know law is still a very highly regulated profession and and the regulators themselves are in the same situation they are unsure about what is going to happen and they also feel they have an obligation to. Not only ensure that. Customers clients and consumers are protected but in some ways, the profession is protected to if you like so. You know it's it's a it's a fine balancing. There I. Think. It's a fight balancing act and you'd say if the changing changing things. So going back, you know you care as an individual eighteen status of expert. Some form of encapsulation of knowledge and analysis occurs enabling professional experts, derived diagnoses, decisions, and conclusion wrapped late. and you make some distinctions. Type of learning that. Human? Beings. That the distinction between doing drive and become a gift and laster Yes yes. Yes I think that's important. So the the the the principle behind this is that Individuals can acquire a lot of knowledge in in various areas. So as I say learning how to drive a car, you learn how to change gear you though with the speeds. Braking different rates, conditions, and things like that. So. If you WANNA take that further and become a formula one drive or something like that. Then you have to undergo a very different kind of training and that kind of thing becomes a lot more collective rather than individual because you start to you're you're going to be in a group that is gonna be doing a particular kind of our driving. If you like everybody in the group has to understand what each other is doing that group, you can't have people going right a racetrack at two hundred miles an hour or thinking individually feel like they have to have a collective consciousness. About. How to drive in that situation? That's nothing like how? You and I might drive. I'm not saying we bad drivers just saying spreading very different. So I think professional work is not. That different from this in a way. So once you you can go through school and you can do your law degree and you can learn your low. We can learn you engineering's this applies to or professions really. But in order to become a professional in order to become somebody who can operate function within that. Group if you like you then have yourself have to develop collective consciousness and and one way of thinking about it is that we we can kind of tacit knowledge. This assorted knowledge you learn on the job from people, which is not always articulated in a precise formulate kind way but it's something you pick up from the way. Somebody does something you just recognize aw that that's how they've done that might not be. Written down anywhere or anything like that. But you know that's different from now exiting differently from the way that wise doing I think X.'s doing it better I and you and you just, and you can absorb that. That's what I mean by this kind of tacit knowledge and that comes about from the professional context. As how the professional context develops becomes absolutely crucial to how you introduce new ways of doing things new my daddy's new skills new outlooks if you like and I. Think this is where we're on the cost of of this beginning to develop I mean we we know it's got to be done quite how it's going to be done. is yet to be. So. So let me make a statement John and I want I want your reaction to it so eat in hard sciences eight years against again medicine. Expertise has about a consistent happy of remorse. Whereas enor- economics and business in general, let's say expertise is not about the ability to apply rules but to deal with. and at and if that is true, it has lot of implications rate. It has implications as to how we might divide work. Between. And machine in the future. And the skills that universities need to impart on on on new graduates are also quite different. So I always argued in the business. engineering contexts that universities having changed the dog they get mentioned before they're using the same. Using the same. Out Thirty four years without asking the question are those skills relevant, anymore or more importantly watch. Really relevant for a human being in the future rate. do you agree with that that expertise assert more about dealing exceptions apply? Putting it actually. I. I can see the logic behind what you. Saying I think what distinguishes? A good professional whether it's a good engineer good architect or good lawyer or doctor is is somebody who has a certain? This may sound strange but it's the. Imagination. Creativity. about. Kind of flare that allows them to function on the nausea they they've got and developed over the years and the experience. Gathered from Nova pitching what they'd be doing over the years and so on, and it allows them to see around things in ways which they perhaps would. I can give you an example if you like a law. So I'm in in Germany and some other countries. For example, there's a particular way of bundling together mortgage securities I I won't go to detail about this, but this statute that enables you do it. And then you can sell these securities and get money. In certain countries, the UK, the US, and so on. This, NICI. So in a sense to put this kind of a a deal together it. Couldn't be done if you live. So a bank came to one of the large English law firms and said, look we wanted we want to replicate this in in the UK, want to set a market this we're not the statues off there. What can you do and what was interesting was that the law firm then went back to first principles lawyers who were looking at this went back I suppose they looked at some vape basic areas of law matter your trust. And contract from what have you? I'm from that they constructed elite supplement that looked very much like the one in Germany, but without stat sheet and they tested it and it worked. Out To be credibly successful. So much so that the German government started German legal profession started to complain because they said. You can only do this by statute and these we find a way of doing it three. I suppose using law and there it is an they were vowed shops by but that was a particular example if you like of of what you were talking about, they took the exceptions they went back to first principles and said you know or How would we get? This is where we gotta get to, and this is a way right at the beginning what are the steps we need to take and and? And that's what a good loyal will do if you. Right right? Yeah. So that's very important point. So you in your paper dawn as the DREYFUSS and rice note that the proficient performer immersed in the world of skillful activities sees what needs to be done. But decides how to do it. So as we move into a and other technologies, I think it's important point it is. Right from Dad benefactor culture we have been using humans as you mentioned before in lots of with meted activities big not designed for humans I would I would contend enjoy doing things over and over again, and if you had thought of doing that, yeah, because they have to do it for living right and so so we should be moving to word It would where anything that is with pita on delegated to the machine at automation in the bottom of that and Appealed autonation you can have intelligent automation you can have you know reinforcement learning those types of things you have some aspects of intelligence into the into the two. And deploy humans Don't Miss. They're really good at in some case. I'm. So you know we've been studying the green for ages be our no close. It feels to understand mother. Heck it does You know it's not neat learning it. Oh, BBC of. thirty years ago as see that person again, you could see you could you could have a feeling. Then you've seen that before and and what the brain has done actually not only as he that pattern but also age that matter intuitively for thirty years and say, yes, that face I, guess before. and. So there are some superpowers the brain has reaped have been applying the all all. So for a technology might allow. Look I. Think Technology will allow us to incredibly complex things without having to think about too much I. Mean if you look at the way a port functions, for example, any major port these days they've got millions of containers and ships going through them all the time. So there's a lot of paper going through the you those charter parties, bills of lading guarantees. So the lot of legal work that's being done it, it's all quite standard stuff. I mean everybody. KNOWS, what needs to be done and so on. Now, some people are beginning to think while the best way to handle a port if you like I for everybody should know is to put everything that's going on in the poor into a blockchain so that you can see the whole supply chain. You see when something comes in, you can determine when the goods are being offloaded. When they're being shipped, you can stop making the payments as a result of the. Operation of the smart contracts if you like, and the whole thing would be just one quite seamless. In some ways without that much human intervention really just need oversight Some bits of coordination so on. But at the moment is still a a lot of humans are vote in that shipping people, law people, all sorts of things which is. I think insane. That's a waste of resources. We know that there are people who have all kinds of problems that require that creative flair she like as so why waste money on the routine stuff when you could develop skills to the the real need if you like in that way? Yeah Yeah. So I, want that some that bit that John Blockchain, for example, as you mentioned. So so one reason especially in the professions like law and business humans have an advantage justice dimension of trust. and you know at least our generation we don't really. At eighty level, right. So so having that. Human human touch is still extremely important for us. Now, technologies like Blockchain, for example, actually allows that trust to be tensely decoupled, right? Yeah, and I think I think you're right. Look I. Think I mean one of the reasons we make contracts is because We, don't trust each other. So we we devised these documents with all the conditions in them. Something goes wrong. This is what will happen things like that and so on. What are the interesting things? You know people really rely on contracts are met you. You draw up a contract. And the to business people stick him in the drawer I never look at again less something really really fundamental goes wrong but they know sumit doesn't that never look at that again. So you say value of the contract, what did it actually do if you look at some of the Asian countries say like Taiwan or parts of China, you have a assistant coach Guanxi, which is where people developed effective relationships by knowing each other over a period of time around business that allows them to develop trust it. So You know there are different ways of of handling trust, but we we seem to spend a lot of time on trying to minimize something You know which we don't really do a lot of if you like. So I think one of the advantages of of blockchain is that it just it removes a lot of this from from the equation if there's certain things you know that can happen. as a result off if this thing that systems. Lead happened And you know. As, long as you've got oversight and you can see what's going on than. You don't need to be too concerned about it. It will just do what it needs to do in that way and So. Again. That's still very much in the early stages, but we are seeing situations where supply chains A shipping goods from one country to another can actually be done under smart contracts through a blockchain. Technology if you live. That that is now happening I associate goodful dealing with things like gum counterfeiting if you're. Producing. Particular high-quality could site move our phones or particular pharmaceutical products and so on you know it's one way of guaranteeing the quality of the product is you couldn't I say look you can examine the whole supply chain or the data is there. And you know his Eq- code look at it and you get the whole thing going all the way back The. Again, issues around that if you're dealing with the digital. Is Much easier once you start dealing with physical products then you have. A question of how do you get that first initial digitization of the physical if you'd like to goes on so though some people I know here in Australia who? Run A company called Beef Ledger, which is trying to export beef straight beef to China using the blockchain supply chain, which will. Guarantee the security, and the quality of the goods to the Chinese consumer APP because having problems with this before. But I will tell you now do doing something like that does require that the people you are dealing with. You're going to set this up with You have to have a trusting relationship with you before you can set up a technology that will do away with the So we're still in that. That's really early days. I think another a lot of time way to go right Yeah, but the technology works it. Clean potential one could argue contracts exist because they probably known performance if you have a technology that drives that probably the of non-performance zero, then you can actually get rid of for contract. Yeah limit. It is. Not. Goes back to that earlier point I made that. Most most contracts are fairly standard. You know a routine things they're there to. Record a series of transactions payments that have gone on between people without the to do much. If you like you know once you you're you're doing the business, the contract just kind of records that in perpetuity. So the small contract just takes that into a different area and an an actually does the whole implementation and execution without people to be involved in that too much and there's something goes wrong. But if it if it all goes right then back it is done you need to you don't you think about it Right. Yeah. Hasn't been jumping to another are forthcoming people globalization law at. A time of crisis in the? Global Lawyer and so in the say Nikolai Condom Nieve a Russian economists in the nineteen thirties believed the worst economy operates long sixty year cycles Then he called K. Braves. And you safeguarding coronavirus analysis, the fifth psycho young's from nineteen eighty to twenty thirty. It's you save twenty, nineteen forthcoming John You might have. I think so I think say because I, tell you off the what's happening this year I thought my good I couldn't My God. I was just. Owners because you know a contract device these waves up into into what he calls four seasons spring summer or winter at, and we're in the winter off this fifth cycle if you like this is. All the bad stuff happens and he's news war. Famine Disease I think wait a minute that sounds Yes yes. That's exactly right. A. But one of the interesting things about contractors was that you know he he a because he's A. Solid economists are installing a dip executed. By the way you know he he got fed up ninety that was the end of Nikolai unfortunately but he. He said instead of know if you like the ownership of the means of production are being the determinate for changeover from system system, he said it's it's technology and and that the technology will drive you out of the downswing of the last cycle into the upswing of the new cycle, and and the way that works is the win. You're in this kind of winter period because of the kind of economic. Gloom pervades if you like people tend to hold back in subsurface vestment in terms of technological innovation of what have you and so a lot of energy resources, resources, money capital if you like builds up to a second point when people say we're GONNA go for this is this is it? And that's when if you like technology comes to the fall on, really drives it forward. So from that perspective, what he's saying is that you know come right about twenty thirty. If. Things are going slowly now regarding technology they're going to speed up. In. This period and that's when it will. You know really also take take off and people have looked back over our preceding cycles and they've you know it works if you like not just their. Fantasy theory there are also the people who do Cleo dynamics in history these the quantitative historians and they've done a similar kind of analysis of historical periods and said, yeah, you know there are all these citrical. Processes that take place even revolutions occur and big upset occurs and what have you and and. One of their Perspectives which I find quite interesting is that they say one of the reasons for revolutions come about is caused a lease beginning to compete with each other and and an an I look at say trump in in America and I look at the Democrats and I I I would say Modine, India I look she in China and different groups of elites who are engaged really profound struggle for the future of their countries if you live. Out which again is leading to this kind of potential eruption of activity and a new ways of doing things. Yeah. It makes a lot of intuitive sense gone. So one way to think about this also. There are a lot of excesses. So innovating go good their excesses in the system people to believe that invincible they changed assumptions about. because they don't see any. and. Financial markets to right. So these cycles and real real mass that uniquely talking about you can see the. Happening in the financial markets more clearly. But what he's saying is that he happens mortgage and you ask in this paper in two thousand, nineteen for in many ways go. Crystallization off the settling ketone economic forces lost throat ear Kublai doomed as populous. Separates nationalism and lead clients and I think they have that we have probably the answer to that. But you see I think. One of the points I was trying to make an in in this paper walls that Global Law. If you like is is, is the a kind of synthesis off chaos? How do we bring some kind of order to chaos now once you start seeing the undermining? Of his global institutions, you see trump was withdrawn from the W. H. O.. He's he's are criticized NATO he he won't have the do with the International, Criminal Court and so we've got this kind of real life tension now between a an international legal order that's being built up since the Second World War both Ekit economic and legal order is Global And so we can't just a radical globalization I mean even even with covert, we can't eradicate mobilize ation we've got to. Handle covert the Kobe pandemic on a global basis. Otherwise, we'll. We're lost it retreats to a national. Approach is not gonNA. Work? We'll be defeated in that race is going to be global. Might. Be One of my questions in in paper was will who are the people who are going to be doing this? Kind of bringing the the order to chaos if you like and that made argument that it's got to be the global lawyer. And this is a person who not only understand their national legal system but also able to communicate with lawyers and officials. From around the world if you like. To be able to develop a kind of common. Language common discourse that enables them to stop putting these things together are, and it's not just a simple massa of saying mathematically, it works this way or not. It requires the kind of pulling together of people, but it requires that sort of common understanding which. Comes out of what I was saying about this idea of testing knowledge you know as you got this kind of professional consciousness you know how people ought to behave and how they will interact with you, and then that enables you to be out of bizarre to predict how you can do things and so on and so on. That basis I think we can operate kind of global order. It had a a below the institutional level if you're not kind of private. As opposed to the public according and that will put three. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah you know I the limit John I don't know if you think this way I limit one could as. Want to stay need for. Countries what does the need for legal system differentials? We set this up with the premise that it's easier to manage small chunks. one could also argue with Edmund Affect. -nology that you don't need to segment this debate that we have done. which might make these types of issues you know. See where you're coming from and I'm going to say yes or no? Yes, I think the home range of of questions that can be handled by the technology the ones we got pay I don't chain, etc. I don't I didn't see any issues there but there are a lot of decisions that needs to be made a book in terms of putting things together and resolve disputes that can only function at a human level because it's not. These are not decisions that are simple binary decisions. If you'd like, it's yes or no it's it's often a lot more nuance than complex about I mean, one of the resources in the World Kiva Zero System, the world amendment which is being fought over if you like is water, a water is probably one of the most valuable resources anywhere and it's you often find that rivers and things like that sort of flow between countries, they form borders. And and you are you know people if you look at the Nile, ESL start stopping in Sudan throwaway down to the Mediterranean. So he goes to countries all three countries, east European and then into Egypt's and so unwell well, who has the right to put it dime at a particular place and things like that all of that has to be cooled in act. You see a not going to be done at a human level that that's what caused the skills in negotiation judgment interpretation understanding if you like of the other people, no machine can do that I got. Yes before we conclude, I want to touch on one other thing So in the paper, you say as technology and culture intersect more and more. Ethical conundrums will intensify these raising questions about the rights and obligations of robots. And go beyond as moves. Three laws of robotics in two issues of rights of all moon. Algorithm, stem serves. So this is this is an area that be Kevin babies even even really form some notions allowed rights of all modes at rights of a are. Sai, gets more sophisticated. Yes. Yes. I do. I, mean I think this is one of the issues we already know some of the problems with algorithms and and you know can we can be are they transplanted from you see what's going on the ethical issues around the construction and implementation of algorithms and things like that. But I I I think looking into the future we all going to rely on things like robots. And various kinds of machines so much more so that if you look at a country like Japan, which is a a an aging population such that it doesn't have sufficient younger people to look after the people who need looking often. So machines, I'll be part of that, and that means people will stop forming real relationships with machines and and so that's when I would say. Okay. So let's think about how we View a potential rights of machine that we give. We give rise to humans. Yes. We know that we give rights to animals. Now we've also given rights to viz in forest in some countries as well as so machines I think our. Next logical step you know do we do we treat them with respect Let me give you one. Very classic example yet the production of. Robots for sex if you like is a major industry at the moment, some manufacturers say they want to program them say that people can act out rape fantasies will do we want that I? Mean you know should we be at first of all? You know? We should be having people behave in this particular kind of way, but even an uncertain if you do it against another human being, you'll be punished for it and you say we'll a machine is a piece of property you should be you should be doing that but I'm getting to think that maybe a machines should be treated with dignity say that we are treat ourselves with. Dixie. This a kind of reflexive situation here what we? Do to machines we do to each other, and they may again due to US depending on how they evolve and and move forward in that way is a very contentious issue. A lot of people would reject that right out of hand I agree I think we've got to stop thinking about stop dining forward because I. think we're going to at some point again. I. Don't know when. But at some point we will be having to deal with that. It's a it's a very important point. Joan. So if I understand you correctly, you know that the rights to animals the rights to inanimate. INANIMATE things like Lubers The recent those exist is because of its effects on humans and can see video a clear link in the future we would see a very clear link between a algorithms and robots ended affects on human. So this is not me You know each not fantasy in the sense that yeah, robots should have rights, but rather it's a more conceptual question. Any fraud did not have rights each going to cabin negative I I think that's absolutely true. I mean just to highlight that if you like this firm called Boston Dynamics that produces. Robots and they produced these videos of these. Now, these robots are resistant being pushed over and things like that, and it was quite interesting because a lot of people say all you can't treat them in this way. This is awful and so what I mean that that's the answer for more fighting to to the extreme extent. But it I think you know on the basis what you're saying, you know how we Oakland. Hold human beings accountable to each other in an increasingly complex world machines have become part of that. We can't just have them all sitting on the edge as though they're not part of who we are, what we are and how we do things. Right. So. Incursion Johnny fuel sort of look forward five years. At. The intersection of law and technology. But you think people see sort of the biggest. I. Think you'll see it two wins. On the you know for the individual The individual, you're going to see a lot of them just interacting. With artificial Tennessee, say lost questions about what my rights for this how do I deal with a tendency agreement? How do I complain against a producer company or something like that or that's going to be automated? is fairly straightforward to do and and it will only need A. Minimal. Amount of human inside of. An intervention if you like. At the other end at the. In I think we're GONNA see more and more technology coming in because as those basic functions that are. Being, carried out by junior people or or paralegals or things like that are the ones which are going to be increasing, automating creasing. I'm. We will replace the humans and just let machines do that because there's no point in wasting human resources on that whether that means we need fuel or more lawyers That's an open question I think it will that we need different kinds of lawyers We will need Roy Moore to logically aware much more sophisticated. They don't it's be programmers or odors or anything like that, but they need to have a quite a a a a strong understanding and gross what's going on in technology in that way if you like so. Yeah. We can definitely see an. Yeah, so I, think you mentioned the so from a structure perspective in all forum DC law firm sprucing to word. It a group of equity partners. Around it by machine so to speak well, I. Think. I was in that paper or another one I. I'm S-. Forecast. Law. Firms. Being. Distributed decentralized we'll tournaments organizations running on a blockchain with with the various people. into setting when they will no I. Think the law firm is still a very strong and powerful is Shutian, that's not gonNA disappear straight away. But certainly the numbers of partners who control things will shrink. They'll that will get smarter as proportion and yes, they will be surrounded by machines and they surrounded by people who are servicing those machines. Your excellent. Yeah. Thanks for doing this weekend. John really enjoyed the conversation. Thank you very much. It's been great fun and very

Blockchain John Gill Eappen Eappen Queensland University Of Techn Blockchain Technologies Australia Griffith University India United States German Government Innova Bloomberg Inflammation Royal Society Brisbane John Blockchain Chiba
"aw" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:47 min | 2 years ago

"aw" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Aw. From.

"aw" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"aw" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Aw is aw aw thank you for joining the.

"aw" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"aw" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"My first name in my last name like horribly misspelled and it's like it's like tonight this person unlike okay well have you ever let that person just play the show yeah thank you thank you bye bye were ooh the we will listeners that's our show please remember torreton review us on itunes you can follow me on twitter cameron esposito we recorded by map rousseau produced by sierra keto and farrell audio theme song is by aw and you can find themlisten to awcom thanks for listening to query i am hello beautiful i'm amy eric founder of madison re i hear colour company i named after my daughter one of the things i value most in life it's time time to spend with my daughter time to spend with family and the time i put into my company that's reinventing the way women colored their hair the busiest most successful women i know us madison read the amazing hair color hacking in under an hour and for less than twenty five dollars madison read delivers gorgeous shiny multidimensional healthy looking hair with an ammonia free formula you'll look like you just came from a salon but the reality is you have more be time to do what you love things get busy let us take care of you and your hair find your perfect shade at madison dash3com and get 10 percent off plus free shipping on your first color kit use code new that's code new tryon love it that's the beauty of madison read.

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"aw" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"aw" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"In the like interconnection via of like he's a very small oral touch each other's lives i mean they're not the only person to shout out somebody who's also been a guest on the show and i think i'd die yeah and it but in a cool way because what i think is that like every time i try and length thank jenny for being an influence his always like stop bed but you know i mean i had jenny on and now she said she thanked somebody else she think the bush's oh nice yeah yeah and also jr the but she's on i haven't had the bush's anya but hopefully i'm just trying to like get that chain going like it all goes into her body but also talked a lot about how christon rousseau influenced her coming at low yes so it's it's just really awesome because i'm like at this moment where the internet has made it so that we can know each other for her bass thinks the internet saturday foul some time sia and sometimes you how the wrong people to become president series of you also help us to know each other in like yeah close up our web a little bit snag kennel that's how much anywhere my space that's amazing now that's the story for another day well thanks w euro the i think in here and i really love you music hugh our listeners should final your music yeah it you can find it right now under allison weiss my previous name which is as a player smells and an iin tyrrell's and i yes in allison is amazing how you will miss mispell the name allison spellings but for us not any okay are as seen some crazy shit upon a market of our seriously.

jenny bush rousseau allison weiss tyrrell allison spellings president
"aw" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"aw" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"Expecting to like catch eyes with other people and and you know uh both be sad or whatever like like see other people like feeling this and it was like nothing had happened and like all these people are american you know what i mean like a what it was a resort and it was just like no one gave a shit and we were like how do we stay here for like three more days and just sit around the pool with all these people who probably did this you know and and it was just sad and weird and and so we will found some cheap tickets and flew home clear yeah because we wanted to be like with our friends in in our community here in like trying to figure out what the fuck do we do next of course yeah did you figure that out not yet it tell me what it is still trying to figure it out you know leaking podcast like these and uh this is know part of my little rating queer love anthems y'all hopefully yeah you know doing doing these little things that we can do and then obviously you know the bigger things thing's your people hiring of your people and and shell when the time the show up yeah absolutely yeah but i am feeling called to make different arched than i used to go yeah same here feel called to make the ah i like all my signs are about relationships and break off similar half i myself now mike gatting's one of those i'm just like is this is this really the important on but i like to alike to the music thing ellie to cryptically discuss other topics like in the form of olaf's home pretty much.

ellie mike gatting olaf
"aw" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"aw" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"Sison with these two women that we met who ran a horse ranch in colorado for rural colorado did and invited to that horse by its yes their business hurt his unrefrigerated away have kept it is there were yeah one of them had been a nun and the other one that i had been a nurse and the none was also a doctor which had in no with even possible l my guy should know this because a pretty and catholic but she was a nun doctor and she met this woman at the hospital and who is nursing they fell in love she stopping and nunn on the got together they've been together for like was like forty years or something like that added soviet them the resources in the country and they were like i mean a lot of our we live in length trump samarkand but their house had burned down a couple of years prior and their community bought them anew house oh my god because trying made me i n in trump's america people realize like oh these are the nurses that nursing dr that yeah take care of seattle maybe we should like make thereby house to limit that's so nice i know i was kind of i mean it was still awful but it was an interesting place to be first sure yeah while during the summer we were watching everything fall apart yeah we like we actually ended up going home a few days early because allow it was like we we already been there for like i don't know seventhranked days or something so wasn't like that insane to be like well let's just cut our sherpa couple of days short can we're supposed to go back only a couple of days but we like went downstairs the morning after in like everybody in this resort was like an old white person and it just felt really weird and like we went down to at breakfast like holding hands.

Sison colorado trump seattle nunn america forty years
"aw" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"aw" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"Um military holidays really like memorial day um but of arrived jerry yes yes think about all the people that served that lake they were away from their families and couldn't talk about am or they were kicked out of the military or whatever like yeah because it's such a extreme situation any way for her like beyond what i could ever relate to and then i think about being us and beyond that situation key like we're sitting here were like oh it's so hard and i'll be out on stage like imagine not being out in the military here it's like i know i don't know that's what i'm saying is that i know can ever um but if i do because all like tweet about that or whatever some small teeny thing that doesn't whatever area and there will always be somebody who responds or multiple pulled people who respond who are responding from ah firstperson perspective like oh thanks yeah i did this and i'll i did this in this says he looks like all the people who came forward when trump went off and tweeted about transgender the military yes that transgender military banner whatever the right he in his in their easy idea he has preventing transpeople from entering the military in the future yes since they are not there now from his perspective phone oh yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah i will stop the future thing happening yeah well it does feel like everyone was like rollcall people were like hey i have been here gas slash ammo older than youserved and you didn't yeah yeah i know clash i sign up for this shit and used like dodge the draft constantly yeah it's infuriating the irs noah fury that could ever be enough for that man the idiocy that he spouts who i know a tough how how are you holding up in that um fine it definitely took a while tillich field kind of normal again you know i was only honeymoon on election night and it was the worst it was lured wow you're in the morning where were you guys bering kabo oh wow yeah lou party and it was like we were like you know some resort or whatever a place that people honeymoon when they go hot carlo and it was so insane to like i mean you know to wake up that morning be like fuck in easily.

jerry trump irs lou party tillich
"aw" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"aw" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"It's wild to me because there's there are comics it that's not true really yes and i feel like a song at least it's like you can like the crychan cut your credit to graves talks about all the early against meese already have references to to her being trans an i love that because he can like writes poetry and no one fucking knows its flare you make the matrix yeah and then you watch the matrix abujamal's lawyer like oh my god whoa cool i get it with the matrix zeev is this like a metaphor is they're like an matrix thing luke is only a queer thing in the truth is the way trump's these are both trends women do you remember what that movies abode the matrix yeah yeah the original yeah it's about so confused right now well it's about like do you like stay plugged into a false reality room or do you claim your own life and be who you are this is so good yes what's the major major as lesley interests straight up the queer is to movie that it was so queer i'm going to have to go i may i see is like saying this out of my face a senior i don't know about you but i have a tendency to like seek where stuff in a lot of places where it isn't unlike superquick ngos yes nso how recently of you seem bound never let's found what i literally over copyright rate there you can physically see it with your eyes right there are bound is the movie that the white house he's made oh boy that would that is so good and was so well respected that it secured them funding to make the matrix okay so like that movie is super low budget i can't wait a lake colleague good are he only noise straight ahead movie.

meese graves lesley
"aw" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"aw" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"Um yeah it's it's it's cool i feel like they're really good example two because they kind of a they i feel like they started in that world the the queer world and then something happened they crossed over and i feel like they i don't know maybe they helped open up the space for other queer artist to yeah you know i guess exactly i on radio feel like they were so young that they like started trying to be like mainstream folk but then unfortunately every gay person found them and was obsessed with him oh my god we know he had like a like unfortunately for them at the time beginning i'm sure they were freaking out you know like yeah true wearing that badger whatever but then i sink i really do look at them as people that have opened the door because they than like switched over to a more pop sensibility and so there's songs were just played different places sudan people became fans and then everything got queered actress cool and now now you kind of don't have to pick the same way yeah but man you really had to pick yeah what did what did you pick early on uh nine you had to pick well i started playing music before i was out in any way shape or form on oh is at lake it was fine i mean i like i dated boys and i liked them in there was fine so i think like i'm like way more queer than i than i ever will thought i was or could be because like when i came out i was like i am definitely gay only date and like women and then ten years later i'm like those relationships ahead with the dudes that i liked were important wrote like a billion songs about them level first record is about a guy who broke my heart.

sudan ten years
"aw" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"aw" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"I would also no but but what you're saying is true two hundred nb left at your jokes but i mean that's true when i first started doing comedy if you were a comic who was interested in performing for queer audiences you were not also performing firm straight audiences saturday who had to pick that's a thing in or a feel like was in the music world as well for sure they're definitely like when i was living in new york for sure there were bands that like only played like queer gay spaces like gave ours and things like that and pride festivals before things like kuoan queer in punk um like everything got queered yeah everything got queered yeah is there it has got looking incorrectness guidelines bans now that are queer and out and i like can even imagine what that would have been like growing up with that and also that can sell tickets to lake everyone oh yeah we only making the decision enter the the profession and it's like hey do you wanna be able to sell tickets to ten percent of the people in the city or would you like to be able to salt tickets to 100 percent most people in the city because some gay people would have seen me if it was a straight room and i have like air quotes going on right now yeah but no straight people would have gone to what was then arum and this is like you know whatever this as fifteen years ago um so i do think it's really different now and that's really fun and exciting but also maybe i'm different like maybe i'm just less worried about it yes could be i dunno i i look at it i don't think so i look at like tiegen and sarah i want to uh show of you where i stood next to you we're yes search other at this show here and i was just like looking at their crowd you know verses when i saw them ten years prior oh yeah and very diverse now what their crowd was like versus whether crowe used to be like kia and just a various answers for laos i know a lot about their cuffs yeah yeah.

new york arum crowe kia fifteen years 100 percent ten percent ten years
"aw" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"aw" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"Or maybe it's because like fucking living in the south side group the south on like hammered into my brain that that was like bad so maybe it's like internalize o of obea who knows yeah i actually i would only use the word gay pretty much on stage and tell him at ria yeah who then used the word lesbian onstage and i was like that's cool yeah how big it an and now like before well i mean i know exactly why for me um i think the how i grew up and then my understanding of myself and when i was trying to do professionally i was just it's hard to say a saying that leaves men out okay um because as a woman yeah i was taught that i have to be available to men yeah so lesbian is lake yeah not inclusive of men in lake also this is a very binary i mean i'm aware of all these thoughts being like notch full of all of the genders and again answers yet the fifth there is a sort of central truth said i'm talking about here about the way that the word lesbian was used when i was a kid a guy who and what it meant and then what it meant about lake that person's value in society yeah because if men decided your value there and you opt out of that system than what than tigana laughing your jokes how could i love it you're jokes her how could you even exist eac would you be safe we arguable of a job yeah airing serious and amtrak note me volume hit on where you are here's an officer a lotta.

officer ria amtrak
"aw" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"aw" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"Uh like you know just like little things were shall be like uh of dili kinney grab this thing as arches i sure thing baby girl boy person nimitz like because she like accidentally corrects herself in and just like stumbles over it and i love it and she like feels bad and i'm like it's okay it's like the key to singing world um and uh she's uh yeah to she get where you're talking about when he mean like you're talking about an experience that's true for you be ah and maybe not true for her yeah is that something the only should get she doesn't she'll shoot i don't and she like admits that she won't be able to like get it the way that i get it experience it but she'd totally empathizes an like is like there for me unlike wants to understand everything i think that's really interesting because you know as our community in evolves it's firstly different people who identified different ways are going to be part of partnerships yeah where you know the twenty years ago we had just like a different set of words who were like smaller set of words it was like both of these are two lesbians down i mean the i now it's like couples are not necessarily don't necessarily share pronounce within as surly share one uses square one uses gay you know like i think it's just gonna continue in that direction well yeah like the way in our community letting liked to identifies queer likes like the idea that many ways but she always just says gay so i mean it's interesting radion i don't like the word lesbian i've never liked being colas win oh wordy what do you think that's whereas what's that i have no idea the only thing i can think is because it's at like uh maybe like a generational thing.

kinney twenty years
"aw" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"aw" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"Maybe there's a chance that is august nights i know so just to say that on august ninth for you alley in a w and waste early kinda different her jansher will yet alley feels like a neutral neutrally nickname ocala send always from my whole life made me think of like a woman on a soap opera or destroying some woman who like i definitely wasn't wow internet seeing have people always shortened it now so people usually did call you alisyn yeah oh wow okay now as then al's and only my very very close family ever called me alley until like the past year when like my friends to sort of like picked it up because my wife calls me alley and down and so yeah so that that doesn't bother me as much um i don't know i'm trying to figure out do i want to give myself a more neutral verse name i dunno yeah trying to figure out as greg myself of the other night own because i was reading somebody on reddit talking about names namechanging ends they were suggesting to a person that they take their new name and then hyphen old name so it's like a combo and for some reason the first thing that pumped in my head was john allison and then i was like dying because john al's into means the most and same name and also i think of like extended family being like white so you're telling me she has changed her first named john allison chooses fug input john in front of her name and i just feel like that's ridiculous um and then i kinda started liking and i was like what does that mean and then i woke up the next morning and i was like that was an insane thought i hate that so much um so i'm kind of all over the place.

john allison john al greg
"aw" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"aw" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"Rain or i'm like when i can't do this and that and i'm like why can't i this really cruel because it speaks to like the community that you've created around yourself yeah if you're not getting that externally yeah that would seem like you have some good people in your life yeah so that's a positive yet um i've i've come out to my immediate family and i'm sure my and filial find out i mean it's like a i don't know about you but actually coming coming out as gay like earlier in life was so serious and like yeah this is a this new thing is serious but like i'm way more like um i guess like not like like i don't care is much what my family thinks now i'm sort of like i'm thirty years old and like it's fine figure it out reunion came on as a 22 yeah anyone navy that's part of what i would say about like family response isn't it i mean what are they gonna say to you yeah when near thirty i know married seemingly happy hat living a positive life we at right here because i feel like a lot of what parents and families say or worry about which is like actually a rational worry whom parents go wide and once you have a bad life totally and exact what they don't realize is that like action the everything up and who will that point has been confusing i think pick for parents kid coming out is like oh no now there are different yeah before the person coming out it's like oh my god.

thirty years
"aw" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"aw" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"M a w as like a find this person yes seems more difficult now is not the not the way to go then i noticed that your twitter handle is listened to aw from so her number one i guess is me asking should i change that to aw possibly unlike in the process of figuring out right now at one i'm going to call my musical project but it's probably going to be a w and then allison wise in parentheses for like at least a few years you know what i mean just because it had your it'll have to be ah on at least unlike posters and like things where i like make appearances or or play shows are things like that um but i'm dabbling in a in a change it in spotify an iteens tillich whatever i decide i'm trying to figure out really if i'm going to be a w from going to be a band name so i don't know what's the talk to me about that change when you mean well um like what's the what what happened for you um or what is opening for you yeah i recently came out as like non binary gender queer i guess i'm like trans masculine in many ways of still figuring it out it's all brand new yeah that's a you don't have to have like a final answer the seattle jeopardy the maize have like whatever i'm than try it's actually funding to like be in the middle of this process and like figure it out because i am always i'm like worried that people want me like give them an explanation know exactly who i am um but i think that uh one of the best parts of being queer is that you don't always have to like no exactly and you can just like be who you are in the moment simul i'm like i'm having an it turns out like i'm the main person who's like trying to force myself to put myself into a box you know what i mean like i'm having all these feelings like i am like becoming a victim of my own like binary breyer.

breyer twitter allison wise spotify seattle
"aw" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"aw" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"Introduce yourself my name is was formerly allison wise and is now alleyways or a w or a dubs or something and i'm in the process of figuring out what that will be eventually nascar lab yeah and exertion um you may have heard me from the internet and that's pretty much it you know where else they've heard yu wear oh shit about twenty seconds ago yeah yeah yeah we can i curse on this podcast yesterday advice totally word you can totally the f word totally depends on which i've worked worker yes some of them are true the gao not my frankel the other one a hard f yeah yeah yeah now dial a hard enough unless you unless were again yeah we always be dropping hard f totally satit yes they heard you just a few seconds ago goes you actually we i asked you yes if i could lay since one of your songs to be or theme song yes for query such a like business the way to put it for the listeners oh yeah imran did license my song as a theme for this podcast all i wanted to say that because it you didn't write it for us was already is i had to say like that you wouldn't have written it fry is just that i really loved that song so much in so i perched you to ask if we could use that specifically um and it really worked out and now there it is now absolutely so that was me um i love that saw him thank you who we are yeah and i've been listening to it on spotify allott which is of weird which is weird only because it's lewis onehour service okay theme song of my own podcast i buy your like apologizing for listening to it on spotify not having bought it which is what allowed people do oh i'm out about that states should have fell on that by admitted something that i should have obama instead i brasher bought it through band camp how cheinal nine i don't even know how people by music i don't buy unless i buy own records for at least stream it that still lake county here yeah saying the kids are some measure i gave up on the making money off of the selling a songs thing a long time ago.

spotify allison wise nascar obama lake county twenty seconds onehour
"aw" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"aw" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"Hey query listeners it's cameras busy though and when i am not having oh the best conversations you ever heard recorded via a microphone i am also speaking into a microphone doing standup comedy and you can hear me do stand up comedy every week via podcast on the player has together podcast i cohosted with moi free a butcher and is recorded here in los angeles at the ucb theater every tuesday night so just head over to put their heads together and you can hear we tell jokes who would want that i am this is a show about individual experience and personal identity there may be times are folks use identifying words or phrases that don't feel right to you that's part of what we're exploring here please listen with an open heart and as always i welcome your plate engage feedback and courage you to continue the conversation in your life in with your community welcome to query hey quieroz cameron here and i am excited to announced it this week on december eighth rio butchered i won't be lou releasing backtoback our live album that we recruit owner tour this fall you can preorder 'backtoback on i tunes now where you can grab it i tunes amazon everywhere on the eighth please help us get to number one we were so excited about the album yay yet a also today on the show a w a w is the amazing musician behind the query theme song you can follow it w at listen to aw on twitter you can find out more information about were there ban is going to be playing and about buying their music.

los angeles ucb theater quieroz cameron twitter lou amazon