35 Burst results for "ASO"

"aso" Discussed on Medical Device Success - Your Success is Our Mission!

Medical Device Success - Your Success is Our Mission!

04:34 min | 1 year ago

"aso" Discussed on Medical Device Success - Your Success is Our Mission!

"They could just get a blood transfusion from paula. He'd be on your way. So chris Same question sort of back to you. You know what you know. what did i miss. I think politics a great job. On what candidates and clients. We consider any additional thoughts that you have. I think flexibility is is key ted in and i say that in in context is let's let's look at what we what we're what we're trying to do with business and this is advice. We're giving full cicely games is it. What what are we really trying to do. And and if there's a way to accomplish that goal. I mean we're seeing a trend of results based management in. That wasn't as escalated as as it was with kobe. Because you have to rotate the results based you're working from home. You have to manage the results. And i think that is a that is a leadership trend. That will will continue. And i don't think he's going anywhere which results based management sober hired someone to do these five things as long as they're doing these five things you know can we. Can we define this as the success right. And obviously there's there's there's who's variations of that you already. You need to lab do saying you know software development. You can likely do remote depending on the type of coating your donating or you know depending on the function. Of course. But i think i think that degree of flexibility and really having a good litmus test and what good looks like from an organizational perspective especially when to polish his point. Everyone's leading through change management and. No one's got a crystal ball has been. I think we've seen some of the better leaders. Yo have that degree of adaptability and plus going to drive through challenging times insert thriving through kind of what we're seeing right now. Okay okay. that's great. Well we're on the verge of the hour here and we don't have any more questions. One thing i just want to let you know the listeners and the members of the midtech leaders community that are in attendance here today. Is that because you're a acclerate on a podcast. The organization becomes a a free member of the med tech leaders community. Aso so i will send you guys a couple links but the benefit that the community gets is that if you have somebody at Legacy you know keeping tabs on the community and communication. You know you might have people reaching out to you or whatever for advice or you know to. They might have a job for you. They need to do a search something like that. It's a small community. But it's growing. So i just like to say thank you both. This is really been Quite informative it really is giving us a great summary of what the job market. Looks like and med tech and a lot of great advice for both the candidates and the clients right. It's a pleasure. I hope to see a person when they don't know exactly chris. It's a real pleasure to meet you. For the first time so continued the great lack down there with the legacy med search team. You guys have an awesome reputation. You know keep knocking it out of the park and helping companies succeed appreciate again. Well we just learned that. It is very different. Employment market in med tech. Right now candidates know what you want and be prepared to communicate that and your capabilities virtually employers. Also know what you want and be prepared to learn how to select a candidate primarily with virtual tools..

cicely paula chris kobe ted Aso
"aso" Discussed on The Last American Vagabond

The Last American Vagabond

02:14 min | 1 year ago

"aso" Discussed on The Last American Vagabond

"That that's we've seen that there are a history and that it's always the case where it's something that can be controlled. The very concept of electricity right at something or even with perfect transition to where my next point was going to be something like wifi or there's been conversations about wifi the point being if they wanted to it could be free and they could make it something that's book for the most part everywhere in the world and you would have to pay for it but they don't because it's not controllable that way so go ahead point. It's about yeah just about greed in control if they wanted to release the schematics of their. I mean that's our biggest issues nowadays when it comes to having open source firmware for things like i'll wi fi and cellular devices that none of the companies. No one will ever ever release Because they're afraid of being sued by other companies that you know everyone has a patent is. It's a big problem so we do need open and free solutions. And i think we will find them when it comes to exit. Pp it solutions like x. Mpp for instance matrix which is a protocol that is actually uses parts Mpp in it That has become really popular nowadays those in the tech and private communities in in that is sort of decentralized because you can run your next empty i start your own matrix server but it's not truly decentralised like tv. Keep in mind. I have a very contrarian viewpoint on this like you know. I think i'm seeing a little bit or or their head in the future but a lot of people use matrix nowadays so it does show that the are aware of the need to decentralize in have antenne crypt communications whether as privacy concerns is another topic i'm gonna cover take backer tech Check that on the future aso to wrapped go back to the original questions. You have a lot options for messengers to give you a real world example. I use telegram a lot on on aiba phone simply because that's a lot of where my community is right. A differences is when he was telegram. If you're not using secret. Shops telegram is responsible for encrypting decrypted. The communication offered device. You're trusting up to when you run your own accent..

aso
"aso" Discussed on Monster Movie Fun Time Go

Monster Movie Fun Time Go

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"aso" Discussed on Monster Movie Fun Time Go

"I'll i'll feed you cows to godzilla sense in most suicide cases. Both shoes are left together. Okay sure i suppose swell. I i mean is when japanese people commit suicide. Do they like take their shoes off and leave them both together. Is that what he's telling. I don't understand what he's telling us. I'm not sure they're just mostly that shoes. Maybe that's just like a would like Proof that she was like running away or she was. You know one is using it. Some kind of proof. He's he's trying to use it as some kind of proof that it wasn't a suicide but it just seems like a weird thing to declare as a newspaper. Man i've been around and let me tell you in most suicide gazes both live together men. Then they think orders mentioned this that cows have been stolen near mount aso so the are monsters like to snack on the cows to. Maybe they're actually maybe Somebody actually eight something. Is that it just killing it behind. And they developed. They've developed the film that was in the camera and they look happy but they're one of the last frame. Blasts piece of film has the corner of a wing and they cut their just looking at the negatives than we cut to be professor. They have print out the photo and he say animal and they have. This is so weird. They take drawing of some sort of a teradata and line up with the photo panel. Toes the wing and the photo and a little piece of his body lineup. Exactly which is just so weird. They say yes. It must be this toronto don but it only has twenty eight foot. Wingspan is to take down a plane. I just. I'm calling bull shit on that it was total bullshit. It's this is another one of those like a cartoon drawings yeoman's yeah but the reporter thinks that's a that is a good explanation because an animal take toronto..

mount aso toronto yeoman
"aso" Discussed on Post Show Recaps

Post Show Recaps

05:12 min | 1 year ago

"aso" Discussed on Post Show Recaps

"Makes note exists exactly place to america. After watching avatar mature accidentally radicalized entire relieve literally and like. I am happy that they talk about these things and they laugh for sure. They like mentioned this and yes. It's a kids show but like roku who has like some great points. He's like no the nations meant to be separate like says the four nations are meant to be just that four better line than what i said but Yeah like he says the people are to you know be separate and instead like chosen just cannot get that out of his head he just decides like this is what i want to do. Yeah it is frustrating aso's and decides to just do thing but good on good on roku for you know for sure yup Anyway we get back and we see a a scene. A scene change many years later and we see as a roku going to earth nation Like doc island or whatever. Instead of seeing an earth nation city he sees a bunch of smoke with a fire. Nation signed over the earth kingdom. Symbols shot gets better. That's zoom from the tiny gate and the music and going. I'm all it gets me. Every time we get the full fire nation like propaganda music like the whole orchestra back can get. It's really epic. Yeah we get the evil turn here. And then the scene that we get the confrontation between roku and susan is so great has like roku immediately from seeing this barges in to the throne room and he says how dare you occupied territory and then so's and turns around says how dare you address your fire lord this way and they start like getting at each other like they're in each other's faces sawsan in says your loyalty is to our nation. I anything less makes you traitor. I was like there isn't.

aso america roku susan sawsan
"aso" Discussed on Almost 30 Podcast

Almost 30 Podcast

05:45 min | 1 year ago

"aso" Discussed on Almost 30 Podcast

"I took a bunch of photos for my mom's house when i was there over the holidays last year. I don't know maybe there before. And have these pictures of me at these various ages. So i can like send love to those versions of myself every day of this one. I'm like me in a bathing suit. And i was like five. I am just like knobby knees like full blown and every day. I'm like just sending those versions of me love. Because i for so long. I didn't really remember much of my childhood. So having the pictures has helped me sort of like see her and kind of like be with her. But i realized that meditation the other day i was like oh man i find myself some of my most vivid moments of childhood were with my dad eating sweets eating ice cream. All that thing. And i'm like tim. I really miss that intimacy with him and i miss that connection that we had just since we've been apart since he's gotten sick and i'm like damn i realized much that i'm looking for their comfort. You know that. Like childhood joy that i had when i was younger and so the punishing myself where it gets a little bit when we kind of think back but i was reading louise hay and She talks a lot about over. Eating and binging is related to Denial of our feelings and stuffing down our feelings and us not acknowledging our feelings and for me. That is like incredibly true. It's like if i'm judging how. I feel or denying myself how i feel. I will find a way till it's almost like you. Stuff it down in your steph. We are stuffing ourselves in every single way. We stuff associate food. We stop ourselves with stuff was content with content to suffer so information. Yes we stuffing ourselves like a chicken. Yeah and there's no space and we all know what how we feel when we walk into a space and it's minimally designed we know we know what space does for us. We know how we feel after we do a fast or we a little bit lightly when we've been eating heavily. We know we know the the medicine that space is. And that lightness is and where we're afraid. A lotta time. And i even think about you. Know in this body positively movement and this is a touchy but una care. everything is touchy We have to be careful that we're not over glorifying becoming so full and so heavy that live can't get in and sometimes in that conversation and i'm all for but if other debris whatever shape you are of course so you know nobody twist my words even though it's just happens wherever i've got a four year old daughter he you know. Oh my god like we talk about beautiful bodies all the time and you know it's just everybody deserves to feel confident and and happy and freeness skin. The the thing we've got to be mindful of women get into that conversation is but what's the truth about about what i saw is really asking for our. What's our relationship to lightness. What's our relationship to having more space and space and lightness within within our body. What have we. What have we come to make that main and sometimes now people will wrong people who who live in a lighter body as if they are mistreating it or the you know you must be mistreating it you must be starving without realizing no. They just feel better that way feeling more in touch that way. They're feeling life like life can get to them more. That's a more receptive open state for them because they're not stuffed and yet there are also people who walking around in a light looking body stuffed they just have fast metabolism whatever and there were people living in a larger body. Who really liked so. It's not exactly the messiah the body but what we need. Look at ourselves and i talked about this in the the mother. Summer club actually recently said. I asked the women to to look at their relationship to lightness and where they're uncomfortable. Because i've had to do this to wear my uncomfortable with feeling. I just don't need anything else right now. Where am i comfortable with feeling like i'm just not hungry. Where am i comfortable with. Feeling like i just don't need food. I just don't need like it's like we want to be stuffing ourselves. We want to feel like we should be stuffing aso's because we're so accustomed to heavy and we're so afraid of light and again this is not me saying everybody should go get skinny is not that at all. Like i said you can be skinny and heavy and you can be fuller and feeling light but we do have to be mindful that we are not ignoring our bodies calls. Because we've decided we've jumped on the body positivity thing and said fuck it. It's fine that i feel heavy that i want to. It's like okay of coast. fine. Of course it's fine. You can feel whatever way you want to but is it true for you. The feel good. Is it true for you that life can get to you through this body. Is it true for you that you can feel life in this body. Is it true for you that or is it true for you that your stuffing yourself to not feel life and so this is where we've just got to just come back to the truth and put aside for a minute because i do feel like sometimes we. my again. The body positive movement is amazing. And it's doing the most beautiful things women to accept their bodies. We've just got to be.

louise hay tim aso
Victim Mentality - burst 03

Bald and Blonde

03:23 min | 1 year ago

Victim Mentality - burst 03

"Thoughts lead to feelings and feelings lead to behavior. Now when i've repetitively think to myself. I'm unfortunate i'm the victim then i will feel as a victim and because i feel as a victim therefore i will behave as a victim. Now debt by itself would not be so bad if there was no consequences later on in the long term. Why when i think to myself i'm a victim yet. Why does it always happen to me. Of course it always happens to me than i feel that way and i also feel that weight on my shoulders in my mind on my heart in my chest on my chest wherever we feel it in my thinking maybe some people consider it or experiences as i. Am you know that heavy cloud is above me and it's wearing me down. It's so heavy now. Then we start feeling as such and then we will also in our behavior accept other people's behaviors that then victimize us yes so therefore a little thought has huge consequences so if we as humans only knew how impactful our thoughts are. I seriously believe that we would choose so much. More wisely. the thoughts we think in the first place and then in the second place which starts we want to repeat over and again. And which one do we want to linger with for a long period of time. I absolutely hundred percent agree with that. Which is why we believe that. We need to teach this in schools because these are tools that we should all grop. We said we should own. I had a dream for ourselves. And it's ridiculous that we daren't so i can completely relate to what you were speaking about when you talk about those feelings creating behaviors and attitudes because that's exactly what it was a fantastic the biggest example of my life. Which is my l. patia. That's how i used to feel about myself. I which see my hair falling ass again and and it's not fair. Why is it happening again. Will this ever stall piskunov. Be the center of my life forever. I hate myself when my hair foes ash a height. The way i looking i feel full of shame from the sort of bigotry that i'd faced on my life. When i got older and started lincoln differently. I realized when i look at those times i thought that about myself that i was setting myself up for itch by thinking that way. And i've given all this power to my alopicia. When in fact if i had a role model when i was young who was like i am now and just said tikey pat backed by doing these three things and you'll completely change the way you feel about yourself and therefore what you'll loss will be like. Because john we create what we feel about aso allies. It would've been such a different life for me. Which is what drives me to do that for others today. Of course so. I'm grateful for the journey.

Change Self Sabotage Manifestation Transformation Mental Health Personal Development Mindset Piskunov Tikey Pat Daren ASO Lincoln John
"aso" Discussed on Diet Culture Rebel Podcast

Diet Culture Rebel Podcast

05:24 min | 1 year ago

"aso" Discussed on Diet Culture Rebel Podcast

"Then you'll beautiful. You just say you know you don't need them and i still got booed anyway. I love my dad. But then the compensation to tell him that five side these amazing me on well and on the to get the mail. And i'm sorry that was getting kyrie talking about that. It's going to be the hottest conversation that i had Yeah it's sound so hard but it was the hottest conversation yet so enlightening conversation. And the most hailing compensation because it was the giving myself route to and a lot of the west and south portland through is. It's one we get to that journey. Make that decision and have the surgery. It's now giving ethel's in raking teams and understanding also and keeping aso self acceptance and forgiveness that we're always looking for We are always looking for that and it can feel you know all of these things can feel good in the moment you know like when we get this external validation from other people and from society you know it feels good in the moment. And there's there's nothing wrong with like desiring that. But i think it just shows up on such a surface level where we think there's like easier surface ways to kind of fix what we're going through but clearly for your story you know that's not it's really not true. There's something that's so much deeper that we need to connect to and and work through within ourselves. And what i really. You've because what it really to me too with Never can pay or south to social media right from the outside. I look so happy. And to a point i was happy with my life. I would not like. I was not upset every day in my life. I was there like at that time. We thing i. I was happy but deep down. I was lost and insecure and looking for that validation so disconnected connected for myself so Which is really taught me now that social mediary such a lot real and compare it because like you can look happy from the outside..

kyrie aso ethel portland
"aso" Discussed on Security Now

Security Now

03:17 min | 1 year ago

"aso" Discussed on Security Now

"It could have been forty five. And it wasn't wasn't and they knew about for eight months and leo a hundred and thirty billion dollars. We could have a second whole microsoft that just fixes bugs. It's really hard could t- to why this could possibly be except just lack of care. They don't care but we're and it's not like they're being forced to discover them. They've they've got the whole security community finding them for them showing them. Here's a problem and here's a zero day. These are good people. I know many of these people. They're not malicious people. They're they're they're they're just like you and me. There's gotta be an explanation beyond there is. There is no cost to them. Lia yeah it does not says businesses and it's not worth spending the time or energy to fix it because it doesn't cost us any money. Don't need to yeah. They lost not a single customer type. They don't they don't have any ones goodwill anymore. They've got our balls is what they've caught goodwill and you got him by the short hairs exactly. Well they don't. Because i think there's lennox and olympics is growing very rapidly. I'm not proposing that it's more secure. But at least they try to fix the problems as soon as they crop up. What would you. I mean steve. You still are gonna use windows because you have to. They do have you. They've got you it is. It is the most functional platform it. You know it's not even when i'm looking for software. You know many of the things i want just odd. They're not on the mac they're no it's just i think you would find good. I think you would find what you needed on lenox. I'm thinking but maybe not. I dunno lennox. I think fits your ethos a lot closer. Well that that nation's enterprises aren't going they're not doing it and that's where your business lies. Is people buying your software running on windows. So you don't have a choice. Well and actually my software will be booting on intel machines and i will be providing. Aso's i mean one of the things happening with six waxy. Well we're six one now but really with seven is i become completely. Os agnostic so good you know. Just and that's just the reality of the world but but again microsoft's not going anywhere they just don't have to do a better job and they're not and but it is causing real damage. Your right to estimate you really right to call him out. I mean that's that's that is absolutely the case do better. You need to do better microsoft. Well there we go security now I think you should change the title of they've got our balls but you know okay. We'll go with microsoft's culpable negligence. It's not quite as punchy but Steve gibson as a grc. Dot com That's a good place to go to get a copy of this show. He has sixteen kilobits audio sixty four kilobytes audio and transcript. So.

lennox microsoft Lia olympics steve Aso intel Steve gibson
"aso" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

03:17 min | 1 year ago

"aso" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"I don't know the guys grasses too long or you can't have that trailer park there or you know you're supposed to have the numbers posted on your house or your mailbox or whatever. I'm kind of surprised. I just assumed that pasco county was in the hick panhandle but yeah it's up by tampa. Yeah i was surprised by that as well. And the fact just the whole pre-crime thing is just. It's so wrong to even think anything about a person before they've done it right like a guy can look at me mean you know. Look like he might hit me. He might punch me in the face but it's not right to do anything about it until he actually throws the punch right. It would be wrong for me like you know. Call the cops on a guy. Like i'm pretty sure he was gonna hit me for you. They just punch him because of his look on his face. Yeah it just. The whole thing is ridiculous. The whole concept is ridiculous but here we have it. Unfortunately i'm sure that there are people who are just like all about it. Because whenever i used to listen to crime what what do you call true crime shows. They're always pushing this narrative that goes like in. The police knew that he Committed crimes in the past and they did nothing about it. The police knew that he had the capability to do something like this and they did nothing about it. They're always pushing. The police should be able to do something before somebody gets murdered. You know television pushes a lot of crap. That doesn't fly and that's the mentality of these swine. It's comply or else right right or else what. Well i you know. If you don't comply you will find out. And that's why. I think i said it on the show the other day. The real root of all evil is the desire to control people. You know the cop just wants to control these people so bad because they believe that you know their overlords told them that these people are bad. The crazy thing is it's like everybody's got a little evil in them but most of us suppress it. You know what. I mean but cops nope they just have. They don't have given a license to be evil. Yeah right it doesn't matter what they do it because they were the special shiny badge. Yep they've been granted extra rights haven't they or they just people. they're just doing what. The algorithm decided was right. So in that vein. The aso's predictive policing model is a solution in search of the problem except that it seems to just create more problems quote. The supposed purpose of the program is to keep people from committing crimes unquote says barge l. But what this ultimately accomplishes is an erosion of trust between people and police and the continued involvement of people within the criminal justice system..

hick panhandle pasco county tampa aso
The Amazing Benefits of Cryotherapy

Beauty IQ Uncensored

01:26 min | 1 year ago

The Amazing Benefits of Cryotherapy

"So what are the benefits of cryotherapy So i think some of the biggest benefits would bay the reduction of inflammation so it very much reduces inflammation in the body and in the joints when it comes to skin as well so it increases collagen production and because of how cold it is so when you go into the cryotherapy chamber all of your blood vessels will constrict and sorry. Blood will get rushed to the center of the body as i guess a survival mechanism so protect the bottle organs and then when he come out of the cryotherapy chamber all of that blah. That's going to the core of the body. it's freshly oxygenated. It's all the nutrients out of back into it that then shoots apt the extremities of the body and basically flushes your entire system with fricks. Fresh oxygenated blood. So okay so who would not be able to do this. I'm probably so anyone that has sivy dislike of the cold would probably not. Well when i say severe. I mean sabih anyone. We hot conditions probably wouldn't be great so we get a wide array of people coming. He aso get anything. From professional athletes to grandparent's in the eighties that will come in use it for arthritis or any can wind conditions to everyday people that will just use it as well just to maintain the general vitality and hell sorry. Yeah huge huge Broad range of

Fricks Sabih ASO Arthritis
"aso" Discussed on Impaulsive with Logan Paul

Impaulsive with Logan Paul

03:02 min | 1 year ago

"aso" Discussed on Impaulsive with Logan Paul

"So i was also the kid the kid who's already listen to rap. I have my home. He's from where. I live far away from the school. It was like a whole thing. I was only going to school because my cousins were smart. And it's like a cat dude like now pull here suck. I wish i share guy who was so nice to change out his pants. God i'm smoking. We live fund did smoke weed. I did smoke weed shortly. Like in eighth grade after that. So what did you. Where did you go. What catholic school. I got kicked out so i'll back with the girl and all that stuff like my school had really liked. They were just like fed up with me and they're just like you should not come back or do this anymore. Here and i was like i was officially said you know i probably user. Let's do this. Yeah this is not for you my book so i was. I was happy. I was so happy i had a public school. That was right in front of my house. All my friends went to it was so much fun. Like mahomes smoking black and milds in front of the school. Like i'm like yeah. What can i go here bro florida. It's like that. Like like. I had one of my home like drove to school. Like in the wealth. No no fifteen his yeah. He was a super senior. But yeah i was just like i was already like. They're all the time like with with those friends. And i'll just like this is not for me like i'm not like all these kids here like. I was at catholic school. No offense anyone's very religious. But i'm like all these stories are fake shit. I'm like you. there's no adam. And eve i'm sorry go to. I'm sorry big. I make us like like my thing is like no. It didn't actually happen. But they're like stories that have symbols and that's what it's about so like at my school like they were very literal with a and i was just like it's not like like a little thing like you're listening to preach and then that shorted grab your dick and then you stop listening and then you're like in and out. Brian never gave a fuck so in short. He started touching. My dick. i was like this is. This is all i care about this raw. The boys are back now. We all i think on the dick yes so anyways then alive. I really wasn't for it. And i just was like i really just want to do this and like when i went to that school. I'm like really got close to a couple homes and we started making music is older brother was like a producer. That's kind of where. I started to get in where i fit in type thing. And then yeah we started like making noise and florida and like doing shitty aso's with nobody atom and fucking fighting people and putting it on the internet where you find people because nova showed up. No it was kind like people would show up and be like not. They wouldn't fuck with you or something and you'd be like yo fuck you..

catholic school florida adam dick Brian aso
"aso" Discussed on Bit Storm

Bit Storm

05:16 min | 1 year ago

"aso" Discussed on Bit Storm

"Some history and again playing into the best system like they're from previous battles that then add to them or like the unspoken system does do like certain besties will get a name weapons. We'll get nine based on the fact that oh you you like three times in a row destroyed fucking cyclops with this weapon. Then it's now you know the ipod. Whatever what this enables us to do is capitalize on each in your game. You're managing now create new merchandise. Yeah that's a good thing. That's a good part of it so it now becomes that the betsy system has actually just brought forward like new merchandise. That you're bringing aso at the age of fucking action figures plush. I liked the idea that your custom like your gladiator be. They may know based made their way up. Become one of the more popular fighters in this ring. And then you get to make fucking action figures and plush. She's out of them that we generate essentially with whatever clothing. You've put them in and then you can choose like this one comes with the mythical i- polka that like it's got whatever it is the one of the named weapons you can choose to like. Release the limited version that yes that's like increasing your revenue increasing revenue end. The cool thing is for twitch streamers and that sorta stone like you could actually be selling off like pinzel all logos of here like your your champions basically to your to your audience so you get that sort of i love the idea of banana pose for wallpapers and in your merge stole people come in and purchase wallpaper fifty cents or whatever but it's still and and take a small cut they they they took life. I actually love that. As a twitch thing actually. I hadn't thought of it from a streaming point of view but even just as the crowd and having some integration there where they can like they can be maybe like voting on which side they going for..

aso
"aso" Discussed on The Changelog

The Changelog

02:36 min | 1 year ago

"aso" Discussed on The Changelog

"The ui while you have open aso which is a very nice feature you know. Just show me what i'm doing here. Don't make like the the screen doesn't change in vi. It's just very hard gronk. what changed. Yeah anyway and then quit is pretty easy. Truncates breezy. what we're trying to talk about cat turns out none of us. he's cat. why do use cad. The main times i will use cat is when i'm looking at say a markdown. File or in the cases in undoing. Say in a stage cajun. Yeah on my cat then. Pipe that into the clipboard. Kinda offing Those are tons. I'm using cap primarily. I'm not using often. Yeah but you know if we're comparing can't the bad. Why when they do that or something. Close to the sea because or that. 'cause like just make my finger not move over what to keys. The key is to keys away from the b. keys bath brand because it says it's cat with i thought that's why they picked it. Okay that that's making more sense now. So cad for the uninitiated is is short for concatenation and it just prince files to standardize and we'll also concatenation multiple files which one of the cool things that i have done that. You may not know is it can actually concatenation multiple. Mp three files into a longer mp three file. So let's imagine you have a couple of textiles and you wanna create a combination of them right one after the other. This is very common for certificates where you'll take multiple certificates and our private key or whatever and you can candidate them all together into one new file so he like file one cat one south who and then you do the the carrot the greater than carrot to direct that instead of staying out to direct it to this file which of the next argument to file to her file. Three you can do that with mp threes and we'll actually concatenation them as if they're tax files so if you wanna splat a bunch together you can say cat and between one one nine three three and directed three mp three and it will work in just listen to them and it just starts the second one after the first one in the new file which is pretty cool. It's a new way to get your master feed. Yeah there you go just cat sal cattermole together go go go go twenty. Four hours of change master feed is very. I never knew that you can also use the star upgraded with cut as well like if you have to match on a file pattern. You can just do something like well. I've done this before. In the past where i have my notes set up to her. Like twenty twenty one dash and then zero seven dot st like july twenty.

aso sal cattermole
"aso" Discussed on Opening Arguments

Opening Arguments

06:11 min | 1 year ago

"aso" Discussed on Opening Arguments

"I became to princess. Who adore you saggy pants. Fewer cars more bikes sakashita kasumi cracking down the law cracking down the law adopt pet posed decline in ear docking day. Jury belliotte patchy at last baby. Heather l. matthew vernon adam kosta jeremiah's fancy microwave emporium in an alley j alden. Walt dan ally. Bosnich apologies to david in brooklyn and theresa gomez. That scotch comment was aimed at eli bosnich. In ninety week's episode numbers will start with sixty nine. Mark your calendars david in brooklyn sam. Now mitchell. i'm sympathetic to this patron name. If andrew knows what. The aso aso h defense is. I will up my pledge. Do you know what that is. The a. s. h. s. aso a so. Is that a show of hands. That'd be my guess. No idea. I agree with that. One hundred percent. Natasha grudge rap. Wants you to support the justice policy institute sam buck and conrad michael's champion forever and ever and ever unless somebody seats should try aright. Oh no social. This firm has ever failed the bar exam kidding and outside forty-three did i pork my streak. Oops i put my streak like the old. Snl commercial are thomas. There's a ton of destructors in this. This was a patent holder brought a patent infringement action in federal court against a licensee of the patent almost all of that was distracting nonsense. That this had nothing to do with patents. All this was doing was providing that you had an original cause of action in federal court. You didn't have to know what a licensee was. Verse rivers of the patent-holder none of that. It was just patent-holder. Believe that a jury would be more sympathetic to his claims than a judge and asked his lawyer. Hey give me a jury trial what do you do to get somebody a jury trial in federal court and there were four options and i love you narrowed it down to a nba sort of the two earliest options. Right which is filing serve a complaint that includes a jury trial demand. That was a. That's what the coin went with or be filing serve a jury trial demand at the close of discovery. That's what you went with. You both eliminated. Cease-fire conservatory Within the thirty days after the close of the pleadings that is incorrect. For reason that. I'm about to complain and you eliminated. Make a jury trial demand at the initial pretrial conference really good. The pretrial conference is super late in the press quite yeah and so right so to good eliminations at least Or the coin. Got it right. that's exactly right. You picked file server. Jury trial demand at the close of discovery. And i gotta tell you. We've porked streets forked myself. Celery thanked Almost right park my street so a is violence complaint that includes a trump. This is by far standard practice. You will see this win. It will say jury trout demanded. I know you don't have to be honest. Okay you do not have to file a jury demand with your computer. Glutton under federal rule. Thirty eight b one. You must serve that demand no later than fourteen days after service of the last pleading directed to the issue upon which a jury is sought so within fourteen days of serving your complaint. You've to serve the jury trial demand with it so most lawyers are just like well. I'm not gonna you don't have to respond to it for longer. So most lawyers will just put the jury trial demand. I almost had this. I'll tell you. I i remembered like you know. I think i remember when we read complaints and they say jury trial. And i you know i thought i remembered it showed a gone with it. For some reason. I just i latched onto b. As in like. I think it was a test taking thing. Okay extreme two answers or a and d like earliest and the latest. And i think i was kind of leaning toward b for that reason. I should've i should've stuck with that vague memory. I had of reading jury trial demands and complaints. So i failed but the coin the coin data right the coin got one. At least somebody got one right so true rooting for the coin. At this point the coin has not done well and they need that law degree to pay some bills. Indeed they do. But i look you know as you pointed out You came close and Close doesn't count on the bar exam but it does count for purposes of andrew's heart. Man that hurts. I almost had. It was so close but it was one of those fairly arbitrary ones. That just comes down to a rule. I don't know and You know. Feel like i did the best i i well. No i didn't i could have picked. I had i was so close anyway. All right well. I blew it. The streak is parked long streak. Then let's start another one is our big winner of this week's t. Three well thomas. This week's winner. Is ben gas right on twitter. Who writes a having read a few complaints the oa way. I usually see the demand for the jury trial at the tail end of the complaint. It allows the parties to brief on it before the trial passes the initial stages great plug for us. Great plug for the oa way good reasoning. That's absolutely correct right. You want to know early on in the process. Are you looking at a jury trial because it it will alter your strategy. So congratulations bending joy. You're never ending fame and fortune and everyone. Let's give them a follow. That is at gas right. Ben g. a. t. h. r. I g. h. t. b. e. n. on twitter. And congratulations ben on being this week's winner and that's our show. Thanks so much for listening and we will see you on friday for another rapid response says always i move for a bad court thing. You mean a mistrial. Yeah that's why you're the judge. And i'm the law.

Heather l matthew vernon adam kosta jere Walt dan ally Bosnich theresa gomez eli bosnich aso aso justice policy institute sam buck conrad michael brooklyn david aso Natasha andrew mitchell thomas Mark nba
"aso" Discussed on Dear Writer

Dear Writer

05:42 min | 1 year ago

"aso" Discussed on Dear Writer

"Mercury us publishing. It basically looks like kind of wings but book as well. That's open It's got all of baba everything It's got to on the bottom. So like i said so basically if i were to go and set this book down in any barnes and noble you would know that it was self polish even have words. It's the inside of the library of congress coating so and i paid for this like everything that you see i paid for so mercury west was just kind of that next step of well who you with now. Of course now. I found out that you kind of have to be a small Doing quotes you have to be a small press which is five authors or more. I don't know where the line is to get entered into different reviews review on all this different stuff that you can't do if you're just a one author publishing company so i do for minimal fee. You know. I give the the people that are with me. S bien numbers. Because i just bought a whole package of one hundred. Because i knew i was gonna keep writing so i gave i get those Any tidbits that. I could possibly help with looking professional as far as a book cover goes. There's some people out there that i'm like where why. Who did this. Like soccer own because this is not look good in. It's one of those things where it's hard for me to like really hone in on and focus and say what is wrong with it but i know it's wrong you know it's just one of those things where you recognize a mistake when you see it So anyway so yeah aso anybody who's listening. Email me a asked me what. I do what i'm offering that stuff. I'm not taking any royalties like i'm really here. You know there's a lot of authors out there. And i love him to death and they're really good people and maybe maybe i will change my mind once i get out there but i'm not in this to get money from other authors. I'm in this to help authors make their money. I don't want a piece of their pie..

barnes congress soccer aso
"aso" Discussed on Hanselminutes

Hanselminutes

05:52 min | 1 year ago

"aso" Discussed on Hanselminutes

"Any of the other cells that depend on that value automatically update for you so it's driven by kind of functional reactive programming paradigm of where each cell is. It's sort of own little functional program and observable keeps track of the dependencies between then and updates everything that is relevant whenever something changes whereas in jupiter you'd have to go through and kind of run code linearly manually. Go back and rerun things if you if you adjusted something Kind of high up in the dependency tree and so this is really like where observable becomes an amazing tool for things like prototyping and tinkering and learning exploration Data exploration is really amazing in in that kind of reactive environment. Because you can instantly see changes so you have you. Maybe start out with some sample. Data build the visualization. You wanna see. Then you're making some changes to the data and the visualization is instantly updating. You make some tweaks you can add things like sliders and buttons and check boxes As you go. So you can take a value in kind of abstract that out into a slider just parameters and thresholds and so it gives you this really interactive instant feedback environment for developing visualizations and not just visualizations. But any code that you want so this can be really great for all kinds of prototyping on the on on software on java script so yeah that makes sense so let me see if i can paraphrase to make sure i understand. 'cause i'm starting to put this all together in my head so aso when i do devon jupiter and again i do it in c sharp we all have dominant notebooks and things like that python and all the different polyglot notebooks. That are out there. You know the cells exist you hit run cell. The cell then changes the context. And then you kind of do things somewhat linearly. And then you'll see. People inject polyglot notebooks although have some d three in there. But you've got your data wrangling on the server. Side your big data. That's getting chewed..

aso
"aso" Discussed on Purposeful Social Selling

Purposeful Social Selling

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"aso" Discussed on Purposeful Social Selling

"Gosh my team's probably listening to this and thinking yet that st and aso going along with my admi being an graham seven. It's all about the fine by. I think it has really forced me to look. I always knew that. I needed to do those things. But looking at it from a business perspective in going okay you really need to map things out like a really started looking at things in not only quarters but looking at a year from now three years from now where do you wanna be which. I never really encouraged even my leadership team to do way. Okay we'll weird. You want to be and i think it has helped to not only keep things calm when we have a years. The monthly schedule. This is when you can expect calls on the same day in time anything. We can do to simplify. But it's also made it so that it's more effective right so people know what to expect. So they can clear their schedules. They know how to behave how to show up right. So it's all part of that success but looking ahead has been everything yeah and it creates trust with your team when they know what to expect. They're more likely to show up and make the time for it. So if you're like every monday you can expect we're at a call at this time. It creates trust for your down lines knowing i can. I can talk to a new crew. I can onboard. Somebody and i know. I can always tell them. Hey first monday of the month. We always do this second thursday of the month. We always do this. So good deanna. What about you. Shana I think something for me kind of going back to like trying to dig for problems. That's kind of how. I've been able to be a little bit more proactive. Before in the past if i had launched like a boot camp or like a challenge and it didn't go over well or i didn't have the buy in i..

aso Shana deanna
"aso" Discussed on GamesMyMomFound

GamesMyMomFound

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"aso" Discussed on GamesMyMomFound

"Once i actually make so it's going to say then then we have to record for it so careful what you wish for her. I listen you know me. I'm a glutton for a microphone punishment. So i will. Yeah we're a hundred percent. I just don't know when. I'm actually about to watch the movie here soon. But that's for another reason but we're definitely gonna be doing some point. Yes but it's going to be a paycheck. They'll be our first patriarch saying. Hey maybe already you know who knows. I doubt that's all right. Thank you aso. Infinity were directed by the russo brothers as usual overall impressions. What'd you guys thing about the first time you saw it only three years ago at this point so we don't have to really go back in the the way back machine for this. I remember really liking it in theaters. I remember leaving like super happy and be like man. I can't wait to see that you know. I can't wait a year for the next one for the sealer. we see the same happy shows. Great movie i'm like my god. I need to know more. You know that's all. I wasn't i i saw this time. I was just like okay in three months. I can see endgame that just leads credence to the fact that it's only part of a movie if you feel that you need to see more well every every time i leaving. Mcu i can't wait for the next mcu movie except for a couple iron man. I need something better than this shit. When i first saw it and spiderman far from home..

russo brothers aso
"aso" Discussed on P.S.A Podcast

P.S.A Podcast

05:36 min | 1 year ago

"aso" Discussed on P.S.A Podcast

"You're looking at things from different okay. If there is an internal issue is a yearly in the mind and increasingly the thought that makes you feel restless and worth it though. The first thing that you do the other winning zaidi's that you look at the different perspective. Remember what you have in mind is not always the right scenario. You know. And i'm reading from their crazy talking about how what we think to be. True is true nine not necessarily the truth but sometimes what we believe to be. True is just as bad as believing a lot so i think that the anybody who struggled with that. It also says most of the time the overthinking you always over think the negative. How often do you really think. Positive stuff you on this. I would think that you don't you don't you. Don't your time overthinking positive stuff. And i think that's ready for me especially lately. Well my going to love you. Know all over the place. But the era late marinade all the give the positive wooded and not maybe but does this satellite. You know where. I am right now. you know fried out with like you know there's been so positive thinking about it but it's other things that you know that i find myself going bets. Who just really you know That i'll trying to get together. He falls aso amount. Say i'm trying to highlight the spot..

zaidi aso
Gunnar Esiason on Patient Advocacy

DNA Today

01:49 min | 1 year ago

Gunnar Esiason on Patient Advocacy

"Thank you so much for coming on the show. Thank you. Thanks for having me on. And thanks for following fibrosis over. Yeah it's fantastic to have you just share your experience with cystic fibrosis the patient advocacy that. You're a part of before we jump into all that for people that may be jumping into the series. And don't have a background on cystic fibrosis. What is your elevator pitch when someone says well. What is cystic fibrosis. How can you educate our listeners. Yeah start by saying cystic. Fibrosis is pretty complex It is a recessive. genetic disorder That is most generally associated with restore declined or or or way these But the truth is just if affects just about every single organ in my body and and really what the the problem is is that thickest builds up not only my lungs but also my pancreatic and a few other organs but The the real trouble is is in the lungs. I you know. Classic respiratory disease sticking. You is the perfect medium for Expectations take hold and create any number of issues for people with the aso right now. We we see that. The median age of data for people. Who is early thirties We do expect that that number will increase as be bad. You know had a number of significant Therapeutic breakthroughs over the past years. Think we'll talk about a few minutes But things are looking pretty. Good right now for the cystic fibrosis kennedy. I think they're on the up and up and You know just really What i've long said is that it's probably one of the most significant medical monitoring medical miracles Always be surpassed by the vaccine development over the past year. So we had. We had our moment in some air. But i'm certainly happy to yield. That's why like to the public health success that we were starting to see here.

Cystic Fibrosis Fibrosis Cystic Respiratory Disease Fibrosis Kennedy
Michael Imperioli On Acting, Success, And The Buddhist Path

The Wisdom Podcast

02:04 min | 1 year ago

Michael Imperioli On Acting, Success, And The Buddhist Path

"Michael welcome to the wisdom dommage chats. Thanks for having me so great. To have you get i was gonna Start off. I thought i'd start off by asking you how you got into buddhism. I was wondering whether it was a full. You become well known as an act. Taro aso at what point in. How did you get involved in buddhism. it was definitely after around two thousand seven during a right when the sopranos was ending the same year But i i i. I discovered buddhism. Through the writing of jack kerouac when i was like nineteen years old And i bought at saint mark's bookshop which is no longer there. Unfortunately but i bought a copy of the diamond sutra which i could not make heads or tails out of i mean it was way beyond me and i did not understand but there was something about whatever how would ever care wack talked about or whatever my perception of buddhism was. There was something there like. I i appreciate it for some reason and i wasn't looking for anything religious at the time that copy of the diamond sutra. Believe it or not. It stayed with me all these years after. Like twenty different addresses and moves and stuff. I still have it In wrote that book the scripture of the golden eternity which is poems really but he had an incredibly deep understanding of dharma and was a big practitioner of it for a very long time. You know unfortunately the end of his life you know he he kinda succumb to alcoholism and and I think it it Pulled him away from the dharma and his studies and his practice. I think but there was a time when he was very much into a great understanding of it. So flat fast forward. Many years. So i was nineteen. This book kinda sat on my shelf for years

Saint Mark's Bookshop Taro Aso Jack Kerouac Michael
Saying No When Your Kids Ask You for Money

Breaking Money Silence®

07:15 min | 1 year ago

Saying No When Your Kids Ask You for Money

"We are going to talk about how setting limits and your financial life can boost your financial confidence. It's one of the challenges that i find. Many women face is saying no to their adult children when they ask for money. Yes i know you love your kids. But when does loving them mean setting a limit around your bank account so today to help me answer this question. I have carry rattle. She is a financial therapist and coach. Founder and ceo of behavioral sense and ceo of stopping over shopping carey has over thirty years experience as a financial executive with multi country experience in banking brokerage and credit card practices. Welcome carried to the podcast today. Kathleen thank you so much. And i so love what you do. It's a pleasure to be here. Thank you. I'm excited to break money. Silence with you on this really interesting topic so let me just set the stage a bit. Because often when i am giving a presentation to a group of parents of breaking money silence across generations incurring encouraging intergenerational. Talk there the question always comes up that someone in the audience has a young adult child who they want to set a limit with. They want this person to be financially independent. They clearly love their kid. But they're finding it so hard to say no and so this struggle i think is really somewhat universal and so i do empathize with them. But i wanna really talk today with you because it's an area that you work in about how you can talk about finances with your kids and start to set those financial limits so tell me just off the top of your head with this issue kind of what's the highlight what makes it so challenging. And then what are some of the reasons. People should actually say not their kids. My gosh so. I also empathize not easy right especially when you have beautiful big looking at you. You know pleading it's it makes your heart melt but you know went when you give your child everything. Here's what you're telling your child right. You telling them that. Money is limitless. You telling them that spending has no consequences and you're telling them or you're not helping them. Connect the dots between spend how that accumulates into debt and where the money has to come from to pay it off in our job as parents is to prepare our children for surviving and flourishing in the world. Especially when we're not around and so teaching kids things like that doesn't doesn't help. So the idea is to switch that around and say okay. What is saying no help them. Do it helps them. Learn how to plan ahead. So that they don't get into predicaments. It helps them learn how to make choices and set priorities so that they understand. They can't have everything and they need to understand how. That money is accumulating in terms of debt. And how they have to figure out how to pay it off in some ways. It's actually a gift to say. No it's something just popped into my head. I actually In my twenties used to give my father a hard time. I had been in therapy around some of some. You know body image self esteem issues and i came home one day and i said to my father. You don't say no enough and he's like what and wasn't around money moves around other stuff. But i was like you should have set more limits with me. He's like new. I blew it and so you. I don't know if every kid comes home and says to their parent eventually. You should've said no more But there is some real value in teaching people that there's limits that there's struggle that and and i find that there's some self esteem that comes from having to figure it out even though you might have a kid who pitches a fit at the beginning. Oh absolutely right. Being being able to conquer the world on your own is awesome and we have to give our children that ability you know. Yeah being the safety net. All the time is just not going to pay off. Well i feel like society puts a lot of pressure on mothers in particular in. My story was certainly about my dad because my mother was actually pretty good at saying no but with women. There's this there's almost this over correction on how we not only have to be their parents. We have to be their friends. We have to be selfless and we have to give to others. And that's just a recipe to be overwhelmed and not feel good. But i'm wondering what do you think happens when we are in that mode of trying to be the best mother we can be and we want to give our kids everything and we're not setting limits ourself let alone our kids. Does that complicate things around money or that kind of a separate issue. I think it totally complicates things. And i'm going to tell you a short story about my mother and then segue got to finances. It wasn't about finances but my mother was incredibly selfless. She raised four kids She worked and she was so stressed out all the time because she denied herself everything to give to her children to give to her husband to give to her work so my mother passed away a few years ago. And somebody asked me. What do you remember most about your mother. And you know what popped into. My head was not what i shared. What popped into my head. Was she used to yell a lot. And that's because my mother was so stressed all the time but she deprived herself of self care and self kindness. So let's segue that into finances right. The same thing can happen if you are denying yourself so much to give to your kids. Are you threatening your own enjoyment in life that you worked so very hard for. Are you threatening your own ability to retire someday because you are mortgaging your house to you know. Give give your kids a down payment or put your kid through school. Of course you love your child and you want to get them set straight and and you know have have a good life and not have huge debt but you know. Here's what i want somebody to think about an. It's a little blunt. So i know i'm being awfully director. Rupert it on the aso. When when you when you think okay. I'm going to mortgage my house for my kid to send them to school so the first part is okay. I love you child. I'm gonna mortgage my house design you. And here's the part you don't say to yourself and by the way dear child because i'm putting myself in so much debt. I'm not going to have retirement and so you're going to be supporting me when i'm retired.

Behavioral Sense Carey Kathleen Rupert
Dermatologist Dennis Gross Says 50% of Patients Visit His Office for This Treatment

Art Beauty

01:58 min | 2 years ago

Dermatologist Dennis Gross Says 50% of Patients Visit His Office for This Treatment

"I think that your skin on your body really can give away signs of aging right. Yeah well here's the deal you what you're saying is like what everyone's talking about was going through. Your head is what i'm seeing in it. So many patients coming into my practices and the fact of the matter. Is that right now. People are they want to take better care of themselves. But i think in fact my like i'm approaching twenty twenty one year of self care because people at i'm seeing my practice over fifty percent of them are now coming in for bodywork. Yeah like is huge. I mean that was not the case a few years ago because people. I don't know exactly why but you can. Now get skin on your body to look gorgeous and radiant and firm and younger and spots can come off in your you can get the craziness to look better and you can get rid of the acne characters lower and all that stuff. People want that aso. They're coming to my practice and redoing that and times change so here. We are with a lot more we can do for body. Let's talk about like what are some of the most popular body treatments that you're seeing people come in and ask for your practice so in the practice people are coming in because they want firmer skin out some examples great to ads like real life to it so i have people coming into the practice who are like one woman came in. She does yoga right and she was telling me how and she literally pulls up her leg pants and said look at these. Look at the crepe is above my knee. I never had this before. Okay and she's starting to notice it. And i think she noticed it because she's seeing her leg in a certain position yoga every day and over the years. It's not the that look at that loose. And then people coming in because they want their their arms to looks firmer. That people are coming in who have had some damage on their bodies. Like you're in florida. Plenty of people go to florida on a regular basis. They get lots of sun there. It

ASO Florida
Viennetta Returns

Eater's Digest

04:17 min | 2 years ago

Viennetta Returns

"Via data a favorite dessert from the ninety s from the nineties. I'll is coming back so we have brought on lead social media manager at mussa to talk us through it. Welcome to the show adam low. I'm so happy to be back and talking about something that's so so near and dear to my heart so for those who do not now explain what is being at us or via neta is Basically an ice cream cake. It's in a loaf shape and it's known for its signature ruffled. Look on the edges The classic one is made simply of vanilla ice cream and chocolate like magic. Shell chocolate And that's that's it. That's it's it's a chocolate and vanilla ice cream cake is the most straightforward and also Infancy way to talk about something that is famous for being quote unquote fancy. So when you say something is is back. Has it been rereleased or is it one of those things where it's like now cool again is being Rerelease after being. I believe it was discontinued sometime in the late nineties Although in my research for this i could not nail down a specific year When it was taken away so Vienna is owned by unilever like the international ice cream. Conglomerate and vienna is has been sold in markets all around the world for years. It's only in the us while most famously in the us that it has seen discontinued for the better part of twenty years. That's awesome was hurt. It's back yes but It's it has been continuously available in the markets this entire time. So why do so. Was this a huge moment online and like who who who was. Who's freaking out about this. Okay everybody was freaking out about. This is the is the most distinct way i can put it. Mostly millennials is. The best is probably the best description. I would refer back to what my colleague john said when she wrote this up She was talking about how this is. This is a desert that was widely available when we were kids and something she mentioned that was also like hundreds of people who are sharing. The story about this is When people saw this in their freezer they knew that they were going to have guests was something you serve. People saw the fact that that everybody remembers it but it's been gone for so long Created dislike nostalgia bomb that went off. The thing is it's like i said it's chocolate vinyl. it's certainly not Some exquisite flavorful creation. It's it's so much in the style of this thing with the way it's the the edges are ruffled and lay it on aso layers of chocolate and vanilla We actually had Sir on ada. From a few years ago we had a post about video that was filmed inside the vienna factory in I think i think it's in portugal. Where it's it's the assembly line basically and it's just the machines shooting ribbons of vanilla ice cream and chocolate and then slicing them Chopping them into the lowest that they get sold in and then packaging them. It's like he's the assembly line of how it's done. That post has in the entire time. I've worked continuously like made people Crazy when they see it everybody sees it and they wanna share somebody else. they're like. Hey remember eating this so yes long way of saying yes. There was a tremendous nostalgia about this. That honestly has been very obvious. This was going to happen whenever they brought the annetta back. So it's really just very surprising that they haven't brought it back before this because the potential for nostalgic marketing in a product. Like this has been there for for all this time. They were saving it for when the world needed at the most.

Mussa Adam Low Vienna Unilever United States John Portugal
How to Control Cravings

Dishing Up Nutrition

07:20 min | 2 years ago

How to Control Cravings

"My name is leah. Klein showed i am a registered and licensed dietitian and i have been seeing and helping clients with cravings and with a variety of other issues for the past three and a half years at nutritional weight and wellness so nearly every day i like i mentioned i work with clients who are trying to get their cravings under control because this is really a lot of what drives our food decisions how we think about food some of the emotional choices that we make around food and a lot of my clients come in and they are frustrated they are so done with the sugar cravings and they might say to me i am so done and because i know if i have just one i can't stop with just one and then i know the consequences afterwards. I know that i don't feel good. After i indulge. And i know that that's one of the big reasons why i keep gaining weight. Why can't lose weight. But it is so hard to stop with the cookies and the chocolate's when they are just sitting around so like nicki i have personally experienced some of those cravings in the past. I completely understand where they're coming from. And i tried to relate that to them that we've all been in that boat here's ninety seven percent of us have been in this boat at some point one or another and so how again. How do we build in some of those realistic solutions for each individual. Client to help them. Get off of that cycle. yes exactly. we're real people rightly have really well. Good morning and it's nice to be here with you. Leah i'm nikki doreen. I'm also registered and licensed dietitian. I've been helping clients nutritional weight and wellness for about two. And a half years to as i personally have explained that i have dealt with cravings in my own life. I've also had many experiences in my past work experiences with clients or patients actually at a weight loss. Managment clinic where they did weight loss surgeries so i would help them with their eating prior to surgery and then after surgery but one of the biggest things was they had a lot of cravings. That was a lot of reason why those folks were in my office. When i saw them they gained weight. Because of that. And that's a big concern with a lotta people dealing with cravings Some of my patients had to lose one hundred pounds some two hundred some even upwards of four hundred pounds and so if you think about the impact of having a high sugar diet or high carb diet or being having cravings for sugar that can really affect you And you look for solutions other than food. Sometimes mike weight loss surgery now not all of my patients had issues with cravings but many of them did and i think the big thing is they were looking for that solution of weight loss from the surgery and to help them with their cravings. All of my patients were just like everyone else. They wanted to lose weight to be more active. You know to you know if we ever get snow maybe go out and have you know like go skiing or they wanted to walk around. The lake. Walk their dog longer than just a few minutes. They wanted to get into more stylish clothes. They wanted to fit on an airplane. Someday you know comfortably airplane seat. I heard all of those things. They wanted to be able to play with kids or grandkids. All of those were reasons why they wanted to get rid of their cravings and lose weight. Yeah so nikki thinking back then when you were working in that setting and working with these clients had a lot of way to lose You know and this might be a question. Some of our listeners. Wanna know the answer then to the once they had that surgery so you worked with them pre and post surgery but once they had that surgery did weight loss surgery actually help take away their cravings. Unfortunately no and you know quickly learning from working at that clinic that that was the case. The cravings didn't go away. The hunger didn't necessarily go away if it did. It was for a very short period of time and We need to. And so. I spent a lot of time explaining that yes the surge would help them lose weight but not necessarily help them with the cravings and. I really had wish that. When i worked in that clinic that i wouldn't have i knew more about cravings and that biochemical piece in the brain because i think i could have helped my patients more. Yeah so that's just very interesting to know. And i guess i'm curious to know too with those clients that you saw and if that you know if the weight loss surgery didn't necessarily resolved their cravings but what happened in happen those weight loss surgeries. A lot is now. The stomach and the digestive tract has a lot less acreage to it. Like you can't fit as much food in there as usual so now potentially would you say that. sometimes you saw even if people couldn't necessarily Satisfy those cravings with food. Would you see that translate somewhere else. Definitely yes there was definitely some addictive behaviors. That happened because sugar is an addiction. Sugar cravings are a lot of people. Come into our office. You probably hear this. I'm addicted to sugar aso. How i learned about how to help people with cravings was a real clinical experience. You know my clinical experience from the weight loss surgery know clinic showed me that there was an issue out there but once i worked at nutritional wellness i learned about the how to fix those cravings why those cravings were happening and so it helped me myself and it helps it helps all my clients so you know back to you know my previous patients you know they would lose weight you know the first year or two and then all of a sudden weight would start creeping back you know and a lot of them would gain all their way back or some of them would gain a lot of their way back and some of them would even gain more So it was really you know we never got to the root cause those cravings their food. How do we balance their blood sugars. So they get off that cravings train absolutely. Let's circle back. I know you have a couple more stories that you just want to share from your experiences there but we do have to go to our first break so stay tuned. You're listening to dishing up nutrition brought to you by nutritional weight and wellness and many people are told that how they think determines how well they feel. They're told that positive. Thoughts and affirmations are the answer to overcoming depression and anxiety and yes. It's true that positive thoughts and affirmations really can help change the chemical process to create better attitudes in a better mood overall but researchers have actually found that in these modern times many people lack the essential nutrients for brain wellness that supports their overall sense of wellbeing. So today during our breaks we want to share some of those key nutrients that we all really need to achieve a well functioning brain and we'll be right

Leah Nikki Doreen Klein Nicki Sugar Aso Skiing Nikki Mike Depression
Restoring the American Chestnut

In Defense of Plants Podcast

04:56 min | 2 years ago

Restoring the American Chestnut

"Things got yeah. This novel pathogen ideas terrifying especially when it comes to like with covert. It's got some twenty billion people to work its way through. And the chestnut, almost being jack-of-all-trades in being widespread was probably one of the perfect recipe. Check boxes to say like okay. This is how you have. An invasion meltdown caused the collapse of species. It's scary and it's so sad, but at the same time. Is Much as I've never seen a large chestnut tree, or been able to appreciate them, for what they were were lucky and very fortunate that there are still sprouts there are these these trees are still on the landscape in some capacity. I mean it is kinda functionally extinct. I. Don't know if that's the proper scientific way of putting it, but. There's chestnuts still out there today. Where did the American Chestnut Foundation kind of say? We have to do something. What was the impetus for that and kind of winded it happen, and what was those early stages Kinda like for it? Sure so so functionally extinct. That's that's the term I think for for the American, just not in words Aso a lot of people think it's extinct or endangered or threatened. It's none of those things it doesn't fit any of those categories, because there are so many sprouts out the wild, so it was estimated before billion in the eighteen hundreds at the height of the species population. The blight swept through reduce them to basically sprouts, and the under story so most hardwoods. If you've got them down, they die of the blight bill re sprout. Sprout burn readily just not does that, so they sprout. They get the blake usually by age seven fifteen. They Divac, they re sprout. They get the blame back. They re sprout so so that's what you see in the forest today, the eastern us on their an estimated four, hundred thirty five million trees, so so lot still a lot, but most of them do not reach flowering stage. We think about two million, or so are probably still flowering on somewhere around point, five percent of the population is probably still flowering and producing knots. And that's what's been used at a lot of different breeding programs and eastern us when the blight I went through the USDA's stepped in a sense implant explorers to China to say hey, finding replacement for the great American Chestnut, and so they brought over. Chinese chestnut, so that's about Chinese just nuts on the landscape. They are all over the place. You see them on farms. The USDA real big push for people to plant Chinese chestnuts. My popol planted them on his farm, but they they couldn't replace the just the American chestnut, because they typically they have been bred for Russian. Typically don't grow as tall as the American chestnut. They are very branchy, so the timber isn't as of high quality all as America's. And so that was one of the first attempts to try and save the American chestnut, or restore it or replace it, and then, since then since the thirties on through, people have tried various breeding techniques. They've tried spraying. The fungus was something they've tried systemic fungicides in the fifties when nuclear radiation Israel real huge people were taking chestnuts and throwing them in nuclear reactors to get them to mutate totally serious. And, so you've got plantations of irradiated ulmer radiated chestnuts. Most of them are in Maryland. Okay up ground where a lot of that defense. Stuff was happening, so makes us. That might be another podcast, but but there's this uranium question to try and find resistance within native. American chestnuts and people went pretty much given hope in the seventies and eighties stuff still going on, but at a much lower rate, and in the early eighties there was a corn geneticist Charles Burnham. He said Hey. Trees or plants? Why don't we use plant breeding the we using corn and things like that and use that for trees as well to impart resistance. So, that was the start of the American nomination. Arkham Burnham and some other founders I got together they the various, all nonprofit, scientifically minded organizations and say hey, let's try something called back crossbreeding to get a light resistance, and who the American chestnut and when they started, they thought that blight resistance was very simple traits that it was only two or three genes that controlled this trade, and therefore back crossing would work after you get above three genes back. Crossing really isn't active. The the numbers required too high and astronomical talk about exponential. You need exponentially large. Populations as you increase the number of genes for traits, so it was a it was a noble thought and would that it that be that resistance was only controlled by three. We know now that light resistance is controlled by many martines than three so a while back crossing itself isn't the end all be all American chestnut restoration, TCI the American Chestnut Foundation has embarked on other avenues to try and restore the American chestnut, and but but that was what what began the foundation

American Chestnut Foundation Charles Burnham Usda Maryland Divac TCI China America Israel
Will COVID-19 bring down Airbnb?

The Big Story

10:54 min | 2 years ago

Will COVID-19 bring down Airbnb?

"Ever since we launched this show almost two years ago. Now we've done episodes about the housing crisis in Canada comes up often and it comes up everywhere from Pi to Nana avert to big cities like Vancouver and Toronto and Montreal. And every time we cover it we start with. Why how did this situation come to be and there are of course some different reasons in different places but one thing one thing keeps coming up again and again and you get one? Guess as to what we'll city place here in the downtown core as one of the highest concentrations of airbnb rental units in Toronto and tonight some housing advocates are saying. That is booming. Business is driving up the prices for those who are actually looking for a permanent home. That was then though and this is now on a city known for its sky high pricing when it comes to housing and rentals is seeing a bit of a shift. According to experts since the Ontario government has banned airbnb there was actually a huge influx in rental apartments being available right now. Nobody is traveling not even within Canada. And as you might imagine that has had an impact on airbnb business model and Bhai impact. I mean it has basically obliterated so what happens to the rental markets Canada's biggest cities to thousands of airbnb landlords some of whom have staked their financial future on this platform to the company itself. Does it di- Does it? Evolve and what happens to the future of development in big urban centers because in order to understand? How much could change from here? You also have to understand how much AIRBNB has done to drive the direction of cities in the past decade. So that's where we'll start. Who knows where we'LL END UP Jordan Heath Rawlings and this is the big story. Matt Elliott is a columnist who writes about municipal policy. He writes in the Toronto Star. He writes for the CBC and several other publications. I mad. Hey we're gonNA talk about Airbnb today and It's decline. I guess in Toronto and in other cities around the world. But why don't you I kind of give me an explanation? As to how AIRBNB rose to such dominance in the rental markets of big cities. I mean the short answer is money. I mean. Imagine you're a landlord and you sort of have choices with the property. You Own the traditional way where you find. A long-term tenant You know you can make some money off of that. But there's some what landlords might describe as hurdles. You know the rules around addictions raising rent or whatever Whereas AIRBNB is way simpler. A bad tenants don't really last for longer than few days in most cases and then the money. I think the money is just the big thing I mean. Imagine you could rent a place for two hundred dollars a night for fifty nights a month. You're at three thousand dollars a month in income from that. That's more than the average rent in most Indian neighborhoods and Enough to carry a mortgage worth a million dollars or so so landlords are looking those two options they were increasingly going the RBM Dui. Because I know you cover Toronto. We'll just sort of use it as a proxy for some of the biggest Global cities which have some of the same problems with AIRBNB. Can you give me a sense of the size of AIRBNB IN TORONTO? Before the pandemic began like how dominant is it was it was very dominant and increasingly so a fair. Bnb which is an anti airbnb at secret supporting a note that but they did some number crunching and looked at the data from AIRBNB and they estimated there were about seventy three hundred Units on BNB that did not comply with the regulations passed by the city of Toronto. Those regulations are not enforced when they were doing this. But those were the rules. Saying you know you can't rent out an entire house that you don't live in you can only rent out your principal residence. So seventy three hundred units that would have been on the rental market but been consumed by AIRBNB. is hugely significant in rental market as tight as Toronto or vacancy rates over. The last few years have been around one percent so you know I think one of the reasons people got pretty fired up about AIRBNB. Is this idea that you know these are. This is a rental market. That is very very challenging. Very expensive very tight and airbnb comes along and suddenly another chunk of air. Rental market is no longer in the market. And we're going to get to the pandemic I promise in in one second but How much in the hallways at City Hall was this hot button issue in the months leading up to say February or early March? When things started happening I mean housing. In general is such a huge huge issue at City Hall There's increasingly concerns that you know we're looking at a city that is just unaffordable for anybody but the top of the economy. So if you're a service worker if you're a teacher you're a nurse if you're a police officer like all of these jobs some of which pay pretty darn well when you look at what housing was renting for in Toronto. It just wasn't really doable for a lot of these people especially if they're people that are looking at you know. I want to start a family. Have a couple of kids and the only one of the people in a couple goes to work in those situations. Those that arrangement used to be doable. In a city like Toronto increasingly. It was not so when you have that sort of greater backdrop of housing counselors and bureaucrats and policymakers and advocates are looking for levers. They can pull. That might improve the situation. How many looked at AIRBNB and said okay? This is a relatively new thing. It has taken units out of the rental market This is something that we can look at it as a way. You know for whatever difference. That'll make it would make some difference to to make things better. As far as housing goes but you mentioned that they weren't yet enforcing the regulations they were not and I mean that's that's an interesting story by itself because the regulations passed by council which I mean at a high level. The major changes that they wanted to impose. Were you know you can only rent out your principal residence so if you have a condo and you want rent it for a couple of weeks on AIRBNB in the summer while you're off on vacation or whatever that's totally fine but if you buy another condo with the plan to just rent it on airbnb making income off of it that was going to become a against the rules. There was also going to be a cap on the number of nights you could rent a a unit in Toronto. One hundred and eighty nine year was going to the CAP But when they passed those Suddenly there was a challenge by a landlord turned out. Airbnb was supporting this challenge. And while that was before the a tribunal they held things up for a two years pretty much but a year and a half to two years while they waited for a ruling on whether these regulations could actually go into effect that finally resolve itself in the fall. But then all of the sudden you have this pandemic happen and you know the has stuff stuff as ended up on pause result. What'S HAPPENED TO AIRBNB IN TORONTO? And other places since the pandemic began it all kind of blew up To be honest I'm AIRBNB. The renters are primarily travelers Whether international or domestic travellers they're people come in from one place to another and in mid March Traveling shutdown just is not happening so there goes the market for airbnb in most cities So all the sudden you have a situation where you have all the supply thousands of units that were on Airbnb and that's how landlords made their income Suddenly were empty a bookings being cancelled and going forward. There's not a lot of hope for our travel to resume in the near term so it was a major shock to the system as all these units suddenly no longer had people in them at all. How bad could this get for the company if it continues? And what have they sort of gun in an attempt to respond to they've done a few things Airbnb announced a fund support landlords. Who were facing cancellations? You know for bookings that came in before the Pandemic Aso I think there is a desire on airbnb. Parts to see this Just sorta sustain the urban economy. Obviously they want to make sure there's still people with airbnb listings after all. This happens That airbnb itself is facing major. Financial Distress They have laid off. I think a quarter of their workforce They are saying they are revenue for the year is about half what it was projected to be at the start of the year. So they're facing a multi billion dollar. Hit and resorting to layoffs. And it's a really tough situation for for the company and then for landlords. I think some of them are going to be able to whether this because they're looking at the situation where they know they bought a unit listed on Airbnb they can defer either mortgage right now at a lot of banks. So maybe there's a way that they can hold on and and keep going through this but you also have situations where landlords have hugely over leveraged themselves. You know really gambled on this as a way to make a quick buck. And you know they're looking at situations where okay. This was going to be my My Nest Egg is is how was going to get rich and that is is really starting to fall apart for a lot of them. When I wrote about this for the star a few weeks ago I got a lot of emails from Landlords with immunes who were just incredibly angry about what I had written Because I was not coming down on the side of the landlords talking about you know how much of their life savings tied up in this Airbnb Model and this their despair for what's going to happen in the future. Can you give me an example of what that looks like when you get severely over leveraged investing in Airbnb Imagine a situation where you come into Toronto and you buy a house for yourself for you know everything in Toronto as close to a million dollars these days. So so you buy a million dollar hosts to live in and then you think well you know to make some extra money. I will also by Condo for a half million dollars and

Airbnb Toronto Canada City Hall Ontario Government Principal Matt Elliott CBC Jordan Heath Rawlings Montreal Vancouver Airbnb. Officer
How A.I. is Filling in Coronavirus Testing Gaps

WSJ Tech News Briefing

05:51 min | 2 years ago

How A.I. is Filling in Coronavirus Testing Gaps

"As we've been going through this pandemic there have been a bunch of things happening in parallel on the one hand. People are doing everything they can to figure out how the virus is spreading. They're trying to mitigate it from spreading telling people to stay indoors wearing masks all those sorts of things and health officials are also working to find a cure for it so that we can all go back to normal one of the ways that tech companies and health. Insurers have been trying to do this is by utilizing artificial intelligence a I R digital science editor Danielle Hernandez has been looking into this and she joins us now Danielle. Thanks so much for being here. Things were having all right. So one of the big questions is where testing stands at this point. How are they using? Ai Right now to try to fill in the gaps with testing right so since the pandemic started in came to the US Are TESTING CAPABILITIES. Have lagged and so. It's made it difficult for policymakers for researchers for clinicians for everybody essentially to track where exactly the corona viruses striking in the US and also to help us understand like where are the areas that are most at risk are and so because testing is still not reaching optimal levels. People are trying to assess risk. And where might be safe eventually to reopen economy safely in a data driven way? And so- policymakers researchers health systems are looking at alternative forms of data alternative being because it's not testing data and it's not necessarily tracing contact tracing data either Aso. They're looking at medical records from past conditions responses to respiratory illnesses like the flu complications demographics and other things that affect our health that we don't typically think of think of health related like what. Zip Code we live in. What socioeconomic background we have these things really do affect our health because they affect access to it and in our in our health throughout our lives and so they're mining that information to try to come up with insights about who at risk populations are and where they should deploy already scars resources to get ahead of the spray. Do we have a positive examples of that around the country like places where they were? They've used ai to try to figure this out well. So I spoke with one company that I mentioned in the story called Kinza. They make a smart thermometer that tracks. Thermometers our body temperature. So because the symptom of us in terms of nineteen and other respiratory illnesses is a spike in temperature. They think that they can use this information to basically alert Public health officials governments early earlier than you would actually like. Maybe have a positive test to to help them. Figure out like where these hotspots are. So they say that their data shows that like across the country like they were able to see in their data abnormal spikes in temperatures. That didn't Corley or were different than what they were. Seeing historically at other points and so one of the things that governments down in Florida are doing like deploying some of these thermometers to communities that are at risk so homes that have healthcare workers or people with preexisting conditions or that live in large households that might be more risk of complications but also being super spreaders and so the data are early. They haven't been validated Which is one of the criticisms that scientists have like they? They think that this information is useful but that we should keep in mind that the data aren't perfect and the previous attempts to use in medicine have met with problems because the data are incomplete and this virus is so new that we just know very little compared to other diseases about how it works. How it manifests complications etc. One of the other Examples that you had in your story that was really interesting as an speaking of like specifically targeting at risk communities. You had an example of in your story of a group. I think in Oklahoma that was reaching out to people they thought could be potentially a higher risk. Can you talk about that? A little bit. shores so this healthcare provider in that space in Oklahoma contracts with employers to provide their employees and their dependents with healthcare services. So think about like boutique clinics kind of settings right and so they use artificial intelligence system engineered by a different company to look through data that includes outcomes. Er visits socio economic data zip codes and so they use these data to train an algorithm to basically pick out who they thought would be at greatest risk if they were to contract Kobe. Nineteen so these are not patients with covert nineteen currently but patients. Who would maybe end up in the hospital in an ICU on a ventilator because other previous history as well as these other factors that I mentioned so nurses that were employed by this organization. They got on the phone and call these patients to tell them. Hey you may be at greater risk here. These are the things you should do. You know hygiene social distancing and then also inform them about what they should do if they were able to they were experiencing symptoms so the idea. There is prevention right. So I don't want these people to remain out of the hospital and healthy so that they don't overwhelm the healthcare system possibly infect other

Danielle Hernandez Oklahoma United States Kinza Editor Corley Florida
Report: Texans trade DeAndre Hopkins to Arizona, receive David Johnson in return

The Herd

00:35 sec | 2 years ago

Report: Texans trade DeAndre Hopkins to Arizona, receive David Johnson in return

"Rich the cardinals and Texans okay let me guess okay bill o'brien making a move so you got to think outside the box okay involves who involves which channels the running back position aso Kenyan Drake is a former free agent so we can inject a transition tag I know that right so what country all we know is David Johnson of the cardinals going to Houston when Houston okay so can you stand for David Johnson goes to Houston because I mean I think Carlos Hyde was just a one year deal I think

Cardinals Texans David Johnson Houston Carlos Hyde Bill O'brien
Mike Bloomberg's campaign is polluting the internet

Reset

07:53 min | 3 years ago

Mike Bloomberg's campaign is polluting the internet

"Taylor Laurenz Tech reporter at the New York Times. You are one of the most online people I know and lately I've been going online and seeing a lot of one person and that person is Mike Bloomberg. I've been seeing him in my twitter timeline. I'm seeing him on my instagram feed. I don't follow Mike Bloomberg. What is going on here? Why is he all over social media? Right now yeah well you know. After entering the presidential race. He's really tried to make a splash for himself In the media so he's been obviously buying lots of television ads also buying lots of ads across the Internet and that doesn't just mean banner ads Oliver Websites but also sponsored content on a lot of our favorite. You know mean pages and influence our accounts. And he's been essentially paying these people post memes and messages viral videos on his behalf. I am curious about instagram part. Especially because I feel like that has been the most visible controversial element of this Bloomberg add by. What do those look like? Can you tell us a little bit about the Bloomberg memes on Instagram? Yeah Aso the sort of medium campaign that dropped across a lot of the biggest accounts like Fuck Jerry Moist Buddha tank Sinatra. These are names. You may or may not be familiar with but they have millions of followers on Instagram. And what they did is postponed essentially fake looking. Em's between themselves and Bloomberg where Bloomberg would say funny kind of relatable things like I have a billion dollars. Can you make me look cool? And then the members of pretend to respond through this fake. Dm Like yes. Or No. Or I'll think about it. All of the posts had the caption. You know sponsored content but even so you know people. People like thought that they were fake. Yeah some people's keep damning me like are these real. Yeah it's like it is really fake looking especially because of what he saying right like I have a billion dollars. There was the one about like having a car with Lamborghini doors a level of self awareness and irony that I don't think the real Bloomberg has ever displayed. Yeah exactly very self aware and very much like playing into how he's uncool you know boomer And what about twitter? So he's definitely also making a big splash on twitter. What's his twitter presence like? He's just been posting on it in this very during just away He's been calling people out he's been doing the whole brand twitter thing where you like quote tweets and dunk on them. He's been doing that to donald trump attempting to kind of clap back. But you know they also posted this what people were calling a doctored video this video. That was kind of remixed from the debates to make it look like Bloomberg. Were saying you know. Has anyone else started like a business? I'm the only one Chevy started a business. Is that fair and know? Attempted to make it look like all. The other candidates just sat there in silence. They played crickets in the background in reality. That's not what happened the debate at all and it's actually kind of a funny video which is slightly disturbing. Mary Internet very video. It's very like I mean people make those things about trump all the time But I think to see it as sort of like sponsored content. That video also went out across a bunch of Munich counts so to see these. We Macau's that are being paid to essentially distribute. This highly edited video. That a lot of people won't know is edited Is Yeah I. I can see why that would really concerned people. Yeah right like seeing Bloomberg. Come off really well in this debate. That people in the no no he did very badly in. It's an effective tactic here but completely skewed from reality. Yeah and it's also I mean it's blatant misinformation. And when you think about you know what a Lotta people on the left have criticized trump for You Know Bloomberg is essentially leaning into sort of some of the worst aspects of that So I understand the criticism I think on Bloomberg side you know. He's essentially leveraging a lot of marketing tactics that have been used for a long time in the corporate world These types of viral sons videos. You know very active twitter presence paired with influence or marketing on instagram. I mean this is just like marketing one. Oh one for a lot of corporate brands But it is. It's just kind of jarring to see it leak into the political realm. And who are the People? Who are actually behind these memes on instagram and twitter. Who are the ones that are creating this content for the Bloomberg campaign? I'm so essentially. It's you know people from a couple of different groups One is Jerry media who most famously runs the account fuck Jerry Their CEO and one of their creative directors is involved with the campaign. It's also a bunch of people from brand fire which is another kind of influencer marketing collective and doing things media which is a media company that owns a lot of other big large accounts like middle-class fancy white people. Comes things out so those Mimi counts really appeal to the millennial vote And then in terms of like you know his actual team. He staffed his digital team with a ton of people from the tech industry themselves so people that are intimately familiar with these platforms hiring from places like facebook and Snapchat. So you know. On all sides he really has the best of the best in terms of digital talent Also because he can afford to pay them an exorbitant amount of money and he's promised them jobs through November no matter what the outcome of his campaign which no other political campaign could ever do that. So I think that's also why he's managed to attract some of these people. He was also just working with average people to essentially do digital what he called digital canvassing. I think other people would have other names for it where he's basically paying people twenty four twenty five hundred dollars a month To like text all of their friends about him and Post about him on their personal social media accounts so he's kind of engaging in a lot of tactics With a lot of sort of cross sections of different people. So what is the ultimate goal here with the Bloomberg campaign in hiring these younger folks to pass around memes and working with you know the tanks tra- people and other big influencers mean the goal with all of this is just generate attention online? It's to make a splash Bloomberg has entered the race late. He's not even on the ballot yet you know. He just participated his first debate recently. So he's just trying to get in people's heads you know. He's trying to establish himself as a front runner and viable candidate And the best way to do that is to get people talking and I think that that you know. He's very successfully done that It's it's also like he doesn't have to play by traditional rules. He has so much money that he can kind of do whatever he wants and so. I think that's also why you see him. Embracing really bold strategies that frankly other political candidates would probably shy away from because they don't have the resources to necessarily see it through in the way. Bloomberg can we're when we can just dump tons of money see if something works doesn't work dump tons of money elsewhere So he doesn't have to be quite as strategic. I think you know some of the other campaigns and I mean talking about dumping tons of money and whether or not it works. What's the response been to these mutants. Yeah the response has been positive. Negative Obviously there has been a huge amount of people online. Who think it's Hilarious and funny and love it? Um and then you have the other people who think it's you know the death of democracy so it doesn't really matter it doesn't really matter what people think the point is is that people are talking about him that you know. He's he's being talked about as a viable candidate. That's the only thing that matters so in that way it

Bloomberg Twitter Mike Bloomberg Instagram Donald Trump New York Times Tech Reporter Oliver Websites Lamborghini Chevy Jerry Their Facebook Macau Mary Internet Munich Mimi
Are we losing the Southern Cross constellation?

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

07:39 min | 3 years ago

Are we losing the Southern Cross constellation?

"Of the great sites in the seven night skies is the iconic constellation of the Southern Cross. However if you're in the city the stars of the southern cross a lost you to the glare of light pollution and even in the suburbs not all the stars in the cross a visible. It's a growing problem for sky. Watches right around. The world and increasing majority of people can no longer see the true beauty of the night sky from their homes in fact many of our listeners. The side of the Milky Way stretching across the night sky is just a childhood memory and today sadly an entire generation is growing up having never seen our galaxy the place we call home in the universe. Astronomers the fine light pollution. As I'd official light that shines were. It's neither wanted when needed light from poorly designed incorrectly directed light fixtures shines brightly into the sky. They're scattered by a molecules moisture aerosols in the atmosphere causing the Sky to light up a phenomenon sky glow and it's not just sky watches who are affected as anyone who suffers from a badly position straight light shining that bedroom window and knows more importantly it also has numerous direct impacts on the environment putting a heat strain on wildlife in both urban and rural areas. He become disoriented by the bright lights. The editor of a strange sky tell US magazine Jonah. Finale says dark sky preserves being established around the world to help combat the problem. And now this one in Australia. Big News recently. Is that three thousand square kilometres of south. Australia's mid Murray district have been declared a straight as I doc skype reserve. Now what does that mean? It's an official thing where officially designated by the International Dark Sky Association and that means that that area is great for viewing the not sky and the people who live in that area businesses that run in that area the governments that control that area are all going to work together to try to preserve quality of the night sky with good lighting. And that kind of thing so this is looks down with upwards. Don't Sean you lot up into the sky of the sky glows Because the sky actually go out I mean. It goes blue during the day. Because there's lots of light to illuminate. That's the race but even even at nighttime the sky is not pitch black If you live in a city if you look in the sky in not In the city you'll see the scarves gray. Actually it's not pitch black in between the stars it should be pitch black and the amazing thing about this area. Which is what they're calling the river. Murray International Doc Scar Reserve ten ninety minutes drive from Ed light by the way but on a scale of zero to twenty two with twenty two meaning. Perfect doc skies. This region school was between. Twenty one point nine one twenty one point nine nine out of twenty two so you don't get much bit of that. It's a really bright spot. So it's it's great that they've done that so it's a straight is i. Doc Sky Reserved now across the Tasman in New Zealand. They already have some docs car reserves and then wanting to even one third there are plans afoot or is there there people pushing for to make New Zealand. An entire DOC. Sky Nation Because Museum has the most beautiful skies. And it's a big tourist attraction. You know there are lots of tourism operations that revolve around astronomy. And they're going to be more and more of them so they just want to preserve the quality of the not Scott because it's a really important thing and that doesn't mean everyone has to turn off all they like and that kind of stuff. It just means being sensible about how we how we you know Illuminate Aso's in the ground during during not Thomas and Does do it in such a way that it preserves the quality of viewing the not scoff everybody for much just generation but generations to come so that's really tremendous. Isn't it so we got this magnificent docs reserve in South Australia and there are some other sort of one step removed from Dark Sky? Reserve down the sort of ladder of hierarchy of DOC. Scott to there are a couple of other places industry that they're you know already designated Something slightly less than that and across the Tasman Museum and the other guy for Dachshund Action. So good on him. I say we need more than two regularly drive from Dow into Sydney. I I I was working down. I used to have my holidays in Sydney and when I was doing those drives on a regular basis. There's just nothing like stopping at a truck stop in the middle of the outback and and looking up at the night sky for an hour or so and just seeing that spectacular vista that Villanova. Black Sky absolutely amazing. It really is amazing. Isn't it It so doc out Dan that he's something that you can you can try For people who live in the cities To do a bit of a comparison if you do get to a dock sky spot where you're really far away from the lives of towns and if there are some clouds in the sky so if you've got clouds in the sky in the city at not time you will see the clouds because the lights the lights shining with over lots. We go down on the ground. Illuminate the cloud and you can see the clouds. The clouds look white or gray or whatever they are at nighttime but if you go ask in the APP or anywhere where it's really really dock and there were some clouds in the sky. I looked black. They're like big black holes in blocking at the start because there's nothing to eliminate them from below well. Yeah it's really quite striking your cost if you could see them side by side the two things software side you get a better better idea of it but If you go out if you live in the city you go outside one night and some clouds in the sky not fluffy cumulus clouds. Whatever you'll be able to see them as clouds but you go out into the into the Bush. When there's no moon doc is and the clouds will when you see images of Earth at night from the International Space Station you see glow this this yellowy. Greenie sort of tinge on the sky which is caused by the citation of molecules in the atmosphere. You didn't notice that aglow from looking up from below No you don't Looking down you sort of You get a bit of perspective on that particularly if you can look sort of sideways through the atmosphere which you can do from which we really can't do. Yes that makes them down here. Yeah but Those pictures of us at night show you look beautiful little lots but you look at those and think what's the point of having that lot shining upwards. There's there's absolutely no point in. Lots of data will eliminate up within it to eliminate the ground below so those lights not with life. The shining light presumably. Some of it's going onto the ground where it needs to be so you can see where we're going but the rest of it's shining up into the sky. I mean it's just pointless. It's it's really bad lighting design. And it's just wasting energy. Astronomers have been banging on about this decades now and and the good thing is that You know whereas before a lot of people wouldn't really take notice odds just astronomy kids but now of course it's an environmental problem as well so look stable getting involved in it and you know more more power to the my side because using plotting uses less pal. Yeah but what we're finding now is because it's so cheap to run. Led's instead of the incandescent lighting people leaving the ladies on for longer and then installing more of them so because it's so cheap actually see an increase in the amount of light being emitted. I guess it's just the same as any other thing that we notice that they say particularly pollution is by the time you'd notice. There's a problem it's too late to fix the problem I mean the classic example is Australia's major optical observatory side Siding Spring Up Baron. So the Meet New South Wales you can see the sky glow of Sydney Horizon. That's hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of kilometers wide direct line whether it's leading. Led Lights on longer will will permanently because its shape or whatever. It's any sort of pollution and this we stop to think about US then Nothing really changes finale. The editor of Australian Sky Tell US

SKY International Dark Sky Associa Sky Nation Because Museum Australia Murray International Doc Scar United States Official Southern Cross Editor Scott Sydney New Zealand South Australia Sydney Horizon Tasman Museum South Wales Thomas
Global AI Adoption Trends

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

08:31 min | 3 years ago

Global AI Adoption Trends

"Hello and welcome to the AI today. PODCAST I'm your host Kathleen Mulch. I'm your host Ronald smells so one of the things we do at cognitive let occurs we produce research on the markets and landscape. We look across all the people that we've spent time talking to the use cases. The case studies all Venice. Did you spend time talking to and we ask ourselves the question once a year. Well how is he. I being adopted worldwide. What's happening in the world with people actually implementing an yeah right right are people or companies are certain regions more heavily adopting ai than others? What's really going on so a few weeks ago? We published the report called Global. Ai Adoption trends and forecast for twenty twenty. So we'll linked to it in the show notes. This one is a free download so we encourage all of our listeners to download it and check out the findings but we're going to spend some time today going through the report itself and highlight some of the key findings and maybe some unique or interesting. MM findings that we found from the survey and the report that we did and so the way that we accomplished this as we serve it we sent out the survey to over fifteen hundred individuals individuals various different companies and countries all over the world and got some two hundred and something responses and use those responses to one inform US specifically what's happening of course allowed allowed to also generalize in some ways about the trends that we're seeing for that if you're interested by the way participating in future surveys. I encourage you to reach out to us. Send us an email to info so I- NFO at Melissa and L. Y.. Dot Com and we would be happy. Include you in future service right so so we'll go through some of the key findings first and then the way that we also broke. This down was by our seven patterns obey because we said okay. Well let's one thing to say people are adopting ai but how truly are. Are you adopting A. Are you doing predictive analytics. Application or chat BOT application or hyper personalization application so some of the key findings that we've found from the the report is that by twenty twenty five over forty percent of the respondents that answered our survey said that they will implement a I in one or more of the identified seven patterns earns of Ai and almost ninety percent said that they'll have some sort of impress a implementation over the next two years. We found those numbers to be. You know very positive positive signs for the industry because it saying almost half will implement one or more pattern by two thousand twenty five so just a few years and then ninety percent so nine out of ten said that they'll have some sort of a m progress within the next two years so you might be thinking. He's looks like contradictory information. Wise that the forty percent or say and do but ninety percent have a project that they're doing two years you would think that ninety percent they're doing well this has to do with of course understanding versus the patterns because we asked them all. Okay yeah great well. Let's not talk about. How many of you are looking at doing a chat Bot and the next two years okay? How many of you are looking at doing a machine learning predictive analytics or recognition project or some sort of automation project? That's using cognitive automation. Oh well all of a sudden now. The numbers started going up and in our chart will show you kind of how the adoption patterns are looking looking because basically when you start looking at the more details yeah machine learning honestly an ai are being embedded in everything and it actually may be difficult to avoid using a machine learning. So even if you're saying well maybe we're not intending to build her on machine learning models it may end up being the end up using them anyways so we also sort of looked looked at turtle how the world was moving with. We're like well. Maybe you know North America Europe bird kind of moving at a different pace Rasiah Africa. Now you know what this is one of the interesting things about I in our research from all respondents and a response come from all over the planet they are all roughly moving at the same pace. It is true that you know Australia. Eliana Asia Europe. They have different timing. What their plans? But basically it's not like we're seeing an over concentration of aggressive plans and North American Europe and less so otherwise it's just it seems like this is just the global movement and then another thing we've talked about process automation a a lot and many companies especially many government agencies here in the. US are very hot and heavy on and process automation. In general. What we found is that fifty four percent of respondents plan to implement a approaches to process automation within the next few years so over half and then fifty two percent of respondents plan into implement a enabled conversational systems by twenty twenty five so those again were not really surprising numbers for us but something that we wanted to point out because because people are finding value in automation and I think in general taking their data cleansing it and then using it for higher level value uh-huh and so when they're able to take cognitive approaches in process automation they're starting to really see value in so we're excited that people who are really moving forward with that? Let me talk about a enabled conversational systems all the time and how companies can use that to help in a variety of different ways that can help with customer service service can also help with. It self service so they could use it internally as well and it's able to allow companies to do more with the same or less resources than before right right so our last sort of key finding sort of digging so some of the more details in a moment is that for the organizations that are sort of struggling with making ai ham or like a haven't quite quite yet taken the step. What they've said is that their biggest barrier to adoption is actually insufficient quantity or quality of data? That's like one of the biggest things things followed by lack of talent so basically people in data for a lot of response to send you know even for the people who are moving ahead. They have acknowledged that these are things that a slowing them down so for the companies that are not planning to implement ai at all within the for the next two years. The thing that they said was the biggest showstopper was just. They haven't yet justify the Arwa. which kind of makes sense or that? There isn't enough of an advantage of AI. Over non approach sprang for the ones that have taken that next episode okay. I think there's I want to do this project you know. I have have an R. Y.. I think it's going to give me an advantage. There getting stuck on people and data right right and that really comes as no surprise because cleaning data it can be a very very manual process very time intensive it can also be very costly as well and depending on the sensitivity of that data. That depends on what vendor or you can go with and where physically the data needs to be cleansed and crapped then followed by limited availability for a talent and skills. We've talked about. There's a big telling cruncher especially around data scientists so some of these smaller organizations. Just don't have the money to afford a data scientist on their team. So what can and they do then. That's where they're limited by hiring talent so digging a little bit deeper in one of the things we did our report is we asked them say okay. Well how many of you doing okay. Great Right now. How many of you are doing hyper civilization or pattern about is a nominally? Is predictive analytics. No automation which is not AI. We spent many reports talking about that. But we do track it because it is that when those pathways to get Aso we talk about process automation separate from autonomous systems. And then we talk about conversational systems recognition recognition systems and then goal driven system. And maybe it might not come as much of a surprise but the thing that's been the most widely implemented as of last year conversational national systems chat bots voice assistance Alexa skills. You know smart tech spots and embed. Yeah because you may not necessarily be thinking of those things is they. They're are all powered by machine learning especially the constitutional system. I you know high rate of adoption moving at a very sort of steady in four grants annual growth that the annual growth but like the OT overall adoption is like twenty percent and twenty four percent just keeps growing that episode. The thing that's kind of more interesting is the ramp. The rate at which people are implementing running process automation right or plan to within the next few years so in twenty nineteen there were about. Ten percent of participants had are bought in production production. Twenty twenty about sixteen percent but by twenty twenty five so five years from now fifty four percent so one out of every two every other. Yeah half half of the people want to have. Rpa In practice and implementation at their various companies and that says a lot to the growth in the potential of that

AI Venice Kathleen Mulch United States Ronald Twenty Twenty North America Australia Eliana Asia Europe Melissa Alexa Scientist Africa
Creating Empathetic Bots - Robocopy Leads the Way in Conversation Design Mastery

The Voice Tech Podcast

05:03 min | 3 years ago

Creating Empathetic Bots - Robocopy Leads the Way in Conversation Design Mastery

"When these chat bots became a thing 'cause it was always like away right you have to have virtual system on the website. You'd ask the question and they would know or give you a very long answer and became more conversational and I realized you know understand the technology I understand the dialogue and I now understand service space so this is something from you to explore so started out on my own on pretty much by raising my hands and say you know all all obsess over this problem. I got a few clients right away and Dan. I met my co-founder and they already had like a design. Agency there psychologists by trade using psychology to think about user experience in conversion etc.. So we SORTA teamed up because we realized there's artificial brain there's a human brain and there's language it makes total sense for us to tackle this problem so we started out as agency working with. Bryant's we fought. That was going to be We were going to be doing but once wrote a blog post that said we train our own people in our academy and then brands from all over the world started reaching out which which is a good problem to have I guess right so we look like might as well start academy but that was like Chat Bot relatives so we developed some curriculum for that and we had people come to the the office and have a couple of weeks with us. We like every Tuesday night and then won a larger search engines. Reach out to us. We got connected with them because they were putting out in Google assistant assistant and they were interested and they obviously have that. It's important to train conversation designs around the world for voice right because if you have a bad google assistant experience you know. Two brands not delivering good content. That you're GonNa Green socks ride so they reached out. They connected us with all these different conversation designers. That have been doing this for twenty years that were in the back of call centers working on the IVR systems and they had developed so many techniques that they aso many hours invested in so all these people that work in very large famous companies now just helped us develop these courses and work with us from all the best practices that they had independence that we saw we developed like really step by step design. Method that we dance sort of put out and that sort official to certificate is based around and was great and I think that's what I'm proud of stuff most to stop every team that we work with now. Is that if you take a use case and you follow the steps a good conversations gonNA come out and we have that here this week in Singapore's just starts out really messy with the use case and you When we have a conversation we look at the bond rates in the user needs because a user has rational needs but also emotional needs? So we look at you. Know what expect water during Zayed eighties would motivate them. Where are they most likely to be a win? That having these conversation all that stuff influences dynamics and then we also look at like the botany where we look at in order to resolve this about has to ask certain questions it needs to be interesting to think about having needs but yeah if you treat it as another agent of course something that has needs and then you can address those. Yeah it's like a you know comes from screenwriting right. Every time there's two characters in the movie and they engage in dialogue to both have a goal in mind riding because of that conflict gets messy at a makes it interesting exciting so yet from the bots perspective if I WANNA help But perhaps there's also certain information that already have because I'm integrated with a database. Maybe I have certain responsibilities. I have to share a legal legal information etc so we have a canvas that we use you filled in with a bunch of posted. Some day he got to people they sit back to back from each other so the Kency NC notice the older have is just works and role play. One's going to be planning to usurp the other one's going to be playing the bought and we let them figure it out on what I it's really really messy right. It's very confusing. It's silly the usual start asking questions but each question to us or ask we have to figure out. Is that a question more people would ask. This is a training exercise. You conduct face to face in the classroom with the guys in the brands. And this is a way to tease out. The main flows and the problems in the conversations stations that other customers their customers to have. Yeah so we'll do that exercise and so we'll do it onside face to face but it's important that the people are sitting back to back accidents each other. So what does if the user starts asking questions done every time you ask a question. It's a sign of a lack of information concerned that you might have so something needs to be addressed so what you do in. The next iteration stopped the bottle. Probably proactively communicate that information right and takeaway anxiety before curse curse and that leads to a lot of empathy right because if you engage in dialogue and you feel like I really understand you because I address all your questions before they even appearing to your mind. Yeah and phoebe yeah you become very calm as a user. You're okay with me leading the conversation fall

Google Co-Founder DAN Singapore Bryant Zayed Official
Visiting Virunga National Park in the DRC

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

09:14 min | 3 years ago

Visiting Virunga National Park in the DRC

"I'd like to welcome to the show. Neil from Ireland. WHO's come to talk to us not about Ireland but about Virunga National Park in the Democratic Republic of Congo meal meal? Welcome to the show thanks. It's great to be here now. We're talking to an Irishman about an African country. What is your connection with Virunga National Park Mark with DRC? I came across Franca. Maybe like a lot of people scrolling through next lakes and came across to Verona documentary was Oscar nominated donated a couple years back Across and when I watch this and I saw the conservation work being done there. I kind of felt a nose and the theon says well ever since we've been kind of keeping tabs on the park keeping tabs on to charity in the work. They're doing kind of daydreaming about coming here someday. Someday and fortunately a couple of months ago we got to choose and spent eight days in the park. And if we I wanted to put it on a map we're in the DC. So were in the western half of the southern part of Africa and where we within the Democratic Republic of Congo Virago. National Park is Roy's on the eastern edge of the DRC. And if you were to put on a map you're pretty much in in debt. Exact heart of Africa. So there's a very large cece Ghouma which is about a million people and the park ruins north from there along the border with Rwanda and Uganda excellent. And why should someone go to for National Park. Okay so I just Kinda tree. Main reasons people generally go to vulgar. I I swear I is the picture postcard. It's near Dongo Volcano. So for those of you don't know it's one of the only active laugh lakes Exon art so it's very very unique thing. I think there's only seven in the whole globe so that's a really big attraction the second power to to this is melting guerrillas. So again there's only three places on earth you can see mountain. Gross National Park is one of those and then finally when I'd say as Virunga is one of the oldest and degrades national parks on earth and wounded world's gray conservation projects and you can visit it with almost no other tourists so it's really a chance to see a great African National Park pretty much share says and when you say there are only a couple of other places you I can see mountain gorillas. You happen to be a stone's throw from them when you're in a national park absolutely so not grits. Basically the only live in the mountains and those mountains straddle the Rwandan Ugandan and DRC barter so within an hour urine in basically it's the same guerrillas and they actually do pass back and forth across the border and thrown guys just worn out those treat locations but there's some differences in in terms of price ace and the size of the group. You'd be with so can talk a bit about this when we talk about grits Deidra okay but really that areas why. I wanted to make sure that people understood is where we're win. We're all the way over there to the east. That means we're really just across the border from Uganda. What kind of are you going to recommend for US earth too? So I know gingerly generally on your podcast for kind of a week. Itinerary and Veronica some flexibility when we're going as far as Africa absolutely and I guess a lot of guests if they go to Africa. They're likely to maybe tag. This onto a maybe a wider trip or wider safari. Sorry so Veronica is actually very flexible so anything between kind of two days to eight days. You're going to see quite a lot. And there's kind the four main sites within the park and depending on your interests and preferences you can mix and match them so if you really only want to see the volcano you can be in forty not eight hours if you want to do everything about eight days and what we did was we. We spent quite a lot of time. There we dare nineteen days so we did everything quite a bit of detail and we can talk data entry but you can abs- dookie slice and dice it to fit your time-scale excellent and where should we start anyone. Visiting Virunga is going to be coming through the lower city of Goma. Now Goma is kind of an interesting place For want of a better. That's word so it's it's a city of a million people would huge number of those being UN peacekeepers and NGOs. It's always been in the power of the word. That's a little bit chaotic. And I found when I was looking at open. Your your listeners. Might find interesting is if you go on Google alert. There's two the twin cities. Most people will come in from Rwanda your fly into Kigali which is only about two to three hour drive into the border crossing and there's a town Cassini and Rwanda which is more twin the goal Matt Iran Roy's teacher. There's no real clear bar between the except if you look look on Google alert you can. Even if there was no barter on the map you could absolutely tell the difference between Rwandan D. R. C. On one side of the dimap map. There's these beautiful houses. Lovely Straight Roads Gardens Greenery and on the other side during his chaos absent whose that notre chaos and to be clear. You're you're side absolutely but chaos in isis going. So is an unusual place. I think the feeding on got there. It was kind of POMPEII in waiting. So the first thing that would really strike you when you get into Goma is developing near Dongo frames your the entire view so you look out over the city and in the very near distance is an Uruguayan. Go at eight. Tenths give out a a lot of clouds of smoke pretty much all day round and that's not a fake sewing. Volcano is very much active and erupted in two thousand and two was the most recent and and Flow True City caused quite go to visit damage. You'll still see when you drive through to see see places where say there was a two story house house and now the entrance is on the first floor because the whole ground floor is now basically solidified lava. It's an unusual usual spot. It's not one that I suspect. Most visitors spend any great toy man so like false wego barter and we a mess our guide who took US pretty much true Goma without stopping so we drove through the city. It's perfectly safe during the day but you kind of I think the most interesting power to the city is just to see I think for anyone who's experience either hasn't been in. Africa are as experience maybe more to safari lodges and that client side. It is a good introduction to maybe some of the more real day to day experiences underground it would awake in your senses for better or worse. But it's very interesting place to pass through and you mentioned meeting your guide. How did you find a guide for this trip? Spoiled it being quite a complicated power to the world. This was probably one of the easiest trips. I've ever taken so to go to the National Park because of the security region the organize everything centrally. So your point of contact would always be the national park and they have a specific tourist department that looks after all logistics. Ice was wanted under things that concern me day. One was a land border that I have to cross in Africa and does not always a reassuring thing to be doing so actually when I was underground founded wonderful laws when you cross the border into the DRC. There's actually a very very modern building thing that was actually funded by Howard. Both I think is one of he wanted years. He does a lot of charitable work so he actually Biz modern. Warren Buffett. Aso's Sorry Actually Warren Both its broader or other. Okay yes so. I think he's actually a partner in the business and he's also equally successful at he's actually hugely involved in Goma and national packets of and as has done amazing work. And actually when you go around here you'll see lots of signs bearing these names where he's foundation has done. Great work to actually Barda. Crossing itself is fantastic. It's like a modern kind of airport tight building and wanted conditions. Wins all of this very fancy building being used was that for the National Park. Were actually given an office inside in the Border Patrol area. So when you go in you don't meet Garrett's you don't meet people checking your passport. You actually meet your tourist. God who will take her passport. Kgo Eight eight-point scenes and organize everything for you while you sit comfortably in their tourist office so for anyone who's nervous about crossing borders navigating like that this is absolutely nucle- The easiest thing in the world it's not something to be concerned

National Park Africa Goma Virunga National Park Democratic Republic Of Congo DRC Rwanda Virunga Gross National Park Uganda United States African National Park Veronica Matt Iran Roy Franca Google Ireland Border Patrol Dongo Volcano Neil
Speed vs. Safety: Rapid Approvals from the FDA

Sounds of Science

09:46 min | 3 years ago

Speed vs. Safety: Rapid Approvals from the FDA

"Why is the FDA's rigorous testing so necessary. Well I I think you're aware that a lot of drugs fail From safety concerns we all know about getting sleepy with antihistamines. Or you know that's the actual aside side effect that comes from the action of the drug on the brain. That's at the senior centers that we would like to counteract allergy. So that's what we call pharmacologic based aced toxicity. It's an effect actually on the target. But it's in a way that we don't want it to act GOTCHA. So as we're working on very new drugs we often don't understand like where there's receptors are in God or the brain or the immune system. There's a lot of things we don't understand about the basic mechanisms of action of disease and there's lot of things that we don't understand sometimes about where the receptors are in the buddy. I mean it seems great. Yeah but that's why. I'm kind of glad if my original training and classic Comic Anthology Because you have to ask questions okay. where else is the receptor? Who else could hit end so? FDA trained to think about those nightmare scenarios of what it could do that. You don't want it to do right and ask those hard questions to make sure that we have the checks and balances right a lot of the early drugs That were used in AIDS. Patients Cause Peripheral neuropathy and that wasn't shown very well in the animal models models but it caused intense pain in the patients at the same doses that was needed for the virus. It wasn't until later that we got the protease inhibitors that really counteracted the road. And that's the basis of the lifesaving therapies that we have today I was really fortunate to be. FDA during that time when the protease inhibitor came through so switching gears a little bit what is personalized medicine. When it comes to patients like for example adjacent armstead and meal Amac? I understand that Jaycee is a twenty five year old with Lou GEHRIG's disease while meal is a young girl with batons disease who have both recently benefited from personalized medicine. He I think we have come to the place in drug development where we understand a lot more about genetics of disease so so yes switching away from viruses and into genetic Madison we have a lot of inborn errors when we learned that there is an inborn Gene that was missing in a patient has always been there born like that and as soon as we can diagnose them and with that replacement gene product or the enzyme of interest interest. We can save their lives so. LS has also been learned to be a whole series of different mutations responsible for LS Um and so you have to look at those different subsets according to their genetic diagnosis. But we also know that Batten's disease is a specific mutation and there's also something like fourteen different forms of Batten's disease that are mutations in same pathway that result in the same type of phenotype of neurological article degeneration some earlier some younger and some an older kids or adults in the case of Mula. She has two mutations that are different on both of the wheels that caused the dysfunction of a particular protein. Batten's disease six seven and there's only a handful or double handful of kids worldwide. They're known to have that particular subtitled batons and Jaycees case she has a very aggressive form of al it lasts called F s mutation and it has a particularly bad course people with F.. US typically sadly succumbed LS typically approximately a year. Because it's so aggressive. It's very hard to intervene soon enough. And there has never been a medication that could actually address the fundamental gene problems in these two cases so we need to design whole new the truck when we find the particular mutation and it turns out depending on the molecular biology and that control mechanisms around them. A tation some all of them are amenable to go nuclear type therapy and both of these girls have been their particular. Genetics have been amenable to A strategy she of using nuclear tight enter equally sadly we did not know that. JC had this particularly bad ale ass us until she was twenty five. Her family had lost her twin sister at the age of seventeen and Alex add add. Actually he contracted the symptoms of L. S. at age eleven so the two girls were identical. They had the same mutation but one got symptoms at eleven on the other at twenty five. JC I guess Through some grace right. Her symptoms arose during time in which a drug was already available in unaccompanied show that happened to be appropriate for her. So I understand and that in this case she got lucky. Well in a way because the drug already existed otherwise we couldn't have intervened quickly enough. Yeah it was an act of considerable effort on the part of the patient advocacy group project. LS The head of Columbia University's LS LS center. Dr Neil Snider in the company who originated the drug and all of us that were helping around the sides trying to support like an exoskeleton including Charles forever and I was helping with the regulatory strategy and also trying to make sure that the drug that was chosen was actually appropriate to the most expedient animal model so as a result of that we were able to put together a very lean and mean I N D for JC and get her approved through the FDA. I have to say. FDA was understandably cautious but when they heard her situation detail and how she'd lost her twin sister the understood of course about a few and they made a lot of exceptions to the usual toxicology regulations. Well I know that she had been she and her family. They had been advocating pretty publicly for a while up until it was approved. I if I'd been in her mom shoes I would have done the same thing called. She lower local congressman. The Stephen King and there was actually quite a response. In Congress. There is a bill that was put forward to ask. FDA to move expediently for JC. I don't know that that had specific impact but just to say that they got some considerable public discussion. And how Camilla's case different in her case Tim you At Boston Children's Hospital recognized that her condition was suitable for an exon skipping being drug very similar to Isis Been Raza and he was able to use a similar backbone and design a drug from scratch within several months it was quite remarkable global. We've done the testing for it and then we've Were able to get started with just a acute data and then I designed a type of a program in which we would update the FDA very regularly on the progress of the toxicology studies so that we could extend her dosing and again. FDA's group group that does an enzyme replacement was wonderful. In working with us to customize that I approach how do you envision cases like these being handled in the future after all not everyone. Everyone has a congressman. That's willing to go to bat for them. Like Jaycee did not. Everybody should take one. There's definitely a sea-change coming is really exciting. And it goes back to the changes brought about by the AIDS patients who identified that they were an extreme unmet medical. Need we see the finalization of the L. S. guidance. We see a lot of guidances have come out on rare disease from the agency in the past twenty four months. And I'm very excited about this because we're really getting to the place where we custom tailor the amount of upfront non clinical research. That has to proceed to human trials customize. That the patient's situation well do you think that each was going to require its own uniquely designed non clinical research at will or will there kind of. Okay you're not gonna be able to have like a standard version that works for most Aso's typically called platform toxicology in kind of a dream. Right now when you look across all a good nuclear tides you find out remember. I mentioned early in this talk about the pharmacologically driven toxicity. Let's say there's another place in the genome that has has a similar sequence. We end up having the drug acting by its intended action bit at the wrong place which is an off what we call an on target but unwanted toxicity existed that could arise by modulating genome which is a little scary right to put something into the spine or once. You invoke gene therapy. What's done is done so you need to have really careful toxicology evaluations that look at the animal as if it were a miniature clinical trial? And you know you're basically siklie handling the animals has patients and so we get as much information as we can vary from each particular experiment and try to make sure that Ed's translation Lee accurate for predicting patient risk. We need the parents to know that right. If if you were me. Resigning are up to our child. An an in-and-out shoes

FDA Congressman Jaycee Batten Protease Inhibitor Ls Ls Center Peripheral Neuropathy Lou Gehrig Dr Neil Snider Aids Alex L. S. Stephen King Congress ASO Camilla ED