37 Burst results for "ART"

Fresh update on "art" discussed on KTOK Programming

KTOK Programming

00:27 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "art" discussed on KTOK Programming

"The festival, Indians I warned them about the being mistaken are getting a little hurry thinking the day of God was already upon us, he said. Chapter two second facilities to first three Let no man deceive you. By any means for that day shall not come. Except they're coming falling away first, and that man of sin be revealed the son of perdition who opposes and exalts himself above all that is called God or worshipped. So that he as though we were God sits in the Temple of God showing himself to be God. This kind of contempt. Is almost beyond imagination, but it shouldn't be. Because we see little hints of it all over the place in the performance of the wicked in our society. This almost goes on. Arise. Oh, God. Lift up your hand. Don't forget the afflicted. And when he uses this word Afflicted or poor or downtrodden. He is talking not so much about people who just fall below the poverty line of income. He is talking about people who have nothing. Who are poor by standards of the world. Why, he says, does the wicked scorn God He has said in his heart that God will not, you will not require. In other words, he doesn't think that God will ever judge it. You have seen it, though, for you. Behold, mischief and spite to requite it with your hand. The downtrodden commits himself unto you. You are the helper of the bereaved. Break the arm of the wicked and the evil man, seek out his wickedness until you find none. Now Some people look back at the psalms. And they say, Well, this is just not worthy of a Christian. They should not think that way. They should not pray that way. I will tell you a personal story. Once upon a time, I was very upset about the performance of one particular man. And I forget exactly how I did it. But I got into the verb Ege of this psalm actually prayed, break his arm. And then I couldn't pray that I realized I can't say that. I don't know this guy's heart. I can't go that direction. But what I was able to do was to pray that God would break the arm of the wicked and the evil man. That he would seek out his wickedness till there was none left to find by not naming the person. I set myself free to really get on God's side against the wickedness of man. We'll continue with this theme, but first grab a pencil on a piece of paper. I haven't offer for you that you won't want to Miss Ronald Art has done a complete reading of the songs, complete with commentary and music and is available in album form, Write or call and ask. Fear free introductory seeding tiled the songs There is no cost or obligation. Right to born to win post office box 560 White House, Texas 75791 or call toll free 1888. Bible 44 song continues. The Lord is King Forever and ever, the aliens are perished out of his land. Lord, you have heard the desire of the afflicted You will prepare their heart. You will cause your ear to hear to judge the lonely and the oppressed. So that the man of the Earth may no more press These oppressors air the thing that just great on the psalmist. And it's particularly the weak. The downtrodden are the ones they take advantage of. And why would you expect it to be otherwise? Why do you stand afar off? O Lord? He asks This song is a prayer cry out to God on behalf of oppressed people who are being taken advantage of by wicked men. You know Christians, even though they're sinners do not stand afar off when a disaster strikes. They can be found everywhere, offering food and clothing and shelter to the afflicted. I recall distinctly when hurricane in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina would it destroyed New Orleans and ran so many people out of that area? In our city of Tyler, Texas. There were five shelters for those people. Four of them were in churches in the fifth was served by a church. The food was provided by a church. Not by FEMA, not by the government. Like Christians. No. If we have that obligation when disaster strikes like this, why should we stand idly when the wicked are oppressing the poor and murdering the innocent? Why would we stand afar off when we don't stand too far off from when we can provide food and shelter? The very least we can do is offer this prayer. To call God's attention to the works of evil men. Why does God stand afar off? Well, maybe it's because Christians are not calling him to do something about the wicked. If we don't care, why should he? And I would not even dream of speaking for God or implying some motive on gods or some weakness on God's part far from it. But nevertheless, I think we have to ask the question. But, you know, then why would we not do something about these things? Is it because we have dismissed the idea of really evil? Modern man seems to justify the wicked. Alleging that he is that way because of something bad that happened to him. As though the fact that I suffered when I was younger or in another situation somehow justifies the evil that I'm doing today. And we think the wicked can be cured, so we're reluctant to pray against them. But this song does not require that we pray against an evil person by name. Only that we pray for God's judgment upon any man who would do these things and keep on doing them and not repent. We don't need to be letting ourselves get dragged into this idea that there is not really human evil in this world has to be dealt with and sometimes dealt with. Severely. There is it seems a war going on. Of which we may find ourselves unwilling participants. When Paul wrote his first letter to Timothy in Chapter one verse, 18. He said, this charge I commit to you, son, Timothy, according to the prophecies that went on before you That you might buy them wore a good warfare. Holding faith holding a good conscience, which some having put away concerning faith have made shipwreck. War. A good warfare. Surely that's just a metaphor. But, you know, Paul deliberately chooses a word in the Greek that has borrowed from a military campaign. He's talking about warfare. And then there is this in second Corinthians. Chapter 10 verse three. Though we live in the world, we do not wage war as the world does..

Temple Of God Texas Timothy Paul Afflicted Fema Hurricane Katrina Tyler Miss Ronald Art New Orleans White House
Washington DC's National Opera Offers Pop-Up Opera Truck to Bring Live Operatic Performances to the Community

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:46 sec | 17 hrs ago

Washington DC's National Opera Offers Pop-Up Opera Truck to Bring Live Operatic Performances to the Community

"Of the pandemic, the Washington national operators bringing sweet sounds, the audiences throughout the area with its pop up operas Washington National Opera Cape for its young artists are bringing their art to where people run their Saturday errands We sing without masks were far enough apart and we do not face each other. Everyone we're singing. Samuel Weiser is one of the live performers at the free concert stage from a repurposed truck called the Concert truck. It's designed and operated by Susan Wong and her partner, Nick Looby. We're just very happy to be continuing to give great music to people throughout D c. Maryland Virginia area, It's socially distanced pop up. Opera in Vienna, Virginia. Tick Uliano W. T Open. A lot of people seem to love HBO's for

Washington National Opera Cape Concert Truck Samuel Weiser Nick Looby Susan Wong Virginia Washington HBO Partner Vienna Maryland
Fresh update on "art" discussed on CBS Sports Radio

CBS Sports Radio

00:43 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "art" discussed on CBS Sports Radio

"Yes. And then even diet. I feel like you know, a nutrition is so important to feed the body and then obviously if you're living on the streets, so this incredible nonprofit is is here today to share the word on ways to help and different events that are coming up. So you are part of the Indy give which I'm very excited. We love to give back to give and learned everything about the community. Nonprofits involved. Tell us about your event coming up on Sunday, the eighth of December. I'm really excited about this. Healing out loud is our event this year, and we are inviting community. Members who have a little bit of talent to come with us. We're doing it in partnership with another Give organization, the Mill Elbow Art Theatre. So we will host an event on December 8th at 6:30 P.m. at the Mill Abo where individuals will share their talent. Maybe it's spoken word poetry. It might be singing. It could be a comedy skit or it could be something that's a little bit more soulful. But we are open mic night and at the event, anyone can participate. We just Ask them to contact homeward Pikes Peak to set up their performance. And, of course, we'll be asking for donations. That's the whole purpose of the into Give campaign and we're asking for contributions to help us fund the important case management services that we provide for people in recovery. Yes, So if there's no one that's listening right now, and they happened to know so when, with mental illness, possibly homeless and in addiction, what would someone due to go? To get a hold of you and go through the service is sure I think the best way to start is with the phone call to 7194735557 talked to one of our staff members to find out if we're the appropriate service for them, if not will direct you to the right place. We have a waiting list for housing programming because the need is so great, but we have many Pierre organizations in town. That we can help start the process of services and treatment so that they may begin to move forward in their life. And you're very active all year long. There was an event you did I want to say maybe it was early summer late spring dinner in the dark. Yes, that was a fabulous dinner event for us where we really got to showcase our mission in the community. We told stories of recovery and triumph and will be doing that event again next summer. Dinner in the dark. The concept is that some of our clients live under the stars, and that we want to help them get permanently housed. So dinner in the dark allowed us to have a little linked to The extreme circumstance and then talk about how we provide stability for individuals and families. Yes, and I had people contacted me. Is the dinner really in the dark? Well, it was under the tent and it was dim lighting, but we decided to God we did not go too edgy. We did not make people fumble around their table setting and looked for their food. But I thought about it because that sounded fun. It did its It sound pretty epic. To be honest cousin. People could really understand what it's like to have a mental illness because mental illness is not like a wounded, broken leg years. It doesn't mean you see, it's just in the head. It leads to depression and a lot of times you would never know. It could be the person to do next to you. The person you love the most, and their suffering and site well is so prevalent, you know, one in five Americans have a mental illness and nearly one in five Americans. Have a substance use disorder or a misuse of alcohol or drugs. So this is a really prevalent issue, and it really does create that sense of overwhelm and inability to move forward. So when we provide services and treatment, individuals were really helping them peel back the layers that have led them to leave. Ah, life in the darkness and and step in towards A future and really help them in their journey to become stable and really highly contribute to the community again. Wonderful. This is great news for a lot of families. I always joke about Thanksgiving. You know, you have Uncle Bob come over and Uncle Bob just out of control. It's not really funny. It's this's the kind of program that you know. Uncle Bob could really using, and those that are suffering in silence. So so excited to have you on homeward pp dot organise the website, but tell us about your collaboration within the given What these donations Going for? Yeah, We've been a part of the Indy Give campaign for over five years, I believe and butt into give dot com Forward slash homered, pikes peak dot org's We're in the home safe category. The funds that we use from the campaign will go towards our case Management services because we really believe that individuals who are overcoming these barriers needa hand they need a guide. Through the process. Our case managers provide individual treatment plans and really help them navigate these difficult systems of public benefits of how to find housing. Once they leave our programs and really prepare for the future, So case managers play a critical role in that very critical and it's good that we're learning this because I see a lot of times on social media people oppose. Hey, I'm about to be homeless and I have these struggling issues. And does anyone know where you could get helping everyone There's the comments are blank has no one Early knows, And it's great that we continue to get the word out. And that's also what Andy give does November December. I call it fast and various fundraising. That sure is, you know, year and giving is the time of year that most individuals look within themselves and figure out how can I contribute back to their community? So we're really pleased that the Indy give campaign has been a growing part of our community solution towards philanthropy. I can't help but be prideful that our community has into.

BOB Uncle Bob Mill Elbow Art Theatre Pikes Peak Mill Abo Pierre Andy
Art exhibit in Chadwick Boseman's hometown honors legacy

WBZ Afternoon News

00:23 sec | 18 hrs ago

Art exhibit in Chadwick Boseman's hometown honors legacy

"Boseman died two months ago from colon cancer. Millions of fans mourned, but maybe none. So deeply is the residence of his hometown of Anderson, South Carolina. Artists there have taken up their brushes to help themselves and others cope with the loss. They've created a new exhibit featuring more than a dozen local artist offering their interpretations of Chadwick. Bozeman's likeness. Among those artists is

Colon Cancer Bozeman South Carolina Chadwick Anderson Boseman
Pew Center for Arts & Heritage Announces Over $10.5 Million for Philadelphia Artists, Organizations

KYW 24 Hour News

01:20 min | 22 hrs ago

Pew Center for Arts & Heritage Announces Over $10.5 Million for Philadelphia Artists, Organizations

"A a pandemic pandemic hit, hit, but but one one of of Philadelphia's Philadelphia's largest largest philanthropic philanthropic organizations organizations is is investing investing millions millions of of dollars. dollars. The The local local artistic artistic efforts. efforts. Story Story from K Y W Skin glow over 41 Arts and cultural organizations in the region are receiving grants from the Pew Center for Arts and Heritage Executive Director Bullock Moran Cola awarded 29 Project grounds We have awarded 12 Artist Fellowships. The Total award is $10.5 million. And the money goes toward projects, performances and exhibitions. Programs will be designed for in person and digital experience, and Maren Cola says each project engages in a substantial social or cultural issue. One of the recipients of the Institute for Disabilities, a Temple university. Lisa Sana, born director of the institute's media, arts and culture, says a grant of $359,000 will be used to explore the pen, Hearst State School and Hospital which closed in 1987. We thought that there was room to tell the story of pen Hearst in a new way, and one that really centered On the voices of people of disabilities and their families of the people who were most directly impacted by the practice of institutionalization. Currently, pen Hirsch has been used as a haunted house attraction, an idea Sonneborn says that those in the disabled community find offensive. Kim Glovis

Pen Hearst Pew Center For Arts And Herita Philadelphia Bullock Moran Cola Maren Cola Hearst State School And Hospit Institute For Disabilities Executive Director Lisa Sana Kim Glovis Sonneborn Hirsch Director Temple University
Boston's Berklee appoints first woman to lead music college

WBZ Midday News

00:19 sec | 22 hrs ago

Boston's Berklee appoints first woman to lead music college

"College of Music names its first woman president, Erica Mule, will succeed Roger Brown in July. Brown is stepping down after 17 years. Mule is a composer and conductor who previously led the music and art school at the University of Southern California.

Erica Mule Roger Brown College Of Music University Of Southern Califor President Trump
AOC met more than 400,000 young potential voters on their own turf: Twitch

On the Media

05:01 min | 1 d ago

AOC met more than 400,000 young potential voters on their own turf: Twitch

"Holy cow On Tuesday this week, Congress person Alexandria Kaze O Cortez undertook a socially distant get out the vote effort through the streaming platform twitch. Her pitch opened the three hour plus event and closed it to first things first. If you are able to vote we are here I will vote dot com. Make sure that you make your voting plan and if you can't vote if you're under the age of 18 make sure you talk to someone that can vote and try toe direct them. Tie will vote dot com. And make sure that they get their voting plan in place. But 400,000 plus viewers hadn't pulled up posies first twitch stream to hear her pitch. They were mainly their toe. Watch her game. Oh, my God! Oh, my God. Oh, Mike, I knew it. The first term representatives first kill in the game among us, which has lately become popular among videogame streamers, some of whom joined her that evening. Rosie is that Is that weird to just call you AOC? No, Romeo. See Mike pence. OK, call me I Iove you guys. All right, though many have politicked on social media before. The old school playbook of the ground game and TV ads still dictate the 21st century campaign. But from the cove it era emerges a new playbook, according to the verge political reporter, mechanic Kelly and in that book Tuesdays Livestream marks a landmark event. McKenna. Welcome to the show. Hey, it's great to be here. So the stream was a massive success as Faras viewership goes, but it was also billed as a get out the vote effort. Do we know how successful that Wass At the peak point of the stream folks of the DNC were saying that they were getting the most referrals to the website? Two. I will vote dot com than they ever have. Do We know how money that Wass I was not able to get a specific figure. But during the vice presidential debate they bought fly will vote dot com And then when Taylor Swift Said that she was going to endorse Joe Biden they bought Taylor will vote dot com So there have been huge referrals to this link before and saying that the stream was bigger than say. That huge viral moment with the fly, and Taylor Swift, who is arguably one of the most famous celebrities in the world, says a lot Now, a lot of folks weren't going to sit through the entire thing. But there were moments that were clipped and put on Twitter or YouTube. Like when AOC talked about socialized medicine with H Bomber guy, you go to the doctor and you say I have this problem, and then they prescribe you medicine and then you just go pick it up. That's it. And then you go home. And you Google how much it would have cost in America. Oh, my God. Later he kills her. I'm actually a bit heartbroken, but, hey, life is cheap. Can you talk about that moment, so people and users on twitch our custom to diving in and out and jumping in the chat and chatting for a little bit and then maybe going watching on TV or some other video so unimportant part? Of the twitch culture is the clips function. And when people do catch something interesting those clips in those conversations Khun Go viral and reach even bigger audiences on Twitter on Facebook on YouTube than they ever could on twitch because which of course, is live. But these clips will last forever. Now. Polygon Senior Editor Patricia Hernandez wrote this week that it wasn't just about organizing and savvy. This was fandom. Those hundreds of thousands of viewers included thousands of stands, referring in this case to the AOC diehards. For people who you know, aren't as hep to the jive as I am. Stan is a term that's drawn from the title of an Eminem song. Right, Right. My girlfriend jealous because I've talked about 24 7, but you don't know him like I know you slim. No one does. You don't know what it was, like people like us growing up for me, man. I'll be the biggest fan. You'll ever lose yours, then. Yes, we could be together. When it comes Tio stand culture with pop culture and movies and television. Oftentimes people will draw fan art of their favor. Characters and people were doing that for a OSI in 2018, and she was re posting that fan art on her instagram page. So she has been building this community of people for a very, very long time. And that's why Tuesday's stream was so successful she already had this base. There are already people who stand each bomber guy. There are already people who stand Tucson piker and poking Manet and the other folks who are on there. There was just a bunch of communities colliding in a really interesting way. And then, of course,

AOC Mike Pence Taylor Swift Twitter Youtube Wass First Things First Congress Romeo Google Mckenna Rosie Tucson Reporter Stan Khun Go Joe Biden DNC
Houston police officer's body escorted to funeral home

This Morning with Gordon Deal

00:33 sec | 1 d ago

Houston police officer's body escorted to funeral home

"A police escort accompanied Harold Preston's body from the medical examiner's office to the Lockwood funeral home Chief Art Art surveyed Azevedo Let me start that over again, Chief Art Azevedo says. It's time for HPD to pause reflect and mourn this officer. I can tell you that How the outpouring of love that we've received from people of Houston. It's touching our officers Heart. Preston, a 41 year old HPD veteran, was shot and killed this week by an illegal alien during a domestic violence call.

Chief Art Azevedo Harold Preston Lockwood Funeral Officer Houston
Where do words comes from? Find out in Washington, DC’s newly opened Planet Word museum

Consider This from NPR

03:10 min | 2 d ago

Where do words comes from? Find out in Washington, DC’s newly opened Planet Word museum

"The. Much anticipated planet word. Open today in. DC. Yes. Yes. Back in twenty seventeen DC mayor Muriel Bowser, and a team of advisers picks philanthropist and Friedman to restore the historic Franklin school building a gorgeous building. By the way, millions of dollars have gone into restoring the national historic landmark much of it. Friedman's own money to create a place where people can explore are evolving language. Now, that restoration didn't happen without a couple of shall we call them hiccups along the way city officials halted construction for quite some time after discovering. That the project's developer violated DC's strict historic preservation rules but all of that is wrapped up now in the museum is officially open to the public WMU senior editor gay. Bullard got an early look at the museum and he's here to take us on a little tour as you turn off K.. Street and walk into the courtyard of planet word you're showered in language. There's an art exhibit in which Willow Tree made of speakers plays a mix of languages from around the world. Inside the historic Franklin school building has been given a thirty five, million dollar restoration the preserved stare tiling wainscoting and a few other flourishes Nantou the building century and a half of life. But the displays are exceedingly high tech I up a twenty foot high wall of carved words brought to life through powerful projectors and narration. The tells the history of the English language. The exhibit invites you to say a word from the wall like smog or sport to get a quick etymology lessons on. Board. Shorts. Burns over. In the next room, a giant globe of lights is surrounded by screens each with a friendly face of person who will teach you about their spoken or signed language. I tapped on Venezuela and got to try a regional tongue twister. And? Eric Kahn. Areas Cigar. A Nice in the gallery on humor, you can play word games or help and artificial intelligence right captions for new. Yorker. Cartoons according to my analysis. This caption about cannibalism mine database says that cannibalism is usually very serious, but sometimes, it can be funny to take something serious and pretend it is not serious. This is called dark humor in the library. Visitors can grab a book from the Shelf, set it on a table and be treated to an animation and narration explaining something about the text the technology can be dazzling but museum founder and Friedman says, it's in service of a larger purpose to reinvigorate excitement for literacy maybe with technology and with sort of the wow factor, we could make books and words and language sort of. Them and. With their imaginations captured visitors will think more about language for now the museum is working on virtual events for those who can't make an in person for those who can plan at word is open four free but you'll need to preregister for a time to get in admission is limited to twenty five people per hour.

Friedman Franklin School Building DC Muriel Bowser Bullard WMU Willow Tree Eric Kahn Venezuela Founder Senior Editor Developer
Jacob Lawrence painting missing for 60 years rediscovered in New York apartment

Midday News

00:30 sec | 2 d ago

Jacob Lawrence painting missing for 60 years rediscovered in New York apartment

"By artist Jacob Lawrence has turned up in an Upper West Side apartment. The painting had been missing for 60 years now on display at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Museum says a visitor was touring Lawrence's exhibition realize some of the artwork on display resembled a piece inside her neighbor's apartment. The exhibit wraps up at the Met on November. 1st, The owner of the missing panel, has agreed to loan the artwork for the rest of the tour, which is expected to end In December of 2021 12 18

Jacob Lawrence Metropolitan Museum Of Art
Building an Email Newsletter Directly from Instagram with Steph Compton

GradBlogger

06:00 min | 3 d ago

Building an Email Newsletter Directly from Instagram with Steph Compton

"Welcome to episode number eighty one of the grab blogger podcast the song for helping academics change the world through online business helping you by give me the tools and tips to strategies. You need to build online business write a research experience around your background and your expertise and around change you want to make in the world owes. Dr. Chris cloning and Days episode were talking about building an email newsletter directly from Instagram and we're doing that with Steph Compton from Steph access on Instagram & Stef's, I access them on Twitter and we don't have a website to give at the moment which will actually be talked about in this podcast episode. So Steph, I want to say thank you for coming on the ground blogger podcast and sharing your your experience today. Yeah. I'm heading me. I'm excited to be here. I'm really excited to have you on niba from notes by niba who we had on episode 69 and 70 of the podcast recommended. I reach out to you just gave me your Instagram wage. So I went there got a link Tree on your profile I clicked on it first link is bold letters new and improved get my Weekly Newsletter plus Q&A. It's like well, okay that's forward and off. I love it. But then try clicking through the other links and there was no website cuz I want to learn more about you and what you do and then I was so intrigued that you had the newsletter and this Instagram following but website that I I had to sign up for your newsletter that point I got to figure out what's going on here and I was pretty pleasantly surprised me on the news later. It's a really well-written. You're very open with what you're dead. You're very helpful. You take Q&A in the newsletter, which is well let you describe the newsletter more detail, but there's a lot of cool things in there that I just was impressed about and thought that others could Implement a in their newsletter strategies, but may be I need to get you on to figure out what's going on with this no website and how do you start building newsletter without a website because we work with people all the time that you know have a website but aren't willing to start birth. Their newsletter it was I just intrigued by this whole setup. So I said I got to get stuff on the podcast. I appreciate you coming on. Yeah. Yeah, so in this episode and this is actually a two-part episode. If you're in Chicago and how to use Instagram the next episode next week's will have tips and strategies on how step uses Instagram to build a following there in this episode over and talk more about steps of background how she took Instagram a server newsletter has she monetized reference online and we'll follow up on what's the deal with this this website and can we see one coming in the future? So as always you can download tracks this episode at gravatar.com / 81 and just when you download that you can control that you can find what we're talking about here and then use that to implement your own business as well. So stuff just jump in I guess. Can you share some of your academic background to some of your your story how you got online? Yeah. Sure. So hello everyone. I am Steph so I'm actually a third-year PhD student wage. Virginia Tech currently I am in the department of human nutrition foods and exercise and I study a varying cancer metabolism so very much a basic background, but I got my start at a very small arts college called Emory and Henry College. That's where I did my bachelor's degree and got that in biology and then it came to Virginia Tech actually for my Master's and kind of switch lanes. So I actually did my Master's in community nutrition and dietetics. So I did a lot of like all across the research spectrum of doing like this basic plant genetic science and my undergrad moved into my Master's Degree, which was very much community-based and learning like dietetics and applications and and standards of care within Healthcare and then I kind of combined my two loves of both nutrition with Biology to pursue my PhD at Virginia Tech as well in the same department, but I switched gears to go more like cellular molecular track. So right now like I said, I'm a third-year PhD student. Hopefully we'll be doing my my name. Asian proposal pretty soon. So I'll actually be a PhD candidate hopefully within the next few months, but I'm also got an Instagram about almost two years ago. It'll be two years in December, I believe so I actually got on Instagram at the at the suggestion of science Sam which I'm sure some listeners may be familiar with science Sam is an amazing science communicator and Neuroscience. She's been doing a lot of information about covid-19 Ali and she's been a really great support system in a really great person to follow and kind of look up to and then the science communication community. So I had actually been talking to her for my personal account that I have and talking about like science communication and accessibility as well. So we're accessibility ties into my story is when I came to Virginia Tech. I actually I worked as a braille transcriber and a tactile Graphics designer and the accessible Technologies office at Virginia Tech. So what when I originally started my account, it was a combination of doing science computer. Station but also teaching people how to make their information more accessible. So I kind of started in that area and eventually kind of brought in more of my nutrition background as well. So actually educating people about nutrition in the science of nutrition because that's really where my expertise lies and then also at the same time talking to people like Health Care Providers and other science communicators and other people who use Instagram to Market and like get themselves out there and educate on how they can make their communication more accessible So within that as well, I also teach a class called Health counseling is currently averaging a text. So I kind of bring all of my different experiences and I have the nutrition that I'm actually doing I had the science and I'm doing every day in the lab. I have the accessibility that I've worked in before as well as my life experience being an educator in the classroom and online and my my account has really expanded throughout all of those different things. I always joke on my account that I'm super multi passionate and it's because I had These different areas. I really want to come together in my account. And so that's that's really how I started and where I've gone from there in the two years. I've had my account

Instagram Virginia Tech Steph Compton Twitter Dr. Chris Cloning Health Care Providers Chicago SAM ALI Henry College Emory
Hundreds of parents separated from kids at the border remain "unreachable"

All Things Considered

04:50 min | 3 d ago

Hundreds of parents separated from kids at the border remain "unreachable"

"Since the Trump Administration ended its policy of separating migrant families at the U. S Mexico border and Still, hundreds of Children are separated from their parents. As part of a lawsuit over the policy lawyers and non governmental groups were assigned to reunite parents with their Children. And now we learn that in 545 cases, parents have not been located or reached yet. That's according to a court filing made yesterday. By the way you and the U. S. Justice Department. Earlier. I spoke with legal arts, the lead lawyer on this case for the value and I asked him to tell us what's known about these Children, so they're very young, many under five many, many under 10. We believe the Children are in the United States, either with foster families or relatives, sometimes distant relatives where they've never met. The parents are overwhelmingly In Central America, having been deported without their Children, and I think what what's important to understand is why we still haven't found all these families. First of all this is a second batch of Children with the government hid from us it from us in the court. The government originally told us about 2800 families. We in the court assumed that that was the extent of the separations Onley later in the winter of 2019 because of HHS investigative report, Did we find out their mayor in many, many more kids separated at the very beginning of the Trump administration. I just want to be clear. You're saying the government hid them from you. Initially, the government denied that this program existed after it became public after the national outcry after the involvement of the courts. You're saying the government still didn't totally come clean at that point. Exactly. The government never told us about this additional group of Children that were separated on Lee because of an HHS internal report that we learn about them. Ultimately, Thie court ordered them to give us the list of the families on a rolling basis within six months. So we got started looking for these families very, very late in the process because the government and hit all the families We then started looking for them. But the contact information the government gave us was largely stale because the family has been separated so early in the Trump administration's tenure. And then what happened was we had to go on the ground and look for the families in Central America literally town to town, the pandemic kid and that largely had to be halted for for months, so the combination of the government hiding the families from the court even after the court outlawed the policy. And then having a search for them town to town in Central America, and the pandemic has meant that there are hundreds and hundreds of families we still haven't found yet, a White House spokesman today told reporters. We've contacted these families and the sad truth is that many of them have declined to accept their Children back. There may be a variety of reasons for that, but it's very sad. The administration wants the families to be reunited. For various reasons. The family's just have not accepted the Children back in many of these cases. What's your response? Is that true? That is highly unfortunate that the administration is trying to shift the owners on to these families. These families are making an agonizing decision not to bring their Children back to Central America wasn't a danger to the administration wanted to do what's right. They would bring these errands back to the US after having them put through such horrors. They should never have been separated in the first place. And unfortunately, even the parents and Children were in the U. S and have been reunited. The Trump Administration is still trying to deport them, rather than giving them some status. You'd think after committing this kind of Unbearable practice of separating little babies. The administration would turn around and do what's right and give these families some status. Could you imagine a scenario where some of these Children may never be reunited with their parents, where you may never find some of thes mothers and fathers whose Children are in the U. S right now. You know if I'm being honest, I have to entertain that possibility. But the truth is, I try not to let that creep into my thinking because I think we have to remain optimistic and what we've told Accord. Is that we will not stop looking until we found every one of these families. This has been the most outrageous practice I've seen in my nearly 30 years doing this work, but for us to stop now would not continue looking for the families. Would just be horrific and the government has washed their hands of this. You know, I I wish I could say there was some choice but I don't think there is we just have to keep looking. It's legal aren't of the girl you who is leading the group's litigation over the Trump administration's former policy of family separation. Thank you for speaking with us. Thank you.

Trump Administration Government Central America HHS United States U. S Mexico U. S. Justice Department Accord LEE White House
Parents of 545 children separated at U.S. border can't be found

All Things Considered

02:45 min | 3 d ago

Parents of 545 children separated at U.S. border can't be found

"I'm Ari Shapiro in Washington. It's been two years since the Trump administration ended its policy of separating migrant families that the U. S Mexico border. And still, hundreds of Children are separated from their parents. As part of a lawsuit over the policy lawyers and non governmental groups were assigned to reunite parents with their Children. And now we learn that in 545 cases, parents have not been located or reached yet. That's according to a court filing made yesterday by the EU and the U. S. Justice Department. Earlier. I spoke with legal arts, the lead lawyer on this case for the value and I asked him to tell us what's known about these Children, so they're very young, many under five many, many under 10. We believe the Children are in the United States, either with foster families or relatives, sometimes distant relatives where they've never met. The parents are overwhelmingly In Central America, having been deported without their Children, and I think what what's important to understand is why we still haven't found all these families. First of all this is a second batch of Children with the government hid from us it from us and the court. The government originally told us about 2800 families. We in the court assumed that that was the extent of the separations Onley later in the winter of 2019 because of HHS investigative report, Did we find out their mayor in many, many more kids separated at the very beginning of the Trump administration. I just want to be clear. You're saying the government hid them from you. Initially, the government denied that this program existed after it became public after the national outcry after the involvement of the courts. You're saying the government still didn't totally come clean at that point, exactly. The government never told us about this additional group. Of Children that were separated on Lee because of an HHS internal report that we learn about them. Ultimately, the court ordered them to give us the list of the families on a rolling basis within six months. So we got started looking for these families very, very late in the process because the government and hit all the families We then started looking for them. But the contact information the government gave us was largely stale because the family's been separated so early in the Trump administration's tenure. And then what happened was we had to go on the ground and look for the families in Central America, literally town to town Pandemic kid and that largely had to be halted for For months. So the combination of the government hiding the families from the court even after the court outlawed the policy and then having a search for them town to town in Central America and the pandemic has meant that there are hundreds and hundreds of

Government Trump Administration Central America HHS Ari Shapiro United States U. S Mexico EU Washington LEE U. S. Justice Department
Dept. of Justice Accuses Google of Illegally Protecting Monopoly

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

04:43 min | 4 d ago

Dept. of Justice Accuses Google of Illegally Protecting Monopoly

"We we turn turn today today to to title title fifteen fifteen of of the the United United States States code code section section two, two, which which reads reads in in relevant relevant part part every every person person who who shall shall monopolize or attempt to monopolize any part of the trade or commerce among the several states shall be deemed of a felony and unconvicted thereof shall be punished by fine not exceeding one hundred, million dollars if a corporation. So, if you don't know now, you know the corporation and question of course, is Google which found itself on the receiving end of an antitrust lawsuit today filed by the Department of Justice and eleven state of general. So as we do when technology leads the news we've gotten molly would the host marketplace tech on the phone to make a smart? Hey, molly. AK So So many questions number one is who's been around for a long time. It's been John Norma's for longtime dominant for a very long time what took so long for this to happen. Yeah, well, it's really interesting because, and in fact, the Department of Justice notes this in their filing. There is legally a difference between being really really really big and really dominant as you know and between maintaining that dominance in a way that crosses over into illegality, and so it takes a while to make that case basically that maintaining the dominance is the illegal part whereas it's fine to just be gigantic route What's The counterargument? What's Guna say? We're we're just doing our businessmen nobody here, but US chickens. I mean, yes Google counter argument is that this is a flawed lawsuit and that there are plenty of options out there for search their official blog post rebutting the filing of this lawsuit included a lot of gifts in which people use being Microsoft's having. So if you know anybody who does definitely, let me know I want to talk to them. And then they counterargument to kind of the lawsuit itself which a lot of pundits said. N Even. Legal Scholars people who worked on for example, Microsoft case in the nineties said you know this? This case could have been bigger. There were suggestions that it was being rushed even over the objection of some career lawyers and state attorneys general in order to get out before the election. And the scope of it is very limited to search the counter to all of that. Of course, as you gotta start somewhere and these cases are a big deal right an and searches is kind of the low hanging fruit. Let me just back up a minute to that to that bing thing you are, and we've talked about this on making me smarter our podcast, your devoted user of Duct Dot Gov for its privacy implications. Of course, it's more protective than usual, but also the point being. How many really good options are there if you want comprehensive search, it's got to be Google right because they've got all the data and everything. Well, there are a couple arguments around that. One is that people perceive ruled have better search results because it's filter bubble because who knows a lot about you? So it will say Oh if you the example, actually that lawyer I talked to today gave was that maybe there's a plumber in your area and a lot of people have used that plumber before and so they'll search they'll service give you that search option I. But in fact, you might not want that you might want somebody who's better vetted or something along those lines. The Art. The core of the argument that the Department of Justice is making here is that Google has paid a ton and a ton of money to device makers, including apple and using its own android platform to make sure that Google is the default so that every time I, for example, want to use duck duck. Oh, in a browser or on my apple device I have to. Find the setting that lets me change that default and most people don't write and let the whole thing was what got Microsoft in trouble right with back low these many years ago. The last time we had an antitrust thing was they were put s right, right? Yeah. This lawsuit impact is very, very similar to the Microsoft case someone on twitter referred to it as almost a cut paste. Well you know they can. They can do that at the Justice Department. We got a half a minute tops what now happens inside Google. They fight this thing because I imagine even though they can afford a lot of lawyers it's going to suck the life out of them. It's a big deal. It's a really big deal even if you quibble about the scope and whether they should have included advertising and data, the fact is that these cases have major impacts at it set Microsoft. Back a decade of innovation. It's at IBM back a decade back in starting nineteen, sixty, nine at and T.. So Google spends a lot of money a lot of time and is very, very distracted trying to fight this thing. Molly would the host of marketplace tech thanks. Thanks.

Google Microsoft Department Of Justice United States Molly Justice Department Bing Apple John Norma IBM Official Twitter
HPD Chief: 2 police officers shot in southwest Houston

Larry O'Connor

00:41 sec | 4 d ago

HPD Chief: 2 police officers shot in southwest Houston

"In an apartment complex in southwest Houston today. One of them fatally Houston police chief Art Azevedo saying the three officers were called to the complex to assist a woman to move out of her husband's apartment. After two of the officers were struck by gunfire. The SWAT team was called in about 26 A. M. The suspect looked out the window saw the heavy police presence. By that time Swatch around Thea apartment had well contain had taken over from patrol. And he came out and surrender the couple's 14 year olds. Dunn was also shot at the scene transported to a local Children's hospital. The motive behind the shooting is under investigation. The family of slain

Houston Art Azevedo Dunn
Equity Shot: The DoJ, Google, and the suit could mean for startups

Equity

06:09 min | 4 d ago

Equity Shot: The DoJ, Google, and the suit could mean for startups

"Hello and welcome to an equity shot. My name is Alex Wilhelm. I Have Danny Crichton on the phone Danny, how are you? I'm doing. All right. Alex how are you today? Better than Google who has been sued by the DOJ and eleven state aid over anticompetitive behaviour. Now, Danny we have known for a long time that this was coming. It was pre sage tr- think rather heavily I had a chance to dig into the actual filing. I have many many opinions but just going to set the ground people are tuning in and unsure of why we've reached this moment why Google and why? Now why did take me a little bit of time to find the filing I using bang and after I gave up and Use Google which may be part of the problem but let let's let's boil it down. Obviously big tech has gotten really really large over the last decade there's been increasing concerns about all the big tech companies everything from facebook to apple, Google and onwards and onwards. What are the angles that the government is trying to take on unto regulating these companies is around antitrust. In the United States the major antitrust act is the Sherman. act. That Jay filed under this morning under section two it's specifically focused on search and particularly search advertising and so. One of the things on the conference call with journalists. This morning that the wd was talking about is obviously there's a lot of concerns about social media bias. There's a lot of concerns Abou- Anti competitive practices around android and chrome, and a bunch of other issues all around tech. This lawsuit from you Jay is only focused on searching particularly search advertising and the reason. That sort of comes out of some of theories out of Yale and some other law schools which are focused on Google's consolidation of the ad market over the the arts and teen to its acquisition of Doubleclick and a bunch of other at tech companies over the years. So they've launches lawsuit they have eleven Geez all those agencies were gop, agee's and it's filed this morning. To point out that this is all about focused on search search access in some way more than I expected the circular benefits that Google gets scale as google has more data coming into view usage you can improve its products and therefore it's better than everyone else, and so the is how does Google maintain all of this market share and my read of of of the lawsuits some of the points are pretty good. Some were bad. So I think that there's a key paragraph that I went to bring us everyone listening. That I pulled out from the filing. This is from deeper into it. So if you go just meet the I won't see it but it's a good summation. So if you'll excuse my terrible reading voice here, we here's a DOJ's opinion about all the stuff google has unlawfully maintained its monopoly by implementing force in a series of exclusionary agreements with distributors or at least the last decade particularly when taken together Google exclusionary agreements have denied rivals rivals access to the most important distribution channels. In fact, Google exclusionary conduct cover almost sixty percent. Of US search queries be things like it's android device agreements. I'd add almost half of the remains are funneled through properties owned and operated directly by Google. So essentially, this boils down to Google has used commercial relationships to essentially force other companies specifically device manufacturers to pre install google software and give Google search preeminence. Google then gives manufactures often cut revenue back to make it look like a transaction but in reality if you want to run ANDROID, you have to use Google on your phone or you can't get access to anything. That you need, and then therefore you become a partner and the consumer gets Google kind of pre installed and pre defaulted. It might my issue at this is a pre default or a preset default is not a death sentence and this DOJ filing kind of treats a preset default, the end of the conversation for that consumer. So if consumers were just more active in picking what they wanted us, there won't be much of an issue here. So I'm curious about your view on their relative strengths of the different arguments as you've rhythm. To me the with nuts here is to think back to use v Microsoft you know what? Two decades ago in one was a landmark trust case particularly in tech but even just generally, it was focus on defaults of browsers within explorer explorer on windows and twenty years for we're still talking about default search engines that are browsers but through browsers, it's not even about the browser. Today. But basically, what search engine is in the bar up I, think that this is an interesting angle. Again, I think the advertising pieces much more critical. The advertising market Google is very dominant and it's network effects is very, very strong and network only exists because Google owns a frivolous vertically integrated sort of add operation right now and can really join in any part of the tier. Tracking the can't do analytics because Google owns a whole stack and so to me that has always been the strongest part the the browsers are tricky, right so so Google does pay apple for instance, billions of dollars to be in safari and particularly mobile safari. It pays Mozilla hundreds of millions of dollars of not billions of dollars to be the default search engine in Mozilla, and that's one of the largest revenue sources for the foundation and the company. Google's argument has always been consumers have choice. In fact, BING DOT COM is less characters than google dot com it takes less work to get to Bengal com a crazy as it sounds but the reality is that has this victory in search for reason, is because they own so many different components they have you know excerpts from different sites that are built around technologies that you know even here tech-rich we have integrate with Google search to ensure that our articles are given priority in those search engines so we can't just. Ignore, Google entirely, and so I i. think the argument is fairly decent. Now, the challenge here is that there's so many different angles there seventy lost his the democratic. AGEE's have their own lawsuit underway and they've said they're going to continue to do that separately from the DOJ congress's looking into second to thirty, which affects more facebook but also potentially goodwill as a sort of open harbor and forgetting the term. Now you say her safe harbor harbor it's a safe harbor I think safe harbors would have opened component they'd be lake. Exactly, the pond. Yes. The savings bond, but you know there's all these different angles I think what's interesting is the timing obviously the the DVD and his staff this morning really emphasizing this sort of the right time he said, it was after sixteen months of investigatory work on the antitrust division happened to be exactly two weeks before major US election to the reality is is as has been a discussion at the DJ. For a decade. So you know it is obviously particularly all-time. The reality is they've been doing this work since you've only years possibly even to the Bush years as well.

Google DOJ United States Alex Wilhelm Danny Crichton Facebook JAY Agee Apple Doubleclick Microsoft Yale Partner
Beauty Tips To Empower The Visually Impaired

Art Beauty

07:17 min | 5 d ago

Beauty Tips To Empower The Visually Impaired

"Fabulous guest and co-host is Chelsea win. She is a licensed cosmetologist an image consultant and she also is a very special kind of educator Chelsea Welcome to our show. Thank you. Thank you so much for having me Amber, sir, Thank you. To be honest today. It's a real honor to have you on because I'm going to let you explain the type of education that you provide. Well, thank you so much. Aside from being a cosmetology instructor where I work for a global company name Chi and I teach hair make I mean hair techniques and color techniques and Beauty School for students as well as for teachers and salon owners. I also teach non Visual and adaptive techniques for individuals who are blind wage. Julion pearre disabled on you know, makeup techniques grooming hygiene how to do their own Nails how to do their own hair so that they can prepare for job interviews and even more so more importantly it's about being independent self confident and always looking your best whether or not you can or cannot see yourself in the mirror. I have to say you be honest with everybody listening right now when I you know, a lot of the times I'll receive story pitches and ideas some of them come from you at home. And when this month when your name came across my desk, I was intrigued because admittedly, you know, I thought I don't know that many people who are visually impaired and you know, when I started this podcast, I really wanted this to be a place where people could come and get education and be empowered and and also be dead, Lightened about things that we might not know about whether it was products or procedures or or people in general and you know through talking to a learned that October which I feel like I'm not many people know his breast cancer breast cancer awareness month is is also visually impaired Awareness Month. Correct? Yes. It is the month where there is white cane safety day, which is nationally recognized day and it's about you know, recognizing individuals who are blind and visually impaired and really addressing their independence with by using the white cane which as you know is what they use to help with orientation and mobility and all the Independence that maybe a lot of people may not perceive that they have right so but yeah, it's a very empowering Day, I am so honored that you are here. I think that for again people listening. This is going to be inspiring and emotional when we started talking in our in our pre-owned chat. You've got some some such brilliant tips that whether you are visually impaired or fully sighted. I think that you are going to find incredibly useful and and I hope this podcast particularly gives you a little bit of inspiration and you know, and and that you leave it feeling a grateful for those of you who don't have to deal with visual impairment of how lucky we are. So I think you get into this field. How did you get into this specialty? It you know what I have to say. It was purely by accident. I really was very much like you and very much like most people in the world who may or may not most people haven't met a blind person in their lifetime. And so I was very unaware of the need even that this even existed that there were blind women who wanted to learn how to do their makeup nor did I even have the idea that that that was something that you know was a concern and so several years ago back in 2011. I started volunteering reading for the blind games on a radio show called sight into sound radio and I was volunteering, you know, just to read books read, you know magazines to to the song mind and then over that course a couple of months later. I went to an event that we were, you know, hosting or not hosting but there and I met a blind young lady. Here in Houston. She's also known as the MasterChef winner for 2012. Her name is Christine Hall. If you pull her up on the internet, you'll find all information about her. She is a blind woman here in Houston who won MasterChef 2012. Wow, and you know, she's like a celebrity in the blind community and I walked up to her cuz I was there on site into sounds behalf. And I said, hey, you know, I'm a hairstylist and a makeup artist. So if you ever need anything, I'll be more than happy to help you and just so you know get you ready for the cameras and get you ready on set and she said, you know Chelsea, there's so many makeup artist and and people like that that are usually on said that can do that for me home. But to be honest since I lost my vision I haven't been able to do my makeup for myself anymore. And I said, oh really and she said, yeah and I said, well she's like, so do you think you can teach How to put on my own makeup and I said, why don't know I've never taught a blind person to put on their own makeup before, you know, I teach you know, young ladies and their mom and later, you know women that come in at my school and all the time who have Vision, but I said, you know what? I don't know but let me give it a try and so so we set up an appointment in her kitchen. I came to house several times and cookies something good. Not yet. Okay. All right. All right. We got to get in there. She did open up a restaurant here in Houston called The Blind goat, so just woke up there, but she has her own restaurant and she she does cook but at that time, you know, we sat down in her kitchen and she she taught me what it is that a blind person needs. Like how to teach her I didn't even know how to teach her. So she was like, okay. Well, can you describe that a little bit better? Can you like what you know and then hear what does that bottle feel? Like, what does that feel? And so here I am in our kitchen learning how to teach a blind person with audio description. I didn't even know what the word meant at the time then it was how to give verbal instructions on how to describe color how to map your face with your fingers and feel like orientate or your body. Like where are my eyebrows where you know are my thoughts eyelids and things like that and then like using your hands as guides and using voice as you know instruction and so it was like and then learning how to identify the differences between this bottle versus that

Houston Chelsea Amber Consultant Instructor Christine Hall Beauty School CHI
Change, Loss and Timeless Love

Tara Brach

05:05 min | Last week

Change, Loss and Timeless Love

"Nama stay and welcomed my friends. Really glad to have you with us. I was recently perusing two different articles. The first title was aging the secret to happiness and the second was WANNA be happier. All you have to do is get older. So same theme and they both draw on research that teams to confirm this correlation that the older we get the happier we are. Now I know that seems counter intuitive given the challenges we face that we. Lose, people we love and we lose our youth and our health and our memory. I saw cartoon this very old couple and they were both on rockers on the porch and he's responding to her. He says, now you want an open relationship. Of Billy Crystal, but it this way he said by the time, a man is a wise enough to watch his step. He's too old to go anywhere. Okay so there's this evidence that Carlos aging with happiness and the understanding that resonates for me is that through our our lifetime, we have the capacity to learn and adapt and spiritually evolve and. With the passing of time. There can be a growing acceptance of the inevitability. Of Change and loss. A growing acceptance. Of Change and loss. and. Walk. Clearly, this doesn't happen to everyone for those that do deepen in that acceptance. Nabil's living and appreciating the moments. And loving were fully. So the title of this talk, and the one that follows is change loss and timeless. Love. And the theme arises from a central teaching on the spiritual path and. That is that our capacity to live and love fully is totally intertwined with how we relate to change and loss. So. This'll be AH invitation for you to look in your own life at how you're relating to change and loss. It feels really relevant right now to explore this given, how many people around the globe are experiencing such rapid change and real loss due to global pandemic and Deepening social divides and climate change the devastation to this earth. And while it may feel like change a speeding up. impermanent. So what really makes us clutch? Is really the nature of all takes form. And we know it on the on the largest sweeps. If you think of the history of the Universe Big Bang and stardust forming and planet earth elements combining to create this amazing variety of life forms and then Homo sapiens evolving tools and art and science and war and slavery in plagues and collaboration innovation. The whole thing you know empires coming and going Greeks the Romans, the Ottoman. Empire Portuguese the British the American. You know rising to dominance and then passing we always think things are for good but it all passes and here we are. On the brink of destroying. Earth our home. Seeing species common species become extinct. galaxies. Of Stars collapsing into black holes, it's all in permanent. And then. We can sense it on the most minute level you know if right this moment. You take the time to perhaps closure is and bring your attention inward and hold still really still. You can sense that. The body everything inside a moving if you feel your hands is anything holding stelle. It might seem that way if you're very very tense but if you even begin to relax a little, you can sense the hands feet. In the face. The Heart Everything's moving. Nothing hold still there's this. Ever changing flow of sensations feelings. Sounds come and go. Your body's replacing sells millions per second. Within those cells nonstop motion.

Billy Crystal Carlos Nabil
Interview With Whitney Wang

Embedded

05:39 min | Last week

Interview With Whitney Wang

"Welcome to embedded I am Ille- Co alongside Christopher White. Today we are going to talk about professional Taco copters. Well actually prescriptions delivered via drones in places where growth's aren't viable. I guest is Whitney Wong from ZIP line. Thanks for joining us. Thank you so much for having me. Could you tell us a bit about yourself? Sure. As we said. Hong I'm embedded software engineer at supply. Supply is start and we make high-speed fixed-wing drones that deliver essential medical supplies around the world. Joins a blind a year ago straight out of college, and I actually have a background in mechanical and aerospace engineering. Building robots sand. Really, excited to be here today. We are excited to ask about drones and. Some world travel. But before that, we want to do a lightning round where we ask short questions may watch for. And if we'RE BEHAVIORAL OURSELVES WE WON'T ASK WHY. Are you ready. Good To to complete one project started as. Well. In practice I definitely start doesn't but in theory I would definitely like to compare one. Do you have a favorite acronym. That's a good question. I don't actually have a favorite acronym, but I have at least data acronym cuts new. Okay it's it's one of those reclusive acronyms. It's very annoying. If, you could teach college courses what would you like to teach? I took this really amazing course when I was in college called transformations in art and engineering and it combined art and engineering, we've got to do a lot of really cool embedded. He projects and was really free form and yeah very creative So I would definitely like to teach a class like that. Drone. Or Quad. Copter. I guess Quad Copter is a subset of droned. Depending on your definition but. Said fixed-wing. So What is the silliest application you've seen? ooh. Twenty question i. I guess. One of the summers for my internships. I worked at a startup where we try to make an indoor drone. It was basically a quad copter encompassed in a ball and it looked like the death star so. That was pretty fun. Cool. Do you have a tip everyone should know. Yeah Don't be afraid to get started I definitely seen many of my peers. get really intimidated by Harvard projects coming from like same more pure software background but you know, don't be afraid to to just like get moving in and make mistakes and learn along the way. Okay. So tell me about zip-line. fixed-wing launchers. Give us the rundown. Yeah. So the technology is pretty cool but it seems kind of random men and a kind of strange If you look at it from like today's perspective just watching videos online how it works is actually we have a swing drones. They look like tiny airplanes. They an operator assembles these drums on a launcher, which is basically a high speed catapult. The operators hit a button and these drones catapulted into the sky at a hundred kilometers per hour. So these drones, then move across the sky and We actually have a service radius of about eighty kilometers, which is about fifty miles and when it reaches the final delivery site which is typically a hospital or health facility in any of the countries that we serve. It will open. It's payload doors release a package with a parachute attached to it, and that package will guide to the ground and the local doctors who requested the order will go in retrieved package. Are Jones will autonomously fly home and it will actually. Do something that we referred to as a recovery, which is essentially It doesn't have landing gear. So what it does is it has a tiny centimeter long hook. At the end of its tail boom, and there is a big trust structure where our original like launching location is so like the recovery system is right next to that catapult launcher. And on top of this big trust. Will be a a line essentially like fishing line attached across this trust structure. The line will snap up as the drone reports keep. Yes. Location at a sub centimeter level accuracy back to the ground station and it will engage with the line catch on. So it's pretty magical looking.

Quad Copter Whitney Wong Hong Ille- Co Taco Copters Christopher White Harvard Software Engineer Jones
A Conversation With Mary Anne,  Woodworker

It's Wood - A show about all things woodworking

08:15 min | Last week

A Conversation With Mary Anne, Woodworker

"Hey, everyone. Glad you could join me today. On this episode, we will close out our three part series on the Bainbridge Artisans Resource Network or barn. For Short we're going to talk to marry an a Woodworker who works here at Barn. We will talk to her about her experiences as well as how she came to the barn in the first place Maryanne. Thank you for talking with me today and welcome to its would. Thank you for having me. So what brought you here? I literally moved here because of the barn. I had left. Alaska and trying to find a location to move in the lower forty eight. And I had originally thought Portland and had lived in Ben briefly. and was looking for homes to buy and ended up. Simultaneously Looking for homes and Ben Oregon, as well as Bainbridge. And decided on Bainbridge off when I was googling different things about the island I noticed a a feed on the barn and is like, oh. That was the tipping scale and That that is what brought me to Bainbridge now had you been woodworking previous? Only dabbling because the woman I was always told I wasn't allowed in the woodshop which was really frustrating. And I had no interest in home economics and I got stuck making Keiko semester and it was completely boring. And then. I. Dated a man for many years who was an expert woodworker was he did marvelous work but he was kind of the same thing he he didn't like women in the Woodshop So. I would help design pieces, but I wasn't really involved in doing the woodshop. And then when I moved to Alaska, I found a really wonderful man who just would take two or three people in and. Teach them, everything he knew and. That was when I finally started doing some. Woodworking and then when I discovered the barn, I was totally excited because these guys at the barn are incredible. There are so supportive and the creative. Mix of everybody is just wonderful because we have professional would workers as well as novices. So it's been really really wonderful experience and he's like these are so important. Yes and I there's woodworking tends to be a solo thing we're in our basement. We're a garage by ourselves working and to be able to work around like minded people that have different skill sets than you. It's just a wonderful resource. It is the the collaboration between everyone is really what makes very special because it it it edges you along to maybe venture into different areas that you wouldn't otherwise do because this the person at the next table could be. Exploring. Exploring all kinds of different options with a poxy or doing different types of wood bending or whatever which You know maybe I haven't done before and so it's it's a wonderful opportunity for me to be introduced to it and then question whether I can maybe dabble in some of that as well. The other thing that's really nice about the Woodshop to is that we have monthly meetings and those monthly meetings they bring in some very good speakers and it's a lecture format. And you, you get your feet wet with areas that you've never dreamt of, and so that's been also very helpful. Those kind of things really stoke the fire. We all. You're here because you're maker and. You know all these people. Everywhere in Barn. It's that passion and to be able to bounce ideas off people or see what they're doing and going. Wow I want to try that and it just feeds. Yes For instance I am well, barn has the which has. Various. Different courses they offer as well. So you know there there's formal instruction in whatever you would want as it's offered and there is a a man that goes to the woodshop here who's a retired retired architect in designs these really amazing furniture pieces and now he's turning around and he's offering a course on furniture design Well. That's a perfect opportunity for me who's just really a beginner. To start dabbling an actual design and I, you know his wonderful instructor. So why wouldn't I? You know utilize that. So, it's very exciting how you can be pushed in different directions just based off of what other people are offering right now you've been coming here for two years. I'm close to two years. Yes. Almost the beginning of born as a institution. Talking to Mike earlier and he was saying this has been around benefiting for a couple of years. Yes but my can tell you more about the actual beginnings because. There was there was much more involved in a prior to the. Previous two. Yes. These kind of things don't just spring up right it's a process of years. Yeah, exactly. What are you working on right now? Well. I'm going simple now because I just needed a break from things. So right now making Swiss bread cutting boards. And prior to that, I, done matching Bedside tables which still pet every morning because they're just they're beautiful. I, love it. They were solid cherry and it's it was old tongue and groove, and I made my own slides for the doors and the doors are all dovetail and George. She's perfectly set in that little Nice Square and I just love it. So every morning I still pedic proud of it, and that's what's so exciting about it. You get you get end product that if you use I mean it's not I mean not speaking down of. Wall art and things like that which are beautiful and they serve a great purpose. But to be able to make something that you're using, you're cutting boards, tables chairs. Yes. It just it has a different feel to me. That's probably why I do it. But. What's your favorite project so far? Those tables. I'm probably most proud of those. Yes. I did. Oh. It was a a bit over adventurous here. Overzealous I first project here I named the Nemesis. Because I went. I I found a piece of throwaway. Kulla would that was beautiful and it was a live edge but nobody wanted it because it was all crumbling and falling apart. And I figured I could do something with it. So I went around the house trying to figure out where it could fit and I made this whole contraption where I had to first poxy the live edge Koa Wood. So to stabilize the falling apart pieces and then I superimposed on solid black walnut. And then built a black walnut cabinet to the left of it, and then I flooded the area of. of where the Koa wood was placed on top of the block walls and Walnut. So the whole thing looks like. A frog sitting on a riverbed because the Koa wood is like the riverbed in the knife flooded around it, and the whole thing is just a whole toilet paper in my bathroom. It fits above the toilet perfectly within the squarespace of the. Of The wall and it was. It was totally over my head as a first project but but that was the whole point. All the guys were here to help me out and it's not just men. There are some women to. So everybody kind of puts their own two cents in and. you know really the project was done by multiple people assisting me not just me.

Bainbridge Alaska Bainbridge Artisans Resource N Ben Oregon Maryanne Koa Wood Portland Instructor Mike George Kulla
"art" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

13:17 min | 5 months ago

"art" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Very well apply here and then there's also the other than this is just a logistical problem to deal with Carina viruses. A lot of these pieces he went be able to have it. Shipped T for quite a long time because Airfreight is shipping's much much reversal of the ship is of furloughed or best off. The of air freight has gone through the roof because there were safe flight since if he roots and these an export license certainly from UK. When get it so Yeah all of these sort of instrumentation instantaneous factors. They really apply for their so. It's called a few barriers. And what do you think about? Well I think the yeah. The shipping issue is is a bear but also probably temporary. But the by now thing. Is I really big issue facing the pivot to online right now and it is one thing that I was? I will say that. Sotheby's did well with the introduction of their gallery network platform which They allow basically like point of sale purchases within their own online platform which they are hosting galleries on which is kind of strange model to have an auction house bringing dealers and be like hey sell through us but what it allows buyers to do is to do that. Exact you know I want. I WanNa buy this right now. Click here's my credit card INFO boom and it's all processed through subsidies and then the just goes and tells the the gallery. Hey you sold this work through us and I think that's actually really really smart because that is how online sales I think need to happen. at least throughout most of the market. Obviously like really big ticket items. Maybe will require a little more back and forth. But that's that's very common practice already when you're trying to sell multi-million dollar work you're going to have to do some hand-wringing and and meeting and talking and viewing But it's something that the art world has struggled with with the the by now feature that something like an pre existing online sales platform like artsy introduced last year but hasn't had a lot of success with but I think Sotheby's potentially could because so the bees has the Industry brand recognition and kind of like vetting cachet to make a by now purchase. More OF A SAFE BET. One of the things that we know about about galleries. Is you see and one of the things that we see on the online. Viewing rooms is is that there are prices given for for most of the artworks but we also know that different crises. They were different discounts for museums. That kind of stuff but with auction houses like Christie's and Sotheby's as it straighter in the sense that the price given moved the price paid and therefore is that an advantage for auction houses in this sort of more impersonal world or is that is that a simplification. I- probably is an advantage in this in this sort of world and as you say the fact that auction houses it's always been a little less intimidating because you can see the estimate even if it's alive sale you're sitting there bidding and you can see how the price is going up and you know We should know when when you have to stop bidding when you can't afford it anymore whereas as you say with a with a gallery often is not so clear you have to find out what the price is. You never quite sure whether that surprise for you or whether that might be a low or high price for somebody else So yes so. I think it's possibly less intimidating and the auction has been doing this for ages and online instant online sales. They do have. They've got a really big head. Start with having done by fitting as well. So so yeah. I think they've been trying to kind of ingende this This trust in buying online for fifteen years for me so you don't really have that maybe through the fares they all of the buyers will bide auction underfed as well as you say. That sort of something to do with brand trust is built three relationships and just getting used to buying in a certain way from certain platform. Maybe that's something that's going to gray for FAZ. And and fatter is as well Margaret in in your piece about the freeze on online. It was really interesting to see. The certain prices were being given. You know you could you. Could you could explore in a more transparent. Apparently transparent way what what the prices are is that something of an illusion genuinely transparent. No I think there's a lot of people talking about how well and this isn't a new conversation. This has been going on since the advent of of selling online over the past two decades The idea that there's some kind of like transparency by being able to purchase online or more democratic field that allows more buyers to come in and purchase art work I think is has always been kind of a red herring. The potential for it perhaps is there but you know Only the auction houses are really the the bastions of of pricing And that's how it kind of how the art world has always established the the value of works against this The price they're willing to publish it and and posts in their sales Now that you have it coming in to others fears like the freeze online. Viewing Room Something that it's something that started also with The Art Basel Hong Kong Viewing Room in these online viewing rooms. The sale price is listed. And then you have to click to inquire. You can't buy right then. The inquiry process is where any any number of transactions could start to occur like discounting. And you know kind of going back and forth with the client about what what. Maybe they feel like. They want to spend or if they're going to put it institutional collection that that's like business as usual one hundred percent for the art world and then on the freeze platform. What I thought was so interesting that once the work has sold you can no longer see the price it was listed for. It just says sold so in the end that isn't offering any more transparency they could ostensibly put whatever price they want on that work then whoever inquires about it they could offer them another price. And then we'll never be the wiser for what had actually sold for But I do think that this kind of moment is bringing up some interesting dialogue around what it means to have price transparency in the art market. And that it's been kind of evidenced in a recent online sales platform that was started by this conceptual artists. Darren Baiter who is selling his own work and the work of about twenty other mid career artists through their dealers on his website that he's created and they are all the all priced As what they would have been for sale for a sensible in fair setting and then that price is struck through a next to it is a price and red lettering and they're all discounted From anywhere between thirty and ninety percent and so you can kind of see the arbitrariness of pricing and artwork within this really simple kind of tongue in cheek sales platform that he's created that is offering a lot of commentary on how business is done but it's also just a really good way to move some artwork in this particular moment. Let's see also he's also of engaging with the Tobu's of sailing up right so he's exploring the idea of the inventory which is a word that sends dealers into a panic. You know you're not. You're not supposed to mention inventories. In the stock of an artist dealers have so not only as a platform for selling. But it's a commentary right so it's almost sales platform right. Yeah it's definitely a really sharp commentary isn't artwork as website essentially but also very functional artwork and. This is really a hallmark of of Darren's work. Already I mean he has always been interested in looking into the meaning of art and its relationship to money like five years ago. He raised sixteen thousand dollars on a crowd funding website in order to sell the stack of money itself as as a lot in at Christie's London and ended up netting more than sixteen thousand dollars and then he just donated all the charity so he plays this with this a lot. But I think I think what's interesting about his platform inventory Is is that it. It's that moment where this has clearly been on on a lot of people's minds for a really long time and now is the kind of point to drill down on what what we're doing in the art market currently at how can we do it better. Can we talk about some of the things which we've liked because I'm aware that so far both Scott you guys? We sort of had a critical view but there are some things which I think all of us have engaged with. We've we've found enjoyable experiences an neither Anna you like the vajgl gallery site. We should get which feels more sort of virtual virtual experience. Yes it's interesting how. It doesn't necessarily have to be the very biggest galleries to doing some of the best stuff here as well. It's sort of interesting how it's of playing with the hierarchy little bit when you're in your nine space so they've released a really cool and the Sort OF GALLERY TOUR ONLINE. Viewing Room Which I think is a lot more sophisticated. Feels a lot more real? It feels that you've got that sense of exploration which is really hard to create online So I like what they've done an to my mind. It's a lot better than what has been worth of done as well with theft. Npr space in the Minoan. One which I kind of is clever like it. It gives the sense. They're very good. She got kind of creating this A sense of atmosphere and a website which is quite hard to do. This brand is very strong in that kind of way even it was very kind of lifestyle e so with the sort of and everything else it kind of you. Do you get a sense of of the space that they will be creating Minorca which is meant for next year So yeah so. It's interesting to kind of see these. These different kinds of approaches Margaret. Cho Yours an effective use of digital. I think that like something like an houser interesting technology like. That's I think it's cool that they've created something so in-depth and we're going to see I think a lot more of that kind of bespoke. Vr technology coming out from many galleries says untitled. Art Fair is going to launch kind of similar software for for their fair platform. Soon and I don't know if it's good or good or bad per se like it's certainly entertaining and I think that the entertainment is probably important. Because that's that's what the art world has also kind of really relied on to get people excited about. It seems to me that the art world has had such control over its ascetic and it's an ascetic really works arch coolness that so many galleries. Have you know the materials of the architecture and the spacing between where everything is so immaculately controlled and suddenly? There's a whole new language that they have to learn about how to make things sell online. Which is totally different from the physical experience. So it's in a way. It's a sort of challenge rule. The galleries and the auction has everyone to develop an ascetic for selling our online which attracts that level of kind of atmosphere and event coach which is so central to ourselves right as so interesting as she. The idea of kind of an howdy put a personality of any business effectively into website. I would have no idea where to start. But it's these tiny little subliminal messages really when it comes to visited a gallery or an art fair or it could be a restaurant or whatever else it is that it'll be the scent of the of the Hansa from the lose or whatever whatever it is little tiny kind of signifies of the quality of place the kind of play kind of person that's meant to appeal to and of course the fact that you're part of part of that club tribe if that appeals to you and I'm sure that these online spaces particularly in the World Health Organization yesterday one that this might become endemic. Kerlin viruses was it. I mean you know. We don't know how long we're going to be living with these online. Viewing rooms four. Um and I do think that going to go away but it be interesting to see how how they can start to more effectively. Mvp Out with that kind of same. Perception of value intrigued an inaugural. Thanks for joining us. Thank you thank you.

Sotheby Christie Margaret UK Darren Baiter Art Basel Hong Kong Carina World Health Organization Mvp theft Anna Scott Minorca houser London
"art" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

16:01 min | 7 months ago

"art" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Package that includes funding for the self-employed so as Hamburg. So have many others and there is a focus here on the self employed and small companies because these obviously the backbone of any economy and the last thing you want when people are in general actually structurally solid is a whole wave of insolvencies just because if temporary liquidity caused by lack of income bright. What's the self-employed package in Germany? In the package for self-employed freelancers etc announced in in tandem with that for employees people on people being paid by companies. It was actually yes. It was announced at the same time the whole lot and it includes grand so that people can for example apply for a one of two five thousand euros or nine thousand euros from from Berlin The federal government packages not quite three the parliament yet. That's going to happen this week but it should be ready to take applicants from next week. So it's all pretty swift and I think most reassuringly is that people knew very early on that it was coming so am they. They can plan around that. And to what extent has culture have artists been at the heart of the discussion because certainly from a British point of? Yes we as a community are talking about it but in terms of government announcement. It's been very much dealing with self. The self employed as a kind of amorphous. Mass has culture actually mentioned on a sort of by politicians. It has I mean the culture minister has said that she said actually that especially at this moment artists on just indispensable their vital. So that's a direct quote from her so I think there's a general acknowledgement that culture is released system relevant that we need it especially in dark times and that I think might be quite surprising to people in the UK or the US where it's much more difficult to get recognition for the needs of the the arts but then that's generally the case that in Germany generally culture is very heavily supported by public funds by the government And at the time like this in a in a time of this kind of panic I think we really see how different societies valley there artists now. A federal system. You have different art. Center's Berlin is the one that we would automatically think of. What's the government doing four artists? Berlin it's particularly extreme case of course because there are so many artists and people in coach in the cultural generally living in the city. And if you think of all the dancers singers musicians as well of course it's a visual artists in performance artists. And all these people who com- work the man it's a massive knock to the economy. Applicants can ask for grants or loans in order to make sure that they can get through the next few months. And there's a generalization that it's a threat to the economy's whole F- artists come back here and you getting a sense from people in Berlin for instance. They are calm about this. They do feel they are being listened to and they will get support. You know. It's one for governments to make statements of course quite another thing for an this being delivered to people and people being able to pay rents on studios that side of it. At the moment. I fail quite a lot of calmness. The government particularly Monica glitches. The Culture Minister Minister has been extremely reassuring. Saying things like we're not going to leave you in the lurch we understand the desperation and repeatedly and she's been very much in the public eye on on on radio lots of tweets. Lots of 'EM press statements coming out to the office and so on so I think people feel they haven't been gotten of course if it doesn't work quite as smoothly as has been promised and application seemed to go nowhere or take a long time to be dealt with than it might be a different story so. I think that's something we'd have to come back in a week or two. To what extent is there a private foundation based funding system in Germany? All the As there are in the UK and US Baldi setup to fund for instance things like conservation and another kind of art work which goes on behind the scenes at museums. For instance. There have been a couple of private initiatives. The Ants Fund Zeman's Art Foundation for example is often offered grants of up to twenty five thousand years to ensure that restores and curator's academics people writing catalogs or working on paintings will get work so that the museums can apply for that money and full restores and academics to take on specific tasks and has made very clear that they shouldn't be tacit. The museums were already planning. They should be new tasks in order to make sure that this additional work. So there are a few private initiatives like this. But I mean it's going to be at least one thousand nine percent state operated and Germany because that is the way the economy works here in the art world works here. And what about commercial galleries? Obviously we know that there's a there's a thriving gallery system in in Berlin m out how to what extent are they struggling to what extent of they in a position to take advantage of the kind of Emergency measures were. There are whole load of emergency measures that they can take advantage of. It's not just the initial one off grants from Berlin. On from the gym government they can also defer tax payments they can defer social security payments for employees and there are various other measures. Live taking place. Such as landlords are not allowed to throw am self-employed or small companies out of their combination. If they can't pay the rent the moment so there's a whole load of protective measures in place that will help galleries to weather the next few weeks and whether or not some of them will suffer and some of them will fall by the wayside as a result is a bit difficult to say at this point. I think that would take much longer. And we'll have to see how things develop one thing. That is intriguing in your piece on the newspaper. Dot Com was this question of 'em compensation from the Health Department of Health Office of the German government for some people. Can you explain how that works? Yes that means that. If you're a performance artist or for example musicians as well or dancers who have suffered cancellation. It's because of the corona virus. So you lose money because something that you were planning. An scheduled event has been cancelled. Because of all the social distancing rules. You can claim compensation from your local Health Office for that and Leslie Museums. I mean nervous. The the Humboldt form has been on so many people's minds for so long and it was due to open this year. Have you got any sense of on the one hand? How concerned museums are about their futures and especially about the Humboldt Forum? About what are they saying about the future of eight how to help to what extent postponing their opening that we haven't heard yet but I'm sure we'll be postponed. I think that was probably on the cards anyway. Before all of this lots of other postponements have taken place. I am sure you saw an auster while the new Albertina Martin Museum couldn't open the scheduled time and the Jewish Museum. Belen is also planning a brand new opening that was to happen in May with the new permanent exhibition and a new children's museum. That can't happen now. Of course it's all going to be pushed back. But I think we can be fairly confident that the museums in Germany which Moseley public funded in any case will have government funding at some point to help them through this Roy again. That's that's that's different from the UK because we've there's been a push in the UK for a Greater. Sorta percentage of private funding to help museums develop their programs etc so in Germany still very state-funded and you feel confident but because of that system that we will looked after I think so yes. I think that's absolutely the case and I've been reading as well in the New York Times for example that American museums very very worried about the huge losses of shortfalls of income from admissions tickets. And so on and and the government is not very willing to make up the difference because there's no tradition of public funding for museums in the same way that there is in Germany In Germany's really part of the state infrastructure most museums There are some private museums but they are really the exception so it's unimaginable that the government would allow them to fail as a result of this crisis. Okay we'll caffeine. Thanks so much for coming on and keep his posted. I will thank you now for the second in our new series. Lonely works in which we turn the spotlight. Unsworth WORKS IN MUSEUMS CLOSED. Because of the corona verse. This week. I'm delighted to be joined by Zoe. Whitley the knee director of the season. How in London? She's arrived from the Hayward Gallery where she was a senior curator USA curated. Kathy Wilkes is British pavilion show at the last Venice Biennale but perhaps best known curatorial work was on soul of a nation at in the age of black power. The show of African American on that began at tate modern in two thousand seventeen and traveled to various venues in the US which she curated along side Mark Godfrey. So He's chosen a work by Alma Thomas in the Smithsonian American Art Museum and you can see the work as we discuss it at the art newspaper Dot Com Click on the puck cost link on the homepage and look for this episode. Cesari tell me about this work. Why did you choose it? Well it actually continues Other art newspaper conversations that we've been having so I was recently profiled in Brushwood. Thanks very much and I was asked. Which painting I'd want to live with and I think there's something about working in public institutions that even though I don't feel that way about clothes and shoes I always want more I don't tend to think about artworks things I want to possess and yet as soon as that question was asked there was one painting that immediately I could see super clearly in my head is something I could easily live with and want to look at all the time. Because it just brings me a lot of joy and it's a painting called wind and Crepe Myrtle concerto by The Washington DC PAINTER ALMA. Thomas I was born in Washington. Dc My grandmother had a Crepe myrtle tree in her back garden and we spent a lot of time outside. And exactly these kinds of the wash of color and these kinds of shapes that Alma Thomas created with her brushwork reminded me of completely the way. Our Garden would look blanketed by the small pedals off of the CREPE myrtle tree in the summertime. So lovely the Almaz. Such an interesting figures and she because because she was a teacher for most of her life and only really became an artist late in her life then indeed achieve quite a lot of success. Well exactly I think they're a think that thing to think about in terms of the way we understand an arc of success or what counts as success. She studied it. Howard University With a professor named James Herring. Who was very important in teaching a whole generation of African American students? Art Art History. So she was able to study are there and was the first black woman who received a Master of Arts degree from Columbia University in New York and then while she was working as a teacher and when she retired from teaching in about nineteen sixty She was devoting herself to painting full time and ended up becoming the first African American woman to have a solo exhibition at the Whitney Museum of American Art. In nineteen seventy two. She was linked with what's called. The Washington Color School. I'm really interested in the relationship with that. Because always that was dominated by white male artists and also certain certain language that kind of language which much more associated with sustaining and also very very objective. How do you see that relationship with the Washington school? I think it was a kind of loose association. I think we're always trying to fit people within these kind of existing histories and to make these neat stories and the stories aren't always as neat or is linear as we would like them to be. And even though Thomas was acquainted with people like Jean Davis and Morris Louis and others. I think it's also important that within that history can complicate the picture by other like incredibly talented and Virtuosic colorist working in Washington. Dc Like Sam Gilliam. So there were range of practices kind of influencing and affecting one another and so that dominant narrative isn't always the only one or the one that I think is the the most interesting was remarkable. Her Star is there's always the sort of mosaic not to it which of course you know you think about it in the context of something like Bronte's pursed impressionism. But in that particular moment it seems to me to be quite a unique language that she developed in in in you know if you think about the that period that she was working well when Mark Godfrey and I were developing the exhibition Sullivan Nation. One of the works that we were looking at including of Thomas's Was a work that she'd made right after the march on Washington for jobs and freedom and for most of her career most of her life so more than about twenty years she was working representation and so she made an image that put together the kind of visualization of the scene of the marchers with these placards and made. Interestingly enough the way she was able to then think about reducing those placards as a kind of a unit that she then thinks about and works in many different ways in terms of how she approaches abstraction but she was also looking at other major figures in our history like Matisse so one of the works that was on view in the White House during the Obama presidency was one of her paintings called Wasi which has many formal similarities to Matisse's the snail which is in tate modern collection so..

Berlin Germany government Alma Thomas UK self employed Washington US Mark Godfrey Hamburg parliament Crepe myrtle tree Leslie Museums New York Times Humboldt Smithsonian American Art Museu Whitney Museum of American Art Dc Washington Color School
"art" Discussed on The Art of Charm

The Art of Charm

02:08 min | 8 months ago

"art" Discussed on The Art of Charm

"Of science around Krizman. If you've wondered why charismatic people stand out so much well now you know charisma is made up of so many parts that very few people truly understand it and even if they understand it even fewer people actually have the drive to practice those traits to perfection. And that of course is what we are all about here at the art of charm. Now they give for tuning in. We have a shout here for one of our alumni. Eric wrote in this week to our private facebook group and it was soon as they hear from again. One of my favorite things about what we do here is the laws that people go on to live after they come through our courses so eric says hey guys grateful to air sea for kicking my ass. Last year I've never felt more confident in myself and my values it is. Set my mind at ease over several social anxieties which I no longer possess or dwell on for too long. I am comfortable in my own narrative and whole with my values this week. I was able to reach out to a struggling teammate. Mike Class regarding his own social anxieties and started him on the AFC podcast. I hope the follow up with him after spring. Break to see how it feels. I can't wait for you to do that myself. I love when we hear from OUR ALUMNI. And how much? They're killing it after the boot camp and of course share the podcast with your friends and family who could benefit from this as much as you have. Now here's your challenge for this week based on the charisma traits that we've discussed right down three things that you could do differently when you're interacting with people and don't be vague about this right down the exact words that you would use or the exact actions that you would take the reason for this. Is that if you plan to come up with a great plan in the heat of the moment. Well you're probably GONNA fail but if you have something ready to go then it's going to be so much easier to pull through. Let us know how that went for you? We're always excited to hear from you. You could send us your thoughts by going to the art of charm dot com slash questions. And you can always email us questions. The CHARM DOT com. You'll find Johnny and myself on Social Media at the art of charm on facebook instagram and of course twitter. Now if you enjoyed this deep dive into.

facebook Mike Class Krizman Johnny Eric twitter AFC
"art" Discussed on The Art of Charm

The Art of Charm

12:50 min | 8 months ago

"art" Discussed on The Art of Charm

"To show that you're enjoying yourself at that moment and I always say smile as a window that goes directly to how you're feeling in the moment right. There and enthusiasm has optimism embedded in it. Yes right people are drawn to happy optimistic. People they're not drawn. Johnny said to pessimism so being optimistic is a big part of being charismatic. It's not only a belief in yourself of like. Hey people do like me and people gravitate towards me but it's also just a belief that hey we can all have a great time and this is a great environment and looking for the positives in any environment. You're in. We could all be there all night long. Judging the music the temperature the drinks the people every single factor that goes into going out or going to an event but that is not going to help you become more charismatic. Allow you to harness that. Inner Charisma to unlock it in yourself is actually bringing. Some optimism bringing some positivity to that environment. I know it's difficult to go out. And maybe the music is not to your liking. Maybe the atmosphere's onto your liking and I as I've gotten older and more rigid and knowing what the things are that where I wanna be the things that I like a I still at times. Find myself where I have to go where I'm not so thrilled but I can either a get nothing out of this situation and complained about it and bitch about it and have a miserable time or I can try to get something for my time for the evening. And there is a checklist of things that I'm going to have to do. In order to switch over from somebody who's going to be pessimistic about the evening and and look for everything wrong to somebody who's optimistic about evening and looking for reasons or it's going to go right first thing I'm going to do is I'm going to have to put a smile on and we're talking about amy. Cut His power pose of being able to have open body language to allow the atmosphere to fully. Hit me put on a smile to show that I'm enjoying myself and it's those things slowly will start to turn the way. I'm seeing everything and try to make a positive out of what was or can be easily negative and what you're talking about is choice. Yes optimism is a choice and in order to be optimistic. You have to start choosing to look for the right things for the positives in any of those situations which is why even when we talk about developing out your social skills. We're constantly talking about finding those small victories. Finding those moments where you can be optimistic. You know what the conversation lasted longer than the last few times. I've been out with a stranger next to me. You know what I talked to more people than I had in nights previous. I stayed longer than I normally would because in the past I would have laughed when I felt a little awkward or anxious. Those are all simple ways for you to start making a choice becoming optimistic. And as Johnny said that non verbal expression of optimism that smile beaming it towards people. And we get this a lot just smile all the time. You talk about smile. All the time is that. I don't feel like smiling all the time. Yes I would love everyone to smile more but it doesn't have to be all the time but giving people doses of that smile looking people in the eye and giving them a great smile is a huge tool in your nonverbal tool belt to evoke that charisma that we're talking about. I can make this very easy for you. Please do make up. Make it very easy for everyone listening if you realize that you're that much more attractive when you're smiling you know that you're going to be engaging in the motions that are. GonNa make you more attractive. More magnetic more charismatic. Then why wouldn't you be smiling if you have to go to any social engagement? Seems like the smart choice and see. This is what this and this makes it easy and so people are like. Wow you guys are smiley. It's an easy choice to make. Why would I do anything else? When I understand the what I have to gain in this situation now I understand that every day presents new challenges and a lot of things happen and sometimes life gets heavy and doesn't go in the direction that you wanted to however you can still fight it or find those times where it well. I have this thing. I have this meeting. This is where you turn it on and you have to do your best because we were inviolate show. We talked about this exact thing. Yes there are moments where you are pushed. Your limit emotionally you are spent. You are pessimistic. You are frustrated with life and the simplest of fried. You could do for yourself to put yourself in a better place is to move your body to exercise to get good chemicals flowing again in your brain you have to physical activity. Sparks your body to create the chemicals necessary to fight that negative mood and a lot of our clients will work out before going out on any of our field night activities because it puts you in that mental state of feeling. Good Your Body. Got The juices flowing as we say. And all of a sudden you're gonNA find. The conversation is a lot easier. It is a lot easier for you to smile at people now. One of the favorite things that we challenge all listeners to do and we challenge all of our program participants to do is start cheers ing and high fiving people to really point this out to make this clear that this clear signal of enthusiasm right to high five someone you have to be pretty darn enthusiastic to cheer someone you don't know you have to be pretty darn enthusiastic and of course if you've never done it before you're like well this is going to go. Well I don't know this person. Why would I come over? And and show him this enthusiasm. I have no reason to be enthused. And all those thoughts that creep in your head and what. You will find going back to this idea that these emotions are. Contagious is after a couple high. Fives and a couple cheers. Your mood is lifted. That's the power of enthusiasm. It is a self fulfilling prophecy. You add some energy to the other person's evening. Smiling cheering them. I don't know what this guy cheers me but I felt good. I felt good in the moment. Receiving a chairs person high fiving but it felt good to receive a high five. You've cheered them up and you've got that boost of enthusiasm and by the end of the night. A lot of our clients go. Why the hell was I doing this before? This is such an easy way to convey that charismatic enthusiasm now. I'm sure there's people who heard that we had just said in there. I thought was. I can't go to barnes cheers. Everybody did you tell anyone. The cheers everyone in the room. Now know choosing people. There's people around you that is it and you will be surprised with just those that simple action does and the message that it says and edge argued about sending some optimism. But you're also showing an act of acknowledgment which allows those around you to feel good about themselves. Why because at allows them to know that you're in this room there in this room and it is a shared space and it will be shared commonly with optimism. Now this last and final component of charisma. Right we've talked about presence. We've talked about enthusiasm this last piece much like those other two are something that you earn. You can build in yourself. It doesn't matter where you grew up. It doesn't matter where you went to. School does not matter your background. You can put in some work to gain that presence to gain enthusiasm to gain that confidence now. This piece is what locks in that charisma when you are confident in the words you're about to share the action you're about to take the way you carry yourself in the room. People take notice. You cannot be lacking in confidence and charismatic. It doesn't work that way it reinforces and brings out the charisma. So how do we do that number? One we showcase confidence by acting authentically. Not acting like Johnny acts or acting like Aj acts but acting authentically to yourself allowing yourself to not be defined by the expectations around you but to set the definition on yourself. You are okay with people not agreeing with you. You are okay with people having a counterpoint. You are okay with people not liking you. That actually makes you charismatic and confident. And it's a it's another switch that you're looking to flip over but it's not so much a switch that once you do it you just turn. It is one. We were talking about earlier. Needs to be developed that needs to be cultivated in each day. You have an opportunity to bring more more authenticity which will bring you more confidence in your life. As long as you're making choices to do things that would allow you to do that. And how can we do that? How can we start becoming more confident while we start stacking some small wins in our favor? We start using that. Optimism lends to find those winds when necessary but by challenging yourself. And other facets of your life you're GonNa find this confidence that all of a sudden starts to build a muscle. I know for US throwing ourselves into training going at the tough mudder half marathons pushing ourselves physically. How much more confident did you feel? Well so much so that I continue running and because of. I didn't want to lose everything that I had gained. It was such a great experience and the confidence that was one from that or developed was so intoxicating. I wanted to continue chasing that for more. And that's that's the thing about it. Once you set these these systems up and you were able to measure your progress and you see her confidence then only makes it that much easier to continue these processes. This is why people get addicted to eating healthy and dictate to going to the gym addicted to expressing themselves the creativity because the rewards internally and externally are just too intoxicating there they are lovely. Think about the the awards externally externally the rewards are people are giving you attention. People are following you around. People want to continue to create. Why because of how you allowed them to fill so you want to do more of that. You want to get better at it. You WanNa you WanNa have that effect on more people you wanNA louder megaphone When we have all the tools and we're using them right now to speak to all of you. What what about the internal rewards? It's knowing that you can get better that you're having an effect on people's lives for the positive that your own life is straightening out that is that is getting better that you have opened up more and more opportunities for yourself to continue creating and ways that you more external adulation so everything is feeding itself and the and the rewards are great and for myself as even at forty six is like. What is the next challenge? How willing handle the day? Well that's it's easily set up. Why because I've incorporated these things into my values that we've been talking about for less I've since we've been doing this. Podcast always comes down to value driven success y because incorporating these ideas into my daily life only makes me stronger and let's be honest. The confidence comes in so many different factors. I mean I remember learning to code the very first website for pickup podcast. Fourteen years ago I go to the way back machine now.

Johnny US amy Contagious barnes Aj
"art" Discussed on The Art of Charm

The Art of Charm

12:24 min | 8 months ago

"art" Discussed on The Art of Charm

"There's levels to it that when you get better with it your conversations go better and exploring people becomes Through conversation and and ideas becomes so much more fun. Because you're now you're actually listening you're sharing there is an actual conversation going. Our conversation is just not me walking over to somebody at a bar and badgering them with twenty questions and think about think about all the things you're excited to share with your friends with your family. What are they they? Are things that evoke emotion in you. You're not excited because you learn some new piece of data or some number or some. Gps coordinates you're excited because the emotion that evoked the surprise. I didn't know that this is fascinating. This is counterintuitive. I never would have guessed. All of those emotions are what lead to the share so of course in order to be a better listener we we have to go beyond our own voice. We have to go beyond the data. Not a lot of us are sifting through conversation trying to find commonalities and we have to start thinking. What are the emotions that are being expressed or being felt by the person sharing with me? And when you can drop into that state when you can start to think emotionally and relate on those emotions is johnny said with the shared emotional statement. That is how we start standing out and becoming charismatic memorable person. Well it certainly makes the conversation fund for the people who are having it who are at that place who are in that level F. Both people are in in in that zone. Certainly if you're in it's going to be a lot more fun than for the person who's not but we hope we're both parties are are added that plays it becomes very fun. In fact that's the SORTA conversations that we strive for when we bring in guest and when we're trying here and it's not always the easiest thing but when you're there it makes for a great time for us in the room but it also makes for a great time for you as a listener to want to listen more. There's there's a lot going on and so without understanding what that looks like and how to get there. It is very difficult even even on twitter today. I got into an argument. Magic argue on twitter mindblowing mindblowing. And I was putting out what I thought was a very thoughtful tweet about this very subject because we were coming in talking about it today and the three was talking about things that make you a better listener. This is simple right. You would think would be able to get an argument as so you were listening to you. I put three very thoughtful sentences that I felt were value pat. Okay that we're just gonNA blow peoples on the edge of my seat these three sentences. That's not what matters at the moment. I can't really remember what they were discussing. The five levels of listening listening and however the first reply was oh I get it. Just ask simply ask questions and I was like I just wanted. This is what I wanted to. Bang my head off will. That's fault number one right. They are only listening for what they want to hear. Yes and it drives me nuts. 'cause this was crafted in a way that. I was hoping that would cut through now once again. This is twitter and I bet For that one guy that was twenty people who shared it. And we're like Oh my God. This is great. I never thought of it that way. Which was my goal but still there are an I this fight of getting people to see listening when active listing as a tool that can be developed. And how to go about it so. You aren't just badgering. People with twenty questions can be difficult. And this idea of queuing it on emotions. The video work exercise often highlights for us that there are a lot of emotions being delivered in conversation and your ability to see them. It's like when I took an art class in high school and I always sketched a little bit here and there and dude old you know the usual and when I learned shading and adding dimension to your drawings online game chaser it was a totally different experience and a lot of us are not listening with that level of detail. We are not shading are drawings. We are only Jason Detroit. Johnny said Pittsburgh. Okay what do I know about the Midwest jumping ahead and not listening to the emotion and shading in? We'll what are their thoughts and feelings on the Midwest. Are you want want out of this conversation and specifically my tweet this morning? I want people to realize that you're not programmed for this type of listening. This is something to be developed and we always laugh because one of the section. You're talking about the term that we're looking at is emotional bids that we talk a lot about on this show and you can say it you can define it. You can set out examples but then we'll do video work and they won't catch any of them and then when we play the video back they're like wow I just caught. There was ten fifteen emotional bids and I missed all of them. Why why can this be explained? Can this be pointed out? Can you have examples? And then you do the exercise and you miss them all because you're not brogue rammed for it needs to be developed. It's a skill to work towards and much like hosting the show and having these great interviews. We have listeners right us all the time who are starting out in podcasting they. WanNa get better listening to your own podcast going back through reviewing the tape is such a valuable experience because you are going to miss those things. It is completely natural to do. So and that's why we review the the game footage now the last piece in this presence that I want to talk about and this is something that comes up on video time and time again is your non verbals and your eye contact and so many of us struggle with the eye contact too much not enough where to look. Do I stare through the person? How do they know that I'm listening? And unfortunately when we get in those moments where we're feeling a little tents we're feeling a little judge or a little anxious. We tend to close ourselves off with our body language. We tend to cross our arms. We tend to make ourselves a little smaller. So there's less of us for the other person to see or judge and these are happening at a subconscious level but guess what does are clear signals that you are not someone with charisma. Those are clear signals that you are someone who's trying to withdraw from conversation withdraw from being present who is not engaged in that conversation. So what we want to do is we want to focus on. Yes softly gazing at the person while we're talking to them to let them know we are engaged the conversation and we we want to create a neutral space with our body language so that we're not directly facing them or arms are not crossed. We're not creating any sort of conflict with our nonverbal communication needlessly and I know it's one of those things where everyone on films like. Oh great I contact smile all the time. I don't cross my arms. We do this so often without even realizing it and I catch myself as well in those moments where I'm like. I don't know anyone here a little tense and the I have to do is where my hands. Oh at my sides okay. Now I'm getting back to being present and being open in that conversation. I always laugh about. How tape gives you the reality whether it's vocally verbally. What you're hearing or what you're seeing and I was just doing the the charm labs Weekly class and one of our participants was re watching the video to get some more notes and he was shocked about his presence on video. And all the filler words that he had used and of course after seeing that hearing that he wanted to fix it. And it's not such an easy thing but it can be done but you. I you have to admit that you do it. Yeah you have to raise awareness to catch yourself doing it and it's something that we've certainly worked on here being on the show of making sure that we're not using filler words or just needlessly throwing in words of that don't have any real meaning. I think the your walls the reality that you've pictured for yourself will definitely be pierced through video. Yeah much like our walls of reality of pierced rewatching or youtube videos and rewatching our podcast videos but that presence is a key pillar of your charisma and people who have quote UNQUOTE CHARISMA. Those charismatic people. They know how to get present in those moments that matter and it's something that you can practice and work towards. I know I was not often someone who was president in those conversations when I was struggling with some social anxiety and frustrating and feeling awkward. But it's something that I've worked with over time and having a lot more experience with it has allowed me to get present when I need to now. The second component of our charisma is enthusiasm actually delivering some positive emotion and Energy and fun and excitement into the conversation and this is called an emotional contagion and the reason that enthusiasm is so important is because it is literally contagious. If you remember back to being in Grade School Win your elementary school teacher would come in to class excited and over the top enthused and slowly but surely the classroom would start to light up with energy or replaying the tennis ball game or are we going outside for recess. We pick up on this signal so clearly in other humans and we become drawn to its magnetic. Well this is where being high value and working to be. A positive person comes into play positive. People are Happy People are attractive. People it will always be that way and I know the first minute. I'd say that everyone's like wow I know so. And so and they're not so and or I'm quite dour but people seem to like me. Yeah Yeah I get it. There's always going to be exceptions to the rule. There's no need to split. The reason is split hairs but as a general rule enthusiasm showing somebody that you're excited to be talking to them showing somebody that you're you're excited for the conversation that you're going to be having showing enthusiasm for where you are goes a long way and let let me go ahead and set this up. This is easy one. Think about this. You're going to roll into any venue. A social engagement. The first thing that everyone is doing is looking for social norms that are irregularities so meaning that that make you not safe for being there that first and foremost so you're looking for people who are not smiling you're angry you're upset any sort of tension a pressure in the room. Is The your first response? Second after that after you realize that you're safe and everything's okay here in the music now. Your rain goes to look for people who are smiling who are laughing who are enjoying themselves. And you're going to be drawn to those people why because there is enthusiasm. They're enjoying themselves. And you WANNA enjoy yourself so there is a natural magnetism there. A smile is the best thing that you can do for yourself.

twitter johnny Midwest Pittsburgh youtube Grade School Jason Detroit president tennis school teacher
"art" Discussed on The Art of Charm

The Art of Charm

11:55 min | 8 months ago

"art" Discussed on The Art of Charm

"We talk a lot about giving value. That is attention and appreciation and acceptance for others and people who are charismatic are generous with giving that value. They are not just focusing on impressing other people themselves. In fact they're focusing more on the world around them being someone who's president and engage in conversation and not forcing their way in or trying to impress someone for the wrong reasons and this myth this idea. That were born with charisma. While it's an old concept essentially as old as charisma itself and in fact the word. The root of the Greek word charisma means a divine gift. So of course we start out thinking. Oh well some people have it that politician. I look up to or that famous person that I follow. They were just born with it. They naturally had this charm and charisma. And here I am. I'm struggling and I don't think I'll ever develop it. So what's the point in working in this and it's really one of the main reasons we started this company. Fourteen years ago was to build this charisma and charm about ourselves and I know thinking back on my high school college years even Grad School years. I wouldn't be pinpointed as the most charismatic guy in the room it has been a process of growth for myself of not being in my head not feeling a little bit anxious or judging myself negatively but instead being present and being there as a great listener for others to spark that charisma and of course you can't tell yourself while. I'm just going to be more charismatic. What does that mean well? I think that's where everyone has a wrong because there's so many different ways of being able to develop Christmas and as I was mentioning it. I think it certainly comes down to being able to express yourself so that others have an emotional reaction that they can either bond with you or be re repel by but either way they're taking notice and I think that's why when we see a lot of marketing and we see a lot of people on I would say internet celebrities who are polarizing and the people who love them. You could almost say that. They're within that person's spell. I mean that's certainly part of it. I mean right. Isn't that one of the root ideas behind the idea of charm? So that those people who are able to fill connected they were able to see something that they were able to emotionally respond with in a positive way where everybody else is repelled by the same messages and we were just talking about. Somebody's marketing this morning. How there are. This is a very popular salesperson. Who who through their marketing garnered a large following and doing quite large events. That people seem to be really excited by. But when I've looked at the marketing I had been utterly repelled by the message that I was saying and this is why I think so. Many people are challenged by the idea of developing their Krizner. Because there is the good and the bad that's going to come with expressing yourself and it there's a lot of responsibility in that as well and I know that a lot of people who come through when they start to realize that they're getting a response in that feedback. Loops starts to work and people are reacting favourably. They also start to see that other people not reacting so favorably. And then you have to get comfortable with the idea that of who you WanNa be who you WANNA represent. What emotions do you want to engage an illicit from other people and you're GONNA have to be okay with that because now that you're gonNA put yourself out there? There will be people who just don't vibe with that and that's one of the factors in charisma is confidence. It's being confident enough to put your voice out there to share your perspective knowing that you're not going to please everyone. You're not gonNA have one hundred percent success with being charismatic. There are certainly people who are going to have an unfavorable view but the goal is to work towards communicating a first impression and interaction in a conversation that allows majority to feel good about that too left that conversation thinking positively of you absolutely the whole component we spend the whole second half of the program installing systems that allow you to build your confidence on a daily basis and as we talked about it on this show. You have an opportunity every day that you wake up of how you WanNa spend that day and what you want to get from it and when I understood that my time would be I can look at it of what I'm going to use it for. And what's the exchange that I'm getting back will? Then every opportunity to grow was a winner for me and depending what that growth and how that growth came and for me one of the interesting ideas behind it was strictly that I want to spend my time doing things that are going to allow me to be stronger in the character that I am developing so that when I do get any sort of that backlash I am fine. You think the market or that I was referring to is going to be upset if he figures out on this show. I'm talking about him. I highly doubt it. Yeah I think he's GonNa be just fine but anytime that you're going to do we have to deal with it here on this show and anything that we do on social media we have to deal with it and the only way to work through that is to be the continue growing confidently and one of the things. That's funny people think of Christmas. Something they're gonNA flip a switch and turn on and it's not and then they also think that the confidence component in this identity that they're about to develop is just going to turn on as well. Both parties are a process. And you are either a going to help yourself in that process or you're going to fight yourself the whole way through it and I've I've seen it both and if you want fast results get out of your own way and if you WANNA lie in your own personal torment then fight yourself on every step of the way. I don't know if you saw the latest message. In the in the of our participants who finally got out of his own way and wrote us a very nice letter detailing how he finally has realized that and and how wonderful his life had gotten once he had stopped and I commented I was like I had to sit here and watch you fight your yourself on every step of the way and for me. I can only point out. I can only show you where these things are but at the end of the day. That fight is on you right. In words to develop your charisma it takes a healthy dose of self awareness. And that's part of the reason that coaching helps support that. You know when we were even starting out I remember some of the earliest conversations we would have would be after going into a meaning would sirius. Xm Or going into meeting with the TV exact and debriefing and looking at it from all angles. And how did you feel about that? What did you think the first impression was on there? And what do you think my first impression was and really trying to dig a level deeper and figure out what was working for us and what wasn't working for us and I know you have a beautiful story of working in an environment that allowed you test these things on a daily basis before even started the company and going into your own little lab to get tips at the bar. It was an easy feeback loop so working in a bar and I basically had run of the place that was managing which is going to be interesting. When we talk to John Taffer but I would read certain self-development pieces that I would want to try and whether it will be something that I would be speaking compliments in different ways or how I was carrying myself and I was able to implement these things on a daily basis and then would be able to measure my results so to speak monetarily in the tips that I was making and after about a week or two depending on how I felt about it and Busy we were. There was a nice sample size of a data set to work with and I know for me when I first picked up. Dale Carnegie's famous book. How To win friends and influence people the switch. That flipped in my mind. Was this concept of just being more interested in other people and in those moments when I found myself a little socially anxious introverted or worried about what am I going to say. What can I add to this interaction? How can I impress these people? I realized that I was starting from the wrong frame. I was shooting myself in the foot before even showcase any Christmas because I was so focused on my own thoughts and actions and the second I started paying closer attention and conversation just taking interest asking a question. A layer deeper being expressive in a motive in my communication with other people. I started to notice a difference in the way that people not only interact with me but the perception that people were saying afterwards and the information I was coming back to me. And that's what got really fascinating to me around. Okay how can I keep honing this skill and develop this further and then I was fortunate enough to go an event in DC. And I did have an opportunity to run into some business leaders and one of them was Bill Clinton at the time and it was amazing to see that level of charisma where everyone in the room felt right. I was starting to have my little impact in my own little social bubble but to see it on a grander scale of literally. Everyone's is everyone's attention being unfocused on someone in when he's leaving everyone cooing and honoring and doing about amazing. That interaction was so. There's obviously degrees of charisma that we're working towards here as well and I think to your point it something not. We develop as a skill like any other skill on our tool belt. Some of US may have been an advantage where we grew up in a house that had a charismatic parent who was extroverted and outgoing that we could SORTA model and Mimic and pick up on some of these traits and maybe in our DNA we have a little bit more extroversion. We have a little more conscientiousness so it allows us to be a little bit more present in a little bit more outgoing in those situations. But even if you don't have those things even if you don't have the charismatic dad even if you don't have the extroversion that you would hope you can still work on developing out the skill. We know if you're a listener of this show. Well you've probably heard US talk about our week long boot camp in Sunny Los Angeles where we spent a week unlocking your charisma growing your social skills and boosting your emotional intelligence with science. Pack lectures drills and exercises. Well we've also decided to close the boot camp this August now. Why you ask well. After thirteen years and thousands of students. We are ready for our next challenge. We started corporate and military training in the last year. And we've taken on a number of executive coaching clients with the success of the show. Ceo's entrepreneurs special operators and professionals looking to gain an unfair advantage with personal yearlong coaching. From us. Now here's the thing. Social SKILLS CAN BE LEARNED. And when you master them well it opens up a whole new world of possibilities. So if you've been on the fence thinking about taking a program or wondering.

president Grad School Dale Carnegie Bill Clinton US Krizner Ceo John Taffer executive DC Los Angeles
"art" Discussed on The Art of Charm

The Art of Charm

07:24 min | 8 months ago

"art" Discussed on The Art of Charm

"Let's kick off today's toolbox episode. All about charisma and we're going to talk about what charisma is and why it's so powerful. Dispelling some miss and teach you how to develop it now. We all know we've been in the presence of a charismatic person. We all felt that feeling at the same time. It's often difficult to point at exactly. What makes that person so captivating? That's because charisma is not a single behavior instead. What science shows is that? It's actually a variety of traits that come together and make that charismatic person the center of attention. So we're going to go into the research breakdown. True Charisma into its individual traits. We're going to give you a lot of actual advice for each one so that you could be more charismatic right away and if you think that's going to be a lot well you might be right but here's a cool thing you don't have to learn all these traits at once even improving just one of them a little is going to give your charisma a boost and you're going to start saying the reactions of those around you change and it's going to propel you into practicing more and more so let's get started and bring some more charm into the world so we're going to delve right and I. We all know charismatic. People in fact when we think about our visualized charismatic a lot of times we think about politician celebrity people with high status and traditionally wealth. So of course when we encounter these people online. We see them in the movies. Were like Oh that must mean in order to be charismatic. You need status. You need wealthy need fame in order to be charismatic and the science actually proves differently in fact there are people who have none of those three things. You are still charismatic. And we're GONNA delve into their secrets today. But I know one of the things we had talked about previously on. The show is the Kobe Brian Interview. And when we had koby studio it was one of those transformative experiences. Witnessing his charisma and the way that he interacted with everyone here just lit up the room. And we've all had those experiences where we've been in a room with someone who just has that it factor but what is it. What is that it factor in? How can we cultivate that in ourselves? Not so we're going to be talking about today. I think we I want to start. With just a definition of charisma. It's a word that gets thrown around a lot and unfortunately because of that we all have our own sort of vague understanding of what it is but science actually defines it pretty clearly and we like psychology. Today's use they call. They write. Charisma is the ability to attract charm and influence the people around you so your ability to draw people in your ability to charm them. Stand out for the right reasons be memorable and of course have influence or persuade people on your perspective is what we are talking about today how to be charismatic and I know a lot of our boot camp participants wall. That's one of the goals that they have joining us here in. La is how can I become a more charismatic person? And one of the first things they notice after the program is that people. When you have charisma start reacting to you differently. They may not know exactly what it is about you. That's different but they notice a difference in our boot camp participants after the program. Oh did you get a haircut? Change your shirt. You look like you lost some weight. What is it about the way that you're carrying yourself that allows you to stand out? Well that is charisma. In and of itself. Why would definitely say that? Our first few days of the boot camp or focused on just that trying to bring out the charisma and then you know for our participants an opportunity to be able to to put together a feedback loop. So they're able to see that other people are seeing the only way that you can do that is to go out and so the guys are going out to to interact with people and hopefully get some wins and I think a big part of it is looking at both sides of your communication your verbal communication. And you're nonverbal communication because when those are in alignment when those are in Saint. That's when we really are charismatic. That's when people remember us for the right reasons but if our body language is signaling one thing and we're trying to stay with our words that of course that mismatch is going to lead people to feel that something is off about us. Something is not charismatic about us and of course we are drawn to charismatic people. Charismatic people end up being the politicians being the leaders that we follow because they have these strong credible signals of leadership. They evoke an emotional response in us and of course we want to serve them. We want to follow them. We look up to their lead and building that leadership role building. That charisma and ourselves is something that we can all do. We can all work towards and I know one of the books that we recommend to all boot camp. Participants is the charisma myth around this exact idea that you're not born with charisma. Certainly there is a part of charisma that can come from your genes. But for the most part we are picking up charisma from the world around us in our environment. Yeah and it's it's about finding out ways to express that and I think that's where the a lot of trouble gets in because everyone has their own ways that they have learned to be able to do that whether you're expressing that through creativity whether you're expressing that through your presentation whether you're expressing that through the words that you use to communicate there's many different ways to go about it and everyone has their own preferred ways that they've invested a lot of time in in order to get something out of it so and notice that all three of those things whether it's creating your presentation or the words you're using these are expressions of who you are so that people can become attracted to you when you find yourself in a herd or within a group you're looking to put together an opportunity for yourself to fit in which means that you have to certainly cooperate with what everyone else is wearing expressing themselves and creating however if you are looking just to be in the group and protected you're not going to do anything outside of that that is going to warrant much attention to herself. I think there's a fine line that everyone's trying to find. Which is what is enough of me being authentic and expressing myself without drawing the ire of the people around me. So I'm getting jealous of the value that I'm getting myself by expressing myself. Is there something interfering with your happiness or is preventing you from achieving your goals? Sometimes life does get the best view. And that's when we see counseling. It is in those moments to be able to bounce ideas off of people and hear your own thoughts as you speak them the law you to have a better understanding of what you need to do and better help will help you do that. Better help assess your needs a match you with your own licensed professional therapists and you can start communicating with them and under twenty four hours. You know. There's been a couple of times in my life where I have needed..

La Kobe Brian Saint
"art" Discussed on The Art of Charm

The Art of Charm

01:30 min | 8 months ago

"art" Discussed on The Art of Charm

"Welcome back to the artist charm. Podcast show where we bring you. Actual tips and strategies and hottest superchargers social skills and turn that boring small talk into smarttalk surrounding yourself with an army of high status individuals to grow your social capital. Unlock your head and charisma and crush and business love and live. And that's what we do here at the art of charm. I'm Johnny Aj. We're very excited about today's episode. It is a toolbox episode. All about charisma but first we have a special free training for you last month. We dropped our discover. Your core values free training. That's right we've had a lot of successful people here on the show over the last thirteen years. And what do they all have in common? They live a value driven life. That has helped them reach their incredible successes. They define their values channel them daily and communicate them clearly to everyone so we put together a free trade to help you do exactly that video one is all about defining what those core values are once and for all video to is all about living those values in your daily life and video number three teaches you how to communicate them. Check out the absolutely free training at the art of charm dot com slash panda or Tex. Panda two one. Six seven eight five zero six seven five four three tax panda as in panda bear or head on over to the charm dot com slash. Panda thank you for tuning in..

"art" Discussed on ART GAB

ART GAB

07:59 min | 10 months ago

"art" Discussed on ART GAB

"Definitely like made me want to own a business again in the future so that will happen to yeah. I think that's a a good thing to learn is like you don't have to stick with something and sometimes you learn what you really do like by trying something new Did you always WanNa do tattooing or did it Kinda just be you evolve indiscipline you like. Yeah no I actually grew up. You know in the nineties where everyone is getting like sunshine's tattooed on the lower back and stars on their shoulders. I never liked twos really at all like I never and when I would just like sit down and like all right well everyone's getting tattoo like what would I get. I could never decide on anything and just to undecisive for permanent decisions like that but throughout my life a lot of people have said like you should be a tattoo artist. WHO's like no? I am not punk rock enough. I don't listen to metal looking. Oh kick I'm not I don't like antitheses what a tattoo or is But it was so I just kind of put that like out of my mind forever But when I was closing the print shop I had There was a lady who was renting a little corner of the space and and she became a good friend of mine and she was the one who was like. Have you ever thought about being tattoo artist because I think you would kill it and and I was like yeah. I have been thinking about that recently. Because I've been watching you know. I have a friend who tattoos and watched her journey and she makes gorgeous just tattoos. That are like definitely works of art that hers and so I got to see it sort of evolved from like traditional Tattoo imagery to like people actually making an art of this I had no idea And then also sharing space with my now co worker Happy Camper used to be in the same building as darling press so. I also became friends with Tattoo artists. And he said you know if you're thinking about getting into tattooing you should go to an Asian food market. Get yourself some pigs ears and take it up into a my space and I'll set everything free and you can just you and just buzz away on the skin. That's not going to yell at you. If you screw up so says why did an The first thing tattooed was an owl and it looked really good and I said I think is what I should be doing. So I've never ever had a desire to be a tattoo tattoo artists until literally just starting school than digest made that choice and the no one for it because it also felt like a very like it could be a lucrative career and still being able to be like a true artist who myself so those things were really enticing like okay could make money and make imagery that is mine nine care about and I like so it felt if the right move when it came him up when it was brought into my life and the lady who suggested it just happened to be my very first appointment as a licensed tattoo artist also. Her Tattoo was my very first official tattoo as a licensed person which is cool which was really really cool little signs that like this is this is the way you should be doing Leah Yeah so what's next for you. I think in the future I would love to start my own. Tattoo shop I've got some ideas about that Eh. Just writing them down and sort of like low key planning That's definitely in my future. that sounds like a really fun. A fun journey not to have a private studio but I would love to actually hire other tattoo artists and get to pick and choose like our style. I guess And I think maybe if life slows down a little bit I wanna take some euro classes like I wanna think that'd be another. Are we to make semi permanent art. That's totally on my bucket list too. Yeah I've been eyeing. Yeah we should. We should attack it together. Okay I think. PNC has a mural class they do yeah and I worked with local artists. Gino Baba Ouaga his last Dat. Tae Think Anyway. He does murals in town and like kind of helped him on his projects. That's not cool although I think yeah I think it's within grassy. Yeah Le- we should totally do it. I would love to. It's definitely not like a thing you can do on in your own. I think you I think it'd be beneficial to learn from somebody like hunting. Maybe probably wouldn't go in the woods and student animal by yourself you you should go with somebody as your first trial. Yeah Yeah and then the first step is kind of intimidating to me like getting permission from I. Don't I don't know if I could get past the first really Kunin. My hands like you guys in like Ninja suit doing it and I asked her to uh-huh Black Knight from this in the daytime. You're like yeah so glad I didn't sign that. Ah Yeah Yeah well. We should reach out some days and do that. Yeah I've had a big hankering for making murals. Then I might just have a rental house right now so I can't really paint on the walls but I do wish that I could just play a big mural in my living room right now but I can't. You mentioned engined eighty second earlier I think. And we're just a block away from eighty second right now. There's so many walls that need. Yeah Yeah now part part of the car dealerships right. Yeah paint a dinosaur right done. Yes yes have you seen that guy on the Internet Ed. That is like he covers group like big graffiti signs like the the ones that aren't that great. You know. I guess more tags He does beautiful like oftentimes. It's like fruit. Usually something edible. Just kind of Improv. A strawberry overlake got Nazi sign and then people will come back and like tag his and then he'll just keep going with it you know. It's pretty lovely. Hopefully I feel like that might be where we would have to turn to if we did eighty second because we'd probably put something beautiful up and then there'd be like swastika on the next day we'd have to repaired for like Ida we fix. This could start a company that is just tag abatement. Yeah and we could just like up down eighty second going over yeah plank instead of like animals or something. Oh Yeah I would love that any the second just becomes as colorful street the parade of animals and love that well thank you so much for being here and it was really fun. Yeah Yeah this is my first podcast interview so it was very fun cool. Yeah thank thank you for having me so easily and uh.

Gino Baba Ouaga PNC Leah official Le Black Knight
"art" Discussed on ART GAB

ART GAB

09:00 min | 10 months ago

"art" Discussed on ART GAB

"Certain parts of the body sort of emulate that balloon fullness. I guess and that's a good thing you don't. Yeah half filled bulletin. No yeah and there's just parts it doesn't matter what size you are. We'll have half full balloon parts. You know the name of this full no balloon parts so like our vice up. You know. It's so everyone's gotTa Gigli biceps because that part is full muscle and when you're not using it it's just flabby are parts that are. They'll have heavy rotation there's a lot of skin there you have to really push that skin around For some reason like the torso rib area is just a challenge and it doesn't make any sense because it's still firm and it's not totally totally squishy but it's just a different kind of skin which I don't know how to describe but I've learned I've learned to do that because a lot of people want tattoos on their ribs. I don't know why but it's a really popular spot right now. What I'm going to go backwards? I liked what you said about the history of of Tattoos News. Is that something that you learned about in tattoos school or is that something. You've just in your own. Curiosity came. Yeah Tattoo School. Surprisingly didn't didn't teach me very much As a whole other story but I yeah I've just been that's been stuff I've just looked at on my own and I never have time to read. So I don't can't. I have books about tattoos throughout history and I haven't read them so I kind of rely on like instagram program and little bits of information like vice videos that we both went to school. Yeah wouldn't have been cool if they went over that. Yeah yeah outside of Yeah right yeah. It's a it's a part of our history for sure. Definitely I just heard a episode on on stuff. You should know another podcast about a guy. They found in the mountains that was frozen like the oldest mummy or something and tattoos on him. Yeah Yeah it's all also task is all over the world to I saw a national geographic with the image of a mummy woman from Peru. She had tattoos. It's all over her body to yeah. I love that so much. Yeah I think it's my turn to ask a question So if you if you could have a superpower what would it be and why the most important question Hon. My answer is like similar to most everybody's he's he's busy in life like. I really wish that I just tack on extra time to my days. That would be so amazing or if I could just you know someone comes in for a two hour touch appointment. I'm like well you know we're not quite done so I'm just GonNa stop everything except for us and we'll just add another the three hours time and then when you're done we will life will be as it was when you first came in. I would like to do that for sure. I never feel like I have enough time in the day to do all the things and sleep and eat. Yeah and relax especially especially in the winter like yeah. The days seem so short And I feel that Oh are especially in the winter. Yeah I feel like we're being bamboozled by time all the time. But we can't bamboozle time like we. We can't turn it around. They can take that. I did more in shorter amount of time. Like I edano. Yeah that's probably the closest I mean other than that. Be Really Cool to fly but yeah I think we're not in younger. I tried to go without sleep but Well no go and is not good for you. Either in flying would be read. Yeah I would like that a lot Ashley you have a new one mode. You're superhero power. Be I I like the flying thing and definitely like specially hitting me a lot is how much time in a day for sure I always I always feel that more in the winter under just because it gets dark. So early What is your dream? Project I would love was as well tattooing wise I can't wait until someone is like. You have my entire back of my body but just just use a whole back hole but all the way down the legs. Someone's like this is all yours and it's just put one big thing hang on somebody. That would be amazing. Would take an entire year but I love. I love thinking about like you know checking with a win. They come back in your like. How's your life been stripped down and let's talk about it Because it's just so much fun to design stuff for people's bodies and something large-scale scale be Super Fun and be if people come back and I know them then I don't have to deal with the scared part of meeting a new person so I'll that's like dream project there But beyond tattooing I definitely someday WanNa get into doing Merrill's us that's on my bucket list and and then I also WanNa start going back to the time thing. They don't make art for myself hardly anymore. ANYM- I'm like ever so it'd be great to also have a little studio to make art whether it's at my house or somewhere else is but I really miss. Ed just missed drawing and painting a lot so I would like to make more art for people tip by not on their bodies. Yeah Yeah do you WanNa talk about Darlene press at all or you could. Yeah 'cause we have have really focused on the tattoos but you do rations and your mom Will you were a lot of hats. Yeah Yeah for sure. And it's it's funny 'cause darling press was so awesome. It's sort of like when you have a good book series in the first book is like man that was good. I can't I'm so glad that I've done with x Nagy. The second book like doing press was like my first chapter or my like you know first book of all the things so like so much of that book bleeds over into what I'm currently reading. We're going to speak motive weekly. So Oh it's it also taught me that sometimes when something isn't working in your life it's a good idea to end it and that doesn't mean that you're failing it means that you're opening up your possibilities to something way better even if you don't know what those are so like pushing AH project that's just failing or you just can't figure out why it's just not even bringing joy like that to me is like failure in the hardest artis the hardest sense so starting that business running for nine years meeting all the people learning all the things learning learning how to lake invoice people and creating systems for jobs All that sites such valuable information that is directly influencing -fluenced my business now so that's that's like the most important thing to manage. Why don't like I guess quote unquote regret? Having being a business that I shut down MEA was a hard choice to shut it down bedroom so glad I did and I think that kind of sums up that that whole chapter of my life I I also don't love printing. Hey sometimes you also have to learn a new. You think to learn that you don't like it I tried illustrating children's books at one point and as soon as I did one I was like never again. Don't like this at all so I learned making seems like the opposite of tattoos in a way. Yeah yeah making multiples something to exist in the world whereas is one of a kind. Yeah Yeah it is pretty much the opposite they both take a Lotta process though Radcliffe big similarity I guess maybe reprinting insomnia learn that. Something's take a process as I'm kind of impatient sometime so processes another hard thing for me. Yeah yeah. I don't think he'll get back into print making that I. I can see if that part's done in my life too but a it's definitely like made me want to own a business again in the future so that will happen to yeah. I think that's a a good thing to learn is.

instagram Peru Radcliffe Ashley Merrill Darlene Nagy Ed
"art" Discussed on ART GAB

ART GAB

02:05 min | 11 months ago

"art" Discussed on ART GAB

"Com slash. Art Dash gathered a little little news for you guys. There's an art show a group art show down at the Corvallis art center called about light. I have a piece up and that it's up through December thirtieth with an artist talk on November. Twenty seventh also funded. New shows are up for the month of November including a great show curated curated by Elizabeth Alaska. And that's at Roussaly Gallery. All in I went to the opening of the new Jordan Schnitzer Museum of art at Portland State University. This awesome museum. Everybody it is down on Broadway and it's totally free and open to the public and it's from ten to five live on Tuesday through Saturday so stop by and check it out. It's really really amazing collection Ashley. How's it going good good Haven't done the branch French thing for a while but as a family we went and checked out the exhibit. My friend actually works for the guy that puts all together. So if you have a chance to check it out how blanking on the name already. So but that's the newest thing art. Why is that we've been up to Yeah so today's theme. We kinda talked a month ago. About a book I had been reading in a suggested it to Kendra. And we're also thinking about the guerrilla girls in how these two things kind of tied together. We didn't want to disapprove view a book but maybe a part of the book that relates to girl or girls action and things. So I okay the book it's called the Nightingale by Kristin Hannah. It's GonNa be a move very soon right. I think they're working on it right now and and I'll just read you a little description of it that found on Kristin Hannah's website was courage grace and powerful insight bestselling author Christa. Hannah captures the epic Panorama of World War Two illuminates an intimate. Part of history seldom seen the women's war. The nine Gail tells the story of two sisters separated by years and experienced experience by deals passion.

Kristin Hannah Jordan Schnitzer Museum of art Corvallis art center Art Dash Portland State University Elizabeth Alaska Roussaly Gallery Ashley Gail Christa
"art" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

12:24 min | 1 year ago

"art" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"UK Art Schools a moment when a world of possibility opens up to students from across the world but ups education in the UK is in Crisis Isis. The teaching of subjects in schools is under threat from the English baccalaureate or e back which ninety percent of people are expected to be entered for by twenty twenty five the People's steer towards subject seems crucial to young people's education. Get Arts are excluded meanwhile at art schools around Britain funding cuts and a steep increase in student tuition shouldn't fees over the last decade of create more inequality and more limited resources at art colleges creating a huge shift in the dynamics of the art college so this week's episode. It is an education special. We talked to the artist Patrick Brill or Bob and Roberta Smith about his campaign for arts place at the center of the curriculum often expressed directly in his art we look the National Art and design Saturday Club and initiative offering a free Saturday learning program founded by the design is Francis and John Searle and we talked to two professors at Goldsmiths College page about the precious and realities of art schools today in the US we took to the CO author of study on the Benefits of Art Education Schools Patrick Brill known. There's Bob and Roberta Smith is a leading British artist. WHO's campaigned ceaselessly in recent years for importance in the face of its marginalisation in English schools. He also teaches final at London. Metropolitan University and I went there to see him just as the academic year was kicking off this week Bob. When when did you first start making our about our education well. I think I when I was a child. I think all are really the all the artists I really love kind of pedagogues Paul Klee Joseph Boyce Bush. I I love the idea that arsov kind of conversational thing and it's a to and fro ing of ideas and so the idea of so are being educated is both of the artist is about curiosity and trying to find things out once you think you know something something the San Shift and you realize that you other things to be said about it so I do about our education self education in in some ways. I went to university time when they didn't really teach you anything at all. I was just left in a room for four years so I found I feel a bit like an auto diet really although although I university educated and so that's important but to ask you a question really precisely making art about problems without augmentation with two thousand ten when the Co that should govern came in one of the things that happened that I realized instantly is is that when that government came in and they had the those supported by the Liberals and the Conservatives they could throw away their manifestos on start again policies which had been endorsed by the electric a Michael Grove God bless him really took that to heart art and he before the election they were saying they weren't going to do any more educational changes you know because I was tired of constantly changing goalposts in education but he really went for it and he created the single the e back and it marginalized art in schools and I thought at the time I I mean I I I thought that was just an appalling structural change range which was going to damage on education and is one of those things we we sit in the bath and you hear this and you think oh well that means. I'll no not mean and that means that means this. It means to be less kids guide to galleries because they know about you know the V. A. Ah Students is going to damage design Britain British design you know maybe it's a bit of a myth but the idea in the nineteen sixties preached his I got really exciting using because the working classes invited into all schools basically in the fifties so so I just knew that was a bad idea and I started dotted campaigning about it immediately vertical attitude him and and I just did what I could and also I have educational -cational chops because my parents but my dad rand Chelsea art school in the nineteen sixties and so I kind of my dad weirdly gone to lobby Margaret Thatcher about outscores with Henry Moore the Josephs club and and so I kind of had this I have this so memo gene or something he's just he's just gotTa tell these politicians are wrong and I know in the art world I know in the art world and Artis Artisan they don't think about their secretary schoolteacher in fact there are more often lightly to say my art education secretary. It was terrible so I knew that they weren't necessarily going to get immediate support from artists necessarily and so. I thought going to do that and something I know about. It's also political now. I've always been bit of a political artists but it's something political that I really really no it inside out you know so. I'm not contributing just off the cuff remarks. You know I do know about the subject was sitting in an art school. You know I'm in London onto metropolitan. University is is the the main widening participation university in the in the country because of its location the students that we got and and so as an obstacle it's the most diverse outscore the country's pretty unique and so it's kind of a to know about these issues not just talking at the top of my head and it's interesting this idea that I think you're right in saying that very many artists had problematic experiences of being to art in schools but one of the things about when you are too is it does expand your horizons in the sense that for instance. I can remember you know yes. You were forced to de Tight. It'll still lives and things that didn't potentially a make you into an artist but also I was introduced to Dr. Ali and I was introduced to Matisse. Isn't that sent the that's. The thing that's being denied to children is just an opening up of their sensibilities isn't it. I think that's I think that's right and I mean I I. I met the art teacher the other day and and Mr Hawks and miss the Hawks really taught me anything but what Mr Hawks did was that he said he was really into dub reggae and what was the hawks did that. He said you've got to go to the anti-racist is to I N Al Carnival and so we traveled to Brixton and we saw Elvis Costello and the attractions turns and and all these bands you know and and it was an amazing experience so in a way that sort of this sort of spice vice. I think other teachers can do that but the this idea of the art room as a creative space. Is You know he's a very important thing for for children and really it's it's subject in schools where you where you can bring what what you know in other subjects too you know thinking about politics philosophy or mathematics or pattern or chemistry you know you can bring all that and and he can create a synthesis of all those kinds of ideas and in fact that's in college. I also knew it wasn't just about micro go and the changes to the APP but the it was the fact that that would have up and down the educative system so what's happening primary education who's the RSP. Let's be you know pretty much. Squeezed out of lots of primary education was totally wrong. You know anybody who knows the history of education thinks about people like mood off style. I mean I'm not an advocate of Steiner's education particularly but you know that children and learn language in a conversation with their parents and their peers fire visual imagery by looking at things by by joining the circle insane that's smother by drawing a square and saying that's dad and then you have the conversation says dialogical. There's something called joint attention. Actually human beings having dogs have exchanged Jay z's that we can we can talk about a third thing and have a relationship with a second person by this third thing is like a triangulation violation of imagery and ideas and art is absolutely principal to that visual allergies principle to that so squeezing our promise scores. This is like a real anti-humanitarian thing to do. It's going to ruin people's lives really not create better people for the jobs market so all of that all of that thinking rarely fueled a series of works and protests and films and ended up with me standing against Michael Govan election and it's still going on but for Thames and Hudson called. You are an artist which kind of outlines why people who don't think of themselves as artists should should think think of themselves as artists so there was tremendous support in the arts community in the visual arts community. Did you think that had an effect did the politicians listen today. Just plowing cloud. I think the effort by the arts community is created a bit of solidarity and a sense that the issue's important and also it's very important to gal people's take on issues It's not just one voice. Our isn't about mom person's voice so that's good but the all the politicians have taken absolutely no nothing from what we've been saying it's on they've plowed on with the back and they will continue to and and can't have listened to tour totally claw fears and damaging British education dodging educational prospects for kids and the damaging bridge rich design and our ability to you know. I think it's a bit of a myth. USPA about Britain being creative and all that everybody else culture around the world kind of colonialism but but actually you're you're completely butchering that USB politicians are doing that they care about the all they care about is league tables and Statistics and marketing and It's just totally wrong so it in essence what you're saying is in order for there to be a substantial shift in a way that the also taught in schools then they need to be a change of government well the needs to be more more than that there needs to be needs to be a change in a kind of global understanding of these things really. I mean creativity not in humanity and about are you know I mean the UN UN Charter. has it has it pretty much says kids should have access to their culture but all people now think should be four participants in that country from the off and and it needs to the on that level will is is about a change of government. I mean God. We need a checkup for so many reasons but it's not necessarily that tits to make the shift that we need in primary education it takes a shift in in how we conceive of Education Russian. There are people thinking along these lines in the peace league tables which is really the league tables. was the where they were the principal organizational force behind you know supporting mathematics and science subjects and technological subjects in the far. Always you know people people my go foot while we got to do it like Singapore that was because of the Pisa League tables well now..

Art Education Schools Bob UK Art Schools Roberta Smith Britain London Patrick Brill principal National Art Mr Hawks rand Chelsea art school Hawks UK Goldsmiths College secretary twenty twenty US Paul Klee Joseph Boyce Bush UN UN Charter. USPA
"art" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

The Art of Manliness

04:02 min | 1 year ago

"art" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

"Talk about what you looked at what you what you took in so this is obviously a really different different way of perception in general were so used to trying to rack up as many you know visual experiences as we possibly we can and I think people spend sometimes more time at museums reading the little placard next to the art as they look at the art so if you're if you force yourself south to look at something for that long it does shift your perception and you you obviously start to notice things that you overlooked the at first and maybe by the end of it. You even have a completely different understanding of the piece that you were looking at. That's the essence of looking slowly and you can do this not just with art with other stuff and you talked about some mm-hmm design teacher. That would say tell students like you to look at this rock but for like an hour yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah or packaging or you know. There's almost anything thing you can do this with. There's a different exercise in the book about looking out the window which sounds like such a sort of like try to have a range of things that are really super easy to delight you. The minute you pick up the book you can start participating in this what you could spend ten minutes looking out a window that you've always walked past. I mean think about that like in your life. There's a window that you walk past asked all the time. Maybe you glance out to see if the you know the world is on fire but you don't really you couldn't really tell me anything about what's the view from that window window and spend ten minutes looking out a window and look at every edge of what you can perceive then do it again a week later and see what's changed. You know so it's it's applicable in all kinds of contexts. Throw did like looking solely exercises. He would just look at a plant or bug for hours hours like the entire day. Yes and people are people are dismissive of that because it's like well you know there was nothing to do and now you can now. You can play Pokemon. Go or whatever and it's true. We have more distractions at our fingertips but there are good reasons to sometime say I don't need to do that like like I want to. I want to pick up on yeah. Looking at watch spend ten minutes watching a book crawl. You know kids do it and kids love it and there's something something to be said for reconnecting with that childhood innocence and wonder and seeing the world. No yeah that you talk about kids have a natural disposition listen to do that and I saw this firsthand. We were in vacation on vacation in Vermont and my daughter is five. She went to the river to go swim but she was like in the shallow hello section and she was there for probably a half hour hands knees just looking looking for rocks and she was looking for and she just sat there like or it literally a half an hour and it's also fun to see her because she has her own little collections. She's got rock collections yeah and she's always look for loose change and find it all the time because she knows where to look like she goes to places where people overlook so we were at a ice cream store the other day and there was like a vending machine and so she like went went underneath the vending machine and she pulled out all this. That's great and it's great that you pick up on that. You know that you you can. I'm always telling people like that. Kids are good inspiration for this kinda thing and if you have access to a child you now take inspiration from pay attention to what they're paying attention to because they don't have that jaded feeling of having seen it all before the world is full of wonder. Saul bellow used to talk about trying to view the world like an alien kit for kids that comes naturally they. They sort of are aliens. You know it's all rival to them so they get get very excited about things and we shouldn't dismiss that we should embrace it and we should be jealous. We're GONNA take a quick break for more sponsors. Hiring can be a slow process this cafe Torres. Coo Dylan Moskowitz needed to hire a director of coffee for his organic coffee company but he was having trouble finding qualified candidates.

Coo Dylan Moskowitz Saul bellow Vermont director ten minutes
"art" Discussed on ART GAB

ART GAB

15:27 min | 1 year ago

"art" Discussed on ART GAB

"I'll boil together like a Gumbo but not Yeah but you get those things you boil them listen seasoning and then you dump on a table Put some newspaper down you dump it on the table and you season it and you just like with butter and stuff you just like. It's like what you do in the summer. I'm just off of newspaper. Are we had that at Miss Delta in Portland. Oh Yeah Yeah. was that totally like that. Yeah I've had that of. Oh another thing I have there that haven't seen in the northwest. is she crab soup. Wow was that I could be totally making this up. But I think it's Sherry Um with crab meat and then like crab egg something about. That's why it's called. She cooks I could have made all that up. They could have dreamt it and I never had that in. Just been a dream of mine. Nobody did have that it was it was like clam chowder but it was is like I could taste the share unit anyway. That was cool. So what's that over there. So Oh this is. Another favorite thing of mine is the walking through town. There's there's this market in its covered but it's outdoors kinda thing and it's been there forever forever. I don't and didn't write it down the name of it. It's GonNa come to me after this but it's a anyway it's just a market market where people sell like like a Saturday market kind of but it's every day In there was a lot of sweetgrass baskets and this is like an art form. Let's baskets of all different shapes and sizes even little cute flowers woven into roses roses. And like you see a lot of kids filling them for five dollars or something but these baskets are super elaborate Baskets some seven with handles some not some like just really intricate details in all hand woven. Let me just read to you locate about him so but these sold there was probably like ten vendors in this outside market where I believe this history. A brief history of that market is where Slaves at go and buy Produce in stuff at the market There I think it's it could have this wrong but I think a lot. The people think that slaves were sold at this market. But it wasn't that where they were sold they would go and shop there so a lot of people think that's the area that slaves were bought and sold not the different area. This is an area where the slaves went and bought produce in sold things I see. So that's where I think people get the mixed up where the slaves were bought and sold is a different building. That is now museum. Oh so the market. It was where they went and bought and sold things. I if it's wrong then let me know but I'm pretty sure that's that's that so So they're called sweetgrass baskets and they were introduced to low country in the seventeenth century by West Africans. Sweetgrass basket has become a low country. Trademark Africans brought the basket making skill when they arrived to the low countries slaves sweet grass is an indigenous bowl. Rush that strong in your cell phone it thrives in the sandy soil of the southern coast and a sweetgrass basket is considered to be a prize cultural souvenir leaving near a little history is enslaved. Africans often made baskets for use on plantations as well as for commerce many who were no longer able to work in the field spend their days making these beautiful hand woven works of art the art of making baskets from sweetgrass began to change changed. Due to the civil war and emancipation. Women began making them considerably smaller. In order to use in their homes for storing food. After the civil war mount pleasant in particular drew many black families that began mass producing show baskets for profit in the nineteen hundres..

Sherry Um Miss Delta Portland five dollars
"art" Discussed on ART GAB

ART GAB

13:23 min | 1 year ago

"art" Discussed on ART GAB

"Bigger jaw wider jaw. Okay so are they aggressive either of them. I don't okay so when is in Louisiana. We went on the Soi fan vote and and they're not aggressive right so they don't like the idea of sharks that everyone thinks dangerous but really they don't know yeah they're not by I. I don't know that they can see are like they. I think they might be like colorblind. I don't know actually but I think we should just go with Danone. There's there's facts about them in their eyesight in what they eat and all that and we should totally those facts on our website. which is What was the website sometime creative? Yes dot com but yet they're out in If you've seen the movie the notebook where they're in this pond like area. We actually heard me in her husband. John's we call him John Ski were in the boat in the same area that they shot the notebook. Is that the one with Jeff Bridges. No I don't have survived with Ryan. Gosling okay yes either. Yeah Yeah but anyway in the movie. There's a ton of swans in that pond it's a swamp actually There's no swans they either. CGI those boys in or they Friedemann they brought about a bunch in but we did see now Agadir in that swamp and he was just chilling but swampy waters are cool because they look black water. But it's just like I think all the plant life analogy that makes it. That color is what I'm guessing. I might just made up but that was fun. London Lily pads in there Okay so back to the art so you guys kiss alive run a boat. Yeah I mean Sadie is like a natural born Tour Guide like. She's just really good at it. She's like the whole time she's been there. She's been like studying up on the animals. The wildlife all that Yeah that's awesome so we did a lot of like walking around and not nature stuff than we did. Go to the Gibbs Museum of art and that's in Charleston. It's like a three story building three floors of art and I think they do classes there. And and what did you see well They had furniture in like early early like eighteen hundred stuff and artwork but they also had a lot of Charleston cultural art there too from the different ages his but one thing so to narrow it down I was GonNa talk about what's called the miniature portraits and those were really cool so so I'll kind of read about what they are but it just like a general idea they're little tiny portrait's that people would keeping their like pocket in on them Kinda like in modern daytime. That'd be like our cell phone. Victors on him or even a couple years back a wallet with Pictures and these were hand painted On ivory. Oh Neat Yeah. And then they. They were like sealed with a lacquer. I don't know At the museum they have like all the information about how it's done but they're on display. They have a lot of jurors full of these really intricate really cool little many portraits. The people who carry these pocket to kind of like like if they were travelling can remember their loved ones or like share them with people show like. Hey this is my son. You're you're right. Yeah so it's like so so in a time before photography where there is no pictures. These were awaited like document birth graduation from high school. Or even your wedding day. So that's kind of how they would record those special moments and life. They were kind of like a memento demento or a token of affection many portraits are hand held paintings drilling created with watercolor paint on thin sheets of ivory. These intimate images were carried or worn by both men and women as a means to keep loved ones. Close out heart even when they were not physically present so a little history early miniature purchasing it evolved from Medieval manuscript illuminations. In classical portrait's medallions from ancient Greece and Rome. They became especially popular during the sixteenth century. Reign of Elizabeth of England and the popularity of these momentous lamented spread from court down to the wealthy merchants though it was kind of more of a wealthy person thing to have so every became the medium of choice around the seventeen hundreds ivory lint natural luminescence to the paintings that made the sitter skin glow. That's what I was wondering. If it was like that kind of to add kind of the texture yeah like more things were done in every now it's illegal of course but like even like antique seeks stores. I don't think can even sell ivory. I could be totally wrong on that but I'm just wondering that is porous material or is it like a shell shell material word be kind of you know like a shell how has like in the IRIDESCENT. Yeah I like. It's more like a shell because I've seen people that are the carving it I may be wrong to because yeah you're right leg bone you've seen bone art right people carving Yeah Ed Murray of New Zealand. They do a lot of bone carbons. It'll be like a cow's lake bone or something or whatever and it's really Qalat more porous so No though was says every this new medium allowed artists to create images of greater elegance and refinement. Amount than possible on them So the European settlers brought the miniature purchase with them to colonial America columnists continue to desire Zaire miniatures therefore turn to local artists. In contrast to European miniatures characterized by romantic. Nigel is style early American miniatures. Churches are simple and more realistic such as the circuit. Seventeen forty image by Mary. Roberts America's first woman miniaturist surest so Mary Roberts. There's like a little example Mary but we could make a post that line. V Great so even window Charleston was home to many great miniature painters. It also quickly became a destination for visiting and traveling. Art is these artists with different. Artistic backgrounds in techniques influenced the production of Charleston's to influential miniature artists who left a mark on Charleston. Were James Peel. Edward Green mouth bowed. Both artists synthesize the sophistication of the European painters with the realism of American artists. Malabon visited Charleston. Several times in his style greatly influenced the work of Charles Frazier like Melbourne Frazier created elegant images of number of Charleston's prominent citizens. Did you say James Peel. Oh I've seen his work is yeah James Really Cool beautiful still live. I guess he mean by down like more down to earth like the hair is not necessarily perfectly perfectly placed as a little scruffy more like a candidate. Shy seems really American right like at that time we were like a little little rough and tumble country. Yeah so the importance of the Gibbs miniature collection. The reason it's important is I think because it was kind of the starting point in America was Charleston further miniature portraits. I kind of started. There is what I gather The first American miniature portraits were painted eighteen in Charleston and today the GID is home to one of the most prestigious portrait miniature collections in the United States if you go to South Carolina China and go to Charleston and the Gibbs Museum. That's the biggest collection in this kind of started They contain more than six hundred items. Then collect the collection spans nearly two hundred years and represents the work of six hundred plus there and then so some of the artists. I've already already said but very Roberts Jeremiah. Henry Been Bridge. Charles Wilson Peel pure Henry Edward Green in Melbourne. George engelhardt and Charles Frazier cool. I was just thinking like what what stood out to you like. Why were you so interested in it? But then I'm thinking you like little things don't you. Oh my God like don't even get me started There's this person on instagram. That makes the hamster like little burritos. And I think it's just it's just it's just the best thing in little houses And little I don't know why it's so great things about our salute always gonna say so what stood out. I took a picture of it. At the Gibbs. There was this little miniature portrait and it was a little palm tree in the it was made out of someone's hair. Oh Hey cool yes so that might be a whole `nother show but like hair. Yeah the little portrait's yeah. Wow that is pretty cool. The victorians Taurean used to use hair a lot for like the race leaflets. Yeah so that would be really cool thing to talk about. It's like how I've never heard of it Being added to a painting before. That's really cool. Yes like most of these little portrait but like as you can see on this. There's a I saw on paying like an eye but the one that really stood out to me in that show was little it wasn't even a portrait was just a little palm tree made out of someone's hair portrait or Plumtree. Yeah but if I ever come across. It's like hair jewelry or art. It's mine that totally makes them. It's just so cool So yeah that was the miniature portrait's in sadie bought me a little magnet of the sky. James School Bread Gibbs. He is so and then she got Miss James School Bread Gibbs so on her fridge her house. She's got the lady I got the guy and they're just like the bottom autumn in the Gift Shop there but hand painted little tiny portraits of the museum's namesake. That's pretty impressive. Yeah so what was the so okay. So was the have questions for you to questions Jay interview. Yeah go before. I don't know I might make up answers. Okay so where did you go. What did you see who is it by? Oh here we go. What was your favorite part of appear? Tightrope that's hard. I liked the museum. We also did did paddle boarding and we went on a day. That must have been just a weird crazy fate day but the waters were so calm And we saw so many dolphins like six feet away from me to dolphins next to my paddleboard. Yeah and we saw tons of like fish puppy into surface like an insane amount of fish to sound like popcorn right by us and we saw like birds diving in and getting them like right in front of is kind of crazy. That was cool just is like nature stuff. I would say that was one of my favorites and just just you know the food food was fun. Cause a lot of southern food But isn't really here. Did you have any low country boil. I had had grits and Okra and oil peanuts and fried chicken and waffles. I I mean I'm sure we could get it here but it's just like it's nice having it in a place that it's made more regularly. That was cool but I don't think I had what you say. Oh little country boil. It's like mentor get it. Wrong and duly sausage prawns.

Charleston Gibbs Charles Frazier Gibbs Museum of art America Jeff Bridges Mary Roberts John Ski James Peel Gosling Louisiana Agadir Ryan Gibbs Museum lake bone Sadie Greece Roberts America Rome New Zealand
"art" Discussed on ART GAB

ART GAB

13:40 min | 1 year ago

"art" Discussed on ART GAB

"Is Andrew. She's Ashley it was. Your Week is good Fasted some wine tastings with friends yesterday. Perfect vic weather for it. So yeah why sailor man. That's are there a lot of wineries and when my gosh it could just like a winery per per couple miles. It's crazy. Do remember the timely to grandma to the Willamette valley vineyards. Yeah vaguely. It's nice. Yeah it's beautiful. Oh an enchanted. I is right by there and I had a friend post pictures. She went to jam forest. And it gets me excited. 'cause as I really want to go and we should take all over my gosh. That's funniest mention that. Because I was thinking that this week I was like me. She told him do that. And I had friends post at a timber game They did a shout out to enchanted forest and had like a big old like enchant for sign. So it's the geist everybody's thinking about it so if we go. It's going to be insane but it'll be `institution of Salem in Oregon. Yeah it it. Is this a big part of the character of Oregon is pretty great. Did you know Christopher told me this. Did you know that the Humpty dumpty statue issue there actually did fall off a few years ago. I seems appropriate like it needs to at some point to live up to its name. Yeah Yeah I can't wait to go 'cause it's yeah all the perfect size. I mean he's young enough to go to the The rabbit hole small enough. But he's big. You'RE GONNA have to do the fun things like the big slide with the The woman who lives in shoe and then there's the witch I wonder if he'd be too scared by the way he loves me scared. Yeah he loves it he He went to the The calls it the what. What does he call it? The scary mansion the haunted mansion at the gross best evil. Oh Nice though. He's still talking about it and that was a while ago. He's loves is it. I've had a busy week. I sold a painting which is pretty. Cool I didn't charge enough and so now I'm having to ship it and the cost of shipping is like you're making nothing yet story of my life. We never charged what we should. Ah I like to think that we're maybe building a legacy and like bringing it to the world is great but I need to learn to charge more for my work because I got to pay for at least for the shipping. You know one thing that I've been doing which is really cool speaking of legacy. I'm helping artists do a mural. Oh yeah that's rape a saw that I wanted to help with. That is still going on. She totally help. Is that central city concern the new Blackburn Building on one hundred twenty second and burnside and it's with artists law. Gay Day he's been around for a for Awad. WHO's been Portland for like thirty years? He's a great narrowest. He's like the really fun him and his wife Runout or really fun to hang out with and It feels like you're actually contributing something to you know. The larger community plus central city concerned. US really cool. Oh things for people that are recovering from a multitude of things. Behave totally me there. Yeah can anybody get involved because this'll be shoutout to like people wanting to maybe help out. Yeah sure yeah Should US Neil and I'll give you all the details Cool I don't see why not. I mean they need help. So is it a big mural and and we're at that stage where mortgage just basically telling us where to paint and It's like highly like pattern oriented mostly black and white Three actually really satisfying nice. Yeah Yeah I mean girls. In general there needs to be more of them. Like I drive around in Salem. All the time I am an like Ho is such a big blank. Wall needs to be painted on right or you see like crappy tagging people just right their name hate that you see that and actually it's like a little more effort into it like no I like graffiti. If it's like well done. Yeah they know tagging out some color. You're targeting tagging just hubris. It's just people that are like I'm full of or whatever But yeah look put a little bit of effort into it but I was gonna say that murals are a great deterrent. I've heard that so like people are less likely to tag that area. There's aren't there. More reason to put more murals right and only other. By the way on the other thing I was going to mention is that I got really lucky. I got to go see the Karen. Kill Garren and Georgia heart stark. He saw that yeah awesome. I just started reading reading their book. While audio I got a book with with going to there was a book. Talk it revolution hall weeks back. It was really cool. I Love Them. It's actually there's some pretty sad parts in the book but it's also like heartwarming. I Dunno it's good idea. I just started it. Yeah I think so you know. It's They are the the people in charge of a podcast called my favorite murder. It's really good podcast. But it's kind of dark humor but it's also just it is really good about. I mean touch other subjects of what it means to be away really. Yeah and I like it. 'cause they're big advocates of mental health then link so yeah the title Kinda throw you off but if you get into the show. It's really really heartwarming. And there for people that may be fill alone and empowering and to we'll get there but it's pretty great yeah totally they were. They're reading their book. A little bit there are being interviewed by someone. 'cause pals does this series where they interview Authors and. I think that they might have had such a large following that. They didn't want to do it at Powell. So that's why they moved it revolution hall so it was kind of set up the interview them about their book. Yeah Yeah and then read some of the book and they talked about other things. Nice yeah I wanted to go to their things but they sell not really fast when they do shows and stuff so you had cancelled so really lucky but one thing they mentioned and I thought that I like I like this. A lot was them. They were asked. Why do you think it is that most of your followers are women? I mean what what is it. Why is it that women really like back the fuck politeness towering women's no I was GONNA say true crime but because it is kind of a thing and I liked how they responded to it they were just basically like they didn't want to be the voice of all women mm-hmm and they were just like well people like it? Yeah because it's Yeah it makes you feel yeah the fuck politeness thing. Yeah fuel empower in like I also think I they didn't say this but it but the question that me thinking by like We are asked to empathize with people right. I mean it's important. Empty is important in society. We need empathize with people in there. What what they're going through and I think for some reason they're show gets me thinking about murderers in like that challenge of empathizing with them? I mean so hard to understand why someone would ever do that. You know and so I think that challenges kind of fascinating like how like I really do want to understand but I never will never fully understand but then it will put you in a different mindset to understand. There might be mental health problems the other issues besides like they just did this horrible thing. It's Kinda like getting to the core in psyche McKee of like another human being Fascinating challenging but I've been watching a lot of dexter like I just started dexter. So that's a really sidebar. Interesting psychology murder. nece I just I was thinking like why do we drink bottled water. Like I just have to Burp the whole uh-huh so okay. So we got really dark really fast. Maybe we should lighten up and talk about South Carolina a little bit start but like everybody should understand that there's another side to life and then it makes you appreciate the happier times even more. I know right. This really makes me want to start talking about brands Bacon. Because I know that so nixed us. Yes Oh but like that's a little teaser Francis Bacon and Lucian Freud whose Mike Anyway. Yeah Yeah so getting down to South Carolina so actually went to South Carolina last week. Is that a friend but also specifically to see art. Yeah our listener listener. stadi- this episode. Three you so in general. There's a a lot of art galleries there. I was surprised. I mean I'm not I don't know if that's the right word but it was just like. Where were you in south God Charleston? My friend lives in Daniel Island which is like half an hour A lot of water. It was fun. It was it's weird because it's the United States but it's were were from Oregon so we're just the babies we don't have any like older. Her history really are like older buildings. Just like it's just a lot older than Oregon's feels it feels very different to write like even though it feels like another country but it's still the United States the origins of it are totally different and the food and the culture her the buildings everything that people I don't know why is the buildings so funny I was just with like I don't know. Is it much older than or in. I mean seventeen hundred. Okay yeah so a hundred years older. Well I mean historically they they keep their buildings they like. There's my friend was telling me that there's a lot of billions. I can't tear down and they have to get the okay to restore it and you have to restore it a certain way. So it's like the whole city is on historic register so like you can't the house and then totally change it up. You have to go by a code or something okay to remember like the billions in the churches are all the tallest points there. Okay there's one building that's like vigor. But even their biggest bullying is like not very tall at all So the whole town is just very old timey okay and there's like giving cobblestone some cobblestone roads still So face I don't wear heels there. It's a way to break your ankle. So where wedges if we're going to be fancy and if if you're not gonNA fancy where comfortable shoes sensible shoes there's a lot of walking I was GonNa ask you okay so you heard a lot of galleries Geller Ellerslie. We walked through the town and just saw like walked. Pass a law but there was a brochure of downtown Charleston Galleries and and listed in this pamphlet is like forty two galleries. And that's just within like like a ten block radius like wow maybe be a little further out but you can see on this map. They're all like condensed in that area. So there's quite a bit that's really cool so a city from there. No she's she's there she's GonNa be actually moving pretty soon she That's a nice thing is the wildlife is totally different than here completely different right. So Ponte's there's alligators lizards her. Just hanging out okay. So we're at a bar outside. There's just like lizards. There's on the wall and I'm like Oh it's not what you see in Oregon. Yeah you see like squirrels rather yeah. They're squirrels there but they were like bread red squirrels. You look like ours but they were like more skittish seem like ours to seem like fatter. Like hey what's up in these ones are just like I gotta go go. There's a cocktail. They're no not cocktail. Alligator alligators DR which are alligators. Crocodiles Dinner Bill and then link. Alligators are.

Oregon Salem South Carolina Willamette valley vineyards Ashley Andrew United States Blackburn Building Humpty Christopher Awad rape Portland Neil Ho Ponte murder Garren Daniel Island burnside
"art" Discussed on ART GAB

ART GAB

12:59 min | 1 year ago

"art" Discussed on ART GAB

"You know. I mean they're there purposeful but but they mask these other deeper anxieties or or or fears or wishes. And you know again to me like that. That's where art plays not just my art but really good art kind of opens you up to two looking and thinking and experiencing the world in in a different way you know. I won't say more more deeply but Yeah just just opens up a different way so like what artists do you. You think needs more recognition. And why do you have any artists that really stand out to you. Kendra Larson. That's it. It's hard I mean. I think there's so many talented artists and I think part of the problem is that I don't know enough of the ones that that are deserving if more recognition because they're not in in the catalogs or the museums and you know what what one interesting thing that I I like to do when I when I go to. Museum is C- A painting not by famous artists or or a painting haning by an artist who is famous. But it's not like part of their their well-known style and that's to me is really interesting because that kind of tells me that there As artists were often experimenting and I think developing a style and developing a really successful style. I guess that's why I really respect like Philip Guston and other artists who are willing to take these big chances and really change up the way that they work or to risk you know not having Success because they've changed the establishment successful. Yeah you know. Actually the Portland Art Museum. I used to think thinks that. Oh man we don't have any famous pieces this is like kind of a lame you see But now actually thinking about it and hearing you say that I mean we have have a lot of amazing art. The Portland Art Museum is just not the the well-known pieces by those artists. So I'm thinking of There's a few Hugh Morris Graves. I mean there's A. I think that there is a few. There's a Milton Avery. There that are like lesser known by those artists but it maybe that it actually makes them more special because they're part of their body of work that are not super well known you know they. They took more risks with them. And I don't know so that's yeah and that's I mean I do think that that's interesting and Or that rather than getting a third rate work by you know a famous artist get like a first rate work by an artist. That's less than on. I mean I think you're totally that would be I'd rather see Like I think they're working towards that. Yeah but that's like a great idea. Just go to the museum. In Tennessee student stands out. He'll oh you may not know the name but it starts there and find out more about that person. And that's how I came across our Pinkham. Ryder Oh yeah. Work work like that. His work amazing. Yeah and but you also brought some books I did. I brought some Some catalogs of premier. I was looking at the Vermeer. Show in Washington. DC At the National Gallery. I can't remember when it was but it's probably over ten years ago now and it was like this amazing amazing. I don't feel ever be able to do it again. But they put together like what he make like forty five paintings that are still in existence and they had like thirty thirty of them or something and again. He'd never been someone that I I loved or was influenced by but seeing these. These works in person like you made reference into that earlier that Hockney said that they were these perfect paintings and they were so beautiful full of light light and just kind of geometrically anyone who's who's got a great sense of composition. I really respect because that's something I'm so I feel so. Oh week at but then also again the sense of intimacy these these interiors the sense of these these people inhabiting his. You've been here. I have an opinion about Eh. There aren't enough dogs vermeer. Paintings do definitely a problem but anyways I ah learning a little bit about what was happening in the Netherlands at that time it is kind of this time where people are thinking talking more about the individual psychology and individual people's interior lives. And I feel like he really captured that sense. So of these people doing really ordinary activities Making lace or pouring a jug of milk or writing letter letter or something And yet those moments are so beautiful nurse. Oh like They're they're amazing. Did you guys see there was a movie can't remember the name of the movie now but it was It was a movie something sensitive lifer I can't remember but it was all about With Brad Pitt. And Sean Sean Penn was in it and It was it was a really interesting film that was it was was like three segments of a person's life and I think having Brad Pitt was one of the one of the guys. So it's like him growing up as a teenager and his his family and then him as an adult and then him as an old person and at the end like all these different threads are drawn again and learn literally on a beach and he's he's he's there with his father easier with his family. The reason I'm bringing it up as Saikia that this any average moment of your life can be this incredibly beautiful thing if you just look look at it through a different Lens right like just making breakfast for your kid with the Sun Shining in on a beautiful day and you're just you know you're just there and That's the kind of moment I think. Premier captures lot in his work. Assist these these these moments of quiet repose or contemplation to playstation or activity that are just humane in in Profound is because there's there's something personal they're like something you can relate to even though it was a different time but that some of these activities pouring milk or whatever it's like we can still relate to it and that these are actually people and yeah I mean there's definitely there's definitely that part and then I think also as a painter. He was so generous. I mean there was something very The light and the color and the garments and the patterns. I think everything was really meticulous about putting together these compositions these these paintings And you know someone. I mean really interested in in in making these paintings like better than they had to be just because he was really invested in in making These paintings like all the all the you know. Tricks of the trade like right like color. Light composition gesture touch pattern later nick cutter just like talk about a master and everything in the composition is really purposeful and yeah I I like that idea that it was just a quiet moment. A universal quiet timeless quiet moment fairly pose just like day. Nothing thing. No huge like it's not like You know this historical paintings where they're like lay slain dragons not like these giant gestures. Quiet quiet small gestures does point to it. Makes me think differently by my day and these definitely have I mean there's there's symbolism there and there's there's a lot of like biblical references but they're the kind of subsumed I kind of feel like they're The symbolism that's in these is something that I'm less interested rested in then I think he found a way to hit that part of these of these paintings because that's what his audience and that's what was important but I think he transcended that by focusing on real people in real space doing every day or near activities. Thank thank you. So what's your dream project if you haven't already begun in or done in. I don't think I have a dream shrink project so much as I wish I just had sort of unlimited time space money to just continue continue exploring painting Feel like I'm in a good place now with with with my work I feel like I'm getting closer to what I wanna I do in in Within painting yet. I don't have like a big ambitious wanting to paint the ceiling for the Sistine Chapel or something like that it's more being able to continue to grow and learn as as a painter. You know the challenge I think is having time space The money and and and Benue. So maybe that's the thing is like the dream would be to have a big venue of a lot of these paintings That aren't just for the art world world. That regular people could come in and spend time you know have couches in front of every painting and I guess that would be. That would be something. You could rent an airplane hangar. Yeah and we can all just hanging out like one of those really hot days in the summer. Hang out not worry about working gets but if it's a cream project project and I should be more ambitious about couches and food no TV. No No Probably no music. No no distraction just like couches food drink people hanging out. What kind of food drink like whatever the people want not not chips and salsa me but you know like nice nicer not like heavy food or whatever but like finger food? Okay Mike. Christopher has anything okay no I was just going to say how long is GonNa take you to pick out the coach. I know somebody else. That's why there'll be tons of couch all the reorder I was thinking like it'd be a place where you just dream of food. You wanted appears appears. Oh yeah throw that into the yeah. Now I'm thinking about that'd be a cool place. I like that you're putting couches next to your paintings in front of Nutley under them. No no Nelson Yeah. I know what you're saying. Yeah none of those benches that they have in the museum but like real couch right comparable culture early boy. Yeah love seats Ottomans. In bed chairs lava lava lamps dare say special section with you do do you deal mainly in oil and acrylic. Do you have any other media art you like to Dabble in you know. It's it's interesting. I kind of have honed in to this thing that maybe it's too narrow but I've done some some Gosh and some watercolor and and Drawing Really I mean there's drawing in the painting but but as I used to to draw a charcoal Much more but I I would say the last ten years I've really just because I don't have unlimited time. It's really been when when I've time it's either making or prepping or or or doing paintings. It's not a drawing practice at all anymore. I could see that because I feel like I feel like whenever ever I draw and then paint Everybody worked out so much in the drawing the with the paintings kind of they lose something maybe and your George Europeans. I feel. I feel that you're exploring and learning every step of the way and so they almost feel like the. The preliminary sketches are in in the painting to. That's exciting. That's right. Do you want to answering number ten..

Portland Art Museum Brad Pitt Kendra Larson Philip Guston Milton Avery Sean Sean Penn Netherlands Washington Hugh Morris Graves Sistine Chapel Tennessee Pinkham DC Ryder Hockney Saikia nick cutter Benue National Gallery