35 Burst results for "ASO"

Proactive job strategies that work

Network Yourself to Success

05:00 min | 3 weeks ago

Proactive job strategies that work

"So good morning and welcome. Good morning how ya get to see you and So i mean as quick introduction and italian oil great lecture four volume about them to find a job in using sales sales method. What is the sales manager. Use it. Because i have the same background i really connected to your approach in them. I want to bring it to the world of how to network yourself and that more proactive approach ties also been successful as sales person for manager for science and now you're a startup called gay yelm you'll tell them more about it so no sorry go ahead. Yeah no welcome to the podcast. Go ahead while your thank you. So thank you for. The production. Name is time or no. I've been working in different. Different says and business development tools for the past seven years or so six seven is also a previous company. I was Walking as panther up in science. And we've been working on scientists fully and a heff lately joined. The averse will set up consists of seven people. It's called pm. A pam is spend management platform basically help companies Replace the old corporate bank credit cards with our platform where they can actually issue credit cards and men's joe expenses and spend according to different vendors or employs. So if you can if you want finger to configure to the subtle flake then you mattered for payments in saas companies for subscriptions and foreign player expenses. That aso in pm. Basically i says the rectal majoor obese now to build the entire department for the grand out on the ground up to lay down the infrastructure for the says flows for a set process to implement the tools and hopefully soon within the next few months. Also start hiring for my team. Great so we will be on alert for that for anyone who's looking for job as in sales is always interesting to be in a startup. You know you can really grow fast this quickly about that in so basically you're working on a large company is a science in how is it is not to move into stuff from more established corporate into startup. What is it. What were you looking for So say by the time. I size walking size since i thought about going inside of the company off from the business development all the way maybe even more than that but you know use a metaphor that is that is just sort of electrode. Say that life is what happens while you're busy making other plans right. So this the the indian founder. He is good friends of mine for now me and we started talking about possibly one day at john start up and everything just happened much faster than he anticipated and even did seem of walking in silence. Full folio to is more I wanted to just go ahead and jump right in and take. This opportunity was handed to me. So that's why. I basically chose to join. It wasn't like sort of like a plenty that they had in mind for a long time. I did hear about this company from other people as well. And i think the major change is that the company as big an structured assassins. You have the right set of tools to use. you have set of process. You're part of something. That's the second machine. Second machine people do calls the doing out linked animals. Everything is documented. There's a process. And all that. And when i joined the when you join like such a small startup like that there's there's just absolute chaos. Right you need to lay down the infrastructural in need to choose the tools you need to build up our the sales process and the deal flows and you need to start and understand. Basic metrics like pricing foil product for example. Like how long does one cell cycle take right. We shall metrics that you are having a company such science so these are some of the main differences and like my challenges coming in now says later in the company.

John
"aso" Discussed on Stories Philippines Podcast

Stories Philippines Podcast

03:08 min | 3 months ago

"aso" Discussed on Stories Philippines Podcast

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"aso" Discussed on Stories Philippines Podcast

Stories Philippines Podcast

05:33 min | 3 months ago

"aso" Discussed on Stories Philippines Podcast

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"aso" Discussed on Stories Philippines Podcast

Stories Philippines Podcast

05:21 min | 3 months ago

"aso" Discussed on Stories Philippines Podcast

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Restoring the American Chestnut

In Defense of Plants Podcast

04:56 min | 5 months ago

Restoring the American Chestnut

"Things got yeah. This novel pathogen ideas terrifying especially when it comes to like with covert. It's got some twenty billion people to work its way through. And the chestnut, almost being jack-of-all-trades in being widespread was probably one of the perfect recipe. Check boxes to say like okay. This is how you have. An invasion meltdown caused the collapse of species. It's scary and it's so sad, but at the same time. Is Much as I've never seen a large chestnut tree, or been able to appreciate them, for what they were were lucky and very fortunate that there are still sprouts there are these these trees are still on the landscape in some capacity. I mean it is kinda functionally extinct. I. Don't know if that's the proper scientific way of putting it, but. There's chestnuts still out there today. Where did the American Chestnut Foundation kind of say? We have to do something. What was the impetus for that and kind of winded it happen, and what was those early stages Kinda like for it? Sure so so functionally extinct. That's that's the term I think for for the American, just not in words Aso a lot of people think it's extinct or endangered or threatened. It's none of those things it doesn't fit any of those categories, because there are so many sprouts out the wild, so it was estimated before billion in the eighteen hundreds at the height of the species population. The blight swept through reduce them to basically sprouts, and the under story so most hardwoods. If you've got them down, they die of the blight bill re sprout. Sprout burn readily just not does that, so they sprout. They get the blake usually by age seven fifteen. They Divac, they re sprout. They get the blame back. They re sprout so so that's what you see in the forest today, the eastern us on their an estimated four, hundred thirty five million trees, so so lot still a lot, but most of them do not reach flowering stage. We think about two million, or so are probably still flowering on somewhere around point, five percent of the population is probably still flowering and producing knots. And that's what's been used at a lot of different breeding programs and eastern us when the blight I went through the USDA's stepped in a sense implant explorers to China to say hey, finding replacement for the great American Chestnut, and so they brought over. Chinese chestnut, so that's about Chinese just nuts on the landscape. They are all over the place. You see them on farms. The USDA real big push for people to plant Chinese chestnuts. My popol planted them on his farm, but they they couldn't replace the just the American chestnut, because they typically they have been bred for Russian. Typically don't grow as tall as the American chestnut. They are very branchy, so the timber isn't as of high quality all as America's. And so that was one of the first attempts to try and save the American chestnut, or restore it or replace it, and then, since then since the thirties on through, people have tried various breeding techniques. They've tried spraying. The fungus was something they've tried systemic fungicides in the fifties when nuclear radiation Israel real huge people were taking chestnuts and throwing them in nuclear reactors to get them to mutate totally serious. And, so you've got plantations of irradiated ulmer radiated chestnuts. Most of them are in Maryland. Okay up ground where a lot of that defense. Stuff was happening, so makes us. That might be another podcast, but but there's this uranium question to try and find resistance within native. American chestnuts and people went pretty much given hope in the seventies and eighties stuff still going on, but at a much lower rate, and in the early eighties there was a corn geneticist Charles Burnham. He said Hey. Trees or plants? Why don't we use plant breeding the we using corn and things like that and use that for trees as well to impart resistance. So, that was the start of the American nomination. Arkham Burnham and some other founders I got together they the various, all nonprofit, scientifically minded organizations and say hey, let's try something called back crossbreeding to get a light resistance, and who the American chestnut and when they started, they thought that blight resistance was very simple traits that it was only two or three genes that controlled this trade, and therefore back crossing would work after you get above three genes back. Crossing really isn't active. The the numbers required too high and astronomical talk about exponential. You need exponentially large. Populations as you increase the number of genes for traits, so it was a it was a noble thought and would that it that be that resistance was only controlled by three. We know now that light resistance is controlled by many martines than three so a while back crossing itself isn't the end all be all American chestnut restoration, TCI the American Chestnut Foundation has embarked on other avenues to try and restore the American chestnut, and but but that was what what began the foundation

American Chestnut Foundation Charles Burnham Usda Maryland Divac TCI China America Israel
Will COVID-19 bring down Airbnb?

The Big Story

10:54 min | 6 months ago

Will COVID-19 bring down Airbnb?

"Ever since we launched this show almost two years ago. Now we've done episodes about the housing crisis in Canada comes up often and it comes up everywhere from Pi to Nana avert to big cities like Vancouver and Toronto and Montreal. And every time we cover it we start with. Why how did this situation come to be and there are of course some different reasons in different places but one thing one thing keeps coming up again and again and you get one? Guess as to what we'll city place here in the downtown core as one of the highest concentrations of airbnb rental units in Toronto and tonight some housing advocates are saying. That is booming. Business is driving up the prices for those who are actually looking for a permanent home. That was then though and this is now on a city known for its sky high pricing when it comes to housing and rentals is seeing a bit of a shift. According to experts since the Ontario government has banned airbnb there was actually a huge influx in rental apartments being available right now. Nobody is traveling not even within Canada. And as you might imagine that has had an impact on airbnb business model and Bhai impact. I mean it has basically obliterated so what happens to the rental markets Canada's biggest cities to thousands of airbnb landlords some of whom have staked their financial future on this platform to the company itself. Does it di- Does it? Evolve and what happens to the future of development in big urban centers because in order to understand? How much could change from here? You also have to understand how much AIRBNB has done to drive the direction of cities in the past decade. So that's where we'll start. Who knows where we'LL END UP Jordan Heath Rawlings and this is the big story. Matt Elliott is a columnist who writes about municipal policy. He writes in the Toronto Star. He writes for the CBC and several other publications. I mad. Hey we're gonNA talk about Airbnb today and It's decline. I guess in Toronto and in other cities around the world. But why don't you I kind of give me an explanation? As to how AIRBNB rose to such dominance in the rental markets of big cities. I mean the short answer is money. I mean. Imagine you're a landlord and you sort of have choices with the property. You Own the traditional way where you find. A long-term tenant You know you can make some money off of that. But there's some what landlords might describe as hurdles. You know the rules around addictions raising rent or whatever Whereas AIRBNB is way simpler. A bad tenants don't really last for longer than few days in most cases and then the money. I think the money is just the big thing I mean. Imagine you could rent a place for two hundred dollars a night for fifty nights a month. You're at three thousand dollars a month in income from that. That's more than the average rent in most Indian neighborhoods and Enough to carry a mortgage worth a million dollars or so so landlords are looking those two options they were increasingly going the RBM Dui. Because I know you cover Toronto. We'll just sort of use it as a proxy for some of the biggest Global cities which have some of the same problems with AIRBNB. Can you give me a sense of the size of AIRBNB IN TORONTO? Before the pandemic began like how dominant is it was it was very dominant and increasingly so a fair. Bnb which is an anti airbnb at secret supporting a note that but they did some number crunching and looked at the data from AIRBNB and they estimated there were about seventy three hundred Units on BNB that did not comply with the regulations passed by the city of Toronto. Those regulations are not enforced when they were doing this. But those were the rules. Saying you know you can't rent out an entire house that you don't live in you can only rent out your principal residence. So seventy three hundred units that would have been on the rental market but been consumed by AIRBNB. is hugely significant in rental market as tight as Toronto or vacancy rates over. The last few years have been around one percent so you know I think one of the reasons people got pretty fired up about AIRBNB. Is this idea that you know these are. This is a rental market. That is very very challenging. Very expensive very tight and airbnb comes along and suddenly another chunk of air. Rental market is no longer in the market. And we're going to get to the pandemic I promise in in one second but How much in the hallways at City Hall was this hot button issue in the months leading up to say February or early March? When things started happening I mean housing. In general is such a huge huge issue at City Hall There's increasingly concerns that you know we're looking at a city that is just unaffordable for anybody but the top of the economy. So if you're a service worker if you're a teacher you're a nurse if you're a police officer like all of these jobs some of which pay pretty darn well when you look at what housing was renting for in Toronto. It just wasn't really doable for a lot of these people especially if they're people that are looking at you know. I want to start a family. Have a couple of kids and the only one of the people in a couple goes to work in those situations. Those that arrangement used to be doable. In a city like Toronto increasingly. It was not so when you have that sort of greater backdrop of housing counselors and bureaucrats and policymakers and advocates are looking for levers. They can pull. That might improve the situation. How many looked at AIRBNB and said okay? This is a relatively new thing. It has taken units out of the rental market This is something that we can look at it as a way. You know for whatever difference. That'll make it would make some difference to to make things better. As far as housing goes but you mentioned that they weren't yet enforcing the regulations they were not and I mean that's that's an interesting story by itself because the regulations passed by council which I mean at a high level. The major changes that they wanted to impose. Were you know you can only rent out your principal residence so if you have a condo and you want rent it for a couple of weeks on AIRBNB in the summer while you're off on vacation or whatever that's totally fine but if you buy another condo with the plan to just rent it on airbnb making income off of it that was going to become a against the rules. There was also going to be a cap on the number of nights you could rent a a unit in Toronto. One hundred and eighty nine year was going to the CAP But when they passed those Suddenly there was a challenge by a landlord turned out. Airbnb was supporting this challenge. And while that was before the a tribunal they held things up for a two years pretty much but a year and a half to two years while they waited for a ruling on whether these regulations could actually go into effect that finally resolve itself in the fall. But then all of the sudden you have this pandemic happen and you know the has stuff stuff as ended up on pause result. What'S HAPPENED TO AIRBNB IN TORONTO? And other places since the pandemic began it all kind of blew up To be honest I'm AIRBNB. The renters are primarily travelers Whether international or domestic travellers they're people come in from one place to another and in mid March Traveling shutdown just is not happening so there goes the market for airbnb in most cities So all the sudden you have a situation where you have all the supply thousands of units that were on Airbnb and that's how landlords made their income Suddenly were empty a bookings being cancelled and going forward. There's not a lot of hope for our travel to resume in the near term so it was a major shock to the system as all these units suddenly no longer had people in them at all. How bad could this get for the company if it continues? And what have they sort of gun in an attempt to respond to they've done a few things Airbnb announced a fund support landlords. Who were facing cancellations? You know for bookings that came in before the Pandemic Aso I think there is a desire on airbnb. Parts to see this Just sorta sustain the urban economy. Obviously they want to make sure there's still people with airbnb listings after all. This happens That airbnb itself is facing major. Financial Distress They have laid off. I think a quarter of their workforce They are saying they are revenue for the year is about half what it was projected to be at the start of the year. So they're facing a multi billion dollar. Hit and resorting to layoffs. And it's a really tough situation for for the company and then for landlords. I think some of them are going to be able to whether this because they're looking at the situation where they know they bought a unit listed on Airbnb they can defer either mortgage right now at a lot of banks. So maybe there's a way that they can hold on and and keep going through this but you also have situations where landlords have hugely over leveraged themselves. You know really gambled on this as a way to make a quick buck. And you know they're looking at situations where okay. This was going to be my My Nest Egg is is how was going to get rich and that is is really starting to fall apart for a lot of them. When I wrote about this for the star a few weeks ago I got a lot of emails from Landlords with immunes who were just incredibly angry about what I had written Because I was not coming down on the side of the landlords talking about you know how much of their life savings tied up in this Airbnb Model and this their despair for what's going to happen in the future. Can you give me an example of what that looks like when you get severely over leveraged investing in Airbnb Imagine a situation where you come into Toronto and you buy a house for yourself for you know everything in Toronto as close to a million dollars these days. So so you buy a million dollar hosts to live in and then you think well you know to make some extra money. I will also by Condo for a half million dollars and

Airbnb Toronto Canada City Hall Ontario Government Principal Matt Elliott CBC Jordan Heath Rawlings Montreal Vancouver Airbnb. Officer
How A.I. is Filling in Coronavirus Testing Gaps

WSJ Tech News Briefing

05:51 min | 8 months ago

How A.I. is Filling in Coronavirus Testing Gaps

"As we've been going through this pandemic there have been a bunch of things happening in parallel on the one hand. People are doing everything they can to figure out how the virus is spreading. They're trying to mitigate it from spreading telling people to stay indoors wearing masks all those sorts of things and health officials are also working to find a cure for it so that we can all go back to normal one of the ways that tech companies and health. Insurers have been trying to do this is by utilizing artificial intelligence a I R digital science editor Danielle Hernandez has been looking into this and she joins us now Danielle. Thanks so much for being here. Things were having all right. So one of the big questions is where testing stands at this point. How are they using? Ai Right now to try to fill in the gaps with testing right so since the pandemic started in came to the US Are TESTING CAPABILITIES. Have lagged and so. It's made it difficult for policymakers for researchers for clinicians for everybody essentially to track where exactly the corona viruses striking in the US and also to help us understand like where are the areas that are most at risk are and so because testing is still not reaching optimal levels. People are trying to assess risk. And where might be safe eventually to reopen economy safely in a data driven way? And so- policymakers researchers health systems are looking at alternative forms of data alternative being because it's not testing data and it's not necessarily tracing contact tracing data either Aso. They're looking at medical records from past conditions responses to respiratory illnesses like the flu complications demographics and other things that affect our health that we don't typically think of think of health related like what. Zip Code we live in. What socioeconomic background we have these things really do affect our health because they affect access to it and in our in our health throughout our lives and so they're mining that information to try to come up with insights about who at risk populations are and where they should deploy already scars resources to get ahead of the spray. Do we have a positive examples of that around the country like places where they were? They've used ai to try to figure this out well. So I spoke with one company that I mentioned in the story called Kinza. They make a smart thermometer that tracks. Thermometers our body temperature. So because the symptom of us in terms of nineteen and other respiratory illnesses is a spike in temperature. They think that they can use this information to basically alert Public health officials governments early earlier than you would actually like. Maybe have a positive test to to help them. Figure out like where these hotspots are. So they say that their data shows that like across the country like they were able to see in their data abnormal spikes in temperatures. That didn't Corley or were different than what they were. Seeing historically at other points and so one of the things that governments down in Florida are doing like deploying some of these thermometers to communities that are at risk so homes that have healthcare workers or people with preexisting conditions or that live in large households that might be more risk of complications but also being super spreaders and so the data are early. They haven't been validated Which is one of the criticisms that scientists have like they? They think that this information is useful but that we should keep in mind that the data aren't perfect and the previous attempts to use in medicine have met with problems because the data are incomplete and this virus is so new that we just know very little compared to other diseases about how it works. How it manifests complications etc. One of the other Examples that you had in your story that was really interesting as an speaking of like specifically targeting at risk communities. You had an example of in your story of a group. I think in Oklahoma that was reaching out to people they thought could be potentially a higher risk. Can you talk about that? A little bit. shores so this healthcare provider in that space in Oklahoma contracts with employers to provide their employees and their dependents with healthcare services. So think about like boutique clinics kind of settings right and so they use artificial intelligence system engineered by a different company to look through data that includes outcomes. Er visits socio economic data zip codes and so they use these data to train an algorithm to basically pick out who they thought would be at greatest risk if they were to contract Kobe. Nineteen so these are not patients with covert nineteen currently but patients. Who would maybe end up in the hospital in an ICU on a ventilator because other previous history as well as these other factors that I mentioned so nurses that were employed by this organization. They got on the phone and call these patients to tell them. Hey you may be at greater risk here. These are the things you should do. You know hygiene social distancing and then also inform them about what they should do if they were able to they were experiencing symptoms so the idea. There is prevention right. So I don't want these people to remain out of the hospital and healthy so that they don't overwhelm the healthcare system possibly infect other

Danielle Hernandez Oklahoma United States Kinza Editor Corley Florida
Report: Texans trade DeAndre Hopkins to Arizona, receive David Johnson in return

The Herd

00:35 sec | 9 months ago

Report: Texans trade DeAndre Hopkins to Arizona, receive David Johnson in return

"Rich the cardinals and Texans okay let me guess okay bill o'brien making a move so you got to think outside the box okay involves who involves which channels the running back position aso Kenyan Drake is a former free agent so we can inject a transition tag I know that right so what country all we know is David Johnson of the cardinals going to Houston when Houston okay so can you stand for David Johnson goes to Houston because I mean I think Carlos Hyde was just a one year deal I think

Cardinals Texans David Johnson Houston Carlos Hyde Bill O'brien
Mike Bloomberg's campaign is polluting the internet

Reset

07:53 min | 9 months ago

Mike Bloomberg's campaign is polluting the internet

"Taylor Laurenz Tech reporter at the New York Times. You are one of the most online people I know and lately I've been going online and seeing a lot of one person and that person is Mike Bloomberg. I've been seeing him in my twitter timeline. I'm seeing him on my instagram feed. I don't follow Mike Bloomberg. What is going on here? Why is he all over social media? Right now yeah well you know. After entering the presidential race. He's really tried to make a splash for himself In the media so he's been obviously buying lots of television ads also buying lots of ads across the Internet and that doesn't just mean banner ads Oliver Websites but also sponsored content on a lot of our favorite. You know mean pages and influence our accounts. And he's been essentially paying these people post memes and messages viral videos on his behalf. I am curious about instagram part. Especially because I feel like that has been the most visible controversial element of this Bloomberg add by. What do those look like? Can you tell us a little bit about the Bloomberg memes on Instagram? Yeah Aso the sort of medium campaign that dropped across a lot of the biggest accounts like Fuck Jerry Moist Buddha tank Sinatra. These are names. You may or may not be familiar with but they have millions of followers on Instagram. And what they did is postponed essentially fake looking. Em's between themselves and Bloomberg where Bloomberg would say funny kind of relatable things like I have a billion dollars. Can you make me look cool? And then the members of pretend to respond through this fake. Dm Like yes. Or No. Or I'll think about it. All of the posts had the caption. You know sponsored content but even so you know people. People like thought that they were fake. Yeah some people's keep damning me like are these real. Yeah it's like it is really fake looking especially because of what he saying right like I have a billion dollars. There was the one about like having a car with Lamborghini doors a level of self awareness and irony that I don't think the real Bloomberg has ever displayed. Yeah exactly very self aware and very much like playing into how he's uncool you know boomer And what about twitter? So he's definitely also making a big splash on twitter. What's his twitter presence like? He's just been posting on it in this very during just away He's been calling people out he's been doing the whole brand twitter thing where you like quote tweets and dunk on them. He's been doing that to donald trump attempting to kind of clap back. But you know they also posted this what people were calling a doctored video this video. That was kind of remixed from the debates to make it look like Bloomberg. Were saying you know. Has anyone else started like a business? I'm the only one Chevy started a business. Is that fair and know? Attempted to make it look like all. The other candidates just sat there in silence. They played crickets in the background in reality. That's not what happened the debate at all and it's actually kind of a funny video which is slightly disturbing. Mary Internet very video. It's very like I mean people make those things about trump all the time But I think to see it as sort of like sponsored content. That video also went out across a bunch of Munich counts so to see these. We Macau's that are being paid to essentially distribute. This highly edited video. That a lot of people won't know is edited Is Yeah I. I can see why that would really concerned people. Yeah right like seeing Bloomberg. Come off really well in this debate. That people in the no no he did very badly in. It's an effective tactic here but completely skewed from reality. Yeah and it's also I mean it's blatant misinformation. And when you think about you know what a Lotta people on the left have criticized trump for You Know Bloomberg is essentially leaning into sort of some of the worst aspects of that So I understand the criticism I think on Bloomberg side you know. He's essentially leveraging a lot of marketing tactics that have been used for a long time in the corporate world These types of viral sons videos. You know very active twitter presence paired with influence or marketing on instagram. I mean this is just like marketing one. Oh one for a lot of corporate brands But it is. It's just kind of jarring to see it leak into the political realm. And who are the People? Who are actually behind these memes on instagram and twitter. Who are the ones that are creating this content for the Bloomberg campaign? I'm so essentially. It's you know people from a couple of different groups One is Jerry media who most famously runs the account fuck Jerry Their CEO and one of their creative directors is involved with the campaign. It's also a bunch of people from brand fire which is another kind of influencer marketing collective and doing things media which is a media company that owns a lot of other big large accounts like middle-class fancy white people. Comes things out so those Mimi counts really appeal to the millennial vote And then in terms of like you know his actual team. He staffed his digital team with a ton of people from the tech industry themselves so people that are intimately familiar with these platforms hiring from places like facebook and Snapchat. So you know. On all sides he really has the best of the best in terms of digital talent Also because he can afford to pay them an exorbitant amount of money and he's promised them jobs through November no matter what the outcome of his campaign which no other political campaign could ever do that. So I think that's also why he's managed to attract some of these people. He was also just working with average people to essentially do digital what he called digital canvassing. I think other people would have other names for it where he's basically paying people twenty four twenty five hundred dollars a month To like text all of their friends about him and Post about him on their personal social media accounts so he's kind of engaging in a lot of tactics With a lot of sort of cross sections of different people. So what is the ultimate goal here with the Bloomberg campaign in hiring these younger folks to pass around memes and working with you know the tanks tra- people and other big influencers mean the goal with all of this is just generate attention online? It's to make a splash Bloomberg has entered the race late. He's not even on the ballot yet you know. He just participated his first debate recently. So he's just trying to get in people's heads you know. He's trying to establish himself as a front runner and viable candidate And the best way to do that is to get people talking and I think that that you know. He's very successfully done that It's it's also like he doesn't have to play by traditional rules. He has so much money that he can kind of do whatever he wants and so. I think that's also why you see him. Embracing really bold strategies that frankly other political candidates would probably shy away from because they don't have the resources to necessarily see it through in the way. Bloomberg can we're when we can just dump tons of money see if something works doesn't work dump tons of money elsewhere So he doesn't have to be quite as strategic. I think you know some of the other campaigns and I mean talking about dumping tons of money and whether or not it works. What's the response been to these mutants. Yeah the response has been positive. Negative Obviously there has been a huge amount of people online. Who think it's Hilarious and funny and love it? Um and then you have the other people who think it's you know the death of democracy so it doesn't really matter it doesn't really matter what people think the point is is that people are talking about him that you know. He's he's being talked about as a viable candidate. That's the only thing that matters so in that way it

Bloomberg Twitter Mike Bloomberg Instagram Donald Trump New York Times Tech Reporter Oliver Websites Lamborghini Chevy Jerry Their Facebook Macau Mary Internet Munich Mimi
Are we losing the Southern Cross constellation?

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

07:39 min | 10 months ago

Are we losing the Southern Cross constellation?

"Of the great sites in the seven night skies is the iconic constellation of the Southern Cross. However if you're in the city the stars of the southern cross a lost you to the glare of light pollution and even in the suburbs not all the stars in the cross a visible. It's a growing problem for sky. Watches right around. The world and increasing majority of people can no longer see the true beauty of the night sky from their homes in fact many of our listeners. The side of the Milky Way stretching across the night sky is just a childhood memory and today sadly an entire generation is growing up having never seen our galaxy the place we call home in the universe. Astronomers the fine light pollution. As I'd official light that shines were. It's neither wanted when needed light from poorly designed incorrectly directed light fixtures shines brightly into the sky. They're scattered by a molecules moisture aerosols in the atmosphere causing the Sky to light up a phenomenon sky glow and it's not just sky watches who are affected as anyone who suffers from a badly position straight light shining that bedroom window and knows more importantly it also has numerous direct impacts on the environment putting a heat strain on wildlife in both urban and rural areas. He become disoriented by the bright lights. The editor of a strange sky tell US magazine Jonah. Finale says dark sky preserves being established around the world to help combat the problem. And now this one in Australia. Big News recently. Is that three thousand square kilometres of south. Australia's mid Murray district have been declared a straight as I doc skype reserve. Now what does that mean? It's an official thing where officially designated by the International Dark Sky Association and that means that that area is great for viewing the not sky and the people who live in that area businesses that run in that area the governments that control that area are all going to work together to try to preserve quality of the night sky with good lighting. And that kind of thing so this is looks down with upwards. Don't Sean you lot up into the sky of the sky glows Because the sky actually go out I mean. It goes blue during the day. Because there's lots of light to illuminate. That's the race but even even at nighttime the sky is not pitch black If you live in a city if you look in the sky in not In the city you'll see the scarves gray. Actually it's not pitch black in between the stars it should be pitch black and the amazing thing about this area. Which is what they're calling the river. Murray International Doc Scar Reserve ten ninety minutes drive from Ed light by the way but on a scale of zero to twenty two with twenty two meaning. Perfect doc skies. This region school was between. Twenty one point nine one twenty one point nine nine out of twenty two so you don't get much bit of that. It's a really bright spot. So it's it's great that they've done that so it's a straight is i. Doc Sky Reserved now across the Tasman in New Zealand. They already have some docs car reserves and then wanting to even one third there are plans afoot or is there there people pushing for to make New Zealand. An entire DOC. Sky Nation Because Museum has the most beautiful skies. And it's a big tourist attraction. You know there are lots of tourism operations that revolve around astronomy. And they're going to be more and more of them so they just want to preserve the quality of the not Scott because it's a really important thing and that doesn't mean everyone has to turn off all they like and that kind of stuff. It just means being sensible about how we how we you know Illuminate Aso's in the ground during during not Thomas and Does do it in such a way that it preserves the quality of viewing the not scoff everybody for much just generation but generations to come so that's really tremendous. Isn't it so we got this magnificent docs reserve in South Australia and there are some other sort of one step removed from Dark Sky? Reserve down the sort of ladder of hierarchy of DOC. Scott to there are a couple of other places industry that they're you know already designated Something slightly less than that and across the Tasman Museum and the other guy for Dachshund Action. So good on him. I say we need more than two regularly drive from Dow into Sydney. I I I was working down. I used to have my holidays in Sydney and when I was doing those drives on a regular basis. There's just nothing like stopping at a truck stop in the middle of the outback and and looking up at the night sky for an hour or so and just seeing that spectacular vista that Villanova. Black Sky absolutely amazing. It really is amazing. Isn't it It so doc out Dan that he's something that you can you can try For people who live in the cities To do a bit of a comparison if you do get to a dock sky spot where you're really far away from the lives of towns and if there are some clouds in the sky so if you've got clouds in the sky in the city at not time you will see the clouds because the lights the lights shining with over lots. We go down on the ground. Illuminate the cloud and you can see the clouds. The clouds look white or gray or whatever they are at nighttime but if you go ask in the APP or anywhere where it's really really dock and there were some clouds in the sky. I looked black. They're like big black holes in blocking at the start because there's nothing to eliminate them from below well. Yeah it's really quite striking your cost if you could see them side by side the two things software side you get a better better idea of it but If you go out if you live in the city you go outside one night and some clouds in the sky not fluffy cumulus clouds. Whatever you'll be able to see them as clouds but you go out into the into the Bush. When there's no moon doc is and the clouds will when you see images of Earth at night from the International Space Station you see glow this this yellowy. Greenie sort of tinge on the sky which is caused by the citation of molecules in the atmosphere. You didn't notice that aglow from looking up from below No you don't Looking down you sort of You get a bit of perspective on that particularly if you can look sort of sideways through the atmosphere which you can do from which we really can't do. Yes that makes them down here. Yeah but Those pictures of us at night show you look beautiful little lots but you look at those and think what's the point of having that lot shining upwards. There's there's absolutely no point in. Lots of data will eliminate up within it to eliminate the ground below so those lights not with life. The shining light presumably. Some of it's going onto the ground where it needs to be so you can see where we're going but the rest of it's shining up into the sky. I mean it's just pointless. It's it's really bad lighting design. And it's just wasting energy. Astronomers have been banging on about this decades now and and the good thing is that You know whereas before a lot of people wouldn't really take notice odds just astronomy kids but now of course it's an environmental problem as well so look stable getting involved in it and you know more more power to the my side because using plotting uses less pal. Yeah but what we're finding now is because it's so cheap to run. Led's instead of the incandescent lighting people leaving the ladies on for longer and then installing more of them so because it's so cheap actually see an increase in the amount of light being emitted. I guess it's just the same as any other thing that we notice that they say particularly pollution is by the time you'd notice. There's a problem it's too late to fix the problem I mean the classic example is Australia's major optical observatory side Siding Spring Up Baron. So the Meet New South Wales you can see the sky glow of Sydney Horizon. That's hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of kilometers wide direct line whether it's leading. Led Lights on longer will will permanently because its shape or whatever. It's any sort of pollution and this we stop to think about US then Nothing really changes finale. The editor of Australian Sky Tell US

SKY International Dark Sky Associa Sky Nation Because Museum Australia Murray International Doc Scar United States Official Southern Cross Editor Scott Sydney New Zealand South Australia Sydney Horizon Tasman Museum South Wales Thomas
Global AI Adoption Trends

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

08:31 min | 10 months ago

Global AI Adoption Trends

"Hello and welcome to the AI today. PODCAST I'm your host Kathleen Mulch. I'm your host Ronald smells so one of the things we do at cognitive let occurs we produce research on the markets and landscape. We look across all the people that we've spent time talking to the use cases. The case studies all Venice. Did you spend time talking to and we ask ourselves the question once a year. Well how is he. I being adopted worldwide. What's happening in the world with people actually implementing an yeah right right are people or companies are certain regions more heavily adopting ai than others? What's really going on so a few weeks ago? We published the report called Global. Ai Adoption trends and forecast for twenty twenty. So we'll linked to it in the show notes. This one is a free download so we encourage all of our listeners to download it and check out the findings but we're going to spend some time today going through the report itself and highlight some of the key findings and maybe some unique or interesting. MM findings that we found from the survey and the report that we did and so the way that we accomplished this as we serve it we sent out the survey to over fifteen hundred individuals individuals various different companies and countries all over the world and got some two hundred and something responses and use those responses to one inform US specifically what's happening of course allowed allowed to also generalize in some ways about the trends that we're seeing for that if you're interested by the way participating in future surveys. I encourage you to reach out to us. Send us an email to info so I- NFO at Melissa and L. Y.. Dot Com and we would be happy. Include you in future service right so so we'll go through some of the key findings first and then the way that we also broke. This down was by our seven patterns obey because we said okay. Well let's one thing to say people are adopting ai but how truly are. Are you adopting A. Are you doing predictive analytics. Application or chat BOT application or hyper personalization application so some of the key findings that we've found from the the report is that by twenty twenty five over forty percent of the respondents that answered our survey said that they will implement a I in one or more of the identified seven patterns earns of Ai and almost ninety percent said that they'll have some sort of impress a implementation over the next two years. We found those numbers to be. You know very positive positive signs for the industry because it saying almost half will implement one or more pattern by two thousand twenty five so just a few years and then ninety percent so nine out of ten said that they'll have some sort of a m progress within the next two years so you might be thinking. He's looks like contradictory information. Wise that the forty percent or say and do but ninety percent have a project that they're doing two years you would think that ninety percent they're doing well this has to do with of course understanding versus the patterns because we asked them all. Okay yeah great well. Let's not talk about. How many of you are looking at doing a chat Bot and the next two years okay? How many of you are looking at doing a machine learning predictive analytics or recognition project or some sort of automation project? That's using cognitive automation. Oh well all of a sudden now. The numbers started going up and in our chart will show you kind of how the adoption patterns are looking looking because basically when you start looking at the more details yeah machine learning honestly an ai are being embedded in everything and it actually may be difficult to avoid using a machine learning. So even if you're saying well maybe we're not intending to build her on machine learning models it may end up being the end up using them anyways so we also sort of looked looked at turtle how the world was moving with. We're like well. Maybe you know North America Europe bird kind of moving at a different pace Rasiah Africa. Now you know what this is one of the interesting things about I in our research from all respondents and a response come from all over the planet they are all roughly moving at the same pace. It is true that you know Australia. Eliana Asia Europe. They have different timing. What their plans? But basically it's not like we're seeing an over concentration of aggressive plans and North American Europe and less so otherwise it's just it seems like this is just the global movement and then another thing we've talked about process automation a a lot and many companies especially many government agencies here in the. US are very hot and heavy on and process automation. In general. What we found is that fifty four percent of respondents plan to implement a approaches to process automation within the next few years so over half and then fifty two percent of respondents plan into implement a enabled conversational systems by twenty twenty five so those again were not really surprising numbers for us but something that we wanted to point out because because people are finding value in automation and I think in general taking their data cleansing it and then using it for higher level value uh-huh and so when they're able to take cognitive approaches in process automation they're starting to really see value in so we're excited that people who are really moving forward with that? Let me talk about a enabled conversational systems all the time and how companies can use that to help in a variety of different ways that can help with customer service service can also help with. It self service so they could use it internally as well and it's able to allow companies to do more with the same or less resources than before right right so our last sort of key finding sort of digging so some of the more details in a moment is that for the organizations that are sort of struggling with making ai ham or like a haven't quite quite yet taken the step. What they've said is that their biggest barrier to adoption is actually insufficient quantity or quality of data? That's like one of the biggest things things followed by lack of talent so basically people in data for a lot of response to send you know even for the people who are moving ahead. They have acknowledged that these are things that a slowing them down so for the companies that are not planning to implement ai at all within the for the next two years. The thing that they said was the biggest showstopper was just. They haven't yet justify the Arwa. which kind of makes sense or that? There isn't enough of an advantage of AI. Over non approach sprang for the ones that have taken that next episode okay. I think there's I want to do this project you know. I have have an R. Y.. I think it's going to give me an advantage. There getting stuck on people and data right right and that really comes as no surprise because cleaning data it can be a very very manual process very time intensive it can also be very costly as well and depending on the sensitivity of that data. That depends on what vendor or you can go with and where physically the data needs to be cleansed and crapped then followed by limited availability for a talent and skills. We've talked about. There's a big telling cruncher especially around data scientists so some of these smaller organizations. Just don't have the money to afford a data scientist on their team. So what can and they do then. That's where they're limited by hiring talent so digging a little bit deeper in one of the things we did our report is we asked them say okay. Well how many of you doing okay. Great Right now. How many of you are doing hyper civilization or pattern about is a nominally? Is predictive analytics. No automation which is not AI. We spent many reports talking about that. But we do track it because it is that when those pathways to get Aso we talk about process automation separate from autonomous systems. And then we talk about conversational systems recognition recognition systems and then goal driven system. And maybe it might not come as much of a surprise but the thing that's been the most widely implemented as of last year conversational national systems chat bots voice assistance Alexa skills. You know smart tech spots and embed. Yeah because you may not necessarily be thinking of those things is they. They're are all powered by machine learning especially the constitutional system. I you know high rate of adoption moving at a very sort of steady in four grants annual growth that the annual growth but like the OT overall adoption is like twenty percent and twenty four percent just keeps growing that episode. The thing that's kind of more interesting is the ramp. The rate at which people are implementing running process automation right or plan to within the next few years so in twenty nineteen there were about. Ten percent of participants had are bought in production production. Twenty twenty about sixteen percent but by twenty twenty five so five years from now fifty four percent so one out of every two every other. Yeah half half of the people want to have. Rpa In practice and implementation at their various companies and that says a lot to the growth in the potential of that

AI Venice Kathleen Mulch United States Ronald Twenty Twenty North America Australia Eliana Asia Europe Melissa Alexa Scientist Africa
Creating Empathetic Bots - Robocopy Leads the Way in Conversation Design Mastery

The Voice Tech Podcast

05:03 min | 11 months ago

Creating Empathetic Bots - Robocopy Leads the Way in Conversation Design Mastery

"When these chat bots became a thing 'cause it was always like away right you have to have virtual system on the website. You'd ask the question and they would know or give you a very long answer and became more conversational and I realized you know understand the technology I understand the dialogue and I now understand service space so this is something from you to explore so started out on my own on pretty much by raising my hands and say you know all all obsess over this problem. I got a few clients right away and Dan. I met my co-founder and they already had like a design. Agency there psychologists by trade using psychology to think about user experience in conversion etc.. So we SORTA teamed up because we realized there's artificial brain there's a human brain and there's language it makes total sense for us to tackle this problem so we started out as agency working with. Bryant's we fought. That was going to be We were going to be doing but once wrote a blog post that said we train our own people in our academy and then brands from all over the world started reaching out which which is a good problem to have I guess right so we look like might as well start academy but that was like Chat Bot relatives so we developed some curriculum for that and we had people come to the the office and have a couple of weeks with us. We like every Tuesday night and then won a larger search engines. Reach out to us. We got connected with them because they were putting out in Google assistant assistant and they were interested and they obviously have that. It's important to train conversation designs around the world for voice right because if you have a bad google assistant experience you know. Two brands not delivering good content. That you're GonNa Green socks ride so they reached out. They connected us with all these different conversation designers. That have been doing this for twenty years that were in the back of call centers working on the IVR systems and they had developed so many techniques that they aso many hours invested in so all these people that work in very large famous companies now just helped us develop these courses and work with us from all the best practices that they had independence that we saw we developed like really step by step design. Method that we dance sort of put out and that sort official to certificate is based around and was great and I think that's what I'm proud of stuff most to stop every team that we work with now. Is that if you take a use case and you follow the steps a good conversations gonNA come out and we have that here this week in Singapore's just starts out really messy with the use case and you When we have a conversation we look at the bond rates in the user needs because a user has rational needs but also emotional needs? So we look at you. Know what expect water during Zayed eighties would motivate them. Where are they most likely to be a win? That having these conversation all that stuff influences dynamics and then we also look at like the botany where we look at in order to resolve this about has to ask certain questions it needs to be interesting to think about having needs but yeah if you treat it as another agent of course something that has needs and then you can address those. Yeah it's like a you know comes from screenwriting right. Every time there's two characters in the movie and they engage in dialogue to both have a goal in mind riding because of that conflict gets messy at a makes it interesting exciting so yet from the bots perspective if I WANNA help But perhaps there's also certain information that already have because I'm integrated with a database. Maybe I have certain responsibilities. I have to share a legal legal information etc so we have a canvas that we use you filled in with a bunch of posted. Some day he got to people they sit back to back from each other so the Kency NC notice the older have is just works and role play. One's going to be planning to usurp the other one's going to be playing the bought and we let them figure it out on what I it's really really messy right. It's very confusing. It's silly the usual start asking questions but each question to us or ask we have to figure out. Is that a question more people would ask. This is a training exercise. You conduct face to face in the classroom with the guys in the brands. And this is a way to tease out. The main flows and the problems in the conversations stations that other customers their customers to have. Yeah so we'll do that exercise and so we'll do it onside face to face but it's important that the people are sitting back to back accidents each other. So what does if the user starts asking questions done every time you ask a question. It's a sign of a lack of information concerned that you might have so something needs to be addressed so what you do in. The next iteration stopped the bottle. Probably proactively communicate that information right and takeaway anxiety before curse curse and that leads to a lot of empathy right because if you engage in dialogue and you feel like I really understand you because I address all your questions before they even appearing to your mind. Yeah and phoebe yeah you become very calm as a user. You're okay with me leading the conversation fall

Google Co-Founder DAN Singapore Bryant Zayed Official
Visiting Virunga National Park in the DRC

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

09:14 min | 1 year ago

Visiting Virunga National Park in the DRC

"I'd like to welcome to the show. Neil from Ireland. WHO's come to talk to us not about Ireland but about Virunga National Park in the Democratic Republic of Congo meal meal? Welcome to the show thanks. It's great to be here now. We're talking to an Irishman about an African country. What is your connection with Virunga National Park Mark with DRC? I came across Franca. Maybe like a lot of people scrolling through next lakes and came across to Verona documentary was Oscar nominated donated a couple years back Across and when I watch this and I saw the conservation work being done there. I kind of felt a nose and the theon says well ever since we've been kind of keeping tabs on the park keeping tabs on to charity in the work. They're doing kind of daydreaming about coming here someday. Someday and fortunately a couple of months ago we got to choose and spent eight days in the park. And if we I wanted to put it on a map we're in the DC. So were in the western half of the southern part of Africa and where we within the Democratic Republic of Congo Virago. National Park is Roy's on the eastern edge of the DRC. And if you were to put on a map you're pretty much in in debt. Exact heart of Africa. So there's a very large cece Ghouma which is about a million people and the park ruins north from there along the border with Rwanda and Uganda excellent. And why should someone go to for National Park. Okay so I just Kinda tree. Main reasons people generally go to vulgar. I I swear I is the picture postcard. It's near Dongo Volcano. So for those of you don't know it's one of the only active laugh lakes Exon art so it's very very unique thing. I think there's only seven in the whole globe so that's a really big attraction the second power to to this is melting guerrillas. So again there's only three places on earth you can see mountain. Gross National Park is one of those and then finally when I'd say as Virunga is one of the oldest and degrades national parks on earth and wounded world's gray conservation projects and you can visit it with almost no other tourists so it's really a chance to see a great African National Park pretty much share says and when you say there are only a couple of other places you I can see mountain gorillas. You happen to be a stone's throw from them when you're in a national park absolutely so not grits. Basically the only live in the mountains and those mountains straddle the Rwandan Ugandan and DRC barter so within an hour urine in basically it's the same guerrillas and they actually do pass back and forth across the border and thrown guys just worn out those treat locations but there's some differences in in terms of price ace and the size of the group. You'd be with so can talk a bit about this when we talk about grits Deidra okay but really that areas why. I wanted to make sure that people understood is where we're win. We're all the way over there to the east. That means we're really just across the border from Uganda. What kind of are you going to recommend for US earth too? So I know gingerly generally on your podcast for kind of a week. Itinerary and Veronica some flexibility when we're going as far as Africa absolutely and I guess a lot of guests if they go to Africa. They're likely to maybe tag. This onto a maybe a wider trip or wider safari. Sorry so Veronica is actually very flexible so anything between kind of two days to eight days. You're going to see quite a lot. And there's kind the four main sites within the park and depending on your interests and preferences you can mix and match them so if you really only want to see the volcano you can be in forty not eight hours if you want to do everything about eight days and what we did was we. We spent quite a lot of time. There we dare nineteen days so we did everything quite a bit of detail and we can talk data entry but you can abs- dookie slice and dice it to fit your time-scale excellent and where should we start anyone. Visiting Virunga is going to be coming through the lower city of Goma. Now Goma is kind of an interesting place For want of a better. That's word so it's it's a city of a million people would huge number of those being UN peacekeepers and NGOs. It's always been in the power of the word. That's a little bit chaotic. And I found when I was looking at open. Your your listeners. Might find interesting is if you go on Google alert. There's two the twin cities. Most people will come in from Rwanda your fly into Kigali which is only about two to three hour drive into the border crossing and there's a town Cassini and Rwanda which is more twin the goal Matt Iran Roy's teacher. There's no real clear bar between the except if you look look on Google alert you can. Even if there was no barter on the map you could absolutely tell the difference between Rwandan D. R. C. On one side of the dimap map. There's these beautiful houses. Lovely Straight Roads Gardens Greenery and on the other side during his chaos absent whose that notre chaos and to be clear. You're you're side absolutely but chaos in isis going. So is an unusual place. I think the feeding on got there. It was kind of POMPEII in waiting. So the first thing that would really strike you when you get into Goma is developing near Dongo frames your the entire view so you look out over the city and in the very near distance is an Uruguayan. Go at eight. Tenths give out a a lot of clouds of smoke pretty much all day round and that's not a fake sewing. Volcano is very much active and erupted in two thousand and two was the most recent and and Flow True City caused quite go to visit damage. You'll still see when you drive through to see see places where say there was a two story house house and now the entrance is on the first floor because the whole ground floor is now basically solidified lava. It's an unusual usual spot. It's not one that I suspect. Most visitors spend any great toy man so like false wego barter and we a mess our guide who took US pretty much true Goma without stopping so we drove through the city. It's perfectly safe during the day but you kind of I think the most interesting power to the city is just to see I think for anyone who's experience either hasn't been in. Africa are as experience maybe more to safari lodges and that client side. It is a good introduction to maybe some of the more real day to day experiences underground it would awake in your senses for better or worse. But it's very interesting place to pass through and you mentioned meeting your guide. How did you find a guide for this trip? Spoiled it being quite a complicated power to the world. This was probably one of the easiest trips. I've ever taken so to go to the National Park because of the security region the organize everything centrally. So your point of contact would always be the national park and they have a specific tourist department that looks after all logistics. Ice was wanted under things that concern me day. One was a land border that I have to cross in Africa and does not always a reassuring thing to be doing so actually when I was underground founded wonderful laws when you cross the border into the DRC. There's actually a very very modern building thing that was actually funded by Howard. Both I think is one of he wanted years. He does a lot of charitable work so he actually Biz modern. Warren Buffett. Aso's Sorry Actually Warren Both its broader or other. Okay yes so. I think he's actually a partner in the business and he's also equally successful at he's actually hugely involved in Goma and national packets of and as has done amazing work. And actually when you go around here you'll see lots of signs bearing these names where he's foundation has done. Great work to actually Barda. Crossing itself is fantastic. It's like a modern kind of airport tight building and wanted conditions. Wins all of this very fancy building being used was that for the National Park. Were actually given an office inside in the Border Patrol area. So when you go in you don't meet Garrett's you don't meet people checking your passport. You actually meet your tourist. God who will take her passport. Kgo Eight eight-point scenes and organize everything for you while you sit comfortably in their tourist office so for anyone who's nervous about crossing borders navigating like that this is absolutely nucle- The easiest thing in the world it's not something to be concerned

National Park Africa Goma Virunga National Park Democratic Republic Of Congo DRC Rwanda Virunga Gross National Park Uganda United States African National Park Veronica Matt Iran Roy Franca Google Ireland Border Patrol Dongo Volcano Neil
Speed vs. Safety: Rapid Approvals from the FDA

Sounds of Science

09:46 min | 1 year ago

Speed vs. Safety: Rapid Approvals from the FDA

"Why is the FDA's rigorous testing so necessary. Well I I think you're aware that a lot of drugs fail From safety concerns we all know about getting sleepy with antihistamines. Or you know that's the actual aside side effect that comes from the action of the drug on the brain. That's at the senior centers that we would like to counteract allergy. So that's what we call pharmacologic based aced toxicity. It's an effect actually on the target. But it's in a way that we don't want it to act GOTCHA. So as we're working on very new drugs we often don't understand like where there's receptors are in God or the brain or the immune system. There's a lot of things we don't understand about the basic mechanisms of action of disease and there's lot of things that we don't understand sometimes about where the receptors are in the buddy. I mean it seems great. Yeah but that's why. I'm kind of glad if my original training and classic Comic Anthology Because you have to ask questions okay. where else is the receptor? Who else could hit end so? FDA trained to think about those nightmare scenarios of what it could do that. You don't want it to do right and ask those hard questions to make sure that we have the checks and balances right a lot of the early drugs That were used in AIDS. Patients Cause Peripheral neuropathy and that wasn't shown very well in the animal models models but it caused intense pain in the patients at the same doses that was needed for the virus. It wasn't until later that we got the protease inhibitors that really counteracted the road. And that's the basis of the lifesaving therapies that we have today I was really fortunate to be. FDA during that time when the protease inhibitor came through so switching gears a little bit what is personalized medicine. When it comes to patients like for example adjacent armstead and meal Amac? I understand that Jaycee is a twenty five year old with Lou GEHRIG's disease while meal is a young girl with batons disease who have both recently benefited from personalized medicine. He I think we have come to the place in drug development where we understand a lot more about genetics of disease so so yes switching away from viruses and into genetic Madison we have a lot of inborn errors when we learned that there is an inborn Gene that was missing in a patient has always been there born like that and as soon as we can diagnose them and with that replacement gene product or the enzyme of interest interest. We can save their lives so. LS has also been learned to be a whole series of different mutations responsible for LS Um and so you have to look at those different subsets according to their genetic diagnosis. But we also know that Batten's disease is a specific mutation and there's also something like fourteen different forms of Batten's disease that are mutations in same pathway that result in the same type of phenotype of neurological article degeneration some earlier some younger and some an older kids or adults in the case of Mula. She has two mutations that are different on both of the wheels that caused the dysfunction of a particular protein. Batten's disease six seven and there's only a handful or double handful of kids worldwide. They're known to have that particular subtitled batons and Jaycees case she has a very aggressive form of al it lasts called F s mutation and it has a particularly bad course people with F.. US typically sadly succumbed LS typically approximately a year. Because it's so aggressive. It's very hard to intervene soon enough. And there has never been a medication that could actually address the fundamental gene problems in these two cases so we need to design whole new the truck when we find the particular mutation and it turns out depending on the molecular biology and that control mechanisms around them. A tation some all of them are amenable to go nuclear type therapy and both of these girls have been their particular. Genetics have been amenable to A strategy she of using nuclear tight enter equally sadly we did not know that. JC had this particularly bad ale ass us until she was twenty five. Her family had lost her twin sister at the age of seventeen and Alex add add. Actually he contracted the symptoms of L. S. at age eleven so the two girls were identical. They had the same mutation but one got symptoms at eleven on the other at twenty five. JC I guess Through some grace right. Her symptoms arose during time in which a drug was already available in unaccompanied show that happened to be appropriate for her. So I understand and that in this case she got lucky. Well in a way because the drug already existed otherwise we couldn't have intervened quickly enough. Yeah it was an act of considerable effort on the part of the patient advocacy group project. LS The head of Columbia University's LS LS center. Dr Neil Snider in the company who originated the drug and all of us that were helping around the sides trying to support like an exoskeleton including Charles forever and I was helping with the regulatory strategy and also trying to make sure that the drug that was chosen was actually appropriate to the most expedient animal model so as a result of that we were able to put together a very lean and mean I N D for JC and get her approved through the FDA. I have to say. FDA was understandably cautious but when they heard her situation detail and how she'd lost her twin sister the understood of course about a few and they made a lot of exceptions to the usual toxicology regulations. Well I know that she had been she and her family. They had been advocating pretty publicly for a while up until it was approved. I if I'd been in her mom shoes I would have done the same thing called. She lower local congressman. The Stephen King and there was actually quite a response. In Congress. There is a bill that was put forward to ask. FDA to move expediently for JC. I don't know that that had specific impact but just to say that they got some considerable public discussion. And how Camilla's case different in her case Tim you At Boston Children's Hospital recognized that her condition was suitable for an exon skipping being drug very similar to Isis Been Raza and he was able to use a similar backbone and design a drug from scratch within several months it was quite remarkable global. We've done the testing for it and then we've Were able to get started with just a acute data and then I designed a type of a program in which we would update the FDA very regularly on the progress of the toxicology studies so that we could extend her dosing and again. FDA's group group that does an enzyme replacement was wonderful. In working with us to customize that I approach how do you envision cases like these being handled in the future after all not everyone. Everyone has a congressman. That's willing to go to bat for them. Like Jaycee did not. Everybody should take one. There's definitely a sea-change coming is really exciting. And it goes back to the changes brought about by the AIDS patients who identified that they were an extreme unmet medical. Need we see the finalization of the L. S. guidance. We see a lot of guidances have come out on rare disease from the agency in the past twenty four months. And I'm very excited about this because we're really getting to the place where we custom tailor the amount of upfront non clinical research. That has to proceed to human trials customize. That the patient's situation well do you think that each was going to require its own uniquely designed non clinical research at will or will there kind of. Okay you're not gonna be able to have like a standard version that works for most Aso's typically called platform toxicology in kind of a dream. Right now when you look across all a good nuclear tides you find out remember. I mentioned early in this talk about the pharmacologically driven toxicity. Let's say there's another place in the genome that has has a similar sequence. We end up having the drug acting by its intended action bit at the wrong place which is an off what we call an on target but unwanted toxicity existed that could arise by modulating genome which is a little scary right to put something into the spine or once. You invoke gene therapy. What's done is done so you need to have really careful toxicology evaluations that look at the animal as if it were a miniature clinical trial? And you know you're basically siklie handling the animals has patients and so we get as much information as we can vary from each particular experiment and try to make sure that Ed's translation Lee accurate for predicting patient risk. We need the parents to know that right. If if you were me. Resigning are up to our child. An an in-and-out shoes

FDA Congressman Jaycee Batten Protease Inhibitor Ls Ls Center Peripheral Neuropathy Lou Gehrig Dr Neil Snider Aids Alex L. S. Stephen King Congress ASO Camilla ED
A Historical Interview with Ruth Simpson

Making Gay History

06:49 min | 1 year ago

A Historical Interview with Ruth Simpson

"So here's the scene it's the dead of winter in nineteen eighty nine I've just taken a two hour bus ride from Manhattan to Woodstock New York a small town on nestled in the catskill mountains ruth picks me up at the bus station and we drive a short distance to the small Cozy House she shares with Ellen Pourville her partner of many years and flora they're very friendly poodle ruth is a small woman although she's quick to note but she's not as finishing once was she's in her early sixties and has short grey here ellen several years younger she's tall and thin made even taller by thick crown of Brown hair as usual I'm starved thankfully ruth is prepared lunch and we talk while we eat ellen mostly hovers in the background occasionally pouring wine for Ruth Ginger Ale for me before I dive into my sandwich I clip microphone to Ruth's butter and press record interview with Ruth Simpson and Ellen phobic bill February Ninth Nineteen eighty-nine Woodstock New York one PM tape one side one interviewer Eric Marcus Alice the time totally closeted then I heard a radio interview with Martha Shelley who used to be active in the game and she gave the name of daughters this and the the address and the time and day of meeting so I just went there one night and the felt had come home to my people just rub it was on a dark street in Manhattan happened on the second floor were you fearful going there that first time let me explain about my being closeted for so long it was I never never had guilt feelings or never thought I'm so peculiar what am I doing in the world but I was very aware of the sociological dangers involved with getting a job and of course I held at the time I went to build a top executive physician on Madison Avenue you have to be concerned going because of your job either put it in a nutshell which is where the logs you've been open You couldn't have gotten your your jobs no I'll I'll tell you what happened about when I did come out of the classic of anyway nope no I wasn't frightened I felt a certain sense of adventure walk in the room and look around and see a hundred women say my God the there are many of us in Manhattan you remember what was discussed at that meeting mouse lay it was a rap session at that time deal was not very political there was talk about a women who thought they were straight but we're having doubts yes there were a lot of stories about what happened when I told my parents it was pretty much all on a personal level awesome I assume a lot of people who attended meetings where people who are risking their their careers Aso's fell out of women were frightened to be there was some of the Mirror Oh yes yes yes there were were straight women screaming a bit about Organization Administration of the Organization and I said that I would be program director after about Mansard meeting she could very heavily involved very fast you became president in sixty nine. UPN President Sixty nine when in sixty nine confronted was it before the riot stonewaller Oh yeah he was yeah what a what is still more present very definitely represented. Hey there's a war on there and keep in mind when you have in those times lesbian organization might have three to five hundred women at a week can dance you had a lot of people that didn't want to hear from politics and some of the women resented when we started to get political where did your political interest come from well I was very peripherally involved in the black movement I would go out and ring doorbells and Gigi to join any ACP all of this sort of thing this was during the same time or earlier earlier my parents fabulous fabulous people Were very active in the very early days of the Labor movement in the country when I was twelve I saw my first police brutality on the picket line saw my father get beat those hand and ran from tear gas so I had all that kind of thing in in my background twice sort of stepped back and for Warriors I should've but then when I went to deal be I wanNA try and try to see it shouldn't be that others have to obey the young people have to go through this sort of pain psychic pain and the deceit and lies and the broken families we reached an age from like eighteen seventy two wonderful over time you were there were dances every every meet yeah where did you see dances in seventy we got the loft down in in the Soho we are so glad because knew how important it was to have a home we ordered lumber for partitions with made a kitchen we made a library I mean so great

UPN President Trump Gigi Soho Two Hour
Lisa Meiring, CEO of Radical Results Consulting, Provides Success and Mindset Strategies

Extraordinary Women Radio with Kami Guildner

08:48 min | 1 year ago

Lisa Meiring, CEO of Radical Results Consulting, Provides Success and Mindset Strategies

"I know you're going to be talking about mindset at ignite and why is this such an important topic to just start there. What does mindset in the mean to you. I love that. Yes yes while it's important because I have seen it. How impactful having the right mindset has been in my own life and certainly on my client's life and so many others so what does mindset I mean that it encompasses a lot so unlike the way I'm GonNa give you a little bit of an analogy and imagine imagine tomorrow morning waking up? You're getting out of bed and they're the foot of the bed. Is this beautiful goal deliberating boxed and inside the box is the most perfect mindset and when you use it you believe in yourself completely you're able to see obstacles as redirection and understand that Alia's air out you become stronger and grow. Oh and you're aware that Dow eighth year is there but you know you can overcome that because you're a bad ass in you know certain view that you're just so worthy league of your reign as gifts to share with the world so I started the Senate. Gorny analogies doesn't compass so much US US mindset is really about our thought. It's how and what we think and it influences every aspect of our life you know it. Wouldn't it be great. If we had a stocking cap like that that we could just put onto our head would lead our whole day right absolutely yeah yeah and it's you know I think the thing is we all know that our mindset is something especially as entrepreneurs that we have to work with on an ongoing only basis on a daily basis. This is so amazing over the course of the years that I've been doing extraordinary women radio. I've gotten to interview some of the most amazing women in the world doing the most amazing things and when I asked them about mindset they were like it's a it's an everyday practice. It's a journey an `social so that we're all kind of working on absolutely absolutely so listeners more about year. Let's in we'll come back back to more more about mindset but let's I want to hear more of your story. has there been a time in your life that just really a defining signing time or situation that just forever shaped your life something that change the path. You're on the journey. Were on. There's there's quite a few but I'll tell you candy. I started my career. Actually an education and I wasn't second third grade teacher. I keep me anymore sector teachers who have gone to the world launch your the CY. I met several women like that recently. It's funny yeah. I was just in a meeting at rise collaborative attend as well as you who became entrepreneurs. It might be something about that background. Absolutely absolutely it was something I wanted to be. Since I was a little girl I mean so I dove for several years I I was really good at it and he was so much passion I add around and so I moved into position and I became an instructional coach. Coach was teaching and training teachers so then the hesitation world between teaching in a as a coach for ten years and it was after that decade long journey when I started feeling drain and it just didn't bring me joy any longer which I imagine those you've met lately probably both the same way uh-huh absolutely absolutely I think as we get these little triggers that say something's supposed to shift and if we start to pay attention to it we we listen listen. We move we act on it or if we don't pay attention to very often what happens is that people is that the universe comes in and helps us gently move or not so gently only move in a different direction through yeah. Here's the generally or gently flush ourselves all in long story short. I'll share that I moved from education. I went to some several other jobs in positions in. I wasn't Louisville told them I was really struggling. I went into sales. I was county executive for awhile and over time. That was a whole dirtiness south of me. Shifting self-image imagine working by did become successful. I just didn't lay my soul on fire and try to all those things and I was struggling. If I might have purpose notifying what my passion wasn't who I was and I think during this sort of transitional period of the frustration and feeling stuck it became a really huge guests firmy. I opened me up a lot of waste of personal growth and development and reading bugs and attending seminars really learning mindsets and I think through that Change Might Aso's significantly and when I started becoming Herrera's Boehner Wall and hearing my authentic southeast has stock in the way that I wasn't navy others relay her same right like I should have the Dow team that my bank account wasn't where it supposed to hold on in that journey a mess like minded people. I ended up working on actually NBA Crocker's. Inner Circle was great phenomenal. He says that's cheap. General Roland human potential and success was a huge hat for me and I got so much to my radical results insulting business awesome awesome awesome was what was when. How did you decided to take the leap into starting your own business from that organization yeah. That's a great question. You ended as a leap. It takes courage. I it does take your so commute scary. Absolutely it was over time and it was it was under his behind the scenes. Hell Outta guidelines in it's essentially in so to be on my own antique took courage but just as you said earlier it was something that was tugging on my heart and no whisper of take this information and lock arms with rush and help them grow and learn and like if I didn't honestly I was I was playing small because my fear I had to. I knew new life the wings grow as I as I went nice and when you when you were in that space and so you had to you work on your mindset to to to work through the fear that was there the work through the uncertainty the doubt that can show up for us. How what what were some of the things oh you did to find that courage and to step into that. I did quite a bit of things I I ended. Adopt hindsight concede us a little bit more clearly ice. I made some some Rachel for myself. I think that was the biggest piece 'cause what can happen is fear continual kind of spiral you in all kinds of. I felt like the only way I can take control of this. I can create some rituals around my my day race starting small. What can I do in my data ensure. I started the day with intention to I was doing a lot of ice still do affirmations uh-huh visualizing. This is what I want and where I'm going. This is a daily practice that you do completely yeah yeah. I it a lot you know sometimes it's Sorta ball ends then but I read a lot of those pieces absolutely and what were some of the most important learnings that you check out Bob Proctor's doctors program to that you incorporate today asked how much a part of it were those rituals obey piece of in your attention. I learned so much from him about the conscious mind in a self conscious mind and how they were in won't get in to that too deeply. Don't know that we got time nine today. There's so much power and understanding our mind really works and the power of our Scott's me. Thank you understood how powerful your thoughts where you wouldn't have a negative one

DOW United States Alia Louisville Senate Bob Proctor Executive Nba Crocker Scott Roland Boehner Wall Herrera Rachel Ten Years
'The Goldfinch' paints dull picture from prize-winning book

Pop Culture Happy Hour

14:03 min | 1 year ago

'The Goldfinch' paints dull picture from prize-winning book

"Donna tarts 2013 book the Goldfinch won a Pulitzer Prize for its story of a boy whose mother dies in bombing. It is an epic tale of grief life abandonment friendship drugs and stolen painting of a Goldfinch now the Goldfinch has been adapted into a movie starring Ansel elgort Oaks vaguely Nicole Kidman Luke Wilson Jeffrey Right in Wolf Hart and Sarah Paulson. I'm Stephen Thompson this week on pop culture happy hour from NPR. You're talking the Gold Bitch of the movie movie and the book that spawned in here with me in the studio is very hardiman. Who was the books editor for Weekend Edition. Hello Bury. It is a pleasure to have you here. Also with us is writer Katie Presley Wrestling Hello Katy Hi there and also joining us writer Chris Clinic Hello Chris. I've seen Goldfinger a hundred times. I'm so excited to talk about so I'm not going to start with you and give you a couple of minutes to regroup start with Berry. You've read the book have and you've seen the movie. Would you think think well I will say that this movie suffers from something that I think often happens when you try to maybe be just slightly to faithful full to a in terms of literary adaptation the book which is a doorstop of a book and has so many places and plot points. If you reduce it down to its plot points it becomes a very and then this and then this and then this and then this and the movie to me felt very plop. PLOP PLOP PLOP plot plot. Here's a lovely actor plop. PLOP PLOP PLOP plot and in their ways in which you know as you read the list of actors in it and I heard Ansel elgort oaks vaguely. I thought well that sounds like a more interesting movie because it didn't it sort of lost some of its Dickensian deal of the book because it seems to me. Maybe you had a director who was so who wanted to be. He's just so faithful to the book that he he neglected to tell the real story of the book which I think you can do and lose truly like maybe half off of the plot. which in some ways is maybe how I felt about the book? I think Donna Tart is marvelous. I am a huge secret for history fan and this is a hard one to do. You're telling this story that spans a number of years and and that involves a lot of characters being played by multiple actors unless you are Nicole Kidman your role is is split between only do a roll if she can play a forty year span in a in a characters life exactly so so this is a sprawling story so to summarize a little bit of that plot boy named Theo he he is at a museum with his mom. The museum bombed his mother dies and feel winds up taking a painting from the museum and that painting has an impact on his life as the the movie follows him through his childhood and his young adulthood so there there is a lot there's a lot of character development to pack into this story and it sort of follows the the fate of this kid and of this painting Katie. Would you think a dark secret about me as a reader is I really am not generous wis.. It's morally questionable characters so I think in order like you're supposed to be in order to be an intelligent reader your supposed to appreciate morally A. and big. US or even morally repugnant characters because they're interesting. I can't stand them. I'm a nice person right like do do it in the streets apparently able in the sheets of a book. Yes the book. Write it on a bathroom. Okay life so what made the book interesting to me was that the central question of the book is a question of moral ambiguity like a boy away who is very recently concussed has just been in a has just been the victim of a terrorist attack plucks painting out of a museum because he thinks he's supposed post to because a dying man has told him to and then as he gets older he realizes what he's done and it becomes a dark web kind of closing in in on him what he's done and the sorts of people who want in on what he's done somehow the movie didn't capture that complexity to the character of Theo. I'm very judgy of unlikeable. Characters is the pithy way of saying it that is a fundamental part of who theo is is that the way that he processes the trauma of losing his mother and being in that explosion is by getting into some really shady stuff and I think the the elgort performance manages to lose that but also doesn't gain any charisma so felt like a very flat performance to me and not performance is central to you have to care about him if you're going to care about this story. He's the one that makes you believe that. The painting is magical. He's the one that makes you believe that the object of his affection is Helen of Troy like worth all affection and that his caretaker is as benevolent as he is. There's so much magic that the book has time came to expand upon through. Theo's is the movie didn't give you so. I came out feeling Gosh. That was awfully pretty gosh. I'm glad I read that Gorgeous Book Doc. Gosh why I'm hungry. It was long. That was the last thing hunger what you came out all right. How about you Chris Yeah. I didn't quite finish the novel before I saw the movie because it is a few pages shy of eight hundred pages so it is about three times the length of a typical novel so even a two and a half hour movie movie is a very hurried very condensed adaptation of this. I think I agree with with Katie's macro critique of how the you know. The movie tells the story and loses nearly all the subtext I sort I thought I would enjoy that more because Theo is the narrator of the novel and we get a little bit of voice over from him in the film but not very much not in his his head you know living with his perceptions the way you are for every word of this again eight hundred page book. I think this movie needed a director with a more a deft hand at combining time period. This is a you know a film and novel that jumps back and forth between our Neri narrators thirteen and when he's I dunno twenty eight or thirty or something Christopher Nolan is a director who does this this really well. Sorry I know always the person defending the Chris Nolan movie in this in this corner but he might have found a way to make it even longer that's not fair. That's got dunkirk but yeah but that thing that this film attempts were were were making the something that is chronologically prior to most of what we've seen gene feel like the emotional climax of the film that is the kind of card trick that he can pull off in this director John Crouch John Crowley who made Brooklyn which I which I like very much. That's a much much much simpler story. It's linear. I don't mean to diminish her or Sarandon's performance but I mean she's not morally conflicted in the way that that answer low Gorz that that Theo is in in this movie. I think that's a great a great adaptation this just I yeah it feels hammy plotting kind of workmanlike. I think it diminishes the book doc somewhat of the same reaction one thing that I kept thinking throughout this movie was why is this a movie and not and I don't mean like why is this a movie like why does is this exist. I'm not sitting there with my arms folded but I'm thinking why isn't this and this is this is gonNA sound counterintuitive. Why isn't this an eight hour series. Why isn't this I mean. This is Amazon Studios. They could have made this as a as a long form TV project and given the filmmakers time to dry out these characters a little a bit better. This is an epic story. This is seven hundred seventy three page book. This is a two and a half hour movie and the movie somehow feels both rushed and slow oh and that's a really tough combination because they're racing through all these plot machinations and I just kept sitting there and it felt longer than two and a half hours. I just kept sitting there thinking. I don't feel like I'm getting to know these characters. I can tell we're a long way from the ending and yet at the same time at weirdly weirdly doesn't feel like anything's happening even though they're so much plot I found the experience of watching the movie to be really frustrating as much as it. It is beautifully shot. I think there are some lovely performances and then I think it's very nicely cast think oaks vaguely as young was a non he was. Aso Oh he was also in Pete's Dragon. Which is I know I've heard the name oaks vaguely before I think he's terrific. I think fin wolf hard as the OS Ukrainian best friend and that he meets when he has been transported to the horrors of the outskirts of Las Vegas. He meets this. He meets this kid. Boris played by and Woolford who has really thick accent and I'm so used to seeing fin wolf heart in the movies or in stranger things but I thought that was a strangely lovely performance really affecting performance. I liked the child actors in this a little bit more than some of the grownup performances. There are all these little components of it that I like. It's shot by Roger Deacons. WHO's an amazing cinematographer awesome. I was kind of a standard with his credit came up at the end because this is not a movie that I mean it's mostly indoors it. You know it doesn't have the kind of big visas of movies like bladerunner when she finally went his Oscar for or you know sicario or the Coen brothers movies he's made but yeah I I was surprised because it just felt like TV for me and not you know not prestige. TV necessarily kind of well. I think wow I mean I do but I do think that's part of it as it did feel like it had the tone of like a like a big little lies tight type story and partly because it enter Cole Kidman but like it felt like it should be on TV. I think that's right because the book itself self is also incredibly episodic. You have and she does this. I mean this is a very secret history a little friend kind of thing to do where she is interested in the interplay of these different worlds of being in the busy the teaming space of New York and the upper east side and then being in this wasteland of Las Vegas and then being the places you go and her books and the way that like class and police and person rub up against each other is is very important and again every idea in this movie feels very unfinished. He obviously understood that thing about class that she's talking about. He understood the thing about you know first impression and art and an in how trauma plays but everything only gets a glancing blow and had it banned you know here is the episode with Boris in Amsterdam. Here is the episode bestowed with Boris and unless Vegas. I think you would have gotten a little more of that and you know what would have been really nice as you know because the book doesn't really have a doesn't land the plane really you're really just sort of circling over a philosophy rather than a a plot ending you would have given the viewer more time to develop it on their own so I I walked out feeling sort of confused and I didn't have that feeling of you know even though I did feel the book's ending is finished I i. I still felt that I'd had an experience of all these things. There was a lot to talk about. There was a lot to think about. I did not feel this here except there was a lot to love in the apartment. I do want to shoutout Oh. My God will be but also hoagies apartment beautiful. I liked all the apartments actually the glimpses you got of the Os the apartment art that deals with his mother and the barber's so the Barbara's are the wealthy family that I take. Theo in immediately after the explosion and e barber is he's a friend of the owes a classmate they were closer as young boys than they are now but they take him in and misses Barbara's played by Nicole Kidman. Who who I gotta say has never I'm not in a coal kidman person and so I think one of the places that this movie faltered for me is it she was like a black hole and the camera just rested on her face gazing at Theo thoughtfully and I was like this is wasted time is not an idea exactly and like that so much of how she actually acts through her cheek bones those are the antenna you know you're watching them for curry action and just like the little movements at the corner of her mouth and I don't Act Shoe Willie find that very interesting. I'm cheekbone person. I like a good cheek bone but it felt felt contractual. It felt like Ms Kidman requires no fewer than fifteen minutes of close up on cheek and the character both in I will say this. This is true in the book and the Movie Opens Up Santa Clara yes in her older age. She her family encounters major tragedy that that compounds the sympathy see that she was already forming for Theo but when we're talking about these weird drops into melodrama added melodrama that was not necessary because the story sorry could be dramatic if you let it breathe a little bit more so like too much time on Kidman. She did not work for me. I did actually like her at her oldest eight in the movie. I saw all of her performances written on top of each other. I saw in your wife like a close match of the way that Hart describes the character but you don't have to do it. Exactly the way tart describes the character you can cast someone else you go a different direction. You know you can still you. An adaptation is not a straight st translation right. I do want to say one thing because if people do not want to see this movie which I would certainly understand after this conversation I will say the book itself is one if those wonderfully meandering tales that actually benefits from the time you spend reading it you know you dip into it for a new episode and the writing eating is absolutely incandescent the descriptions of the furniture the look at Las Vegas the even the descriptions of some of the emotions like the tears ears that fall out of his face that are unconnected to I mean they're they're all of these moments in the book that really stick with you and I will say I do think it is absolutely worth whatever time time you put in to this book too so I agree. I just you

Theo Nicole Kidman Katie Presley Las Vegas Boris Donna Tart Director Wolf Hart Ansel Elgort Oaks Pulitzer Prize Nicole Kidman Luke Wilson Jeff NPR Goldfinger United States Writer Chris Nolan Berry Editor Stephen Thompson
Ansel Elgort on 'The Goldfinch'

Here & Now

05:42 min | 1 year ago

Ansel Elgort on 'The Goldfinch'

"Recently we had the chance to grab a few minutes with actors and sell l. gordon oakes vaguely when the two were at the toronto film festival promoting their new movie the goldfinch which opens tomorrow they play older and younger versions of theo and continued that mash as we spoke this is oaks and and this is oaks no no this is aso this is ansel is oaks it's understandable in the goldfinch bench we go back and forth through time the theo's blend the young theo goes with his mother to an art museum in new york there's a terrorist bombing she is killed he stumbles out stunned clutching painting of a goldfinch then he ricochets from the upper class home of a classmate to his deadbeat dads place in las vegas clash forward the adult view and elgort sells antiques though as we hear in the scene with a client played by denis o'hare maybe they're not antiques i i want to talk about the peace you've already sold me the athletic it is beautiful isn't yes except that it isn't is thomas athletic i mean the phoenix ornament ornament is i'm fairly certain about that but the rest of the chest is not the goldfinch directed by john crawley it's based on donna tarts beloved i love it and bestselling pulitzer prize winning novel i asked ansel elgort first about the pressure but i don't think there's any way we could live up to donna towards novel know every the sentence you hang on is i think i could read that book a hundred times and not guitar alex how about you when you were asked to play the young theo what did you know of it well my mother had had read the book previous and she was a huge huge fan still is a massive end she talked about the book in descriptive it was and how incredible was and so immediately i was interested in the project and wanted to be a part of it yeah i hadn't read the book and so i want to let listeners know oh that especially if you haven't read the book the twists and turns in the directions the film goes will be even more shocking to you but answer how would you describe theo broken i'm very self aware a actor man whose made many mistakes doesn't know how to take them back and end is on like an avalanche of lies and regrets but it just won't stop among the mistakes refer back to that masterpiece that theo takes from the museum the goldfinch which really exists in hangs in the hague it was painted by dutch artist carol pieters for breaches who himself off was killed in a gunpowder explosion but in the book and film theo takes the painting something is mentor hobie played by jeffrey wright finds unforgivable do you know that it was his last painting because he died explosion stupid accident and somehow miracle miracle it's it survives through centuries until you we hung event i didn't know what it was i then i don't even know why i kept it trotting oh he's just trying to keep it safe the cape and oaks how would you describe the young theo say he's broken he's i'm just trying to crawl his way back to normal life and the reminder the constant reminder of the painting being by his side is an incredibly a difficult thing to break that bond that he has with the painting is never severed so he is constantly trying to make sure he has us an understanding of not only where the painting but the painting itself at all times y- the stress of that i mean it's his rock his addiction it's his mother in both breath of you both the os are observers i'm any thoughts about that playing observers i think don atari such a great observer and she wrote this book in first person from theo's point of view so we sort of get a bit of donna in theo as an observer i think theo is incredibly he can be incredibly quiet when he wants to be in and he's constantly looking at everything and everyone and judging everyone on first sight which i think he ultimately might not be the best the quality of him but i think that's who he is the young theo oaks vaguely plays is in shock from living through that bombing and then being hall to the foreclosed does landscape of las vegas where his dad dies and he's left with dad's uncaring girlfriend the hotels only pal we have to get back to new york i can't stay here she'll put me in a home you understand that look i'm a minor i've got no family no friends out here have to go yeah you never really know where you're going to end up but i've definitely grown as a person and grown creatively a lot more of an observer after playing theo i would it's a as well how 'bout you i'm just excited to do more work i'm really excited to keep doing what i've been so lucky to be able to do with my life no kidding your careers continuing you're playing tony in west side story yes one of the most coveted roles i mean just how's that feeling it's awesome it is a blast it is crazy that i'm playing in a musical i love musicals musicals that's how i got into this also i'm enjoying every moment of it the gold finish finished ours ansel elgort and oaks vaguely villanovans invaders tomorrow

Theo L. Gordon Oakes Toronto
Samsung Galaxy Book S: Rise of the phone-like laptop

The 3:59

07:03 min | 1 year ago

Samsung Galaxy Book S: Rise of the phone-like laptop

"Today on the daily charge you got your laptop in my phone. You got phone and my laptop. We've got josh goldman here to talk decks docks and the samsung galaxy book as good morning and welcome to see daily charges monday august twelfth. I'm ben fox and with me. Today is josh goldman to talk laptops chops with with phone processors like the samsung galaxy book s now without further ado. Let's talk to the experts okay so it's p._c. It's a phone. Maybe it's both that's how you might describe a new group of devices coming out that look like laptops but have phone processors. Aso's built in the latest version is the galaxy book s which samsung revealed at it's not ten launch event last week okay so josh what's the value value of these kinds of devices and also. Is it a phone processor or is it just something from qualcomm that they're trying to work their way into more laptops and they started above. Where do you wanna start with. Let's start with the processor the process that's the big deal here. Is that <hes> qualcomm working on these processors to turn them <hes> into the p._c. Market now supposedly that was because <hes> you know smartphone market was slowing down so you know the next slower market the laptops i know so so for people that want to know more about these types of products like what are the big benefits fits of having these types of processors in them so the big benefit a longer battery life lighter weight <hes> laptops in general always on lt connection. That's pretty much. It was kind of like a phone sort of and it gets much better battery life like for instance. The galaxy book asked they were saying it was gonna be twenty three hours which sounds really impressive for a laptop right and there's an asterisk next to that of course <hes> it's twenty three hours of love video playback <hes> and it's usually when they run that test is usually local video playback so it's not even streaming so usually not when people use it for anyone right unless you're i mean i guess if you're downloading stuff from netflix or whatever to your device and then travel. I'm no longer are not. I mean that's the thing is that twenty. Three hours is great talking point but then you probably don't get me wrong. They the past ones we've <hes> <hes> reviewed with the snapdragon eight thirty five eight fifty had really good battery life like amazing battery life that you wouldn't expect from. I'm a laptop again though that performance isn't quite there so that's what i wanted to talk about so we already talked about the good. Let's talk about the bad the performance issues. It seems like every single one of these laptops have their kind of sluggish. Even if you're just like browsing the internet yes so again. It's kind of like trying to run a large phone or tablet off of a processor. Maybe not designed to do that and mainly it's not designed to run windows specifically so so it's i mean she wrote back. They designed it. These doing very well and he's not doing very well. <hes> mm-hmm so what was happening was these these battery lives are really great except it would take longer to do things so carnac okay balanced itself out. The other element that i want to throw in. There is also price. I was pretty surprised that the galaxy book ask was just like a dollar. All are under a thousand bucks which four kind of more like a slower processor. I might have expected a lower price range than that. Yeah i mean ah miniaturization always cost more so when you're getting something very thin. That's really light. I mean the thing weighs what two pounds and it was you. Tell me expert expert. I don't know i wrote about it. Last week. I hate who's around two pounds <hes> twenty three hour battery life so i mean i mean you've got something that is going to cost more okay because of the components and everything's new and it's only when stuff gets around around for a while the prices come down so and just to be clear also asterisk on the show we have not reviewed the specific laptop yet so that's their talking point for twenty three hours beginning to get a chance to look at this later by at this point i would like for instance. What are some of these like in this cohort. The word laptops have you out well. I reviewed the somewhat predecessors the galaxy book to which was a detachable so it was more more like a tablet with a detachable keyboard cover <hes> and that one was supposed to get over twenty hours of battery life as well <hes> that was running snapdragon eight fifty <hes> it got really good battery life <hes> into the teens but again you're you you pay the price <music> because it takes a little bit too weird hand off the best and heard about it was was that <hes> and with the past models to and presumably this one is that like your phone <hes> it'll jump back and forth between wi fi and if you're on a known wifi network and then and all of a sudden you leave that network and go to the coffee shop and you open it up. It's automatically switched to l. t. e. so you've got that mobile broadband connection instantly instantly and you're not sitting there waiting okay. I've got a switch over from wi fi. You can pop it open and start working and that's you know what they're what. Samsung is doing own with this one. You've got a laptop that super lightweight and long battery life. You don't really have to worry about too much. As long as you're in an area with a signal of some sort you should be able. We'll do start working immediately so i do want to jump to another topic so samsung also talked about dax which is kind of like you dock your phone an into your laptop onto. A screen. Is your expectation that like something like dax is gonna grow or they've been talking about it for a little while now and i don't really know oh. If it's got any sort of <hes> i dunno fan base. Maybe i'm wrong about that. I'm sure it's got fans. I don't know how many <hes> <hes> samsung certainly likes it. They keep working at it <hes> so that's kind of different than it's kind of what the complain complain has been about with like the ipad prose is like you've got this super powerful <hes> tablet. That isn't quite what you want from a p._c. Or a mac book or something you know <hes> no touch pad basically no touchback and then <hes> decks comes along and it's android based and then you can instantly switch

Samsung Josh Goldman Qualcomm Ben Fox WI Netflix DAX ASO MAC Twenty Three Hours Two Pounds Twenty Three Hour Twenty Hours Three Hours
Kim Kardashian, Paris Hilton And Aso discussed on Colleen and Bradley

Colleen and Bradley

01:32 min | 1 year ago

Kim Kardashian, Paris Hilton And Aso discussed on Colleen and Bradley

"For you Kim Kardashian was the object of a song by none other than Paris Hilton. You'll remember we reported on this recently. It was like a couple of weeks ago. What was about my best friends Budi? Yeah. But she didn't use the word Bodey. Yeah. Aso friday. Paris Hilton had a single with Dimitri Vegas and like Mike called BFA best friends. Okay. That song was released today. And now we can hear it. What you're going to hear though was the clean version. Oh, good. The bleeped version because I could only find a really nasty version. But our sound guru Rocco was able to secure a clean version of the radio and FA otherwise known as best friends. Okay. From Paris Hilton. And the reason I said this is about come crashing because we're best friends Kim credentials, but they'll be thinking about Kim kardashian's. But as you listen to when am I not, okay? On the body night. Take. Bad. Every past Brad. I can't looking best. Boys, boys. China. Past kim. Looking about this. Supposed to be her. But. But but

Kim Kardashian Paris Hilton ASO Dimitri Vegas Rocco Brad China Mike
These folks are serious about pecans

Financial Issues with Dan Celia

01:22 min | 1 year ago

These folks are serious about pecans

"Coming to that special time of year. My favorite comes at least. Candy and gifts as my family business. My parents started this thirty eight years ago and my husband, and I have now on the retail store for ten years. And we are a store I'm in a shipping company. That is all about the cons. So we grow the crimes the harvests pecans. We crack the con- shelf Macon's make pecan candies, and that's the context. Our services spectacular and our quality is the highest quality that you'll find we've never ever mixed on crop from linear to another. And you find the best party here. We also as specializing in educating our customers on varieties, I've forgotten. So there's so many people that do not know that there are thousands of varieties that so when you when you ship it ASO when you come into our store, we take pride in that. We are able to give you a sample of every different variety of pecan that we have in the pecan orchard and how they take a little bit different. We also make it our goal when an order comes into us if the customer wants it out that day we sit out that day. So we take great pride in our policy our service, and that's a family run business that we really take fighting.

Macon Thirty Eight Years Ten Years
"aso" Discussed on Giant Bombcast

Giant Bombcast

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"aso" Discussed on Giant Bombcast

"But for for leader. And I I was gonna say the music. Is super repetitive. Like, you know, you get another another world and plays it. But like, you know, going through those levels and having be the same song. Every later the same remember music, particularly. I don't either. I remember it being fun. Yeah. Yeah. What's next good vibes being vibes? What's next is the fourth force of horizon game the best forts horizon game. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. He's aged everything it kind of did like that stuff has much more meaningful impact than I was willing to take it face value when they were really buzzing about that like e-3 like I sat down in that demo in fucking bowels of the staple center, and the guy was lavishly describing how seasons we're gonna change everything, and you know, me being fucking jaded ASO's like, yeah. Whatever this spring water in your face. Not quite the dude seemed real into it. And then you know, playing it like does it completely rework how you play arising game. No. But it does add multiple layers of depth to that game that just was sorely absent out for few weeks. You guys probably actually definitively answer. This like does it change the driving that much likely? Yeah. There are the hand is the handling different. A week in the winter is happening. There are certain cars, I gravitate towards summer. Okay. That is more than I expected because there are so many cars in this game. And a lot of times the racing game. A lot of people. Do you find one that you like lot? I'm gonna put on my upgrades this. This is my car. I think the seasons do make use which around in a good way this cool sports car that I was driving around the spring. It's snowing out big truck that him upgrading, and it does make their honestly that is the best you could hope for exactly figured at worst..

ASO
"aso" Discussed on Security Now

Security Now

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"aso" Discussed on Security Now

"Now, the show we cover your security and privacy online with guru, the king of security, Mr. Steve Gibson. Hello, Steve Yolly. Oh, great to be with you on this November thirteenth the lucky. Second Tuesday of the month as I teased at the end of last week. Some news had just hit as we were going to podcast about the about two researchers at a university in benevolence who decided to take a look into the details of self encrypting SSD's, and you know, rather than just assuming because they encrypt that's all we need to worry about is like all the way in gripped. Oh perfect. They. Decided to take a peek under the covers and what they found is not one of the seven that they examined from crucial and from Samsun three were from crucial. The other four were sent for from Samsung, including the very popular eight forty EV. Oh in eight fifty EV. Oh SSD's. None of them were doing the job. Right. And in fact, it was possible without any information to determine to basically decrypt the drive consequently the title for this week's podcast is self decrypt. Ing drives boy. Well, the worst part of this is that in some cases ASO's relies on these drives encryption. Yes, we will have some takeaways for our listeners there is the the recommendation, well these. Guys, have just I was glad that there wasn't an overabundance of other news because I wanted to give this topic enough attention. What's interesting is that very much as with the vending machine problem? Anyone who has been listening with, you know, focus to this podcast for a few years would be able to state as we will how simple this problem is to correctly solve yet. Somehow. None of these drives solved correctly. They solved it incorrectly. So anyway, so there's lots of good takeaways from this, including what anyone using bit locker on one of these should probably do. But but these guys go even further so we'll get to that. We also have we're going to talk about last month's patch. Tuesday this month that is today is the second Tuesday of the month. So it's our patch. Tuesday for Nova. Member. We're also going to look at a GDP are inspired lawsuit filed by privacy international. Just quickly just to sort of put it on our radar in case it actually happens to develop into something. There's another new button net in town making the rounds and two ports that our listeners should just double check on. So that we'll talk about we've got another irresponsibly disclosed zero day this time in virtual box, but probably not a huge problem. But we're again taking a look at cloudflare has just released a very cool new app for IOS and Android that allows those mobile platforms to use their now kind increasingly popular one point one point one point..

Mr. Steve Gibson Steve Yolly Samsun Samsung ASO cloudflare Nova zero day
"aso" Discussed on Sports 600 ESPN

Sports 600 ESPN

02:36 min | 2 years ago

"aso" Discussed on Sports 600 ESPN

"Help breakdown of some of what happened this weekend dig into more. More of what becomes of levian bell. As trade talks start to heat up. Their Paul finebaum Pol. The Paul finebaum show on the SEC network. Going to join us at eight oh five tons to react you from college football this past weekend. Big wins in the SEC for a team like Kentucky over Mississippi State. But certainly the story going to be Alabama to tongue of Loa their continued dominance. They get a win over JIMBO Fisher this last weekend is Nick Sabin keeps a clean slate against his former assistant can anyone actually stopped the tide this season and will Paul find something negative to say about this Alabama team since Nick Sabin asked Nick Sabin ASO Paul's got free rein various see where he goes with. Joe Thomas ten time. Pro bowler future hall of Famer, which is the coolest way that we find anyone that comes on a show is just getting to blatantly say, you going to be in the hall of fame because we all know it Joe Thomas gonna come on and tell us what to expect. He was there on Thursday night. He saw the Cleveland Browns. First win in a couple of years in person. Covering Thursday night football interested. How many of those free bud lights? He got his hands on and what he thinks. Baker Mayfield got coming up this week is he's named the starter for the Cleveland Browns going forward and Michael Thomas saints wide receiver gonna join us at nine thirty A M putting together I feel like very quietly. I don't know if it's just because we've got such an established group of wide receivers. We talk about at the top. But Michael Thomas is working his way into that group when we named the top three or four receivers in the league, he's going to have to be in there because he's demanding that based on the level of production that we've seen in that drew Brees and drew Brees and that saints offense tend to kind of get put aside because we know it's such juggernaut. But we can't ignore what this guy is doing. And we will we'll have Monash show at nine thirty. We're not doing anything. So we won't ignore that. That'll be exciting. I do want to give a quick shout out. TRW tweets and driving into work listening to first and last after being evacuated for twelve days hashtag normalcy. Hurricane Florence aftermath. Do wanna wish? Well, everyone that is recovering from that going on down there. Obviously, a natural disaster. Like that is always scary seeing the the evacuation seeing some of the scenes from down there. We wish everyone. Well, we hope everyone is doing well down there, and we'll continue to try and through your whole party here on the show. So we all we can do we're sitting here. We got little Debbie in the hallway right now, we always told you we would announce when donuts are on the premises and shout out to young Deborah little Debbie, Debbie with the good hair providing this morning in a way that only she can we'll try and provide for you the.

Cleveland Browns Joe Thomas Nick Sabin ASO Paul Paul finebaum Pol Paul finebaum Michael Thomas SEC Nick Sabin football Debbie JIMBO Fisher Alabama Baker Mayfield TRW Hurricane Florence Brees Kentucky Mississippi State twelve days five tons
"aso" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"aso" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"The half and when it breaks I'm Michael Crozier live from the KFI twenty four hour newsroom lawsuits been filed against the American youth soccer organization ACO in connection with the former. Soccer coach in Lancaster convicted of sexually abusing four boys attorney Paul Mona's says a fifth boy was also abused by Renoir Valencia between two thousand and two thousand five be a purse of this lawsuit is to. Hold the ASO accountable for its negligence in not overseeing properly. It's a soccer coaches Lawsuit says the. Did nothing to stop Valenti's. Abused despite evidence it was happening Valente was sentenced in two thousand fourteen to one hundred thirty years to life in prison former President Barack Obama's been greeted with cheers and South Africa's he took the stage. For his first high profile speeches leaving office Abacha's there to honor what would have been the one hundredth birthday of South African revolutionary and President Nelson Mandela came to embody the universal aspirations of this process people. All around the world The. Hopes for a better life Obama called Mandela, one of history's true giants here people to, honor Mandela by respecting human rights Traffic from the helpful, socal Honda traffic center problems in commerce the cones are up in the south end. Senator seven ten freeway working from the five down to Atlantic three left lane coned off sunset quitting time. Here could be as late as five AM want for some slumming to the. Harry Griffith park that's a full freeway closure westbound side of the one thousand four to five all lanes, are shut down scheduled to go as, late, as five AM with the do in the meantime diverting everybody onto the five south locker Santa you. Have construction with. Definitely slowing, things down as well to ten east Lowell over lockers into avenue four right lanes. Shut down could go with late, is six in the morning and north of Stay out of the five of and highway cleanup after an accident and brushfire right lane in the, offramp remain shut down crews still unseen, watch, for a little gawkers block is move on.

Barack Obama Nelson Mandela Soccer Michael Crozier President South Africa KFI Renoir Valencia ASO Paul Mona Valenti Lancaster Abacha Valente Harry Griffith Senator attorney
"aso" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

04:33 min | 2 years ago

"aso" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"KNX ten seventy NewsRadio. Leslie sunshine on the way this afternoon after the clouds mix out this morning highs in the. Mid eighties down John upper seventies along the coast. Upper nineties for the valleys the inland empire mounts in the mid eighties triple digit heat for the desert's today a very slight chance of an isolated storm. Over the mountains and the desert's this afternoon a. Better chance to see the storms, firing, up tomorrow into Thursday for the higher Ovations that means we're turning up the humidity across the board in the next couple of days drier conditions still going to be very warm into the weekend with southern California's most accurate and. Dependable forecast I'm CBS to meteorologist Danielle Gersh can't extend seventy NewsRadio seventy eight in corona we've got, seventy five degrees and Fullerton seventy degrees downtown Los. Angeles at twelve seventeen American youth soccer organization is named in just filed lawsuits attorneys claim warning. Signs at a popular coach was a sexual predator, went ignored for many years live to. Now in the next ten seventies Craig fignar former soccer coach Renoir, Valenti currently serving one hundred thirty, years in prison for molesting fourteen, boys all soccer players with a way so this civil lawsuit that has, been filed alleges that SO knew that. Valenti had problems a traction two young boys from thousand nine hundred to two thousand seven, and that despite complaints of him having boys over to his home in India as Bedroom they did nothing purpose of. This lawsuit is to hold the ASO accountable for its negligence in not. Overseeing properly it's a soccer coaches. Specifically Mr. Renoir Valenti. Attorneys are suing for money damages on behalf of one. Victim who did not come forward in the criminal case now eight YSL is based here in. Torrance directly across the street from where they. Had this press conference announcing the lawsuit that went over asked them. If they had any comment. ASO said no live in Torrance Craig thicker KNX ten seventy NewsRadio twelve eighteen now on KNX Barry has been spotted in the neighborhood Whistler avenue in, Granada hills residents are being advised. To stay in their homes police units and animal control are headed to the scene to try and, handle the situation mentioning no names former President Barack Obama blasting, political leaders today who lie and he says lie again speaking during a major speech South. Africa to Mark the one hundredth, anniversary of, the birth of Nelson Mandela he told his audience that bowl Titians caught out in a lie used to own up. But says that now they have no shame in. Double down on the line instead strongman politics are ascendant suddenly whereby elections and some pretense of democracy are maintained the. Form of it but those in power seek to undermine every, institution or, norm that gives democracy means Mr Obama also spoke out against inequality and injustice in what. Was considered his first major speech today since leaving office twelve nineteen emergency crews responded to a, small plane crash near Lake Tahoe the plaster county sheriff's office has confirmed that at least one person has been killed. Two other people have been injured still unclear at this point. If there were any, other people on board the. Plane went down this. Morning south of, Truckee near the north star ski resort along state route to sixty seven the patrol says. The pilot reported engine trouble shortly after takeoff from the Truckee Tahoe airport authorities say two planes carrying more than two hundred. And fifty passengers at to make emergency landings at Kansas City international airport the first involved, a Delta Airlines flight from Detroit to Kansas the second emergency involved Alaskan airlines. LAX to Dulles no one was hurt in either case the president claims he misspoke on election meddling during. His joint news conference with Vladimir Putin yesterday we have team coverage on KNX the At twelve twenty CBS news special report remember when President Trump said this, yesterday about Russian meddling in the two thousand sixteen election Putin he just said it's not Russia I will say this. I don't see any reason why it would be today Mr.. Trump says he misspoke, and should have been obvious. I thought it would. Be obvious but, I would like to clarify just in case it wasn't an key sentence in my remarks. I said the word would instead of what The sentence should have been I don't see any. Reason why wouldn't why wouldn't be. Rushing the president now. Also says he fully supports the intelligence communities assessment that. Russia was responsible for the hacking critics are still blasting..

Mr. Renoir Valenti president soccer Barack Obama Trump ASO Vladimir Putin CBS Truckee Tahoe airport KNX Leslie sunshine Torrance Lake Tahoe Nelson Mandela John Russia California Kansas City international airp
"aso" Discussed on The Church of What's Happening Now

The Church of What's Happening Now

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"aso" Discussed on The Church of What's Happening Now

"I'm trying to like not smell the fort but also speak into the mic it's i don't i don't want to interrupt you disease since he's bringing it up can we talk about that when you salted me during the periscope that was still can't believe you did them joey salting you by foreign call me over for to do a technical thing there's left me there waiting for an totally thirty seconds to show up and he cupped it he cupped it and threw it and it was shocking thank you but that's the kind of relationship you to have when you can fart on each other him as well but that's real brotherly interaction to be able to fart and the way to sit there whereas whereas it i'm like tell me you know smell this bomb that it was only travel six inches the six inches from my aso's that club had point the right up is like a fucking like a magnet you know fucking no to this day it happened so fast you know a loaf you have any fucking idea how fast it happened okay like if you look at your calendar on your phone yeah memorial day may thirty first so i met that broad the sunday night at the comic as she spent the night and monday day i gave her her house we fooled around we got through a house a little bit i drove all the way to colorado this was monday by the foul monday she was already in colorado.

aso colorado six inches thirty seconds
"aso" Discussed on GSMC Baseball Podcast

GSMC Baseball Podcast

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"aso" Discussed on GSMC Baseball Podcast

"Yeah if i was a rangers fan aso's were boring me he no little boy kuzmin astros have the type of talent to get hot at the right time which doing which all right now yeah and not only that once they're pitching gets back on track you know classical and you got doug fister who's also performing well right now yeah i would be more as far as the rangers fan yeah they asked concern me what do you what do you think about the rangers though do you think they still are in the prime position here and they still are the best team in that division and having a great season but you think they can really keep it up that's another thing too is i don't have taking keep it up honestly you know they got these the rotation is decimated by injuries right now i'm not worried about the lineup they're real good production from hoofnagle door no mamas are who after he's done punching people he's actually playing baseball doing quite wolfer himself as you mentioned there asian bell trae defeating florida time there even though prince fill there hasn't performed well he's had quite to the struggles prince he's only adding to five he's got five home runs thirty six harvey is which is third on the team so that's not too bad but not really doing too well swinging the stick their tool five yeah and he's a he's not longer thirty run guy like used to be but he's still he's still doesn't they hit as a right now and all the prince fielder he still is always capable of only five home runs not doing quite well but he is always keep evolve hitting the long ball he's been such a great power hitter for for years what the brewers and the tigers so always capable for prince he's just.

aso doug fister rangers baseball harvey brewers tigers hoofnagle florida
"aso" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

The Adam Carolla Show

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"aso" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

"Right flow the flow you could lead by example it's sort of like that yeah well so like in la there's a freeway on ramp and there's no right turn on weekdays from eight am to five pm but you'll get behind somebody on a saturday and they'll be parked at the red light because they see the aero with the slash going through it in your home king atom i actually hung through people i'm a hero i home the guy in front of me who's not honking at that person and that aso goes boots what do you want me to do and i'm like honk at that person we're paying it forward right and i'm hoping the person the personal and the sign says because they can't read the fine print that says you can do it on a saturday out of the way mo mobile we have that we'll know we will no way in her how will you know that you can turn what we see the signs and that would be part of the map of the world one important bit of our technology is we go out and we map in great detail the roads including the signs and then that sign in the information on the sign becomes part of the car itself when we hit that intersection and we know what time of day it is we'll follow the rule for whatever that time of day so you'll go out and scan everything in loaded in even like like like a license plate frame that says when the vans iraq and don't bother knockin well that will they will they factor that in all the stationary objects only stationary okay.

aso
"aso" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

VIBES-LIVE

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"aso" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

"Thank you dan am on man then yeah the along governor dolan me sees of beta aso's genesis is that a game alsayaghy dispatced as geduld set yet judgment is but access beta matinee good level been las animas deceitful any angle is mood in this building your legal conceicao apparently embassy necessity go general din the guy that segel angle beadle program bodo in the us this sequined glove theo pinson love nothing.

bodo dan dolan segel
"aso" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"aso" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Thank you dan am on man then yeah the along governor dolan me sees of beta aso's genesis is that a game alsayaghy dispatced as geduld set yet judgment is but access beta matinee good level been las animas deceitful any angle is mood in this building your legal conceicao apparently embassy necessity go general din the guy that segel angle beadle program bodo in the us this sequined glove theo pinson love nothing.

bodo dan dolan segel
"aso" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

VIBES-LIVE

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"aso" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

"No nerves dan on fast man oh boy the along those doling me cities of bad aso's genesis is that all saguy dispatced us geduld set yet judgment this but asked his access dramatically admirable been las animas this book is the moon in this building joe conceicao apparently endless is thus a new day me that siegel the needle toga bodo in the afc and thus edwin igor theo pinson.

aso joe conceicao siegel edwin igor theo pinson
"aso" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"aso" Discussed on RobinLynne

"No nerves dan on fast man oh boy the along those doling me cities of bad aso's genesis is that all saguy dispatced us geduld set yet judgment this but asked his access dramatically admirable been las animas this book is the moon in this building joe conceicao apparently endless is thus a new day me that siegel the needle toga bodo in the afc and thus edwin igor theo pinson.

aso joe conceicao siegel edwin igor theo pinson
"aso" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"aso" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Investment in american recent use has been a company called vanguard which has come not quite from nowhere but sydney from obscurity to be a complete household name it's now this the largest mutual fund manager in the world and the second largest moneymanager behind a company called blackrock then god manages four point four trillion dollars so that's roughly new kittens about three times the uk's annual gdp and it's made his money really from being a pet what's called a passive investor doesn't try and beat the market of distrust matched market and it's ultra low cost much of the most of fund managers out their civic minutes thought them in a start did it like other people though is a bit worried about the had the full value of the of the us stockmarket ahead the dow jones index hit another record high yesterday so aso's chief executive bill mcnabb rithy he thought we were headed for a bit of a bubble in the stock market i don't think warren bubble territory but we think the valuations are very high we are quite worried about it companies have done a really good job managing through this period of more anaemic growth and we're used when a recovery but they have squeezed out profits pretty aggressively in you look at margins and so forth and they've been running at very high levels will very low interest rates are stock prices nothing more than discounted earnings back to lower the interest rate higher that values coyne to be so high valuations in a sense make a little bit more sense in a low interest rate environment that said in a world levels that we believe are very high from evaluation prospective around the world in the likely performance over what say the next decade is going to be less than longterm historical averages what do you do than if you confronted with a a markedly think is a highlyvalued deuce advise people put money in cash or anything drastic weather no because the expected return of equities is still significantly higher than the.

vanguard fund manager blackrock uk us dow jones index aso stock market interest rates stock prices sydney chief executive bill mcnabb coyne four trillion dollars
"aso" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"aso" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"We are the biggest entrepreneur destination on the planet welcome back business rockstars we are continuing our conversation with the dow this six non ceo and cofounder of print all now we were talking about how you partner with some big brands like shot the fi and that was another key things to your success when they came to scaling so first of all think back to how you even we're able to acquire partner like shop by the aso shop advised me commerce platform and we integrated about five months ought to relaunch back in two thousand thirteen they had a hundred thousand act to me i shops the shops using that and ship forward now for years they are public company they have hundred and seventy thousand active shop if i store on their path are and they have an open apps store similar like apple app store where they list all dential gracious they have and if somebody wants britain on the man would ride in tshirt it's our now they have separate cuts very called product sourcing they would find us through them why special there's people who come to our website this okay i wanna use their service but looks like any than ecommerce bassem than we suggest shop five or eleven other platforms them into greivous and it's it's you know by building that partnership we were able to refer cuss rushed to each other help each other brand and that really helped us grow definitely seems like a natural an obvious said but take me back to the beginning when you had to really make that clear that it was the natural an obvious that how did you develop that relationship we you know we started as an ap island just solve a lot of our customers choosing sharpest by they requested that britain any much in our sharpest spy was a fastgrowing platform and we you know by integrated was than we were able to jump on the bandwagon yeah and as you mentioned when we are talking earlier from latvia and there were some obstacles that you had to overcome at i like learning american culture different laws all that stuff so can you speak to that about what some of the main challenges were and how you overcame them the.

dow ceo partner app store ap island latvia aso apple britain five months