35 Burst results for "AVA"

Peaks and Tides Sonoma Coast Chardonnay 2018

The CheapWineFinder Podcast

04:07 min | 4 d ago

Peaks and Tides Sonoma Coast Chardonnay 2018

"Stay home. Cheap wine fighter dot com summit again with another. Why Review. In kind of a companion podcast for wine picked up all. All he's been. Doing well lately and this one's called. Let me grab the bottle so I don't screw it up. Peaks in tied. Sonoma's coach Chardonnay Twenty, eight, eighteen. And peaks and tides kind of. Describes the SONOMA's coast. Ava that's. mainly. A Boutique area that specializes in Chardonnay and new are. It's up along the coast. It's In between coastal mountains it's cold. There's not a lot of huge vineyards in there. It's more boats tiki their commercial vineyards within a big. But it's. Really good growing area. And I want to a snow coast trade event a few years back. and kind of picked up gossip I. Think I would call it because it'd be wine reps and then there would be winemakers and they were kind of upset. That when the SONOMA's coast Aba was set, their boundaries are set up. Some of the bigger. Huge actually. Well established. Literally connected wineries and Wine Corpse. Kinda got the the boundaries moved to cover the Russian river eastward just to cover some of the bigger properties. And the guys kind of upset and I just noticed that Petitioned to have a western SONOMA'S COAST AV A. Now I don't know what the problem is because even the Russian river ones those are really high on liner isn't really good wines. I. Don't get what the problem is. You know maybe it's a small guy versus little guy I don't know. But, that's what they were doing and they were seemed to be all upset about it. So you know that's just gossip me sitting here with a glass by hand listening to winemaker stock. So this is a SONOMA's coast Chardonnay. If you check out your Google look. The the town in the back they said peaks and tides made it. I don't know if there is a pig's entites company, but you can figure out who the winemaker might or the liner or one of their entities might be. It's not a foolproof method of who the biggest Winery in town is, but it usually gives you a good clue. GonNa take a sip of this one. This is a really good nine, ninety, nine Chardonnay. It's got some oaken full Benatti huge amount. Let's got this kind of honey rounded thing going on it's got all sorts of flavors. I mean I got banana and pineapple. Meyer. Lemon and NAPA grapefruit and you've got on least salty thing. It's got some lemon. Vanilla cream. It tastes good. It smells great. It's got a great enrollment to I was Kinda digging that. So for ninety nine in any don't expect all these displays, these wines. So haphazardly that you you know. You don't have an expectation just by looking though this label and this line they also have a pretty good Cabernet. Sauvignon thing that I thought it's up. You know I'm not sure about that one. The packaging looks like it could be any kind of retail brand in back of genes fine. And it tastes good really good at for ten bucks and can delivers maybe over delivers. Ten Bucks will buy you a good Chardonnay out as ten twelve dollars you can you really, really good. But this is to in itself storebrand again, all these been kind of kick in some but I kind of liken it.

Sonoma Chardonnay Twenty Russian River Storebrand Google Meyer
"ava" Discussed on Reverie True Crime

Reverie True Crime

08:00 min | Last week

"ava" Discussed on Reverie True Crime

"Okay to Dave Mack morning. Talk say has W. A. Eggs. Dave Mack. Could you make any sense out of the paternal grandmother's clients? There's not a police report that we know of, and it's my understanding that in that jurisdiction. A tray position, a schoolteacher anybody believes that there is evidence of molestation or abuse and must be reported to police. Is there a police report dave? I'm biting my tongue over here listening to her tongue on your show again, a couple of weeks ago you had her on there and you knew there was some difficulties between the by the paternal grandmother and the mother we well understand that. But what we do know is that when baby a the came home from visiting her daddy that she had cut some breezes and burn marks on her hand and the biological mother took a to the doctor and the doctor. So they could photograph as they would have proof that that's what happened when she was with the biological father you got the mother here trying to dangle some kind. Of An exclusive interview, she's making accusations on national television and has nothing to back it up. The one thing we do know is that she's not being truthful with you because before when she was on, she said absolutely not she has no idea where he is he has no idea where the baby is only the baby is fine that he wasn't hurt the baby and now she says that she knew that he was in Mexico with the baby if he's so broke, why is he getting remarried? February the eleven the leading ten days later and taking his baby a with his new wife smuggling her across the border in a bus. Hiding out three hours for five. Win Games, new white family where has ever been late. This stinks to high heaven. rhetorician I have some hosts that action arena that were on the facebook page bring a home. February twenty third there was a picture posted of Asia's favourite plush toy stitch from the movie low and stitch. He was looking out the window with a heartbreaking caption that said, this is avis favorite stuffed animals ditch. He's waiting on his best friend to come home. March Seventh Twenty, twelve it says good morning everyone. There hasn't been any new leads with police this morning, but we have been working with our contacts at missing and exploited children and working on sending information to America's most wanted to get them to air the story as well. Thank you everyone who has left their porch light on for Asia. On March Twenty, sixth twenty twelve. Thirty, four days missing thirty eight days since she was last seen by her mommy. Hope you're safe wherever you are baby girl. We will never stop looking where going to bring you back home. Porch lights on at night for Eva, until she home. On April third twenties well, someone updated the facebook page and said. Abbas home. Such a happy day for her mommy and daddy as seen above a an evo relief you so much this has been such a long journey to get you home with stop looking and are porch lights stayed on for you baby girl. Thank you to everyone following us on this journey. So glad to see there are still so many compassionate people in the world. Will Continue to keep you all updated as we hand through the rest of this process i. know by this point, the media has probably got wind of Asia's return a Redo ask that you continue to respect that and her family's privacy, and when she's ready for an interview, we will let you know. May Twenty Second Twenty, twelve, she said, hello all of holiday is I don't mean to neglect the page of updates life Jisr context the will and handle and sometimes it's hard to stop by and let everyone know the latest. Brent will be appearing in court tomorrow as he has put in a motion to be released to a third party hensel order have his bond reduced the judges meeting to rule on that motion it is my understanding that some news channels have asked to film it. So I will see if we can find that video. As for an EVA update, she's doing very well, her vocabulary is growing as well as her she is probably three-foot six and she's really getting to be tall. Thank you all for the Mother's Day. Wishes we had a good mother's Day she got me one of those hallmark roses that now sits in her room so she can open and close the bloom as much as she pleases. That's the latest will be updating again soon. On July First Twenty Twelve Athena wrote. I was doing some research today and found a fact that made my jaw drop according to a government website. There are estimated two hundred cases of parental abduction, a day and the United States. However, I don't find that extremely hard to believe because in the time that able was missing I got the privilege to speak with people who were victims of their parents taking NAM or the parents. Who had their child taken from them? It was just something I thought was really sad that it happens so often. September Twenty Years Twenty twelve she wrote. On Wednesday I went to family court and saw Brandt for the first time in seven months. The court hearing felt like it went quickly but by no means, did it wa by? The judge took under advisement what testimony was given and stated that she would publish her decision by minute injury I just wanted to let you know the latest. February eighteenth twenty thirteen she wrote one year ago today uphold NGO The starbucks parking lot to drop my child off with their father for court order parenting time. It was a short drop and to this day I can still feel the emotion of every time having watched my child go back and forth or mom and dad's house. I remember backing out of the parking spot after washing grant and his new wife drove away with Uva in the middle of them. Every time she lived. It would be, of course very sad but I would push it to the back of my mind and just or to when I would get back. On this particular day though I had no idea that I would not be seeing my child for the next forty five days and when never have imagined the manhunt sleepless nights and of course, support that our get to help find my baby. I cannot repeat enough how much. So appreciate the support ahead and finding my child. Thank you so much an update since this February eighteenth day one year ago. Brent is still in jail awaiting trial. He has been offered a plea bargain but hasn't said, yes or no Eva. As you can see earlier got a new puppy named Olivia. Amo has been in school for almost a all school year. She has made so much progress with her speech and motor skills. She hasn't shown any signs of trauma since she came Home April Third Twenty twelve. She has some instances where she will wake up from badgering him but for the most part has been a pretty happy three year old. So I got in touch with Athena and this is the newest update on Asia and.

Asia Dave Mack facebook Brent Eva Mexico United States Athena Abbas Amo America Brandt hensel
"ava" Discussed on Reverie True Crime

Reverie True Crime

04:04 min | Last week

"ava" Discussed on Reverie True Crime

"Is. What if your audience members would like to step forward and now my I would be more than happy to give you the story about this woman earner family in the sick and demented things that they've worn down in there and that's the reason why that their relationship stopped in the first place and the theme that did not want my Miss Baras. Yes I appreciate that because my son we're in trouble I would do everything I could to get the best lawyer for him but it seems to me that if you really believe your little baby granddaughter Ava is threatened or is in trouble, you won't be talking. About exchanging her safety for an exclusive interview. Now, what is wrong with her? Surroundings why is she not saying if she's not safe, she needs to get out of that home right now. Get exactly what I'm seeing. That's why we call your commercial. Is Not working for because the. Spirit, we find out one reason if you are as difficult to get the answer I mean I'm pulling teeth here. She's not say then tell it. Let it be known. Let's get the child. If your son he had to go and take her to Mexico. He is not safe I tried saying that fits the CPS. My son says to CPS nobody will step in a takeover. They say it's matter jurisdiction where we're not gonNA do how else are we supposed to George you get? So system is not working with. Nobody is listening to what we're saying jared some serious issues or not. Maybe that's because you're not giving any answers miss borrows. Now offense I wanted to baby say. You're not giving me answers when you say the baby's about safe I, say why and you won't tell me who I think so that you're losing all your credibility. Let's try incest. Okay. Let's try insists on my granddaughter been molested. How we go there, how about we get some people on the show? Let's do some way to set your says. Is. Islam. There there are some serious issues going on in that household. I. Tell. You about what is what makes us come to this conclusion that it is this? What is? My granddaughter just not needs to be in that. Let me get this straight. Are you saying that baby ava has been the victim of child molestation while in the custody of her mother? Ma'am.

Ava Miss Baras jared Mexico George
"ava" Discussed on Reverie True Crime

Reverie True Crime

05:34 min | Last week

"ava" Discussed on Reverie True Crime

"But right now, just in I, want to go straight out on news that a baby we have been looking for Baby Ava enloe age two has been found straight out to Dave mack morning talk show host with W. A. X. Dave. What can you tell me Baby Ava Sand Nancy it's some of the most exciting news that we've been able to tell in a long time about a missing child custody kidnapping happen all the time. But this one as you have covered since the very beginning baby ava went missing after dad did not return her from a scheduled visit. They had no idea where he's GonNa. They knew that he had cleaned out the house cleaned out the bank accounts and they found his truck added bus depot. They had no other clues to go on but Phoenix police working with the S. marshalls and the. Authorities tracked down baby ava to the small town of Pueblo delay about three hours north of Mazas line and they were able to track down baby ava and return where to her mother. Everybody. Breaking news right now baby EVA low. We told you all of baby ava not long ago. Her mom goes to pick her up at a local coffee shop. Daddy never shows up with the baby she goes to his house day find the home cleaned out partially we moved out no trace of the Bio Dad and his brand new wife they are gone and so is the baby the. Big Headline Is Baby Ava is alive. Baby Ava has been found is back with her mother. You See Daddy there doing the permanent war daddy with the baby with the new wife in Mexico and joining me right now is baby abors grandmother. This is her paternal grandmother Melinda. Boris is with US exclusively Miss Baras I know you're concerned about your son tonight but the big news is they're both alive. Baby Abe. Abe is safe. What can you tell us? Why did your son Take Baby Ava? Out of the country. Girl and many lays up to story straight here her name is Eva Anderson it's not an low and Don. Life one takes my granddaughter out of the country to protect her. If I if I could start out by asking your audience today, do you think it's My son burden attorney out there that could help you. Go through this nightmare for him. Much appreciated. Okay Miss Peres your your side took the baby out of the country and was hiding in Mexico. Read Pay. Why did your son take the really because you told me where you were on my show. Big You had heard from him at all nobody knew where he was less you knew where he was all along and didn't tell anybody. So is that true? That is absolutely correct but my son was not trying to hide the white hurt with sitting at the bus station. My son signed his name to the tickets. If you wanted to hide, he would not what the breadcrumb trail where he was at. Well, why would you leave a trail? I don't understand leaving a bread crumb trail. You're referring to the story, Hansel and Gretel where the eagles data there was trying to kill the baby. All right. Let's rethink that comparison you're on with me recently, and you told me you did not know where your son was now to me if I don't let my family know where I am that means I'm hiding. Let me rephrase it for you. Why did your son leave the country with Baby Ava? Lifetime Brent Anderson. Saint Job for fifteen years. He has a Pursuit of rights as a father's roller judicial system. Was who took his life saving for last fifteen years of hiring attorney so that he could follow officials. Airs Borrow money from family..

ava Eva Anderson Mexico Daddy attorney Dave mack W. A. X. Dave kidnapping Abe Brent Anderson Miss Peres Phoenix S. marshalls Boris Hansel Pueblo Mazas eagles
"ava" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

05:12 min | 3 weeks ago

"ava" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Making me That wasn't me comes next. Must he must exit does nobody sees a thing called? Get them over the other night. Wilson's portable No. He must body of let Ava X. It does move in single. Love Come from Mr Spector. And if it was me these beads how much You sold me? American with us leaving no millet you come. You will see that the best. You gotta take it easy on you. Someone for money..

Mr Spector Wilson Ava
Netflix announces Ava DuVernay-led series on Colin Kaepernick

KCBS Radio Morning News

00:13 sec | Last month

Netflix announces Ava DuVernay-led series on Colin Kaepernick

"Netflix is producing a six part series on the social activism of Colin Kaepernick titled Colin in Black and white. The writing is complete the release date to be announced. Kaepernick will play

Colin Kaepernick Netflix
Netflix announces new series about Colin Kaepernick

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:14 sec | Last month

Netflix announces new series about Colin Kaepernick

"You may not have a job in the NFL, but Colin Kaepernick's life is being made into a TV series Kaepernick teaming up with Netflix and Ava Duvernay for six part drama Kaepernick will narrate the show and an actor. Just to play the younger football stars. No word yet when we'll see Colin and

Colin Kaepernick Ava Duvernay NFL Football Netflix
Ava DuVernay joins the film academy's Board of Governors

Jason and Alexis

01:48 min | 2 months ago

Ava DuVernay joins the film academy's Board of Governors

"Ava duvernay got some good news yesterday and it's good news for all of us that are fans of the motion picture industry what what happened yes so the academy of motion picture arts and sciences sciences but I she's been elected to the board of governors she's one of six to start her first term of course eva she did Selma thirteenth the move it we just kind of briefly talked about and when they see S. so she has been she is joining the directors branch no I don't know much about this after reading this in a little bit more but they're seventeen different branches to the academy and they represent directors casting directors film editors all do you know make up and hair stylist visual effects all different parts of making a film and so in the academy in the board of directors each branch there seventeen is represented by three governors so she'll be of course with the directors they can serve up to three years for three consecutive terms and basically what they do is they think about the vision of the academy they want to preserve their financial health and then make sure that they're doing what they say they're going to be doing yeah and of course representation is very important state right now with the increase of the six people there's five and twenty six women it now on the board and twelve people of color and then so try to figure out how many total that is it's almost half for women which is good that's fantastic and then of course with women of and there are people of color it looks like a click a quarter so but that's good Hey it's about time I'm surprised she hasn't been asked to be on this board

Ava Duvernay Selma S.
"ava" Discussed on The Bitcoin Podcast

The Bitcoin Podcast

02:37 min | 2 months ago

"ava" Discussed on The Bitcoin Podcast

"You know I want I want <Speech_Male> to I <Speech_Male> want to go after actual like <Speech_Male> full on eighth Maxi's <Speech_Male> <hes> and <Speech_Male> <hes> just have little <Speech_Male> bashed <SpeakerChange> in Saint Conversation. <Speech_Male> That's going to be fun <Speech_Male> honestly <Speech_Male> Kevin of <Speech_Male> Happy that you guys entered <Speech_Male> the space because <Speech_Male> or like <Speech_Male> became more serious <Speech_Male> with Abacus. All the <Speech_Male> Maxi's are no <Speech_Male> longer on my back. <Speech_Male> They're all on you <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> guys now. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Twitter <Speech_Male> experience has <Speech_Male> been so wholesome. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> they're on me well <Speech_Male> to be <Speech_Male> They're not bothering <Speech_Male> me because they can't bothering <Speech_Male> me too much. Nowadays <Speech_Male> I make I make <Speech_Male> noise against the ethereal <Speech_Male> for <Speech_Male> real reason like just cancel. <Speech_Male> It's very <Speech_Male> objective noise right. It's like <Speech_Male> look while high fees <Speech_Male> or that <Speech_Male> kind of stuff and <SpeakerChange> there's nothing they can <Speech_Male> say but <Speech_Male> I I completely agree <Speech_Male> like I <Speech_Male> was commenting <Speech_Male> Syria Moloch <Speech_Male> because I <Speech_Male> just east <Speech_Male> to his practically <Speech_Male> going to work <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I call <Speech_Male> or I got some East <Speech_Male> maxed. Yemi me <Speech_Male> saying that. I'm not doing <Speech_Male> good marketing for <Speech_Male> theory. And that's GONNA <Speech_Male> caused our <SpeakerChange> bags to <Speech_Male> dump <Speech_Male> Jesus <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Scrape <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I. Don't <Speech_Male> this is why <Speech_Male> Deano the show. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Let's wrap this up <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Add as much as we <Speech_Music_Male> can that I remember <Speech_Music_Male> to add to shut <Speech_Music_Male> outs and <Speech_Music_Male> look for to seeing what you <Speech_Music_Male> guys build. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> Come on show <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> thank you. Thank you guys. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Thank you dean denouncing Corey <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and also as much as we <Speech_Music_Male> can that I remember <Speech_Music_Male> to add to shut <Speech_Music_Male> outs and <Speech_Music_Male> look for to seeing what you <Speech_Music_Male> guys build. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> Come on show <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> thank you. Thank you guys. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Thank you dean denouncing Corey <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and also <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> John. You've <SpeakerChange> been quietly <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> listening. But thank you for <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> coming in <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> spangles. <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> And

Corey
"ava" Discussed on The Bitcoin Podcast

The Bitcoin Podcast

08:41 min | 2 months ago

"ava" Discussed on The Bitcoin Podcast

"I'm a first differentiates itself with its consensus protocol. Which I know you've talked about a lot before Previous episodes of this but I'll I'll give a very brief overview of essentially. It's a highly scalable both in throughput and also the latency and the number of participants The can participate in consensus. So the first kind of main idea that that started album was the concert. Now since then we've also branched out into this idea of sub nets relate heterogeneous or a heterogeneous network. So that allows us to Kind of scale not just like on like consensus speed sides but also allows people to develop their own personalized Network so for example. We we are able to port the EDM so easily because we can essentially just have a wrapper around an existing EDM implementation and then use avalanche consensus with that and so we can court in two Gecko in relatively easy manner with how we structured sub nets and so that lets people not just You know have very fast infrastructure but also very flexible one so someone could implement their own. Virtual machine has an arbitrary business logic. That's specific to them and so Say so those are those are the two technical side And then I think Kevin can talk a lot more about like the business on how we're kind of it chained to to meet unique in that aspect but I think From the architecture side where we're kind of pushing towards like You know very very flexible infrastructure both on the consensus and the engine side for Kevin. Kevin I WANNA I wanNA trend reiterate something that's I think is incredibly important about The what office doing That is it's a it's a market distinction between consensus and the underlying data or mach- machine. Stay right most open networks right now those things are intrinsically married like like the consensus for lives state and the changes nate whereas Aga An it's different. Nation is consistent his own thing and then you can have other like a bunch of different machines rely on. That's exactly yeah that's basically exactly right. It's program ability not just at the application layer which is what other smart contract platforms delighted to already It's also program ability At layers below that the network stack wind data stacks which is an important property allows some interesting things that are very difficult from for for others One of the most important things that we want to make sure is that we build a smart contract platform that capitalizes on the value of the applications built on top This is something that for example doesn't do I can if I issue a let me let me call a low velocity a high longevity type of assets. Something like You know Real Estate Orlando something like that That on a theorem Looks no different than forgive nommik laser here but the any regular should coin It accumulates the same fees. It does not. It is not guaranteed to be different from any other Coined the does may be has no value whatsoever to it and we're trying to capitalize on this problem in a way that provides a that gives the issue of assets in creators smart contracts on our platform the ability to effectively divide the the the guarantees a little bit more at a higher. Gherardi or Logan. Larry Rather It's it's about you know giving somebody that is issuing these applications that or the asked us that have very high longevity needs and high security needs It gives them the ability to pay much much. Larger fees to be stored for very long period of time and be very secure. Burst something that. Maybe he's just not very high value and needs may be much higher speed and much lower fees so this is something that we allow. That theory doesn't quite allow and and is actually goes down to the to the token design as well so in fury on the the problem is it does not You know if I issue a new token Or if I build a ruler. Successful application of the theory Yeah fees are paid in East which is great but down to the minors and nobody else benefits from the fact that there is usage off of these Of this of this token on the system It's actually It's actually quite a big problem for theory. I mean you have so much value being built on a theory that bitcoin could never could ever dream off right now and none of it is really being capitalized at the value that it should be capitalized by the by the underlying token Our design has been more of the not the designer. We've taken is more of the the one that says. This is a cap supply token like bitcoin. And whenever you do operations that require things like creating new blockchain's and paying for transaction fees and so on they burn off the tokens and the burning Obama tokens alternately creates scarcity novel and so that capitalizes on the underlying On the underlying token of the of system. So that's an in a different designed from How a theory has done this But I mean this more foam I would say peripheral property The first goal that we want achieve is really in the ability to effectively labrum ability at the at the network data layer which is very very important because it allows a lot of flexibility on how you can design your your economics for your smart contract. It's like effectively. You know smart contract level charting almost if you want to think of it that way. Maybe that's not quite super correct. But it's the best knowledge that I can possibly come up with in one sentence and And that's just not the case for any other platform the whoops there okay So Steven you mentioned these subjects that have has right. How do those are? Would you compare those those akin to para chains or something like Sharpton East to a so with the St Louis? Model that you mentioned. How does that compare to something like East? Who which has the goal of being more stateless. Yes so I think the biggest difference the tweet our model and something more similar to their model is that offer us are. Our sub nets are heterogeneous which means that they aren't necessarily running these same The same the Amer the same the same Guess scheme if you're preparing database land So east to at least you know. Correct I'm wrong but Each to is planning on the chief being scale ability on the same kind of network with the same security guarantees in the same network guarantees across all of its shards. So what that means is that essentially. They're trying to paralyse computation and increase their throughput by adding nodes not need to validate the entire the entire state And so that's that's very useful in some cases however what's typically pretty difficult. When there's a lot of cross shark communication which on blockchain it then becomes very important of how you're you're splitting things into shards and so from from our point of view you know you're GonNa have something like you know the die chain or the Guy I G- CHARD. Where ever wants to be on the Diet Chart because everyone of us die and so all of a sudden anyone that isn't on the die charred is going to have to be communicating with the DIA- Chard Which is relatively expensive in most Charlotte Systems However with us Our viewpoint sub nets is that some nets are heterogeneous and so they may contain their own environment so for example B. Edm would live in its own sub met and would have surprise like Is a is Senate that were planning on doing which is a soon of Eutherian state. So so that's That's like the big difference really so we have something that's based off of the functionality. Rather than you know just splitting the entire state. So that's like the main

Dean Dean Nikki dean Eigen Corey Know Lake Stephen Bottle Kansai twitter Rudolph Cornell University Kevin Steven All Klein Alba
Hashing It Out - Ava Labs Kevin and Stephen

The Bitcoin Podcast

08:41 min | 2 months ago

Hashing It Out - Ava Labs Kevin and Stephen

"I'm a first differentiates itself with its consensus protocol. Which I know you've talked about a lot before Previous episodes of this but I'll I'll give a very brief overview of essentially. It's a highly scalable both in throughput and also the latency and the number of participants The can participate in consensus. So the first kind of main idea that that started album was the concert. Now since then we've also branched out into this idea of sub nets relate heterogeneous or a heterogeneous network. So that allows us to Kind of scale not just like on like consensus speed sides but also allows people to develop their own personalized Network so for example. We we are able to port the EDM so easily because we can essentially just have a wrapper around an existing EDM implementation and then use avalanche consensus with that and so we can court in two Gecko in relatively easy manner with how we structured sub nets and so that lets people not just You know have very fast infrastructure but also very flexible one so someone could implement their own. Virtual machine has an arbitrary business logic. That's specific to them and so Say so those are those are the two technical side And then I think Kevin can talk a lot more about like the business on how we're kind of it chained to to meet unique in that aspect but I think From the architecture side where we're kind of pushing towards like You know very very flexible infrastructure both on the consensus and the engine side for Kevin. Kevin I WANNA I wanNA trend reiterate something that's I think is incredibly important about The what office doing That is it's a it's a market distinction between consensus and the underlying data or mach- machine. Stay right most open networks right now those things are intrinsically married like like the consensus for lives state and the changes nate whereas Aga An it's different. Nation is consistent his own thing and then you can have other like a bunch of different machines rely on. That's exactly yeah that's basically exactly right. It's program ability not just at the application layer which is what other smart contract platforms delighted to already It's also program ability At layers below that the network stack wind data stacks which is an important property allows some interesting things that are very difficult from for for others One of the most important things that we want to make sure is that we build a smart contract platform that capitalizes on the value of the applications built on top This is something that for example doesn't do I can if I issue a let me let me call a low velocity a high longevity type of assets. Something like You know Real Estate Orlando something like that That on a theorem Looks no different than forgive nommik laser here but the any regular should coin It accumulates the same fees. It does not. It is not guaranteed to be different from any other Coined the does may be has no value whatsoever to it and we're trying to capitalize on this problem in a way that provides a that gives the issue of assets in creators smart contracts on our platform the ability to effectively divide the the the guarantees a little bit more at a higher. Gherardi or Logan. Larry Rather It's it's about you know giving somebody that is issuing these applications that or the asked us that have very high longevity needs and high security needs It gives them the ability to pay much much. Larger fees to be stored for very long period of time and be very secure. Burst something that. Maybe he's just not very high value and needs may be much higher speed and much lower fees so this is something that we allow. That theory doesn't quite allow and and is actually goes down to the to the token design as well so in fury on the the problem is it does not You know if I issue a new token Or if I build a ruler. Successful application of the theory Yeah fees are paid in East which is great but down to the minors and nobody else benefits from the fact that there is usage off of these Of this of this token on the system It's actually It's actually quite a big problem for theory. I mean you have so much value being built on a theory that bitcoin could never could ever dream off right now and none of it is really being capitalized at the value that it should be capitalized by the by the underlying token Our design has been more of the not the designer. We've taken is more of the the one that says. This is a cap supply token like bitcoin. And whenever you do operations that require things like creating new blockchain's and paying for transaction fees and so on they burn off the tokens and the burning Obama tokens alternately creates scarcity novel and so that capitalizes on the underlying On the underlying token of the of system. So that's an in a different designed from How a theory has done this But I mean this more foam I would say peripheral property The first goal that we want achieve is really in the ability to effectively labrum ability at the at the network data layer which is very very important because it allows a lot of flexibility on how you can design your your economics for your smart contract. It's like effectively. You know smart contract level charting almost if you want to think of it that way. Maybe that's not quite super correct. But it's the best knowledge that I can possibly come up with in one sentence and And that's just not the case for any other platform the whoops there okay So Steven you mentioned these subjects that have has right. How do those are? Would you compare those those akin to para chains or something like Sharpton East to a so with the St Louis? Model that you mentioned. How does that compare to something like East? Who which has the goal of being more stateless. Yes so I think the biggest difference the tweet our model and something more similar to their model is that offer us are. Our sub nets are heterogeneous which means that they aren't necessarily running these same The same the Amer the same the same Guess scheme if you're preparing database land So east to at least you know. Correct I'm wrong but Each to is planning on the chief being scale ability on the same kind of network with the same security guarantees in the same network guarantees across all of its shards. So what that means is that essentially. They're trying to paralyse computation and increase their throughput by adding nodes not need to validate the entire the entire state And so that's that's very useful in some cases however what's typically pretty difficult. When there's a lot of cross shark communication which on blockchain it then becomes very important of how you're you're splitting things into shards and so from from our point of view you know you're GonNa have something like you know the die chain or the Guy I G- CHARD. Where ever wants to be on the Diet Chart because everyone of us die and so all of a sudden anyone that isn't on the die charred is going to have to be communicating with the DIA- Chard Which is relatively expensive in most Charlotte Systems However with us Our viewpoint sub nets is that some nets are heterogeneous and so they may contain their own environment so for example B. Edm would live in its own sub met and would have surprise like Is a is Senate that were planning on doing which is a soon of Eutherian state. So so that's That's like the big difference really so we have something that's based off of the functionality. Rather than you know just splitting the entire state. So that's like the main

Kevin East Barack Obama Senate AGA B. Edm Gherardi Larry Eutherian Steven Sharpton St Louis
"I'm a Feminist But...' with Robby Hoffman

The Guilty Feminist

05:49 min | 4 months ago

"I'm a Feminist But...' with Robby Hoffman

"I'm a feminist but on my way to Seattle came from San Francisco on this lovely American Canadian tour. I sat next to a woman on the plane with such impressive breasts. My instinct which curbed was to say Nice Rack Lady. Nice Rack didn't say that but just popped into my head. I just thought that was a lovely pair of breasts. You and I very different politically speaking. I tried to explain my brother's Shmole. White cat calling bad shmole should construction. Worker in Calgary Canada Nice Guy in the world group of five girls. He showed me around his house houses. You see that they all look the same off the highway. They'll look like a construction off. The you're like who would live there my brother and he's could you believe we got the House so. I'm like yeah. He showed me around. Gives me a tour of the house? He's like I got to make the bathroom however I want. And he's like a bench there because Marianna. She shaves her legs. She should take a seat. Be Safe nicest guy in the world. Try to explain to my cat. Calling is not good anymore. He's like you're telling me you could see a pretty girl and not makes him sick sacrilegious. You're going to see a pretty on. You're not going to tell her plus over there at works. He's how do you think a lot? I was Mariana. So this reminds me of if you said. Nice rack to her. I don't know maybe it's because you're a woman should by the way is not cat-calling anymore. But because he's married so it is what it is out of respect for his wife. Yes loyal his name. Shmole Shmole schmolly numbered. I am a feminist but I like the joker so so I liked it. I didn't know anybody hated it then. I went online while I I didn't see it to have a lot of knock feminists content. I didn't even look at it. Sou- with regards to feminism or not. I felt bad for him physically. He looked ailing and There was some medical concerns. I had first and foremost as a HYPOCHONDRIAC. I was very concerned about his diet. I'm the smoking and popcorn lung. That maybe he was facing a lot of concerns. Feminism the did not come up for me on the list I mean. There's a lot of content. We're asked to empathize with sociopathic white men. Dot onscreen. I feel too many stories about a man who can't stop killing. I'm not saying there is no cycle of abuse and it's never passed but we don't talk about. It's not just a simple and every single time I watch something about a psychopathic man. Which is all the time. Because that's nine tenths of the content available to me on any streaming service slash cinema. It's always feel sorry for this. Man was deliberately being violent towards women but then he beats himself often then he thinks back to when he was a child and he was beaten. And you're like that's just not. That's not good enough. Thank you and we need to stop telling better stories because it's excusing a lot of things. And in my opinion if we had not been asked so thoroughly and constantly by Hollywood and television for generations to empathize with Whiteman. Doing everything and feeling everything and so rarely asked empathize with anyone else. Donald trump could not have been elected. Electable we feel we all feel for white men because we've been trained and trained trained trained and trained in a movie and I'll just okay. Sorry this that one got on. That really took a turn at the joke. I didn't see that being so controversial but it turned out to be very interested in either. I don't read nothing about movies. I was like oh I have a night off ghost movie. Come out ready to talk about it. My girls like what am I. O O Walking Teaneck. I thought no. Okay we'll talk about it anymore. I haven't seen it because I think it's GonNa be on it for me but I am interested because that's about a stand up comedian. Great Place Great Whistle Story writer also. I'm a feminist. When I came into the amazing NEP changed. I saw his indoor art. That was sort of stained glass windows and I was so blown away and I was going to take pictures of these virago backstage and I did. I was like this is beautiful and then I looked at what I've taken pictures of. I'd taken pictures of men astride horses. Thank Neptune the mythical figure clothed men astride horses looking powerful and women with long around on rocks and Avas like Neptune Theatre. These patriarchal pictures. So I said I cannot perform here unless they covered with velvet drapes. Well they could give me the photos and put new photos isn't it? The women are topless and they're giving away the art. I'll just cut the dude out. And I got not suggested that they be given a wears enjoying the art. And I'm not I'm not saying I'm Ben no way shaming the naked women of the Neptune theatre and I'm highlighting them if anything. I think if anything I think we should all get tops off join them free the nipple and say we stand with you. Women Ancient Greece in Rome. We stunned with you topless defiance because sometimes nice rack. Yeah

Neptune Theatre Donald Trump Shmole Shmole Calgary Seattle Greece San Francisco Teaneck Rome BEN Writer Hollywood Whiteman
Former prosecutor sues Netflix over Central Park 5 series

Ron St. Pierre

00:24 sec | 5 months ago

Former prosecutor sues Netflix over Central Park 5 series

"Seven Linda fair Steen is going after Netflix and an actress over her depiction in a series of the Central Park five here's fox's Michelle Paulino former New York prosecutor Linda faerstein sued Netflix ava duvernay and the writer behind when they see us to run a series on the now exonerated Central Park five pairs team claims the show portrayed her as a racist unethical

Linda Fair Steen Netflix Central Park FOX Linda Faerstein Writer Michelle Paulino New York Prosecutor
Remembering Kirk Douglas — a movie legend like no other

Monocle 24: The Briefing

03:54 min | 6 months ago

Remembering Kirk Douglas — a movie legend like no other

"The police employed by San Masters you think they would have believed me fat to Cook Up. That story between you had nothing to do with it very fond of him aren't you. You wouldn't want anything to happen to him. Does he feel the same about you. You wouldn't want to serve out that five year sentence would you. What are you getting? Remember five years and this time you'll have to serve every day of it. You don't have to all right get down doing what do I have to do. Kirk Douglas. Who has died at the age of one hundred and three after a career that spanned seven decades? Wadi is famous for films like Spartacus. lustily many many more with being the monocle ban Rai than indeed Ben that we just listened to was from his debut. That's nineteen forty-six That was the film at the strange love of Martha Ivers and the other voice. You heard in that clip opposite Kirk. Douglas was degrade Elizabeth Scott who is really little. None today was quite a big star in her time but made most of her career Korea in the genre of film noir. Which of course is quite obviously Kirk? Douglas got his start That film and many others as well were well within the film noir genre and really came to personify so much of what he screened type was when he he did. Have this tendency in this Eddie days to play some pretty unsavory characters but also to get the audience to empathize. He's with them absolutely. That was key to that particular role there. I remember speaking to Victoria. Wilson who is the biographer of Barbara Stanwyck who is also in The that film the Martha Iras And she described that film as really being all about post war American wrought the kind of corruption that seeps into the political process. Sometimes when you've got everything that you could ever want you know what comes with victory. Basically and that came to us on a lot of the other roles that Kirk Douglas Played After that there was another film he starting also opposite Elizabeth Scott which was I walk alone. that one of his best known roles was in the nineteen fifty and a film called Ace in the hole which I would argue should be required viewing for as giants out. There It if you're talking about unsavory characters unsympathetic characters has played by Douglas. This probably should be top of the HEAP He's playing a journalist who stumbles across a situation. Where basically there is a man stuck in a hole But he sees an opportunity opportunity then he exploits the situation he basically follows the rule book of tabloid journalism. Buck does everything that you definitely shouldn't do as an ethical journalist and it's it's all about the The the the consequences that come with that or the other the other one I came to very light is probably much better known I saw powder glory about a year ago for the first time. Absolutely live I mean look Polaris Armenian. These really well-known up performances as you would expect from a an actor of Kirk. Douglas Caliber He's starting so many well known films. That have really come to a lot of them. Have come to Croft what we think about when we think about that period of filmmaking that sort of Early to mid century you. He's career started in the forties. It really ended US oppose or certainly the the golden era of ended towards the end of the nineteen sixty so his career path can be directly traced to the ascendants and then descendants of of classic Hollywood filmmaking but he also made so many other films that I think deserve to be rewarded. If you look at the list of films that he was most proud of making yes. There are the well-known ones like spot and so on but one of the films he listed was that I won the strange love of Mahthir Avas. There was also another film called the bad and the beautiful. which is if you if you like a film like Sunset Boulevard all about The the sort of the Iki side of what it what it means to be great and it's ace in the hole compulsory for every journalist Ben Thank you very much on the life of Kirk

Kirk Douglas San Masters Croft BEN Elizabeth Scott ACE Martha Ivers Barbara Stanwyck Martha Iras Korea Mahthir Avas Eddie IKI Victoria Buck Wilson Hollywood
"ava" Discussed on Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

10:08 min | 6 months ago

"ava" Discussed on Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

"A fascinating time where it seems like the center of power is moved away away from the studio in the theater and the Academy Awards and now it's like get your content out there more people who can see it is that you view that as a benefit title word thing all people it opens up the door to storytelling narrative. Change on part of narrative. Change you know when you tell someone in your story. It changed their metabolism idea. About who you are so if we can tell more kinds of stores about more people we can do much better than we're doing in this country right if we can challenge the narratives narratives that we hear the stories that we hear a minute but I heard a different story. Check this one out and it's not just everyone listening to the same thing all the time. We opened up ourselves culture as a community society as a country. Truly believe that so part of that is being able to give more people access to more stories and more ways you know you can see someone some of. There's no movie theater. So there's there's no movie theater in Selma we makes up straight OUTTA COMPTON FULFILL Beautiful. Should've should've been nominated for the Oscar. My opinion by F Gary Gray couldn't watch hopton because they're not with the competent no movie theaters on native reservations. There's movie theaters and a lot of black and brown communities in this country and so people are left out of seeing movies. How does it Irishman? They have to take the bus going to drive into the thing the subway into the next community. That's not their home or you can watch it in your house. I mean do you. I want them to see the movie or does it really matter the way they see the movie. and that's why challenge filmmakers theatre owners and all of that yes. We love eaters I love. Netflix has brought the POW the Paris I theatre here keeping a movie palace going. That was going to go away right. These are important theater spaces but also everyone can't get to it. Everyone can't afford it right. And so it's important to think about new ways to share these stories and I think the new streaming new ways to interact with story is a positive thing and so the sooner that old guard can let go and see the good that comes from it. The sooner will be better. But in the meantime we're GONNA have friction fiction book still fighting for the old way it won't last you know it's kind of like old man on the yard on the lawn yelling at cloud to cloud there. It's not gonNA move 'cause you're yelling at the case of them and it's to their benefit to let go adapt and see how they can make some new businesses but also also you always gonNa love the experience going to seem so for the people who can't afford it and whoever theater near them fantastic but also to the you know the the dad who's been working all week you know what I mean. He just wants to sit down couch and watch something other than football. Right Richman slip to the or you get up to stick around to hear more from Asia. Duve Rene on the Sunday sit down podcast including what it was like to make history with films like Selma Thirteenth and a wrinkle in time. Welcome back to the Sunday. Sit Down podcast now. More of my conversation conversation with Eva Duvivier. You've mentioned history You made history with Selma you made history with thirteenth. You made his is tree with a wrinkle in time. Being the first African American woman to direct a film of the budget over one hundred million dollars are those important milestones to you. When you hear those does does that feel good does it feel important? I know that it's important to other people I it doesn't feel real to me like it's not a part of my identity Alyssa. Sometimes when I hear when I'm introduced feels bitter sweet because it puts kind of seeks to or inadvertently sets me apart it from my sisters who've been doing for a long time who came to early Julie Dash casing women's right like those are women who are doing incredible work. WHO's on policy incredible work before I was born right before I was even doing this? And yet I get those accolades of NATO. It don't when their work is just as beautiful and even more so since the time right and so I think in perspective and not get too caught up in the first. It's it's nice for a moment and I know a lot of people embrace that so I don't WanNa diminish it but also a lot of other incredible women out there like for for example. I've been congratulated all fall for directing Harriet Queen and slim in Hollywood food. In Hollywood where we make movies. People saying congrats on here like you didn't direct. That movie congrats on Queen and Slim. It looks great. I think it looks great to did make it. Don't have anything to do with it. But the because they know slack them make an assumption. Now she's really. Oh we gotta we gotTa Push Mascow that we need to open it up and until that happens. We're going to be pretty static place and this is not the time to be so interesting. You said I interview Sterling K.. Brown a couple of weeks ago and he made history with his emmy us. I asked him that question. He said you know honestly willing my reaction was we still do and I still. That was the first half of last ear. And I've taken enough of your time and we WANNA do not do and ask him 'cause you're such a powerhouse like what is out there in your mind that you haven't done that your dream danner you're going to do a little. DC Yeah like what still out there for you got a lot of road ahead of you just getting started. I also that one just getting started I think for me. My goal is not to expand. My goal is to stay say president. I mean I just WanNa be here ten years doing it and so I don't know if that's a function of being a black woman director in a space where there aren't many people don't even know the difference between us. You know what I mean. Or if it's a function of not seeing any work women with thirty year forty or fifty year commercial careers doesn't exist and that's something that's just hasn't been done before so my goal is to make an empire do things I haven't done Michael this to just be making work. That means something to me that I think will resonate for other people ten years twenty years from now thirty years to be like on your smart directing with my cane. You know I wanna be Scorsese Azazel with a hitch hit movie seventy-seven. It's not been a black woman that stunned that before right and so my goal is to mark secure space and stay there. And if I can do that I'll be the success in my own eyes. I've no doubt to L. chairs. They think Quinton Slim was great. Good job now. I just I had to do it. I had to congratulate her on Queen Slam after the story. She told me about being congratulated that just by strangers on the street but by people in Hollywood for making queen and Slim and Harriet. Which of course did not make you can catch? Asia's new series. Cherish today on the Oprah Winfrey network. I am joined now by the producer of the Sunday. Sit Down podcast Maggie Law Maggie. Okay so there's the body of work there's all the incredible films she has made aid There is her work ethic There's her attention to detail all of which I love. I love most about her stories that she just hasn't been doing this very long. I now now I sort of in the Hollywood Stratosphere of directors and powerhouses as we call her but she hasn't been there very. Yeah I know I loved the. She says she started. I think at thirty two. She kind of like jumped into this world and she had her own. Pr Firm and everything. I I left her advice. She said don't quit your day job. She he said you know I sort of tested the waters. I made a short film about her mom And then once she realized at Sundance she got that award that she could really do it fulltime. She said that's when I you know getting recognition from their peers jumped right into it and you know she said don't quit your day job and also make sure that whatever you're going into you actually like do it you know. Are you good at it but also is this truly your passion and worth sort of leaving you know your other job for the analysis is playing the harp. Okay you WANNA learn and the heart great right. Let's go see if you're any good at the heart. And if you'd like to flip which I thought was a good way to think about. Don't quit your day job. She didn't she continued. You'd work PR and didn't really quit until she won the award at Sundance. It was like okay. I think some people think I can do this and I think I can do it. And man she's had an incredible run and and just even in the last couple of years from Thirteenth and when they see as such an amazing series the Netflix series about the Central Park. Five people I love wrinkle in time and I sort of liked that she was like. Wow that was history wrinkling time with the budget for an African American direct Selma. Obviously were the first yeah best picture nomination. She's like yeah she's like that's nice. I guess but it's not why I'm doing that. She was like it's a little bittersweet because she's she was like it's sort of the time that we're in now but there were so many that came before her that just weren't getting that recognition through now. She's almost lucky in that. It's just time is right right now for it to happen which yeah I thought was so interesting and who knew I like T- t guy but when you somehow ginger milk tea I guess when you go to the right place like even know how join and she helps you pick the right? which she did we wouldn't pick and I love that she again? Like had the sort of lay out of the tea and everything like as I say interviewing director she sort of knew. Oh Oh yeah around the room like how everything was supposed to look where the cameras were what they were picking up but I was like I like that. She had thoughts about the camera angles. We got this. I WanNa take good care of you our production as I said I love that about. Yeah I love somebody who cares that much every detail. Of course why she successful Maggie Aggie. Thank you very much. Thanks all of you as always for tuning in this week..

Selma Hollywood Netflix Sundance Asia director Quinton Slim Gary Gray Academy Awards Oscar Julie Dash Harriet Queen Maggie Law Maggie Queen Slam Maggie Aggie Duve Rene DC football Eva Duvivier Alyssa
"ava" Discussed on Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

09:56 min | 6 months ago

"ava" Discussed on Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

"Sit Down podcast now. More of my conversation with EVA Duvalier people. You're on this crazy run and you have been for five or six years. People don't realize your back story. They assume even making movies for life and you grew up on. He'd be a filmmaker. And now you are. You've had this fascinating career so so your mom's in the room she might have an answer to but when you were a little girl growing up in southern California what was the dream. Would you want to be. What did you think about as you were growing? Want to be a lawyer for part of the wall and four time. I wanted to be broadcast journalist for time. went to produce the news. It's not being front of the camera. I don't even know why I got from some movie or someone with someone walking around producing newscasts news. Maybe maybe maybe or network brochures somehow thought it was going to produce the news. Whatever that is and you were an intern? It's all the way I was an intern. CBS Susan And Yes oh yes. We missed you China by year. I think yes because you were on the O.. J. was was the next summer. Yes unit and that made you do this now way out of here but also so yeah I was That really was the beginning of my career journalism. It was radic. Look I'm good. Yeah so I I went to publicity because there was still a the news so publicity allowed me to touch news to still work on articles and in broadcast S. pieces but not literally for the network but for you know the person who's being in and and so still able to touch news in that way and I did that for a time and then got into moving publicity a which married my two interests news and movies which I loved and so I did Tafoya while at my own agency and then while I was working with all these movies on all these sets and I started thinking looking at the guy directing us like you know I like to knock that off expat right so I would be watching these ramps to the Cameroon thinking does anyone have just or I think you should walk over here instead. They should put the camera there. Autism my mind directly my head and finally let me just go ahead and give it a try and so you made a film for six thousand dollars. Heart store fell about my mom in. How did it turn out it is? I've wiped off. The face of the earth. Day was like what's that movie you made about me. I don't well I think somebody lost it. It is it's tough and it was. My school started two years old. You know I wasn't going to be able to film school so I just jumped in and learn by doing so. You kinda dabbled in both worlds for a long time. Yeah I didn't quit my day job right. This is the big thing I've talked. It's a Lotta people by dreams. How do I change careers in the middle I said well don't just do it all at once taken steps. You don't have to just quit your the job today and go play the harp because you always hard on the weekends no your strings. You know what I mean learn you're good at And also like it even really like I deal for yourself so do it and step since I took those steps over a period of time and and little by little I phased out the other job and then you eventually in two thousand twelve human big directing word Sundance. Maybe I should. Maybe I should quit that ED.

intern EVA Duvalier Susan And Sundance California Tafoya Cameroon CBS China
"ava" Discussed on Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

12:07 min | 6 months ago

"ava" Discussed on Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

"A quiet time car in the four zero five now I right now. You're talking to account for you. I see you mentioned freeway numbers. We found one that was for you in New York. So let's talk about. It's almost you're talking about your run. The last few years has been like bananas. Let's talk about the current project. Cherish the day with own it has really cool concept upped to one love story. preseason yes every hour is a day in the life of this couple. Tell me about the concept when dreamed up. I want to deep dive into especially in these really challenging times just a love story and went to play with idea. How could I do it in a bit of a different way? I love the linkletter films before sunrise before sunset. And these are the movies trilogy of movies that just take a couple of when you see them over the years on one day and so I want to say how do you can you apply that to people. Go to Brown people. Moen people native people. I WANNA see more kinds of people fall in love. It feels like I see just a certain kind of person I love and so Oh and love story. That's not heightened. That's not you know set against something big in epic going on just the quiet everyday moments so cherish the day just shares. What happens on a particular day and it's not necessarily an anniversary or a big day in the life of these relationships? It's just the little moments that you remember that. Stay with you. That change how I feel about the other person that was idea. And it's it's interesting because it's a slow unfolding of the show it's eight episodes and the episodes job so the first episode. What is the first day they meet? The second episode is a year later. The third episode is three months later and so it jumps around it just kind of locates the big days in the life of the couple and and that's to me and I told her I watched the first episode of it is it is just little stuff adds up to something big by the end of the hour. Hopefully there's no big moment for step so there's no explosions or whatever else you want to. But it's like analyzes relationship really nicely so when you obviously at this point you've got your choice of the things you WanNa WanNa do the projects you want to take on doing a lot of things at once. What was it about? This release of this thing is worth my time. I'm going to get behind this you know. They're I'm working on Selma thirteenth when they see us. And all of these projects. That are very politically muscular. And historically kind of you know rigorous in terms the research and really building the architecture of these narratives that really complex and so I wanted to delve into something that was more intuitive organic or about love and personal so relationships and those things are complex as well but just to allow it to fold it away where I didn't have to do our research to take on the Court of public opinion. Just you know something. Something a little lighter but also something that means something to me which is to illuminate all facets of life of marginalized people and I think our personal is just as important as political is our cultural lives a lot of times. I'm asked to talk about my identity and history history work the CO current political climate But also what goes on behind closed doors. I think it's important to examine as well. So that was the idea behind it and then the audience for own I have my show Queen Sugar and so I've come no good audience. And they like and really feel like I wanted to serve them. You know it's over indexes with women A lot of women of color. Who are you know doing beautiful things in their own lives and I think it's important to not only uplift? Folks who are politicians directors are superstars but the women who are really superstars in our lives. Day to day the MOMS and the live and the sisters and so all that went into the STU of Jarash. Today we're talking a minute ago about how you create this who producing it. But you're not directing it uh-huh so that's different for me. It is a different thing. Is that difficult for you. It is really difficult for me because I guess this show really taught me that. You are a control-freak you know I really am. I never really thought to myself that way but I think this is part of a writer director producer. I'm involved in every aspect right so they have to take one off was challenging for me but this is a different way of working. You know I wrote it and produced and directed It's kind of like I can't direct REXONA and write something without producing it. I can't do sit in directed without writing becomes difficult and so that was one of my challenges on Ritalin time I didn't produce you sit and I didn't write it but I directed it so that was the first time that was working with material that I couldn't control every aspect of it and it's it's different. Yeah but when you've got the concept for this show got it up here and then you sort of handed off to some then you come back later and see it. I'm still producing it for the right here in their everyday the actors and the costumes and all that and that's usually it was really hard for me to be on set. I'd be there and I'd be like don't you want to do. I think the cups or his hair. Oh I can't do that okay. Let me to stand over here. 'cause that's yes so yeah it was interesting. Bite your talk a little bit. I did what I just didn't want to make people uncomfortable but just com checking. Everyone's doing and then leave. You know because it wasn't for that because the kid wanting to do so I love. I love people to do their jobs that I think so. The piece is has a different flavor to it. It's not directed by me but it's written and produced by me so it has some elements of me but it has elements of the other directors. Who a hand pick and And so it's it's is lovely. Direct T. service go directly by eight and you're like nope good okay. Russia play out the teapot right. One of the other cool things about Jerick was that you achieve gender equity. Yes the production team. Yes how big a deal is that to you. How important how significant? Yeah I mean one of the reasons why that show another reason why it was important beyond kind of exploring the nuances is love and the different face is the way you make the work. And that's something that I've just been really focused on over the last years that I've had more I guess power in the situation being able to dictate who's in the space who's working Making sure that women are being interviewed people of Color in the room getting opportunities I think it's really easy for folks to say and I don't blame people for saying guys because they want to get the job done and they want to jump for me so these guys are going to get it done for you and I learned that through one of my ep. WHO said I just want to do the best job for view and I know that these guys who always worked with will do the best job for me because I know them and so I want that but I also can't just be looking at the same guys for ever we have to change we have to diversify? We have to open up the doors to who can do the best job for me unless you give people the opportunity to do you never know. Oh and so little by little over the course of my products. I've been pushing pushing at with the goal of one day. Achieving gender parity there equal number of men and and women on sets and for people at home don't know that it's very rare to have that those equal numbers. You know the time I walk onto sets and all men and it's usually Whiteman and so to have a space where equal numbers of men and women you know Starting near parody on people of color as well all current projects we WANNA make. Everyone can stay on their hands on it so I think more people are industry. WanNa do that then. Don't just don't no how sometimes it gets uncomfortable because some people have to move around like a musical chairs light. But it's about time we do it and so on anything that I work on. You know it's it's it's a part of the requirement of doing it and so we achieved on this show and I'm thrilled with. We actually had a few more women than men always over the over. Yeah good for you. So how do we get to the point where I don't ask you that question like it's a big deal like wow you got to fifty percent. How do you change? That went on for a while. It's going to have to become become standard. Become normal until then we have to keep asking about it you know. I don't mind that with the keep asking about it keep talking about it keep pushing it But until the day where the questions uninteresting interesting and there's not an interesting answer and there's no process to just happening been we we have to keep talking about the lesson that there are those women. They're all those people Out there who can do the job so you're just not finding them. That's the thing that the myth is that. Yeah we can't find them. Yeah they're not out there but it's just not true it's just not true there And so yeah you always want to train more people but they are there they are. They're here they're trained they're capable. They're ready they're experienced. They're just scattered across also all these productions where they might be. One woman in this department are two women on this production so when you start to empower them to be together You know you get really beautiful results. And that's one of the the pieces of this puzzle of chairs today as I watched the framed watched the show and I know that it was truly made by all kinds of people. I think that comes comes out in the in the in the sauce. When you watch it really cool crew shot to where it was a shot I've seen before it was on the set supported us in doing that? There was even a day or one of our women wasn't able to be there so and she was a part of her department. So so he wasn't he there's one guy in the picture holding aside say I represent such So it was a great set and we're looking to discontinue that is innovating in front of the camera in the stories that we tell but the way that we tell you know because Hollywood is a system now some things need to change you mentioned queen sugar also on own. Yes and what does the experience like working with and for Oprah and the people don't why is that a good platform for you. I never forget that own. The Oprah Winfrey Network Doc. She is a like the whole thing. But I do Because it's a network named for her that abides by the principles that she prioritizes sizes and it is a place where I can do something on Queen. Sugar Ray said I WANNA hire only women directors. I want to try to kind of balance the scales. What's going on and so we did that five years ago and it's really really changed in our industry in terms of pushing other show runners and other networks to do the same so you can really see the sea change of how folks respond to that challenge on this with now going deeper beyond directors but into the whole crew so those kinds of things that you need a studio a network at work? That's going to be supportive of. And they were down ready to do whatever they could to make that happen. You Bob with Oprah before is she the kind of person who will. We'll watch a rough cut or watch it and give you notes on it or not. That hands off. She trusts you at this pants off. Yeah Yeah it's always been that early on and so with Queens Sugar. The way that came about was we had made summer and I had gone to one of her home. Relax I was like dude over. His house somewhat said that house one one of the houses and it's awesome. It's just comfortable and lovely it's not uh tation ostentatious it's just cozy in lovely and by the book. The bed stand was a book. quaint you ever. I long as somebody's reading. That kept going next day. It was like a little closer to the next day. It was like on the bed so I said at breakfast. There's a book. Corporate service thirds moving around my sweet. She said Oh. Yeah the kids should read it and see if you WanNa make and so I read it and I thought of do it and so we started making the show and I put the first script.

Oprah WanNa New York Moen Court of public Jarash Russia Jerick Whiteman Hollywood writer Ray Bob producer director
"ava" Discussed on Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

04:11 min | 6 months ago

"ava" Discussed on Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

"Term she writes she produces she directs. Does is everything you can do except for here in the movies her. Most recent work is the NETFLIX series. Highly acclaimed series when they see us about the central park mark. Five case in New York City in nineteen eighty nine. She also of course was the director of Selma which was nominated for best picture a few years back. She directed a wrinkle. All in time. Oprah Winfrey's movie that had a budget over one hundred million dollars which was a new record new standard. She made history as an African. American can woman producing a film like that also directed the documentary thirteenth which was nominated a couple years back for an academy award. Her latest project is a series called cherish. The day for the Oprah Winfrey Network. I'll let her explain the premise of the series. She produces it. She created it. She didn't direct it though which. which as you will hear was hard for her to take her hands off because she's so hands on and she has created and produced a directed every piece of work? She's done since she got into the business which brings us to the most interesting part. I think of her story. She's only been doing this for a few years. She won an award as director at the Sundance Film Festival. Seven years ago. Oh and that launched her career she had a PR agency for a long time. She worked with actors. She walked famous actors down the red carpet and did their interviews for them and then she took a look on some of these film sets when she was around movies and said. Hey I think I can do this and man. Has she been able to do it ever since. Eva took me to her favourite tea shop here in New York City. She's very la based as you'll hear she's more L. A. Than she is New York but she's got her spots in New York City and she loves not so she brought me not spot We did a pot of her ginger milk. Tea which I have to say. I'm not a big tea drinker but was excellent She's very detail oriented as you will also hear she's moving the pot around and getting the cups in the right places a director and the other cool detail is her entourage. Raj consisted of her mother. She brought her mom to the shoot. Talk about winning somebody over Mike. You're here with your mom. Amari all in. Here's our conversation in with Eva du Vernay on the Sunday. Sit Down podcast David. Thanks for doing this. We start by you telling me what we're drinking here. This is ginger milk tea cheap and I don't really drink a lot of coffee because I'm already late. This is going to unhealthy levels of energy energy with the coffee so I tried to do and I like creamy thing. Sure so it's can we pinky yeah thinking okay to make sure those hot. That's nice. Nice right we're rainy days snowy snowy day and this is your spot right. How did you find? I was down here working one day and I wanted t so I go like maybe six or seven years ago and since then I've brought so many people here and people like this is a great. It's inspired the people walk by and never see I said to you. I've walked by here. Probably thousands of my life. I never even noticed. Woke dinner so thanks for letting me come spot my one of my New York spots. It's the spot. New New York City really lay where you're from. La and I just feel more comfortable not here. It is the cost phobia the weather. What is a really hard time they can when they see us here was here for about six months and it really? The city works on you. I respect Beck for people who love it here and thrived here. It's just not me I opposite effect so you need really brought me to a place. I mean yes. I was working on a very challenging Story right but but yeah on top of that the city is just very and you're always there is it. Yeah.

New York City director Oprah Winfrey Oprah Winfrey Network NETFLIX Eva Eva du Vernay Beck Selma Raj Mike
"ava" Discussed on The Bitcoin Podcast

The Bitcoin Podcast

12:26 min | 6 months ago

"ava" Discussed on The Bitcoin Podcast

"That's that's the general gist of how this consensus works which is different than any other Distributed consensus we have right now in terms of like classical consensus in Komo consensus. Is that a good summary. Absolutely with some small caveat abby out so Yes so effectively. The the really interesting thing about avalanche stop protocols is that they achieve global consensus based purely on local a estimates of what the actual consensus. This is the really sort of like nice the property I can just observe my local environment and based on my local environment I can come up with estimations of what everybody else is doing without really having to take care of everybody else This is the this is the really interesting thing but the one thing that you mentioned which is that regardless of what what happens you sort of reach consensus It's a it's slightly stronger than that. It's more of like you know under certain cases it will reach consensus in you. You know very quickly but regardless of what happens regardless of if you even have visiting behavior and you have some really bad guys trying to prevent a trying to make you think in your local state is something different from what the global state is They will not be able to do so except with negligible probability And that's that's it's really Can build super high value systems that hold billions of trillions of dollars of value. Because you know the probability of any misbehavior Really double spending warning. The best stuff is usual even though you're just dealing with local state That's that's really what were the biggest or the biggest advantage of these come in and this is in stark contrast to the other families which do require sort of global Out At least one of the two requires a global estimate estimation a global view of the network which is which is prohibitive in very large networks. So I guess what's the threshold Our guest threshold has to scale obviously with the number participants in the network. But like I what percent of people that come to consensus is it like yeah. We can just assume that that's how everybody thinks or that's it. s great question so unlike for example something like no Komodo Has A has a lot of great stuff with with a by the way But one of the things that he doesn't have is that it's not permit tries Boll in how big your threshold is it is. It happens to be that you know at most fifty percents of the system can be Byzantine or can be adversarial. And you can't change this to any other number while diminishes sort of simplisafe. Oh you can't change this That's the short answer. But with avalanche-stuck protocols can actually primary tries to whatever you want and you have two things to consider a the safety or. Do you want lightness. I was recently on a on a sort of small little ramp intelligent group In regards of this Where her you know? We were discussing whether whether safety matters or likeness matters. And if you're trying to build a these kinds of systems that are very the high value shift is the only thing that matters at least in my view I will not the only thing. It matters much more rather than lightness so in avalanche you can permit the system to have you know. Say Tolerance against eighty percents adversarial. As long as it's twenty percent is correct than they still. Can't you know the other eighty eight percent still can't force the minority to double spend But at the dump downfall of lightness so you have much lower lightness. You would if the safety was lower than that's a fine trade off to do because Bitcoin for example Bitcoin always prioritizes likeness over safety fifty. And that's kind of bad because if you have a partition in the bigger network You can have two forks that look perfectly fine. They continue operating and there's a total violation nations safety But in Avalanche Opera Kohl's these will shut down if there's a partition. There will never be any progress being made so system will effectively just halt But there will never be ah stance so you can really just crank the safety up as high as you really want. Not As high as you want but you know up to eighty percents reasonable number to crank it up high and when you're you're safe against anything real so you're saying like when Bitcoin does these weird Kind of folks that all the time in the sense that two people come up with a block at identical times that segments that network until the next block is found in which the other with whichever one happens. I this happens. You can't continue that chain for very long because probabilistically one of them will come up with a block first that'll work and then everything else just automatically switched before that short amount. By the time you have the network basically Completely splitting the security meeting the Hash. Power into two separate forks until something something else is found in which they aggregate together yet and they will at some point aggregate back together as long as there's no network partition meaning that like let's say Europe gets entire disconnected from the US or something like that and half the Hash. Power cannot communicate with the other half hour than those two forks that you mentioned you can actually continue in perpetuity and they can never resolve back together. Can you give me or they will have like what type of physical a coal thing would need to happen to remove their ability to communicate blocks to each other. A cow vision actually happened outside of like structure turning off the Internet question so realistically speaking. I wouldn't bet much money on such a global scale a thing happening however Used to realize the way the bitcoin works is that because it just prioritizes always likeness or anything else than what you can happen. What can happen is that a small subset could be partitioned away from the rest of the network and and that's small subset would continue operating independently of the larger part of the network? So you can have. Let's say a country Sort of cut off from From a larger part for a few hours that country will continue operating internally and will continue potential accepting transactions. But anybody else outside is on a complete different fork mark and so at some point when when the Internet is is reconnected There is a lot of blocks. That will be invalidated so any there isn't really double stance. But would you thought you received is going to be thrown away. Potentially that can happen overtime. Does that can happen overtime. Bitcoin now a full on global half and half split like you know all will all of the US You know operates independently of Eurosport or China very unlikely But it you know these kinds of continental breakdown they had happened in the past There was a recent gate Subaru's my few years ago. Where sort of the I think Korea Korea and a few other countries in that region completely cut off from the US for a few hours Because of some intercontinental connection issue so this can happen and in a protocol like like avalanche Even if this were to happen all would happen as far as Portugal goes is just no confirmation happening at all but Nothing is actually double standard. No reversals. Nothing so I know I know a little more than the average. Joe Does about of labs and Y'all are up to kind of curious what what questions has a lot of the stuff. Yeah like I guess what I'd say is is. How are you guys positioning yourselves? 'cause I concern myself a lot with like what the outside world thinks about like think. I've almost tapped out of crypto twitter. Because it's just complete nonsense like every day all day just nonsense and so I'm I'm living in the out quote unquote outside world. I'm a double agent right now from the outside looking in when people come to me like Oh. You're the Bitcoin Guy Guy and I'm like not quite but you know I'm into it. And so when they think about bitcoin then they start then they find theory and then they find. There's thousands of tokens and and then there is star bleeding by. So how'd you guys position. Yourselves is like because every other token that comes around every other product that comes around the Bitcoin two viewpoint or the theory of two point. Oh or the Howard has different. What will now? Yeah that's great. That's exactly what I said. At some point in my very long monologue in regards to US wanted to differentiate and make something cool No so if technology rather rather Implementation details are the only differentiating factor within your company was in your project That's oftentimes not going to lead to large success. You really. We need to have something that people want. You really definitely really cool so we think about that all the time we are. Not If you're killers is not real we're trying to do at all That's that's a that's just not in our roadmap in the way that we we we think about what we want to build is in. We crafts our platform to design specification based on what we think is what people want and that is you know things like in defiance so on If I can jump into the more concrete details as sort of alluded to this earlier that the financial world is Pretty Damn Archaic in the way constructed. Let me give you an example if you are a a bank in the US. And you're trying I to issue some debts instrumental clients which you can. You want to encode the fallen condition. That doesn't matter what happens against the bank. I want X.. Entity XYZ to be. Paid out first before anybody else than the way to do that. Is You taken that contract. You create the new special purpose vehicle You spend out of the bank. You move the contract into the bank alongside any debts obligations into the new. Feb You continue this until the obligations are cleared out and then you do the dissolution of the SP be all to be able to just encode this one conditional effectively. The entire financial system is is if spaghetti codes went on steroids and was all is just a bunch of like legal contracts. On top of legal contracts to amend other illegal contracts with new entities so on whereas instead we can just transform this entire thing and say look screw it. We're going to reinvent. The entire thing is just basically pieces of code that are that are entered into into agreement with special parties and they can transfer things of value. This is all there is and so we're building a platform that allows that. And what does that look like. Well it's not a coin. It's not a was single blockchain its ecosystem where you can be private you can you. You can get bang. You can issue new Sort of a private blockchain's within our ecosystem but you can also be a public blockchain. You can issue new ones on our ecosystems well so he can bring in ethereal for example you can spin it out as we call sub nets within our within the abacus is some and that's one permission list blockchain It supports the entire Ktar. VM You can build your own functionality. So you can build your own virtual machine or you can also bring in You Know Your Bank you can bring in older contracts spin them up as within the same Probably blockchain but the key thing is that everything is interrupting with each other within the avocado system. So you can have all the contracts Citibank the interrupted with the locations that are launched on atheism that can inter operate with really anything else so.

US Komo Avalanche Opera Kohl Europe twitter Boll Ktar Citibank Korea Korea Portugal Eurosport Subaru Joe Howard China
The Latest: Globes' snubbing of female directors derided

KCBS Radio Weekend News

00:37 sec | 7 months ago

The Latest: Globes' snubbing of female directors derided

"Year absent from the nominations are women directors and screenwriters those categories are without a female nominee ava duvernay was the last female director to be nominated for a golden globe back in two thousand fifteen for Selma Barbara Streisand's in nineteen eighty four when makes her the only woman to win a golden globe for directing I was all last year at alley Portman calling out the golden globes for only nominating male directors when she presented in the category it kind of remains to be seen what if anything will be sad and when it comes to golden globe history I was thinking it could make it she's the projected front runner for a Best Actress in a musical or comedy movie for her role in the

Ava Duvernay Director Selma Barbara Streisand Alley Portman
"ava" Discussed on I Mean... Why Not?!

I Mean... Why Not?!

03:11 min | 8 months ago

"ava" Discussed on I Mean... Why Not?!

"I'd be like who I don't know how to make that happen and you're just like yeah. Let's go ahead and do that. You're so a funny. Feel good but then you make fun of me for all my for lots of things. So it's funny because is an Avis. Said you know she wanted to have like a little flare. And that's her like I'm kind of Tagline is go ahead read it because why not show up your natural you with the little flair. Oh awesome thank eleven's a good combination. I like natural to like I. Don't I mean I don't like my makeup to be like super like yeah right right right. Here she comes in like build it out if you do need it's become so yes. She said that and she and then she started to you. Know go to different website places to start designing and then I started to see like okay. She is actually getting more serious. And so then we started to talk about the best manufacturers and That could help US aircraft. They're like just to like research lacking for A lot of hard work and no airy longtime your doesn't take a long time to and then you know get the products if you like it. Tested tested out. And make sure it's you know the way you were envisioning and and talking through it so did you have to get like products samples and all that to make sure you understand behind the product and stuff. Yeah we did and did really like the like all of my ex. Yeah Yeah I'm really excited to share it with everybody. Yeah and so once you see you knew the products he wanted like. Then you have to Vella website all the apis Larry build it and then I had to complete it. Because he's like okay. It's getting confusing. She had the vision. She knew exactly what color she's what she's wanted so she's done all that on her own she's developed all these division the names of every product. Yeah the names just literally. Almost every part of the whole thing is so cute on the Gotcha like What do this out of bed? She was on the couch pajamas whereas right now I'm the couch. We're in a really office is exactly sleep day guys actually. I like doing this on their calendar and I say okay. Yeah so you us. Oh did you develop your website like who created the website so well I did union. My mom did my heart to do. Yeah I try giving it so so hard. I know it's hard to help me. I mean like I said if I didn't have the direction behind it I would have been more lost. You know so but wasn't it was kind of really team effort. No I know but like I tried to develop a website when I put out my blog loved Kerry and little parallel there. I just I was overwhelmed like I was literally overwhelm so again impressed.

US Vella Kerry
The Politics Behind The Golden Globe Awards

The Frame

06:35 min | 8 months ago

The Politics Behind The Golden Globe Awards

"Welcome to the frame. I'm Steven Cuevas filling in for John Horn. But we're about to hear from John On. He's covered the movie industry for more than two decades as a print reporter and so we figured he's the best person to explain the significance or lack thereof of the Golden Globe awards. The Hollywood Foreign Press Association today announced the nominees for its annual awards which take place in early January but rather than detail the usual inexplicable explicable nominee choices and snubs. We thought we talk about the relationship between movie fans the Globes and the entertainment industry. I John tells us who makes up the association. What's important to me about the Golden Globes and about some other kind of minor film? Awards is that this is not a representative presentative body. They're about ninety journalists. And if you go on the website for the Hollywood Foreign Press Association you can no longer even find their names teams or where they work. It's a very small group of people and they have undue influence because the movie studios have figured out that if they wou- the voters for the Golden Globes and they're filmmakers win awards at the Golden Globes it kind of create some sort of momentum for the Academy Awards but none none of it is very legitimate and H. MPA has cleaned itself up. It's not a scandal ridden as it has been in years past but this isn't an elite group of film writers or film critics that are making these selections and if you look closely at the selections not just this year but but in past years the fact that they are really that serious ask kind of film. Lovers starts to reveal itself pretty quickly. How so? Well let's talk about a couple of past nominations twenty thirteen. There were three nominations for a movie. I bet you you've never heard of salmon. Fishing in the Yemen amend that was a Golden Globe Walker. If you go back nine years to twenty ten there was a movie with Johnny. Depp called the tourists that was largely largely derided that ended up getting multiple nominations at the Golden Globes. And I think if you look closely at some of the selections this year it's clear it's it's driven by the red carpet like who do they wanna have on the red carpet you look in the TV category. There are multiple nominations for the morning. Show a apple all series. That didn't get great reviews because Jennifer Aniston is coming reese witherspoon is coming as nominees and then you look at Ava d'auvergne as when they see us. One of the most critically acclaimed TV series of the past year didn't get any nominations so it's important for the NBC. Show to have that star Klaus so there's eyeball so so people watch. I think that's part of the bias historically for the Golden Globes that you can say it judging between good filmmaker and a less name they generally are going to vote for the last name and they also have some historical by sees you know that are shared by the Academy in the seventy seven year history of the Globes. Only five women have ever been nominated for best director and this year. There are lots of really good female filmmakers that were up Greta Gerwig for little women. Olivia Wilde for book. SMART Hurrell for honey. Boy Marielle Heller for Beautiful Day in the neighborhood. Not One of them got nominated so golden gloves has a pretty poor history when it comes to nominate women the Golden Globes has made some the effort to try to rehabilitate this reputation. What has it done? It's made sure that people who are members actually have legitimate emmett credits. As journalists there been some reports of. I guess you could call it. Bribery or expensive gifts in the past. I think they've tried I to eliminate all of that so again they have cleaned up their act. But there's only so much legitimacy you can bring to yourself when you're only ninety journalists writing for publications that if we had the names I guarantee you you've probably never heard of them and yet the industry I I guess mostly plays along and an actor or director or studio can use success at the Globes as part of their campaign going into Bosco Bosko season one hundred percent and I think that is one of the most interesting parts of the story. Everybody in Hollywood knows in their soul that at the Golden Globes are really not totally legitimate and yet the studios independent companies and marketing departments. Embrace raise them because they recognize. There's a game to be played and the game is. We're going to court the Golden Globe voters we're going to have screenings and QNA's for them and and if we get a nomination are actor or filmmaker is going to be on their awards show and people are going to start talking about the film and one thing gets the other but they do know that really. It's not totally legit but it serves their purposes academy award. Campaigning is a multi title million dollar business. There are people who work as campaign consultant who get hundreds of thousands of dollars for getting nominations or Oscar wins wins. There is a huge business behind all of this and in some ways it might drive ticket sales or people to stream movies so it's driven by finance finance is driven by trying to get eyeballs on the movies but it's all kind of a hustle so John I've never covered the entertainment industry that closely so so like a lot of people in the public eye really always just saw the Golden Globe awards as the first among that more high profile award shows to spotlight the top films of the year. Going into Oscar seasons am I am I off on that. Were not technically off. I mean because the Hollywood Foreign Press Association Asian nominates into different categories for most of the major film awards they cast a wider net. So just mathematically. They're bound to include lewd a lot of movies. That end up getting nominated. I wouldn't say they're that much of a bellwether but because they're embracing so many movies. They have a a mathematical chance of getting most of those things right. John Horn out in New York. John Thanks for joining us to talk about the Golden Globes. We'll see when you get back. Thanks for sitting. In

Golden Globes Globes Golden Globe Awards Hollywood Foreign Press Associ Golden Globe Walker John Horn John Golden Globe John On Director Academy Awards Oscar Steven Cuevas Jennifer Aniston Reporter Greta Gerwig Olivia Wilde Marielle Heller Yemen
Unpresidented: Bolivias leader resigns

The Economist: The Intelligence

00:55 sec | 9 months ago

Unpresidented: Bolivias leader resigns

"Bolivia doesn't have a leader. Yesterday Ava Morales who's been in power for fourteen years years resigned as president. You know there have been protests throughout the country in Santa Cruz. Bolivia's biggest city citizens barricaded hundreds of intersections hoping to paralyze the city and Starve the government of revenue. Ah Mr Morales claimed victory in a tight election last month amid claims of electoral fiddling after the vote count was unexpectedly paused for a day. Mr Morales emerged. Curiously as the outright winner on Saturday observers from the Organization of American States confirmed irregularities in the poll whole including Dr Tally sheets computer breaches. Mr Morales bowed the recommendation of

Ava Morales Bolivia Santa Cruz Organization Of American State President Trump Fourteen Years
Emmy Special: Julia Louis-Dreyfus

The Frame

04:52 min | 11 months ago

Emmy Special: Julia Louis-Dreyfus

"Welcome to the frame emme special from KPCC in Los Angeles. I'm John Horn the host of the frame and I'm Lorraine Ali television critic for the La Times Save. We'll hear from a lot of nominees. It's about their work and their shows and we'll talk about. Emmys can tell us about the state of television right now. which is a really really interesting state? Yeah and one thing I want to talk about is he is late night. Talk shows I mean I know. We think that that's a place to go for humor and some jokes. I'm finding some of the best documentary reporting on television right now is happening on shows like John Oliver Samantha B so we'll cover that I am really looking forward to the limited series category this year because it is dumbass about stuff that has been on television talking about Chernobyl when they see us Fussy verdon escaping down more these are excellent shows and the limited series category used to be kind of like now. It's like that is the place that we're looking at it. I'm looking forward to see what happens with that but we're going to start with a comedy series and that Atas veep its lead actress could make some Emmy History Julia Louis and the emmy goes to even Julia Louis Dreyfuss. Let me try to annoy drivers now for most emmys one by performer and the same the same series peaches came back for its final season. There is another big final season it rhymes with game of thrones it is getting thrown and so on but before veep wrapped up its final season. I had a chance to speak with Julia Louis Dreyfuss. There's a lot of grief around the end of a series assuming the series has been a a good thing and a happy thing which in our case it has been and that has an incredible bitter sweetness to it that can really got you and it did. Let's talk about the final season running for President and she is asked a basic question of very early in the season which is why and other people are curious but here's a conversation. I bet she has with Gary who's played by Tony Hill because it is my God is was the game changer. I took bombed the glass ceiling. I shave my in the sink of the Old Boys Club for three years. He kept me chained to a radiator some basement in Cleveland. So as far as I'm concerned America owes me an eight year stay in the White House at this time. I want a war yeah. What is it like listening to that. It's gobs of fun. I think that's so well written so I was just sort of listening to the language you you know she's not a great candidate. That's not under state but I appreciate her her bitterness and her struggle when you are playing her. You'll have some way of saying okay. I know that this is a character and and I know that what she wants is not something that she's able to express but that's the actor plane her. I have to believe what it is. She wants here's how I would answer that. She's he's a very horrible human being and hideously behaved and really has no leadership skills whatsoever or no point view even other than her own narcissistic endeavor but when you player you have to come at it from well bill why and once you start to humanize that horrible nece you can find a way in to play it with a certain amount of well in a weird way. I say empathy and even though I'm not necessarily asking the viewer to be empathetic. I just want the viewer to laugh off but it just perhaps that keeps her from being hated by the audience right. What are the greater kinds of compliments. You can get from people who work in politics. I I hear time and time again. This is what it's really like in Washington and you know. I- winces I say that too but yeah that's that's what we hear. I had the great good fortune into meet Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan once and she told me that she got together with Justice Scalia. When veep was on on the air every week to discuss the past week's episode because there were both fans imagine that are can't? I know I would do anything thing to have those conversations. Let's hope somebody recorded them. I know maybe the FBI

Julia Louis Tony Hill Emmy Los Angeles Lorraine Ali La Times John Horn Elena Kagan John Oliver Samantha B Justice Scalia FBI Supreme Court President Trump Cleveland I Old Boys Club Washington America White House Gary
"ava" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

06:24 min | 1 year ago

"ava" Discussed on Fresh Air

"To the five in the settlement of the five lawsuit against the city and also when the burns documentary was made president trump was not pre. He was just donald trump. He wasn't president yet so i. I want to ask you about trump. What what it's like to see the role that he played in being a megaphone for finding the central park five guilty not before they were even tried you know just like days after they were arrested and charged he took out full page ads in all all of new york's for major newspapers saying bring back the death penalty bring back our police and this was an argument for the death penalty basically for for children i mean and there were fourteen fifteen sixteen years old so i'm just interested in what was like for you to see his role in the central park five. Yes we played a very famous role in the case <hes> you know with taking out the ads but ultimately you know he's not the story <hes> and <hes> so the i made the decision just to keep it very you know using very sparingly and and use them with his own words and his own footage and we do it a couple of times and there's a couple mentions <hes> when really researched this time he was one of many froment voices that were out saying all kinds of crazy stuff. I mean pat buchanan basically said that corey wise should be lynched <hes> he should be hung in a public park. This is the climate of the time and it was all seen as acceptable and it was just all happening without much of a second thought ought certainly not <hes> the thought about the humanity of these boys and their family so <hes> so yeah as we as we went through just make decisions not to lean in too much into trump. That's one of the reasons why i went to change the name from central park five to when they see us i felt the central park five had become so kind of synonymous with him and him a hash tagging tagging it and talking about it particularly around the documentary as he slammed ken burns and tweeted against him <hes> that i just really wanted to to to to change range the perspective in which we were thinking about this case. Can you tell us something about their lives. Now <hes> <hes> they are great people. I love them a lot. You know really cry thinking about them. All the good good guys <hes> and you know three of them live in atlanta. It's funny because you know anti-roma kway craze the first to leave. He goes to atlanta. He finds this beautiful. Oh black oasis in atlanta where you you know for dominantly black town with you know lots of people from a lot of different parts of the country and and you know there's a cer- certain <hes> prosperity that happens in some parts of the city and lots of activity and things to do and so he goes out there by way the of baltimore and a couple of other cities that he'd stopped in and lived along the way and he finds atlanta and raymond comes to visit raymond is the person he's closest to. They're really best. Friends and raymond comes to visit raymond's like yo. What is this you've got grass in front of your wait in the back to oh no wait what and so shortly thereafter raymond picks up and he moved to atlanta and then a few months after that use of picks up moves to atlanta so three of them live in atlanta and then <hes> kevin lives in new jersey just got married. When i first met him he was not married he was dating this really wonderful woman and i remember him thinking maybe she's the one and i'm like she the one what's going to happen and and now <hes> he's married and they live in new jersey with their new daughter <hes> and and and his stepdaughter they're the cutest little family an inquiry <hes> is in harlem <hes> and he has tried to live other places and just loves harlem you know when he moves hooves out of the city he longs for harlem i mean he he will drive back in the harlem just to to be there. He goes to <hes> al sharpton. Hs weekly meetings every saturday in harlem community meetings <hes>. He's a real part of the community. I've walked the streets with oprah pro before it's similar. It's people love him. They respect him. They look out for him. They give him a lot of love. There and that's why that's why likes it. It's home <hes> so that's what the five of them are doing. You know in different in various places you know with their promotional reckoning <hes> you know but but my hope has been and i've seen it a bit that the that the film is finished therapy in some ways they're able to talk about. The main thing is now people know the story. Corey is really really adamant that people know his story. He said to me early on <hes>. It's not the central park park five four plus one. I had a different story and he wanted people to know and we did everything we could to tell his story. It's it's a very singular story and it's different from the other guys and so just the fact that now when people walk up to him they know him. They know his story. They respect what he went through. I think is i hope and pray that it has a positive effect on him on all of them it will do rene. Thank you so much for talking with us. Thank thank you so much. I appreciate it. Thanks for having me over dove rene directed co wrote and produced the netflix series when they see us which is nominated for sixteen emmys including two for du vernay best writing and best directing for a limited series after we take a break will hear from michael k williams who's nominated for an emmy for his his performance in when they see us as bobby mccray the father of anton mcrae. One of the five wrongfully convicted boys. I'm terry gross and this is fresh air support for this podcast and the following message come from home instead senior care bonnie a home instead caregiver works to enhance the lives lives.

atlanta harlem raymond donald trump president corey wise ken burns new jersey new york pat buchanan terry gross al sharpton netflix emmy bobby mccray michael k williams du baltimore kevin
Ebola Outbreak Spreads to 3rd Province in Eastern Congo

NPR News Now

00:56 sec | 1 year ago

Ebola Outbreak Spreads to 3rd Province in Eastern Congo

"Outbreak continues to spread and democratic republic of congo and here's ava peralta reports. Two new cases have now been confirmed. Hundreds of miles miles south of the hardest hit areas held authorities here say the have confirmed to new cases in this means bola has now hit three provinces in eastern in congo authorities have set up checkpoints at the exits and entrances of all major cities where they checked for symptoms but according to health authorities the infected woman was able all to travel hundreds of miles and even board a boat without raising concern. The woman died in her hometown and she also infected her seven month old daughter who is being treated for ebola authorities say they are mobilizing to begin vaccinating whoever may have come into contact with the virus so far almost two thousand thousand people have died of ebola since the outbreak began a year ago. It brought up n._p._r. News goma in eastern congo

Congo Outbreak Ava Peralta Ebola Seven Month
"ava" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

KIIS 102.7

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"ava" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

"On. This is Trey let's this is Ava max, what's the chain smokers? One point seven kiss FM an iheartradio station. I don't ever wear. Kimmy. Take my hand inch measuring. Seychelle. Think. Got so much. Maybe. With my baby. To me. The best. We had a party, we don't want to be. Kissing. Office, people are around..

Ava max Kimmy
Chemists Investigate Casanova's Clap

60-Second Science

02:49 min | 1 year ago

Chemists Investigate Casanova's Clap

"This is science Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Karen Hopkin all Cazenove the name is synonymous with a reputation for romantic. Let's say excess but a new study suggests that the real Jacome Cazenove may have exaggerated his sexual exploits none in terms of their sheer volume, but in their infectious aftermath because though Cazenove claim to have suffered several bouts of gonorrhea, researchers could find no traces of the responsible microbe on the pages of the womanisers handwritten memoir. The findings will appear in the journal electro freezes casanovas memoir completed in seventeen ninety eight fills twelve volumes and its English. Translation, runs to thirty five hundred pages in this tell-all casanovas tally some hundred twenty two lovers then confesses to recurring gonorrhea relapses to investigate these claims. Researchers turn to a technique they'd previously used to. Positively identified the bacterium that causes plague on the pages of death registries from seventeenth century Milan. Thus we thought we would be able to detect the gun Opoku on Kazan Avas pages. CC candidate meted in use memoirs have been been infected by gonorrhea in his first sex intercourse at the age of eighteen and having suffer from relapses of the sex Peja his lifetime as a gun lover. Giorgio Righetti, professor emeritus at Milan, polytechnic Righetti and his colleague glib Zuber Stein. Who has a company called spectra fon in Israel developed a hand held device that allows them to capture characterize protein, fragments and other macromolecules from the surface of historical documents such biological materials. Can get stuck to a manuscript when say someone licks his fingers to more easily turn the books pages leaving behind traces of potentially infected saliva, but in the case of Kesse. No. Ova that goes not racist caucus could be detected. They did however find traces of cinnabar a red pigment containing mercury sulfide at the time that chemical was used to treat these sexually transmitted diseases. Do your including syphilis gonorrhea quite likely that cousin Alvin been using macrey suit, find to cure relapse, his taraji. So it could be that as infection was in remission when Cazenove pen the three or four pages of chapters one and two that the researchers were able to examine and that in addition to his way with women Cazenove also had a deft hand with eighteenth century pharmaceuticals. Thanks for listening for scientific Americans, sixty seconds science. I'm Karen Hopkin.

Gonorrhea Karen Hopkin Cazenove Milan Jacome Cazenove Relapse Giorgio Righetti Israel Kesse Zuber Stein Opoku Syphilis Professor Alvin Sixty Seconds
Australia Leaps Past US in Smart Speaker Adoption

The Voicebot Podcast

14:34 min | 1 year ago

Australia Leaps Past US in Smart Speaker Adoption

"Surprise me that much actually I think that makes a lot of sense. And what we look at right now is even with margin of error because there's any type of survey that you're gonna take in. You know, we work hard to make sure it's it's a lot of people. It's it's going to be well over twenty percent of the population. And I'm interested for you Lachlan. What does that mean? Because let's say that there's five or six million Australian's now that have access to a smart speaker. How does that change the way you think about how you think about when you work with your clients what they should be doing in this space, obviously was hit as an opportunity because it's it's another channel that's exciting, and this month's bakers that incense standalone of his this mobile, but smarts baker's doesn't clued hubs as well. So we can you know, as a creative can think about really fun solutions. That actually multi-modal Saudis some experiences that that benefit from, you know, just add ability to talk to speak Voces device that does benefit from visual display information as well. It makes sense. So Eva, we've looked at data from a lot of countries we've looked at data from a lot of different research organizations over the years what stood out to you about the option rate. Just how fast Cheyenne's adopted them. They're more as a percentage overall. And as they were saying, I did not know show. He was so tech savvy. So that was the surprise to me, and it was fun to see how also Google entering the market. I impacted the adoption by brand. Well, that's what we want to talk about next. But Matt you want to jump in. I think the other thing which is found very interesting about Australia's a whole. Of course, having lived here saying that happen Assange launch from just the how rapid this is the a lot of companies began to say slots vacances paying a desirable put up to us to hook on the paper into products News Ltd decided that they were going to give away a Google. Probably more good will meet with any new digital subscription to the newspaper publications. They want Balaj United media publication companies in the world. So for them to actually utilize slots fakers away to get able to sign up for a use of from them. Obviously show that this is something that people were interested in Telstar has given away smarts baker's with you purchase of Android fun. Hawaii is comedy giving away a Sunol? We've any pay three. I think will pay thirty. Sorry. You know, it's it's it's not just the. This is the interest from people buying it. It's also logical Oviously have seen the pushing one of these value. Add is enough to entice people into choosing bam of somebody else. Well, we've seen this elsewhere. So Spotify ran a program in Europe are excuse me. They ran into Ridgely in the US. I think in Q four and they had eleven percent rise in new subscribers which was about double what it estimated for they plan for the quarter. But their promotion was that gave away Google home mini to anybody who signed up for the subscription service. You know, switch from the the free ad-supported to the paid monthly subscription. And so and then they've doubled down. Now, they're doing it UK put other countries because it makes the difference in the other thing I was thinking about to you you mentioned that about the giveaways, so that's really popular in the US. There's a lot of the big manufacturers doing a lot of people are doing the giveaways, but I remember seeing a bunch of. Things come across the news around people giving away Google home hubs in during the holiday season. I was wondering if anybody actually bought a Google home or they're all just like giving away. All right. I can speak from experience that I know that a lot of Google minis would given away amongst friends and family at the Christmas just post, and it's pretty cheap pace of technology to buy compared to compare it. Just to fun, for example. It's Nieve talking fifty dollars versus a thousand some it's the huge price difference. And it's a pretty fun pay settlement. Even if we decide to actually look at the also, let's let's just continue the fame of of looking at the the information that waste inside the consoles the actions, the we managed on behalf of our clients. We did see spikes in usage after Kasai. Above the baseline averaged. And once settled down foam that the baseline diner averages remind high than the baseline daily average prior to. So obviously, this

Google Baker United States Australia Nieve Spotify EVA Kasai Hawaii Europe Balaj United Matt News Ltd Telstar Assange Ridgely UK Eleven Percent
Ava DuVernay shares details of her second Netflix series

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:19 sec | 1 year ago

Ava DuVernay shares details of her second Netflix series

"Night. The Oscar nominated director says she changed the name to when they see us because she wanted to break away from the media invented central park five the series premiere is may thirty first she tells it tells the story of the five. Young men wrongly accused and the central park jogger case of one thousand nine hundred eighty

Oscar Director
Mandy Moore, Bryan Adams And New York Times discussed on Lori and Julia

Lori and Julia

05:12 min | 1 year ago

Mandy Moore, Bryan Adams And New York Times discussed on Lori and Julia

"Big name in the world of entertainment is being accused of sexual misconduct. And this is coming to us, courtesy of the New York Times expose published this afternoon, and this is about musician Bryan Adams now he's been around the scene for quite some time. And some of you may be familiar with Ryan Adams as the ex husband of Manny more. They were married. Seven years divorced in two thousand sixteen. Yeah. So Ryan Adams is being accused of abuse. No this ranging from emotional manipulation to sexual misconduct by several women this in New York Times and this based on interviews with multiple people, including Phoebe, burgers, and Mandy Moore. She's talking in this article, he is as she is a singer songwriter, Courtney j and other women all gave a count of their experiences with Ryan Adams. There's also an interview with a woman named Eva. Who claims that she was fourteen when she began talking to atoms they built an on line relationship that eventually led to sexual conversations. And at least one instance where Adams exposed himself over Skype now, according to this report, Adam categorically denies these quote, extremely serious and outland is excuse me accusations in the times is reporting. He's gone on Twitter afternoon. Are why? Yeah, why did he do that? Yeah. So this is what Ryan Adams has to say on Twitter this afternoon. This was published just about seventeen minutes ago. I guess so I'm not a perfect, man. And I've made many mistakes to anyone I have ever heard, however unintentionally, I apologize deeply an unreservedly. But the picture that this article paints is upsetting Lee. Inaccurate. Some of the details are missing misrepresented summer exaggerated summer outright, false. I would never have inappropriate interactions with someone I thought was underage period. So and he goes on. Well, the Ava said that she was all different ages. Yeah. So it started they made initial contact when she was fourteen this, according to the New York Times now Asia's about twenty years old now, and according to text reviewed by the New York Times, Eva atoms excuse me question. Eva about her age repeatedly when corresponding with her online, and she did not always answer, honestly, and their sexual conversations continued, and there is back and forth. He was asking for photographs of her asking pet names, but Zoe it goes into graphic details about this. So. This seems you know, hey, like a lot of these stories he kind of has a pattern of how he behaves, and here's what I find interesting. Holly is that I'm Mandy Moore who we who he was married to. I mean, this guy is sixteen albums seven Grammys Mandy Moore says is one of the women's talking out about how she stifled him her create creatively. Yeah. So I mean, this is what she's saying in this New York Times article. Julia Manny more saying that during the time she was married Ryan Adams almost six years that Adams, discouraged her from working with other music producers are managers and acted in ways that she now considers psychologically abusive. Here's a quote from the article, she says, he would always tell me you're not a real musician because you don't play an instrument. She goes on to say, quote, his controlling behavior essentially did block my ability to make new connections in the industry during a very pivotal and potentially lucrative time. Mine tire mid to late twenties. Now Adams lawyers deny. Dying that Adams ever, stop Mandy Moore from working with other producers and was supportive of her well-deserved professional respect. Now too many Moore's point I believe, I think that's true because he did have some music out. And then it all stopped. Yeah. Exactly. And she kind of went off the radar in her. It's kind of like her character in this is us. I mean, I'm dead serious because he had to quit her music career for Jack and the triplets. Yeah. This is kind of so that role of Rebecca on this is us for Mandy Moore might be more emotionally resonant for Mandy Moore. She might have a little more method to this. If you're going by the New York Times article this afternoon, which that is just really all of this is just unsettling, and it's sad. And the whole thing can be read over at the New York Times. Yeah. Another one bites the dust. Yeah. Marriage of music in control interesting. Okay. She met him when she was twenty three. Yeah. They got married really quickly. I remember they had a small intimate ceremony somewhere. Maybe like. Chat or something. Seventeen cats. Well, she's married to dies. I mean, the guy. Yeah. And she seems extremely happy. But how horrible? Yeah. You know, what I'm sure it's one of those things that many more reflects back on her time with Ryan Adams, and what it seems like in the New York Times article is that at the time, maybe you brushed off some of the things that this person said or you didn't quite understand what was happening but reflecting back as time passes. And as you gain, a new perspective, you're like, yeah. That really was emotionally manipulative and abusive. Ooh. All right. Well,

Mandy Moore Bryan Adams New York Times Adam EVA Twitter ZOE LEE Jack AVA Holly Phoebe Skype Asia Rebecca Courtney J Seventeen Minutes Twenty Years Seven Years Six Years
Samsung will not give up on Bixby

Talking Tech

04:46 min | 1 year ago

Samsung will not give up on Bixby

"Talking tech is brought to you by wicks dot com with wicks you can use artificial design intelligence to create a stunning website right from your phone in five minutes or less. Just go to wicks dot com. That's W I X dot com and create your professional website today. Alexa, Siri Google assistant and fix big. Now, I am Jefferson Graham with USA listen talking tech. I am at the consumer electronic show just let the Samsung press conference where they talked over and over again about Bixby and all the devices that Bixby will be in. We are here with the deans of voice computing, coverage bread can sell and Eva much ller from voice spot dot, a I I was pretty surprised Brett about how much they were talking about Bixby they weren't giving up on Bixby whatsoever. And you were surprised that I was surprised. Absolutely. So I just was at the Samsung developer conference in the beginning of November and probably half of the conference was devoted to Bixby. And really what they've stressed is that they are on the same path of what they announced last year is to bring Bixby, and they're a platform to all of their devices by the end of twenty twenty which will. Be five hundred million devices annually that'll have Bixby access. So what we've seen so far is that Bixby is a big deal to them. And they're moving forward. I will say that the developer conference also was a little bit different than last year because we saw Bixby to Dotto which introduced entirely new technology, and that's part of the vivid acquisition that they made in two thousand sixteen whereas the other Bixby that we heard about in the past didn't work. So well was actually a legacy project and expect to be sunsetted this year to very little distribution in. So Samsung with Bixby it's all about the potential of what they can do because they do sell more appliances anyone else. They dominate smart TV's. They are the number one smartphone manufacturer in the world. So they have distribution. They just haven't put it out there yet in a meaningful way they've had a couple of false starts. So the question now is in two thousand nineteen and twenty twenty can they really get their act together. And we'll consumers at that point say, yes, I wanna use Bixby in in that will only happen if they haven't already. Formed habits and preferences around Alexa, and Siri and Google assistant. Ava refrigerators stoves, washing machines, dishwashers TV's, we heard Samsung. It's basically in every product how big of a challenge is is it going to be for Samsung to get consumers thinking about hey Bixby. Do something for me compared to the other voice assistance is going to be difficult because people have already started established habits around Amazon. Alexa, Google assistant. And yes, the idea in theory of having one assistant to do everything for us on it's great. But Samson's real challenge is getting third party, developers and board. I think the only mentioned Uber, and I heart radio as two of the third party. And as a consumer you want some that's gonna do everything. I mean, Alexa has over sixty thousand skills. Google is in over one hundred million hundred Google assistant is available in over a billion devices today. So we're talking about five hundred million devices in twenty two. Twenty annually, and that's a big deal. But right now, people are forming habits people are choosing which voice assistance are using. And it's gonna be a tough habit to break if it gets formed over the next year. So Samsung not giving up on Bixby doubling down. You'll see a lot more Bixby in Samsung products. You heard it here from the Consumer Electronics Show twenty nineteen with bread concil and either much ller from voice spot dot A, B sure to check them out check out their podcast or newsletter their website, they're everything keep on subscribing to talking tech lacrosse on apple podcasts and Stitcher. And thanks everyone. For listening. Talking tech is brought to you by wicks dot com. When you're ready to get your website up and running you wanna be able to do it quickly and efficiently and wicks dot com. Got you covered they developed artificial design intelligence that creates a stunning website for you with wicks, you can create your own professional website right from your phone, which means you can open your own online store portfolio or blog wherever you are. How's that for efficient? Just go to wicks dot com. Decide what you need a website for pick your style at your own images link your social accounts and just like that your website is ready. You look amazing on every device desktop and mobile and it takes less than five minutes. Plus, you can do it with one hand. So it's time to get started. Go to wicks dot com. That's W I X dot com and create your very own beautiful professional website today.

Bixby Samsung Alexa Google Jefferson Graham Developer USA Twenty Twenty Brett Amazon Siri Samson Dotto Apple Five Minutes One Hand
"ava" Discussed on Bitch Sesh: A Real Housewives Breakdown

Bitch Sesh: A Real Housewives Breakdown

03:59 min | 2 years ago

"ava" Discussed on Bitch Sesh: A Real Housewives Breakdown

"Slow MO. Now, the birds and the bees. Jews. Was beautiful. Watching them all going slow, but it wasn't like you would do so many movie. It was like they were all carrying something weird. Like one of them had the binder. I only watch them all in a row succession thought, what is that? What is that term? So it's so interesting. I don't know why I'd like not been drawn to it. There's certain. Yeah, racism jumped out. Sure, sure. But it's like a mix of housewives and like a low to your house, Dallas where like there was no money there. Patricia is Tennessee Williams. Villainous clinging are failing empire, and but they're sort of like a mix of these younger people to who are like Vander Pompey. So it's weird. The show with like the blend of the older and the younger people. Exactly. Like I've never seen a reality show where people partying side by side or from the ages, seventeen to seventy and all I cast z. and Tom RAV and like shut hanging. This is weird. The scene I would like for the three of us to read, divided up the party. Seeking of JD. Okay. We can all see this, but this is at the founder's ball. When IRA will be playing. Whitney, I will be playing Ashley end Elizabeth JD's wife and Daniel, you'll be playing Patricia and JD. Okay. Okay. This is Whitney upon seeing Ashley dressed up at the founders. Yes. Ava Gardner nineteen sixty eight. That's exactly what Thomas was saying. That's a compliment. Now Whitney says, Thomas squire evening. But Tricia says, you look Hangul. Her son to her son. Whitney responds. Thank you. If I do say so you look splendid as well. And now j. d. appears in a huge for thrown over his shoulders. Here's JT lists. Get this potus sided. Let's go say to the girl. What is that? I know Darlan hi, Hon. Seriously, but a little Valen. Okay. In this moment, JD does not give a fuck about the fact that Elizabeth wearing a low cut dress. He's just trying to make her better. And flatter Elizabeth says, it's the new me Mazen pink you. I lost weight. Yeah, that's what stress does to you. Now. Then JD immediately turns to Whitney and screams scab, but Halley, Quinton into that, my wife, you rational. Scene, a wild JD impression. He has that sort of like urban scratched. Boys just been like yelling at a mere looking at himself, but Likud people clean their squire. His this show is like. It is everything that rises must converge meets Tennessee. Williams beats like the Colby's, the cancelled spinoff diets. And it's just the finale to was such beautiful soap opera. So and this founders ball, it is basically like the lighting you have in a bathroom, McDonald's speaking. It was so bright in that room. That's what I said. I said it looks like a veterans haulers, some Christmas trees. None of them were decorated whenever and Rives. Decoration, the hand, the place cards of.

Elizabeth JD Whitney Tennessee Williams Patricia Thomas squire Ashley Ava Gardner Vander Pompey Dallas Tom RAV Tennessee McDonald founder Rives Tricia j. d. Halley Colby Daniel
"ava" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"ava" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Higher rate fascinating stuff ava kaufman is a freelance journalist and contributing writer with the intercept if thanks so much for joining us today thank you every year about one point five million people start internships in the hopes of getting their foot in the door at their dream job but about half of those internships don't pay it was only last month at the senate approved a five million dollar fund to finally begin compensating interns on capitol hill that money still needs to be approved by the house but the effort was spearheaded by a nonprofit group called pay our interns being an intern on the hills a person of color you realize that there are few people that look like you and that's actually really disheartening the people that i could really to were the individuals that were cleaning bathrooms or cleaning the hallways that's guillermo creamer the chief of staff pay our interns you realize that the people that don't like you they all tend to come from a similar background they all have the extra funds to go out after work into happy hour when i had to rush back to go to class because i was interning working and taking a full course load at seic dot was an unpaid congressional intern in two thousand fourteen and interned in the dc mayor's office the year after that beyond needing the money to live gear says that unpaid internships don't consider the discomfort that occurs internes can't afford what's required for the job one of the things that happens when your intern especially on the hell is you have to wear suits the one soon i owned was not a black suit for example it was kind of agreement tanisha suit so i knew whenever i re wear that it was recommended that i was re wearing the same thing and so that was that was difficult he admiral eventually had to drop his congressional internship to take a babysitting job but today he says being an advocacy group means he can fight for everyone to have access to an internship that could launch a career on paid interns eventually become stafford's staffers eventually become lt's or cheap staff and that individual can not one day wanna run for office so allowing that gateway to be there you know it really it really stuck without and it's not just dc interns of course all types of industries including the media use unpaid interns i sat down with ross perwin author of internation to talk about what unpaid internships mean for this generation of workers i was an unpaid intern myself like the vast majority of people that i knew felt kind of pressured and even forced to certain point to work unpaid doing real work for a significant period of time and it wasn't until then that i looked around and saw that everyone around me was was feeling this pressure to do an internship and i told my family what i was doing and my grandparents said how wonderful you're gonna become a doctor and i had to explain to them actually know this you know is now something that everybody has to do yes the term comes from medicine the it was originally in the medical profession that there was this idea but now it's everywhere i told my parents they understood that much but when i told him i was going to do at unpaid they said unpaid people working on paid so that's when i realized that this was a relatively new phenomenon just in the last few decades that had become completely normalized and it was something nobody had really talked about and what type of change did we see over the past couple of decades that's led to more of these unpaid internships in some ways the most significant one was a cultural change by which you know this is an era of the decline of organized labor of a lack of consciousness really about work and working conditions there is a law around this there is the fair labor standards act minimum wage is you know you have to pay that for people who who work at least minimum wage of course this was a period of minimum wage stagnation and there was kind of this loophole basically where traineeship or an apprenticeship that was really an educational experience could be on paid for a short period of time and through that loophole giant truck was driven and a.

ava kaufman writer five million dollar one day
"ava" Discussed on She Didn't Text Back Podcast

She Didn't Text Back Podcast

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"ava" Discussed on She Didn't Text Back Podcast

"Yeah and i was like i wanted you to before after already been in a fight for a little bit i wanted to work yeah and like it's it made me really sad that we have no i knew a major memories or like videos together that we like were hardly ever video i always thought that was weird i did not ask them to not put me okay okay that was weird that they never put me in anything weird how everyone was yeah yeah because i was like i say that i don't wanna do that yeah it was kind of a deal to our our friend circle yeah people that we know oh yeah it was a very big deal yeah yeah everyone was very shocked yeah it was big deal for us in our little world yeah yeah yeah that was time like it was like i was on something else i really don't feel like that person anymore it's so like that concept of how how much anger or animosity i don't even know how to find you in a really dark place to you're in a really dark place which is so weird because i careerwise that moment that day my release party happened following day careerwise best day that i've ever had even to this point man i remember abe mom was in town and had a drop off at the airport and my ep my life became beautiful drop to that same night and i'm just on at avis house checking by refreshing my twitter and it was fucking blowing up i'd have never seen anything like that and then still and charted at this point but then ava had to leave it was like seven pm i remember before we had our talk or after this is two days after and then i remember i made a snapchat and and this is like the album is coming out like right now snapchat and i was like i hope you guys like it the only thing that like the only goal that i really have is to get on the top one hundred on itunes even if i got one hundred excited and i put out into the world and then eva leaves drop off her mom and then i'm in my car man i wish i could booking shared this moment with at least one of you best moment of my life and i i was.

twitter abe ava two days