35 Burst results for "ARC"

Williams has 27, Celtics make 22 3s in Game 7 rout of Bucks

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 5 d ago

Williams has 27, Celtics make 22 3s in Game 7 rout of Bucks

"The the the the Celtics Celtics Celtics Celtics are are are are in in in in the the the the Eastern Eastern Eastern Eastern Conference Conference Conference Conference finals finals finals finals after after after after knocking knocking knocking knocking out out out out the the the the defending defending defending defending champs champs champs champs one one one one oh oh oh oh nine nine nine nine eighty eighty eighty eighty one one one one over over over over the the the the box box box box Boston Boston Boston Boston did did did did it it it it with with with with a a a a three three three three point point point point barrage barrage barrage barrage in in in in the the the the game game game game seven seven seven seven victory victory victory victory nailing nailing nailing nailing twenty twenty twenty twenty two two two two from from from from beyond beyond beyond beyond the the the the arc arc arc arc grant grant grant grant Williams Williams Williams Williams was was was was the the the the Celtics Celtics Celtics Celtics long long long long range range range range master master master master hitting hitting hitting hitting seven seven seven seven traces traces traces traces scoring scoring scoring scoring a a a a career career career career high high high high twenty twenty twenty twenty seven seven seven seven points points points points Jayson Jayson Jayson Jayson Tatum Tatum Tatum Tatum had had had had twenty twenty twenty twenty three three three three points points points points for for for for the the the the Celtics Celtics Celtics Celtics who who who who will will will will face face face face the the the the top top top top seeded seeded seeded seeded heat heat heat heat in in in in Miami Miami Miami Miami on on on on Tuesday Tuesday Tuesday Tuesday yeah yeah yeah yeah I I I I was was was was a a a a tentacle tentacle tentacle tentacle ball ball ball ball had had had had twenty twenty twenty twenty five five five five points points points points twenty twenty twenty twenty rebounds rebounds rebounds rebounds and and and and nine nine nine nine assists assists assists assists but but but but he he he he was was was was just just just just three three three three of of of of eleven eleven eleven eleven in in in in the the the the paint paint paint paint in in in in the the the the second second second second half half half half including including including including one one one one for for for for six six six six in in in in the the the the final final final final period period period period I'm I'm I'm I'm the the the the ferry ferry ferry ferry

Celtics Boston Finals Finals Williams Williams Williams Wil Miami Jayson Jayson Jayson Jayson Tatum Tatum Tatum Tatum
Doncic, Mavs beat foul-plagued Paul, Suns to even series 2-2

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | Last week

Doncic, Mavs beat foul-plagued Paul, Suns to even series 2-2

"The the the the Mavericks Mavericks Mavericks Mavericks have have have have even even even even their their their their Western Western Western Western Conference Conference Conference Conference semifinal semifinal semifinal semifinal series series series series the the the the two two two two games games games games a a a a piece piece piece piece with with with with the the the the one one one one eleven eleven eleven eleven one one one one a a a a one one one one win win win win over over over over the the the the Suns Suns Suns Suns Luka Luka Luka Luka Dodgers Dodgers Dodgers Dodgers scored scored scored scored twenty twenty twenty twenty six six six six points points points points to to to to help help help help Dallas Dallas Dallas Dallas shoot shoot shoot shoot twenty twenty twenty twenty of of of of forty forty forty forty four four four four from from from from three three three three point point point point range range range range but but but but Dodge Dodge Dodge Dodge was was was was more more more more impressed impressed impressed impressed with with with with teammate teammate teammate teammate Dorian Dorian Dorian Dorian Finney Finney Finney Finney Smith Smith Smith Smith who who who who delivered delivered delivered delivered a a a a playoff playoff playoff playoff career career career career high high high high twenty twenty twenty twenty four four four four points points points points on on on on eight eight eight eight of of of of twelve twelve twelve twelve from from from from beyond beyond beyond beyond the the the the arc arc arc arc amazing amazing amazing amazing was was was a a a atriz atriz atriz amazing amazing amazing whatever whatever whatever the the the words words words you you you know know know but but but I'm I'm I'm not not not surprised surprised surprised he's he's he's capable capable capable of of of doing doing doing this this this Suns Suns Suns guard guard guard Chris Chris Chris Paul Paul Paul found found found out out out early early early in in in the the the fourth fourth fourth quarter quarter quarter one one one game game game after after after committing committing committing seven seven seven turnovers turnovers turnovers Paul Paul Paul finished finished finished with with with just just just five five five points points points seven seven seven assists assists assists and and and seven seven seven rebounds rebounds rebounds Devin Devin Devin Booker Booker Booker had had had a a a game game game high high high thirty thirty thirty five five five points points points for for for the the the sons sons sons who who who host host host game game game five five five on on on Tuesday Tuesday Tuesday I'm I'm I'm Dave Dave Dave Ferrie Ferrie Ferrie

Mavericks Suns Dodgers Dallas Luka Luka Luka Luka Dodgers Dorian Dorian Dorian Dorian Fi Chris Chris Chris Paul Paul Pa Dodge Paul Paul Paul Devin Devin Devin Booker Booker Booker Dave Dave Dave Ferrie Ferrie Ferrie
Allen scores 27, Bucks beat Bulls 119-95 to take 3-1 lead

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | 3 weeks ago

Allen scores 27, Bucks beat Bulls 119-95 to take 3-1 lead

"Grayson Grayson Grayson Grayson Allen Allen Allen Allen Yanis Yanis Yanis Yanis attend attend attend attend to to to to Cooper Cooper Cooper Cooper carried carried carried carried the the the the box box box box to to to to a a a a one one one one nineteen nineteen nineteen nineteen ninety ninety ninety ninety five five five five route route route route and and and and the the the the three three three three games games games games to to to to one one one one lead lead lead lead over over over over the the the the bulls bulls bulls bulls Allen Allen Allen Allen said said said said playoff playoff playoff playoff career career career career highs highs highs highs with with with with twenty twenty twenty twenty seven seven seven seven points points points points and and and and six six six six three three three three pointers pointers pointers pointers he he he he was was was was ten ten ten ten of of of of twelve twelve twelve twelve from from from from the the the the field field field field and and and and six six six six of of of of seven seven seven seven from from from from beyond beyond beyond beyond the the the the arc arc arc arc intend intend intend intend to to to to Cooper Cooper Cooper Cooper finished finished finished finished with with with with thirty thirty thirty thirty two two two two points points points points and and and and seventeen seventeen seventeen seventeen rebounds rebounds rebounds rebounds for for for for the the the the box box box box who who who who outscored outscored outscored outscored Chicago Chicago Chicago Chicago by by by by fifty fifty fifty fifty four four four four points points points points after after after after dropping dropping dropping dropping game game game game two two two two two two two two holiday holiday holiday holiday had had had had twenty twenty twenty twenty six six six six points points points points in in in in helping helping helping helping the the the the walkie walkie walkie walkie put put put put itself itself itself itself in in in in position position position position to to to to finish finish finish finish the the the the series series series series at at at at home home home home on on on on Wednesday Wednesday Wednesday Wednesday Zach Zach Zach Zach Levine Levine Levine Levine led led led led the the the the bulls bulls bulls bulls with with with with twenty twenty twenty twenty four four four four points points points points and and and and thirteen thirteen thirteen thirteen assists assists assists assists while while while while the the the the martyr martyr martyr martyr Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne added added added added twenty twenty twenty twenty three three three three points points points points on on on on the the the the ferry ferry ferry ferry

Cooper Cooper Cooper Cooper Grayson Grayson Grayson Grayso Allen Allen Allen Allen Yanis Bulls Allen Allen Allen Allen Chicago Zach Zach Zach Zach Levine Levine Levine Levine Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Ros
Rev. Martin Dunn: The Worst Thing We Can Do Is Corrupt a Child

The Dan Bongino Show

01:36 min | Last month

Rev. Martin Dunn: The Worst Thing We Can Do Is Corrupt a Child

"You know I've been going to church a long time I'm 47 I'm probably 40 years I remember my mom took me when I was a kid And I've never seen a standing ovation for homily before up until meeting you And a couple weeks ago you spoke out powerfully about the continued attacks on our kids I point out a lot there What we're dealing with is in secularism What we're dealing with is evil and it's our obligation if we're going to be on the right side of the moral arc of history to call it as much Exactly And it's not we have to live without fear That's the most frequent command Jesus told us 365 times be not afraid And Jesus also said twice that literally the worst thing anybody can do is corrupt a child an innocent beautiful child And we don't want to rob them not only if that innocence but of their potential their plans I had the most extraordinary childhood where all the possibilities were opened up to me And because my parents and my church protected me I know that was a major reason why I was able to live more to my potential So it's up to us If there's no other motivation if you're still struggling with a belief in God or belief and Jesus protect these children let them live with the joy and enthusiasm that in many cases they have been threatened with in the most unimaginable ways But again it's not too late and I told those kids at the end of mass you never ever have to lose your innocence and I believe that more than ever

Jesus
LaVine's 25 paces Bulls to 98-94 win over listless Cavaliers

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | Last month

LaVine's 25 paces Bulls to 98-94 win over listless Cavaliers

"The bulls held under the number five spot in the east by getting past the Cavaliers ninety eight ninety four Zach Levine dropped in twenty six points and demar DeRozan had twenty for the bulls who moved two games ahead of Cleveland the bulls help the cavs to just thirty five points in the first half and one for the first time in six road games since March ninth Chicago won for the fifth time in thirteen games this month leaving them one game in front of number six Toronto Jerry's garland scored twenty six for the cavs who shot one for eighteen from beyond the arc in the opening half I'm Dave Ferrie

Bulls Cavs Zach Levine Demar Derozan Cleveland Jerry's Garland Chicago Toronto Dave Ferrie
Melton, Bane lead Morant-less Grizzlies past Bucks, 127-102

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | Last month

Melton, Bane lead Morant-less Grizzlies past Bucks, 127-102

"Do you have any Melton Desmond bane and Dillon Brooks led the Grizzlies offense at a one twenty seven one oh two pounding of the box Melton was high man from Memphis with twenty four points bane had twenty and Brooks added nineteen as the Grizzlies won their fourth in a row and eight of their last nine Melton made eight of eleven from the field including six of nine from outside the arc yeah that's intended to pull at the box with thirty points eleven rebounds and four blocks the bucs third loss in thirteen games keeps them a half game behind the heat for the Eastern Conference lead I'm Dave Ferrie

Melton Desmond Bane Dillon Brooks Grizzlies Melton Bane Memphis Brooks Bucs Dave Ferrie
Purdue finally solves Beard in March, beats Texas 81-71

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 2 months ago

Purdue finally solves Beard in March, beats Texas 81-71

"An incredible turnaround for Iowa state the cyclones won just two games last year and became the first team to win that view and advance to the Sweet Sixteen in the next year eleven seeded Iowa state upset third seeded Wisconsin fifty four forty nine senior guard Isaiah Brockington was part of the program's reversal December the world just to to think of where we started in June like a group that was so new to each other they tell sure had twenty two and the cyclones defense held Wisconsin to two of twenty two from beyond the three point arc third seeded Purdue jumped out to an early fourteen point lead lost it and the pulled away late for an eighty one seventy one win over Texas trivia Williams had twenty two off the bench Chuck Friedman Milwaukee

Isaiah Brockington Iowa Wisconsin Purdue Trivia Williams Texas Chuck Friedman Milwaukee
Sizzling Celtics race past Nuggets 124-104

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 2 months ago

Sizzling Celtics race past Nuggets 124-104

"Jaylen brown and Jayson Tatum each scored thirty points in leading the Celtics to a one twenty four one oh four win over the nuggets the Celts close the first half on a forty two twenty one spurt including the last fifteen points in the second quarter Tatum adjacent Pritchard each had four three pointers before the break Pritchard was five for five from beyond the arc Boston shot nearly sixty percent from the floor sank nineteen of thirty eight three pointers and hit all eleven of its free throws McCauley okay check twenty three points for the nuggets who shot just thirty nine percent from the floor and thirty three percent from long range I'm the ferry

Jaylen Brown Jayson Tatum Pritchard Nuggets Celts Celtics Boston Mccauley
Embiid, Harden lead 76ers over Mavericks, 111-101

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 2 months ago

Embiid, Harden lead 76ers over Mavericks, 111-101

"Jo Ellan beat scored thirty two points on eleven of twenty shooting is the seventy Sixers topped the Mavericks one eleven one oh one and beat had twenty one points by halftime and scored at least thirty for the thirty third time this season James harden had twenty four points thirteen rebounds and seven assists while helping the Sixers make life miserable for Luka don church the Dallas guard had seventeen points and ten assists but missed fifteen of his twenty shots Dodgers was two of ten from beyond the arc former Villanova star Jalen Brunson hit his first seven shots and had a team high twenty four points for the mavs I'm Dave Ferrie

Jo Ellan Sixers Luka Don Church Mavericks Dallas Guard James Harden Jalen Brunson Dodgers Villanova Mavs Dave Ferrie
Clarkson has career-high 45 points to lift Jazz past Kings

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 2 months ago

Clarkson has career-high 45 points to lift Jazz past Kings

"Jordan Clarkson poured in a career high forty five points to overcome the absence of Rudy go bare and Mike Conley and help the jazz beat the kings one thirty four one twenty five Clarkson set a franchise record for points as a reserve with the first forty point game for the jazz since he had forty one last season I just feel good issue boggling like to known any being going in for me a lot this season but you know on whose part is part of the season sometimes you have slow sometimes you got seasons of stars like that were you missing shots he made seven threes and was eight of eight from inside the arc boy about Donovan scored twenty six points for Utah and Donovan Mitchell had twenty five de Aaron fox had forty one points and eleven assists for the kings I'm Dave very

Jordan Clarkson Mike Conley Rudy Clarkson Kings Donovan Mitchell De Aaron Fox Donovan Utah Dave
Tatum stays hot, scores 44 as Celtics beat Hornets 115-101

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 2 months ago

Tatum stays hot, scores 44 as Celtics beat Hornets 115-101

"Jayson Tatum scored sixteen of his forty four points in the fourth quarter of the Celtics fourth straight win one fifteen one a one versus the Hornets Tatum made sixteen of twenty four shots from the field and was six of nine from beyond the arc after scoring fifty four points in his previous game against the nets on Sunday as on score situation scenario you know I don't predetermine what I'm to do on you know what I'm going to so it's not just react to whatever defenses don't Jaylen brown had fifteen points what Robert Williams chipped in with eleven points eleven rebounds the Celtics have won fifteen of seventeen since falling to five hundred and twenty five and twenty five I'm the very

Jayson Tatum Celtics Tatum Hornets Jaylen Brown Nets Robert Williams
Biden announces sanctions, says Russia has begun invasion of Ukraine

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 3 months ago

Biden announces sanctions, says Russia has begun invasion of Ukraine

"President Biden says the U. S. is taking strong action against Russia over its moves in eastern Ukraine the president says Vladimir Putin has flagrantly violated international law this is the beginning of a Russian invasion of Ukraine and the US is ordering heavy financial sanctions on Russian banks and Oleg arcs they share in the crowd gains the Kremlin policies should share the pain as well the president also moving more U. S. troops within Europe to protect Baltic states bordering Russia the European Union earlier agreed on its own sanctions against Moscow and Germany took a big step by moving to block a major gas pipeline from Russia Sager

President Biden Ukraine Vladimir Putin Russia U. Baltic United States Europe European Union Moscow Germany
Obanor paces No. 11 Texas Tech for sweep of No. 7 Baylor

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 3 months ago

Obanor paces No. 11 Texas Tech for sweep of No. 7 Baylor

"Eleventh ranked Texas tech is completed a regular season sweep of Baylor by downing the number seven bears eighty three seventy three Kevin banner scored twenty one of his twenty three points in the second half and finished with thirteen rebounds a banner made back to back shots from beyond the arc to cap a fourteen three run that started the second half putting the red raiders ahead to stay Bryce Williams added seventeen points for tech which is sixteen or know what home this season James again Joe had eighteen points and seven assists for Baylor while Adam Flagler had fourteen points both teams are nine and four in the big twelve I'm Dave Ferrie

Kevin Banner Baylor Texas Tech Bryce Williams Red Raiders Adam Flagler JOE James Dave Ferrie
Gillespie nets 33, No. 10 Villanova beats No. 8 Friars 89-84

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 3 months ago

Gillespie nets 33, No. 10 Villanova beats No. 8 Friars 89-84

"The one over one a top ten matchup as the tenth ranked Wildcats held off number eight Providence eighty nine eighty four Collin Gillespie hit five three pointers and scored a career high thirty three points including a key tray with twenty three seconds left Justin Moore added nineteen points for the Wildcats who went eleven of twenty three from beyond the arc and won their fourth straight Villanova is thirteen and three in the big east the loss snapped the eight game winning streak for the conference leading friars who dropped to eleven to win the big east the Watson led Providence with twenty points I'm Dave very

Collin Gillespie Wildcats Providence Justin Moore Villanova Dave Very
Thompson has season-high 33, Warriors edge Lakers 117-115

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | 3 months ago

Thompson has season-high 33, Warriors edge Lakers 117-115

"Klay Thompson scored sixteen of his thirty three points in the fourth quarter and the warriors nipped the Lakers in a thriller one seventeen to one fifteen it's Thompson's highest scoring game in more than three years Stephan curry made only one of eight beyond the arc but finished with twenty four points Andrew Wiggins had nineteen lebron James scored twenty six with fifteen rebounds but missed two key free throws in the final seconds and the Lakers dropped their sixth straight on the road I am mark Myers

Klay Thompson Stephan Curry Lakers Andrew Wiggins Warriors Thompson Lebron James Mark Myers
Major Athletic Corporation Tweets Pictures of Bare Women's Breasts

Mark Levin

01:58 min | 3 months ago

Major Athletic Corporation Tweets Pictures of Bare Women's Breasts

"If you had told me this morning that later today a major corporation was going to tweet out on their Twitter feed Pictures of 25 sets of bare women's breasts I would be I'll be honest I gotta be honest you gotta be really can't lie on talk radio You guys can smell it a mile away if anyone's disingenuous I'm gonna be honest I would have said well this is gonna be a good day in my life At any moment now as I scroll my Twitter feed I'm going to see 25 pairs of naked women's breasts To me that's a good day You have to understand the ladies if you haven't already figured this out When boys go through puberty and adolescence and their 14 years old and all they can think about is a certain thing in their life that doesn't go away Look at Bill Clinton for God's sake Some of us can control it better okay But it pretty much doesn't go away So you know so I'm sitting around squirreling through Twitter and people are talking about I'm not even gonna say their name because they did this for attention but it is a corporation that sells athletic gear and it's not Nike And I'll leave it at that And they're promoting their sports bras And so they sent out pictures of 50 breasts Two by two thinking it was arc There's no faces associated with them They're just it's just naked torsos Of literally all different shapes and sizes And they're talking about how they all women are made different so that's why we have all these different sports bras to come to See how something tells me That is what what's wrong with that It's just the female anatomy Okay you've never met a straight man then Because men are pretty bass

Twitter Bill Clinton Nike
What Happened to Whoopi and Oprah?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:10 min | 3 months ago

What Happened to Whoopi and Oprah?

"There's so many different type of topics that I want to cover here. And I want to cover this one, which is the Whoopi Goldberg thing. So apparently Whoopi's name is really Karen. Is that right? I miss old whoopie. I do. Old Whoopi was awesome. Do you know that she was in Star Trek? The next generation? Her name was like guillain or something? Want to say? Is that right? Do we have any truckies in there? You can look it up. Guinan. Yeah, I wasn't too far off. That's right. With Jean Luc Picard and the next generation. This is just whoopie used to be someone that was like fun and magnanimous and just kind of kind of an American icon, honestly. At a very distinct name and a great way about her, but she's kind of descended into the same sort of character arc of Oprah. And I'm not going to racialize this, but they racialize it, but Whoopi and Oprah were to beloved, black women of the 1990s. Whoopi and Oprah were stories of perseverance, at least Oprah. I don't know Whoopi's personal story. And of talent, they're both obviously very talented. Whoopi Goldberg was excellent in sister act and color purple, but what happened to Whoopi Goldberg and Oprah and both are super rich. I mean, Oprah is really rich. How rich is Oprah now? How rich is Oprah? $2.7 billion? That's a lot. And Oprah started from absolutely nothing and she's built an amazing career for herself. 1980s and 1990s Oprah, she was charming. She was fun. She was fair, she was honest. 3.5 billion, okay. She had her whole deal in downtown Chicago. Which was harpo studios and Oprah has just turned into an surprisingly nasty person. And so has Whoopi Goldberg, I don't know, maybe someone can explain it to me how the more successful they get the meaner they

Oprah Whoopi Whoopi Goldberg Old Whoopi Jean Luc Picard Guinan Karen Harpo Studios Chicago
Does the Arc Always Bend Toward Justice?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:33 min | 4 months ago

Does the Arc Always Bend Toward Justice?

"Hegel and you look at the process through history, he really adopted a Christian concept of the eskaton because we as Christians believe history has a rhythm to it has a plan that is progressing. A form of Christian thinking that having emphasis on this is called dispensationalism, which is a very structured of different types of time when God comes and dispenses his grace on his people. So I'll never forget James, I was having a debate with vous. That's his name, right? Vouch on ten pools show. And we got into Hegel. And before the entire audience fell asleep, we've kept it interesting. And he immediately was like, oh yeah, I think he was totally right. It's like, what are you talking about? He's like, well, he asked me. He said, Charlie, don't you think things are getting better? Don't you think that we're progressing towards things that are so awesome? I said, you really do believe this, don't you? And it was such an eye opening thing for me, James, because there was whatever. I wouldn't consider a thinker. But we had a decent conversation. He was and he was like, no, no, no. All of this tension, all of this collision, this ant antithesis and thesis and what do you call it? The struggle, the arc bends towards justice. It was really, it was really instructive for me. And you could call it utopia, you could call it heaven on earth, but there is a belief by some of them that they can usher that in.

Hegel James Charlie
"arc" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

06:28 min | 8 months ago

"arc" Discussed on Conversations

"So then you way for a couple of years in in the uk during rep theatre and television. And you've met your husband tomo of a back here in australia. Tell me about what it was like when you were cast in the show that everyone was talking about number ninety six a night australia lost virginity. We didn't know how big it was going to be. What made it so kind of tasty for everyone at from the and apple it was but we call strip television. That means without every night at eight thirty. I remember the number of people who they would write to a a fan letter and they would address lynn and then referred to you your sonia. Is you character character. Yeah sonya freeman but they also what made number ninety six so good was it. It tackled quite a few social problems in a very sensible way specifically the character the joe hasham played of don finlayson the homosexual lawyer. He was portrayed as a fine. Upstanding young men not suit limp-wristed. In any way. And of course joe would was one of the most popular characters and people would write to him and others would write to him and say i'll straighten you out so you can marry my daughter such a period of time but tell me about sonia freeman who who was. She's just the chemist joe james. My husband in it was struck off doctor. It was full of contentious issues. Really boys pushing the boundaries of what was acceptable on australian television. Why wasn't number ninety. Six picked up by an american network. Well i don't suppose it's the only reason i wouldn't flatter myself but i had scenes with a slight love affair with with ronnie arnold who was a dancer came out with alvin ailey dance troupe and stayed in australia lovely beautiful person african american mafraq and american and he and i had this little affair onscreen unscreened on screen and we had a kiss and intermarriage characters never went to bed together like everybody else in the number ninety six but but we did have a kiss. I was told that that was definitely one of the reasons if not the reason. It wasn't sold america at the time. It was still not possible to have black and white together. Sad isn't it. Oh i mean happily. We've moved on. Lots of things have changed. And i think in many ways something like number ninety six helps change things when you can see idiot action. They took on quite. I mean some of the storylines was cillian frivolous that they all. We all had a time when we had a good storyline. That was was going for and your character. Sonya was a suburban chemist. How did you prepare for the role. Before i took on the job. I went to my local chemists. And i said look. I've got this job paying up it. Can i come. Backstage can come behind and watch and watch how you pull the things. Because i said i've got a poor things and count out pills. I want to know how to do. Except when you when you look back at those days and you say oh we've come a long way. How do you feel about it now. It was it was a very happy time. It certainly for us as actors it was. It was a very happy time at some point. You have to give up performing. Yeah do you miss that sense of camaraderie people coming to do i do in like you get it in the theater and you get it in a long running series and yes it it. It is very very tight and sometimes performers before and hard times a bit. You've been a long serving member of the actors benevolent fund and also the actors and entertainers benevolent fund. Which is different in queensland entertainers as a lot of it and probably the oldest but certainly definitely the longest continuously running member of the actors when evelyn fund. Why it's been years. I think it is. Why is it important to you because this little help. They seems to be much much more help for sports people. And there's very little help for actors when they fall on hard. I'm not out of work actors or we give things to not always money. We give it to to the families as well so we. We had a very quite severely handicapped child of two actors and we looked after that child until he was eighteen. How'd you look after them. In in what way we tend not to to give money we have done of course. We pay bills telephone courage station things like that but it it. Everything is individual and everything is totally confidential. And you know. I can tell you about somebody but there was an actor who needed an eye operation and we paid for the i operation and that actor is still working so during covert it has been absolutely fantastic late. The audiences have been when we've had them and and the supporters that have donated money to the actors benevolent act entertainment benevolent funds. You do look buckets. A you do speeches features and in the bucket and it all goes very quiet under the under the right. No one knows about it. And it's a not for profit organization and it is charity. And i know personally you know a number of who would say very high profile actors who have benefited from the actors benevolent fund in the hard times. Few it's now becoming quite open. We can talk about depression. We can talk about hard times. We can get things through but for some reason performance. Find it difficult.

sonya freeman joe hasham don finlayson australia sonia freeman joe james ronnie arnold tomo alvin ailey sonia lynn cillian apple Sonya uk joe america evelyn queensland depression
"arc" Discussed on UX Podcast

UX Podcast

03:25 min | 9 months ago

"arc" Discussed on UX Podcast

"Exactly you pay off as you say is the is the feedback at the end. The conclusion make me think of. I think you and i have talked about on the show before. Choose your own adventure games that i absolutely loved text based adventure games books and paper books from the eighties. Exactly essentially the text tells you you wake up in a dark cave. There's light to the east into the west and you can write go east and you get eaten by lion. Oh now. I don't know i don't go. East need to go west that sort of a small learning loop within the the ark but now you can actually pursue the other path and in the end. There's not not many paths you can pursue so there's the big arc but in within that arc. Lots of small learning loops. Yeah they allow the allowed you to have little deviations from the the main arc but they they were just moments of destructive exploration. I guess on your way on the ark. We still born. Be one designed a teaching you how to pick something up. Perhaps how to light a fire. That was the second part. I can hear that. We're keeping night into show definitely really. Yes we see that we have to explain it. I know but yes. Because that's actually it's a loop. It's the same month now. It's yes every quarter every quarter now. It used to be every month before that they play this alarm that you're hearing in the background and this is the test of that system. Same time every quarter. Three o'clock and the point is that the system that you're supposed to be able to hear it from everywhere in sweden. The danger is over where we so what daniel is doing in this article. He's he's And building up to his point about mixing loop starks and actually enhancing the game experience by using combinations of loops darks parallel arcs and you can also so and also micro pellet parallel arts but the the charts would be playing a song at the same time as you're doing something else and a song actually carries part of the experience micro power locks. That was more difficult to get my head around snippets of evocative stimuli as you progress through the level and snippets of evocative stimuli. I mean only the imagination can can be your border. They're a little bit difficult to understand. Exactly what that meant because the definition was as complicated as the threes itself. So i actually don't play half live. He actually tell us that. Game half life there. And i don't say that so i don't know how to explain what he's saying. Now we got. She says the article. The arc is essential rule book for larger game consisting primarily of loops. So he's in conclusion. He's he's saying that and it's easy to stay on like the the trodden path of doing the same thing type of game play over and over and peop- the game Gain companies they build sequels and and do the same.

starks sweden daniel
"arc" Discussed on By Kids For Kids

By Kids For Kids

06:53 min | 11 months ago

"arc" Discussed on By Kids For Kids

"At the time of joins childhood. The english were looking very strong and many people will leaving jones village in fear for their lives when john was thirteen years old. She began to have visions. She saw things that nobody else could see from these visions. She understood that she had purpose to lead the french. In the battle against the english army joan was just a peasant phongo. How is she going to get any army to defeat the english she needed to speak with the king of france king. Charles a few years went by and joan continued to have similar visions. She cut her hair short and began dressing like a man. This might not seem so strange to us today. Loads of goals where all kinds of close with all kinds of has styles but in those days. This was very unusual. Indeed people started to hear about jones amazing visions. They became convinced that she was destined to save fronts so when she was about sixteen joan and a small band of followers set off to meet with charles who lived in his palace in she. No this was a dangerous journey because there were many enemies about but they rode like the wind and made it safely to shinno when they arrived. The townsfolk astonished at this group being led by a young girl. John's followers were nervous. Perhaps joan was too but there was no sign of fear on her face. They tied up the horses and bravely walked up the steps to the great door at the front of the palace the door was opened by the palace. Guards and joan was escorted into the main hole where she was met by the king himself who was surrounded by his advisers and generals. I am joan of arc. She declared and i have had a vision. I am to lead the french army to victory against the english charles and his company astonished. Who was the strange short head. Young girl who made such bold claims and once we have defeated the english she continued purpose is to ensure that you are crowned the true king of france. What nonsense salted the counselors. How can she possibly lead. Army cried the generals but charles was curious after all they'd been at war for a very long time and nothing seemed to be working. It was a far fetched idea but it might be worth a try very well. He said he may lead our on me to the city of orleans wishes surrounded by the english. The council is in generals were outraged. But there was nothing they could say to change. Charles's mind in preparation. Joan was trained in fighting learning how to use weapons and armor. She also quickly learned how to handle a horse becoming quite an expert rider. Eventually when she was ready she sets leading the french army. To only she was wearing white alma and rows upon a white horse before attacking the english. She wrote the melissa warning them that there were about to be defeated but the english generals just laughed so in march fourteen. Twenty nine joan led. The attack was serious. Battle chevron full hard and inspired the french on me to do the same during the battles. She was hit by an arrow in the shoulder. But that didn't stop her. She pulled even harder until eventually. The english army realized they were losing and ran away as fast as they could. The french army cheered. They had won the battle off such reckless victory. Jones reputation spread far and wide among french. People she and her followers escorted charles across enemy territory to city of down where he received as crown as the king of france but the war was not over. There was a city called campaign that was under attack. Joe fearlessly gathered the army and they once again such a full battle. this time. The fighting was hard. Children fought brazely but things are not going well for the french. The army retreated into the city but joan had fallen from her horse. The people in the city needed to raise the drawbridge for their defense. Joan was locked outside. There was nothing she all the french army could do. She was captured and taken to the english commander. They accused her all sorts of things. They called her a witch. They shouted that she deserved to die for her rebelliousness and dressing like a man. Those nothing joined could do. She received terrible punishment and died at the age of nine teen but she has not been forgotten. She was a hero that lead her people to victory and she is still treated as a hero by the people of france..

joan charles english army jones france army Battle chevron john Joan John orleans melissa Jones Joe
"arc" Discussed on By Kids For Kids

By Kids For Kids

01:56 min | 11 months ago

"arc" Discussed on By Kids For Kids

"Hi guys. I just transported myself to trump sylvania for today's short. I'm in maine in ancient castle. Displeases quite gloomy. They're creepy pictures on the walls. Lots of pictures but no mirrors. I see a contract with a few black cloaks hanging from it. And i see suits of on both sides of me but the main reason i'm here is right in front of me. I'm standing before a huge organ and playing the organ is a tall man dressed entirely in back. He has slicked back head. And if you look closely one can see shops fangs. In his mouth. This is the council of the vampire count fund cotton novick vessel. Beatings who'll be fun. Surprise high count fund cover novic. I'm here for your next reading. Listen i yes yes i. I've been practicing my letter. Excellent saw of that we doing today. Well i we have a birthday announcement for one of our patriots supporters. Here's the name on this piece of paper ready. Yes we'd like to wish a happy birthday to create this in need some help here okay. Let's look at the letters. What does this very good and this oh.

council of the vampire count f cotton novick maine patriots
"arc" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Scribes

Sci-Fi Talk Scribes

05:02 min | 2 years ago

"arc" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Scribes

"What giving anything away? What what major kind of turn in direction I think? We wanted to tell like a hopeful story where we had a character who seemed to be you know the poster child for the way things are the way things were. Right and when she finds out that things are the way she thought. You, know she she takes action and does something good instead of you know we? We seem to see a lot of stories about people finding out bad things, and they covered up, or they ignore it or you know it. It felt like. It would be nice to have something a positive reaction to finding out something pretty. Well yeah, I mean like a lot of cyberpunk is also very dark, very cynical and. We wanted to tell a story where. Someone could admit that you know what I've been wrong. I've believed these lies about. This minority group that I should not have an I can change. I can try to atone for what I've done. I can try to make their lives better, so it's A. It's sort of tied in with the whole. You know thing we were trying to get at where. Society shouldn't be treating. You know different minority groups in these horrible horrible ways. Then once you realize when you wake up to that fact and you know it, you can do something about it. You don't have to just accept it. You can make the decision to try to make the world a better place. Writing this How did this work out between the two of you I mean? How have you had the two of you work on a story a lot of yelling? Work out the outline for our stories you know as a group, and then one of us does the verse draft, and then we go back and forth between drabs, so it's pretty organized. I think we've got it pretty down. We've been doing it for quite a while now. So young comes when when you get down wherever. Live by. We're. Repeating each other religions well, this line sucks and this line could be better right. There's a lot of that. Yeah, it's a lot of compromise. Relation have like a little deck of cards each give each other one for each thing that we really feel strongly about. That's what I feel like we. Take, like okay I'll give you this thing if you give me this. How many issues is this going to play out to hours? It open ended. It's It's wrapped up the first story ARC right now with a four issue monthly sort of monthly. The virus sort of threw a wrench in FIFA. Miniseries that has been collected in a trade paperback graphic novel, which is now available and..

ARC
"arc" Discussed on Arc Benders

Arc Benders

07:53 min | 3 years ago

"arc" Discussed on Arc Benders

"Know that I would have gotten done. Yeah. I definitely wouldn't have part of it was like just setting aside the time for it. But also. Thinking about how I'm afraid to see those numbers because then I know either how bad it could be or how good it could be obviously having a clear picture is the better path, but you know, been reflecting on it a little bit. Like, why am I afraid of this? What is my interviews telling me about how his minor voice answering that question about why am I afraid in? How can I kind of change the script around a little bit hackley able to set goals is is really scary. You know to say like maggots case like I'm going to open this restaurant or whatever. Like or for me? I'm like, I'm gonna grow grow my company to this number in. It's like, it's terrifying. But you know, it's okay. If you don't meet the goal you have to try in. If you don't meet it when you think you want to maybe. A reason but could change it. You know like you can change your goals. Yeah. You can always pivot it, you can always read Iraq. But the thing is the reason the reason I decide to the or if I fail. I don't wanna fail because there is underlying fear that I didn't deal with that. How me back, and I think that's really important whenever you're taking on anything. That's huge. And we have any really ambitious goals and also. Inherent to this all is also becoming deeply vulnerable. And that's actually one thing that I'm working on is essentially, I'm going to watch this accelerator program in September to create a safe space entrepreneurship for people that the program's called figure shutout, and I started as a joke gonna call figure out, but I was talking to a friend who is a graphic designer. And I was like, yeah, I'm gonna create this resource. And it's gonna be great. And it's gonna be early stage entrepreneurs, and we're gonna come together figure shut out. And she's like, hey, have you thought about calling it that, and I was like how harsher? But I couldn't come up with a better name. And so I decided to whenever you're trying to do something. It's always a good idea to test it, and so I decided to test this model with six different businesses this year, and I couldn't come up with a better name. And then I realized it really kind of is a perfect name. We can we can simplify we call Faisal. So Faisal meets weekly. And and for me, it's been a really big lesson and the feedback that I've been getting his yes, it's helpful to have structure, and yes is helpful to count ability. But a lot of the greatest value has just been having support because not all onto preneurs have their version of Lisa if that makes sense, and even when I was first starting now when lease at least we're getting to know each other I didn't have that either. And so I know how is lady is to be tackling something in to try to live your dreams and to be. Able to make that progress on something that's really daunting and scary and uncertain to Italy. Yeah. Well, another thing that's been really hard. Or like another fear that I've been working on has been we talked about it last time, but it's been boundaries. Like, I've really been leaning in to the boundaries challenge. Can you fill in on how that's going for you? Since the last episode. I'm doing. I'm doing it. But it's so hard. I hit a coffee plan with the friend this week. I'm going to shout, Heather Hooper. I love you. And I knew I needed a canceling I needed some more space that data doom work. And so I pushed it back a month. And there was another call. I think you can your shadow there's dog. And then there was another call that was with an amazing starting block fellow and I had another meeting Scheffel than I just knew I couldn't do it. And I was feeling overwhelmed, and so I- postponed it, and I've also been working from home. And you know, and I know when I know some people would prefer that IBM person. And I'm having to set aside like this desire to want to give and give and give and realize that to succeed at what I'm trying to do I have to be selfish with my time. And then I have to put these boundaries in and that I have all amazing and impactful work I want to do and the only. Kamina do it as if I have six hours a day to do it. And that's on top of, you know, Clio work. So that's just it a lot of those feelings or fear. It's fear that I'm letting people down that fear that I should. I think the other words that I've thought about this should. Yeah. Stop shooting on yourself. Yeah. Numerous should I should have gotten more done. I should have done this. I should go to this event. Now, you should do you deepen your gut? No you need to do. Yeah. Oh my gosh. Since the last episode I've been really good about me, not good. But I've been a little bit more brave about setting my boundaries and doing things that make me a little bit uncomfortable. Because I know that in the long run. It'll be better for me. So one example was that I had a commitment to go to conference with Christina in DC. And I'm really looking forward to it. And we're going to do this podcast recording stuff there and Christina still doing it. I add is perfect con-. Yeah. Run by an amazing are Fender. Yeah. I was gonna go to that with you. And then you found this conference that you're like Lisa if there's anything that you're gonna put your money towards this year it needs to be this conference. And it just happened to be the same exact time in my home state in a city that I love Asheville, I'm going to mow summit the momentum summit, and I'm so excited to be going. But I felt so bad cancelling on my commitment for going to purple con-. It just made me feel so bad. But I do honestly believe that I made the right choice. Were you did? And then we're team. So we're going to divide and conquer and represent our benders into cities. Yes, we offer and they're both mission driven impact princes. So, you know, totally. We do the best we can. But I was really proud of you. I mean, you knew deepen your gut that like it was a place you need to be. And also you need to go represent unity to. And I mean, that's one thing that we've talked about with podcast is like this is our gift to the world. But also the only way it's going to succeed is if we also take care of our mission driven companies as well. Right. Exactly. And I know you hate the word hustle, but I have been calling this our side hustle. Yeah hustle. I mean, it is or side hustle. But I don't like the word hustle. I say it's our passion project, and that's a good one passion project our gift to the world these stories, which oh my gosh. Really? It's just sharing these amazing inspiring people who intern will totally help change your life. While speaking of do we want to get onto the interview? Let's do do you want to do the Andrew shirt?

Lisa Faisal Christina Iraq intern Heather Hooper Asheville IBM Italy DC six hours
"arc" Discussed on Arc Benders

Arc Benders

07:17 min | 3 years ago

"arc" Discussed on Arc Benders

"You're listening to the art vendors podcast show created a challenge you to be bold enough to live an extraordinary life with impact I'm here with Lisa her. And that's Christina will now sit back find your happy place and get inspired PS. This episode contains a bit of salty language. Welcome back to the ark vendors podcast where so excited you hear me to we have been those OA now, I'm interrupting okay? I I know I was just going to say I was like we have the most inspiring guests today. But that's just maybe dramatic because all of our guests are fine. But I will say Maggie is insanely inspiring. She is I love her. I was actually a big fan of her before she even launched the restaurant. How did how did you know about her? I used to work with her sister-in-law. Oh, so heard the story about how she wanted to start a place at the table. And it was so intriguing to me that I've been following her from the beginning a place at the table is this amazing restaurant in downtown Raleigh, North Carolina. It's a pay what you can cafe and they serve alongside more than sixty other pay what you can restaurants in the global one world everybody eats network. Yeah. And so you've never heard of pay what you can cafe essentially whenever you go in is this beautiful. Cafe you've definitely should check out the show notes, we'll have photos, but it's a normal restaurant, and it has menu. And all of the prices are suggested a maggie's gonna talk a little bit more about what that means. But it is to me one of those magical places I've ever been and Maggie is an example of how essentially like if you have a big dream of how you want to change the world, and you're nervous about whether or not you can make it happen. This is essentially. Interview for you. This is a story of someone who had a vision, and it took her three years to really realize it, and I think that's incredible. And I think that she was so much persistence. And there are so many people who looked at her as this young woman who is naive and yet she made it happen. She helped people see her vision, and she launched something that's really special in our community, and in many ways, like a beacon of hope it really is. And I do agree that one of the really impressive things about her. There are many, but one of them one of the things is this commitment that she has to her dream just know it. She knew that she was on this something she knew that. It was something that even if it didn't work she had to try just because she didn't always wanna wonder and this the barriers that she ran into she'll talk about this in her interview. Just the fact that it did take so long for this cafe to get launched. I mean, it's really incredible. That that she stuck with it. You know, like, the persistence, and I think that a lot of times we have fear that if something's taking a long time that means that it's not gonna work or if enough people tell you that it won't work that it won't work. And I I'm so impressed by Maggie that she didn't let that Stocker. So there's kind of a big. Like, a big movement around impact metrics, I think the one thing that's really great about maggie's story is the fact that you get to really define how you wanna measure impact. There's a lot of trends and impact invest in this idea that the only way you can change the world is stemming exchange. In fact, there's a book called that actually recommend you re is called winners. Take all the elite charade of change in the world. And I will say it is definitely worth the read because it will open your mind, and they're doubly points made in the book that are worth exploring. But my one critique of the book is that it kind of writes off social entrepreneurship, and it somewhat writes off small local change, and our guests today in a place at the table really challenge that because I think that storytelling and helping people connect with their humanity and changing even one life is dole. Noteworthy. Eighty and is still worth celebrating. Absolutely. Yeah. And I mean, her metrics are crazy. And we're going to talk about it again in the introduction about it. Now. Oh my gosh. In less than a year. Opening a place of the table had over eight thousand meal served more than that was served to people in need more than twenty five thousand patrons made the decision to pay it forward and donate a meal, which generated over one hundred thirty six thousand dollars donation, and they had over twenty four thousand volunteer hours or volunteers came into the cafe and dedicated their time just to help keep it running and often times they would earn a meal and heard of the impact metrics, I love it. They include this on the sign in their restaurant is they served not served, but they have over a million smiles hugs laughs. And the community that they're building their part of the impact that they're that. They're creating through the cafe at it's not just about the money. And it's not just about the know counting heads or whatever. It's really about the spirit that they're putting into their community. And the other thing about Maggie that is so impressive to me. Okay. Gotta gotten I feel like same thing. It's like one of the many things that have press me. But I feel like one thing from impact standpoint as she is just doing on outstanding Java is storytelling. So I received her. I recently of place of the tables emails, I highly recommend you sign up for their newsletter and is flare. Okay. This might not be the best sales pitch for for me. It's a compliment. I cry like half the time, they sent an Email and actually even getting interview I was going back and Email and reading some of her emails, and I just started done because they're so touchy, and so just to give you. A blurb of one. So after hurricane the hit in September magazine out this amount. And she goes last Thursday was a hard one for me all day pace back and forth. Making the decision to open or close on Friday. And the end we had to close because it did not want anything to risk the safety of staff before I left for the day one of our community. Volunteers Darryl was about to leave within t shirt on his back and bag with half a sandwich. I knew he would not go into the shelter for many reasons and new he would do what I was doing pace back and forth, hoping it would not keep raining all night. I knew it was not going to be fun. Couple of days for him. There really was no answer to make the night better for him. But we decided

Maggie Christina Raleigh Lisa North Carolina Darryl Stocker one hundred thirty six thousan three years
"arc" Discussed on Arc Benders

Arc Benders

09:18 min | 3 years ago

"arc" Discussed on Arc Benders

"Strengths. Fagin Harris is the president and CEO. Baltimore core. An organization that enlists talented people in public service and social entrepreneurship in Baltimore City. Fagin co founded the organization with west more in two thousand thirteen because he believes deeply in every individual's right to opportunity and is committed to realizing a more just and equitable society growing up Fagin overcame culture of low expectations, which pervaded his working class community as he puts it I grew up in Baltimore and lived the reality of post industrial America. I was educated in public schools that barely graduated half of its students and watched close family members battle addiction engaged life. I lost friends forces carrying individuals pushed me to reach higher, which led me to Stanford University Fagin is a graduate of Stanford University and the university of Oxford where. He was a Rhodes scholar. He is received numerous awards including fellowships from Shoka echoing green and the Aspen institute. But despite all these experiences and qualifications. It was the six months that took him to land a job in the nonprofit sector and his return to his native Baltimore that finally spurred him to focus on reimagining for social impact sectors talent pipeline. I wanna know all about often require like what is your journey? Like, how did you get here? What inspired you to do this? So back in twenty eleven me to colleagues. Started a business planning to venture around cruising public service social section careers. Social good, and we wanted to go out. Do you build a really effective marketplace for John? How do you support the millennial generation going into them? What is that really? To really cut it. I would say the beginning of like the purpose of thing. But it kind of the start of this latest ration-, I would say, you know, coming out of the great recession. And I think a lot of people really thinking, what's. So we did that from twenty seven twenty thirteen as what I kind of concluded in that was that orientation at actual solution was not gonna work likely markets are too complicated and their two regional. To actively was like the holy grail is like the orbits for social impact jobs, and like everyone in the country can dislike go fine. What makes sense for them? They can like selected efforts. It's vast it's to nuance. So I settled on a place based model in thought, you know, what if you go, hyper, local, you actually could pull this out at a local scale get it done. It's from this area. Also saw were Baltimore had just all the writing mediates position itself is like a destination for social change. It's so with that kind of background after two years of business plane research published a bunch of robots launch twenty thirteen and then that's been like a real. Journey because. Newly basically started out running the fellowship program. I would say today. The bulk of our revenues Oregon of we also run like a search in executive search business, really. That we've had to like all on the sustainability question how to get out of just solely looking for grand dollars dollars. But also figured out like what's our product. What are we selling turns out? There's a ton of demand for what we do. So like sure that we like meet that demand responsibly still alive with our mission. But meet the demand. The revenue of the business. So you're working. On runs. The gamut we run with social sector companies profit sector. So we just did the search for like Roka. You've heard about the real good thing. Coming from malls, aerobics like a big kind of crime prevention thing than they are pretty down from Boston. We did that search search the innovation center Louis university's so higher. Add we'll do to your price brought advisory. So mean private while Blake there shoul higher? Hospitals. Nelson pirker. News super small is ten fellows. I I mean, we didn't have staff who didn't really do it. That I grew. They were just troopers and helped us really divine. Like, what is the experience force Harry coming through a try? I think we learned that is like. The head of capital, the weight, and I was trying to understand how they settled on their talent development model. Yeah. And he was like, well, you know, it's about the five seats and be like random off. It was you know, it's it's clarity consistency. And that I dislike it dawned on me. I was like wait you guys just like make up the five CS. He's like well. Yeah. All this is like internal marketing. So like, no one really knows how to develop people, and that's realize like really knows how to develop people. So like, let's just do the best. We can let's listen to our customers. Build something that they would want. But I really thought that there was actually like best practice out there, everyone does it wildly different. So once I heard the five sees it the late, then I realized like all right? We need to take it seriously. But let me not this pressure on myself to go. Finally, the magic answer honors. Versuns- every organizations. Yep. No magic answer. Okay. So you went to the with Graham, but I'm guessing that was a highly revenue-generating transition was naturally like some executive shirts or do. We basically started doing the fellowship that we quickly. He came over subscribed. So like a call for like thirty thousand eight hundred patients. You know? And then like we reach out employers get like a hundred twenty employees application, so it was clear that there was a really strong marketplace sharing, but we fellowship infrastructure was not told to skilled admit that like at bats. It was always gonna meet fifty people a year, which is still a humongous fellowship, but still the drop in the bucket compared to what people what they were demanding so fast. So then we're just like all right? Well, we got the thirty or fifty people here, but we're saying no to like nine hundred fifty cycle. How good are those people and we have a twenty percent or just as good as the people get into the fellowship. We saw that. We would probably not matching sixty percent of the businesses that are cute. So that it was like all right. Let's just build a business line around the excess demand here. And then you differentiate your search product rights like fellowship is like early era. So we didn't decisively with into like two executive level. Yeah. Stuff because the margins on that are better. Sharon. So mentioned imply love that I'm talking to you. Because you're the first person who's like articulated this hypothesis or like my legs. I don't think there's numbers to my experience. But I feel like I meet someone every week. That's like, I love CISL impact. I want purpose in my life. What do I do? You know, I'm one of the people mandate program that pulled it off. But then the problem is I'm like, yes. Like don't give up. But I, you know, there aren't many jobs yet. You're probably gonna have to create a. See now that I'm creating this shit show. Yes. That is true. Yeah. All of that is true. I think the photo shift person foremost ISM mechanism for creating those opportunities like those the other thing we did Allison on like the quality of the opportunities of realized that. Most eighty percent of the polish slots were not filling existing roles creating clown until it became this. Great vehicle for attracting like third party capital to underwrite creative stuff. And like we're gonna kinda solid is like we could take a chance group person this and try something on a trial basis. We didn't really even intend all of the need to kind of the market took it into direction that surprise all of us. But once it got going it was like, all right? That is a great program that products. Awesome. But we're definitely not like tapped into the full potential search business like they're just a lot of existing roles that like we need to be Philly. And we have the talent that so they're more differentiated than they would look like on their surface.

Baltimore executive Fagin Harris Stanford University Baltimore City president and CEO Aspen institute Shoka America university of Oxford John Nelson pirker Oregon Louis university Allison Blake Boston
"arc" Discussed on Arc Benders

Arc Benders

06:33 min | 3 years ago

"arc" Discussed on Arc Benders

"Solution. It's it's unbelievable. And yet he cared so much about mission cared so much about its community. He went out and took loans that like cost him financially until it gets not even just burn out of your time. It's also burn out on like, what does success look like to me. And how much of like should I be giving? I mean right now, my businesses like real talk. It's not profitable. I'm breaking even and at the end of the year. I was negative about about negative three thousand and. And people don't understand the stress with that. And I think with Fagin I mean, he made a meager salary for all these years where he worked around the clock towards something that who so passionate about and yet I mean that takes breaking toll. And so when I quit my job. I was burned out. And now as an entrepreneur, I go through periods where I'm burned out. And and we have to start talking about what this is. And it can't just be a hashtag self care. It has to be a looking at the root cause and stopping stopping the pattern. Right. Like, really analyzing our lives, and realizing what sustainable, and I mean, I I was laying in bed with my husband. I'm like, I don't know what to do. And he's like what you have to do is you have to less. So for me saying no to a bunch of things. And for me continuously is gonna mean me say, no to even more things. And every no still hurts like I feel guilty. Every time I send a no. And yet every time after I sent an Email. I'm like. Thank god. I said now, I'm always so relieved. Yeah. But at the time it just hurts. It's hard like I hate it. I know exactly what you mean. And also to everyone that's trying to arc bender knows a gift in. It's a gift to yourself in as a gift to the person that you're saying too. Because if you're saying yes to anything it should be because it's something you feel really passionate about. And it's because it's a decision that you feel good too. And you're not doing anyone a service if you're saying yes to things that you don't wanna do because you're going to get resentful and resentment isn't good for anyone and also like run deeply this goes back to their careers. An arc bender. What advice that Fagin gives on this podcast changed my life? I think of any arc Benner interview. I have had this far. That's over fifty interviews with people who've changed the world bagan hit. Upon something that I think is very deep and very meaningful and profound, and I think the most important lesson if you wanna change the world, and that is the only way to make those work is to really understand what you're setting out to do. And how you want to do it. What is that role? Like, what is the type of work you want to do? Because if you're not doing the work that you want to do and the way that you want to do it. You're gonna get blown out like just inherently doing work. You don't like doing it's going to new out. And and I don't think enough people talk about that. I think there's yet again, it's like the Mother Theresa complex that you should give in giving give and that that should be enough. And I just don't believe that's true. I think that it people do the work that they are best at that's really powerful. I'm actually kind of curious Christina because it's the kind of advice that a here. I actually do hear that a lot do what you are good at and what you like doing. But what is it about? How Fagin said it like, why did it resonate so much with you? When you heard him say it, I think that is a great question because I have heard it before. But there was something about this interview that was still real. And I love that that vice was coming from a place in coming from a person who's reaction to social impact was when people are like, oh, I wanna do social impact I wanna do social entrepreneurship his first reaction at dote. Do it. And honestly right now, I feel that we would people are like to start a pub cast, and my immediate reaction is to do it. And I think that goes to anything that's a lot of work. And if you're going to do something that takes a lot of work, and if you're gonna do something that takes a lot of energy and resources of passionate time commitment, you need to be very careful that it's playing to your strengths. And like in the case of the podcast. I mean, we're still haunting our process, but I love this part. I love talking to you. But I don't always love some the editing parts. Yes. And and and is just a lot of time. It's just like lot of time to do it right to the show notes to be thoughtful. And to do you all is service in telling these stories, and this compelling, and and so I have to be really careful to try to minimize the stuff. I hate doing. Yeah. Well, because I'm gonna get burnt out. Yeah. And I actually I don't mind editing. What I hate doing is the promotion, I do all the promotion, and I don't mind that as much. And it's funny 'cause like I actually haven't I haven't even put anything about the last episode of my own social media, but I also hate social media. So there you go. And that's why I haven't a tomb good idea. Yeah. It is seriously because. And it goes back to that. Like elevate delegate thing where it's like if you're doing what you love the things that you're good at than things are going to be much better in your life. And so the idea of like somebody being like, we'll I you know, I wanna do you did. Because look how successful you are in. It's like, okay. Well, I did this thing that I love and I'm good at and that's why it's successful. But if it's something that you just see the success, and you want the success and Leedle you're not passionate about the what the why then you're not going to get there. Because you're going to like you said you're gonna burn out faster because you're gonna hate it. You know? And so like, even those stuff's hard even though you and I both have these like, oh my God. I'm just hide under my bed covers in cry. And not get up even though we do that we still love what we're doing. And the only reason we're still doing it is because we actually love it. Yeah. Not I don't love the burn out part. I don't. The feeling crappy part? But I do when I'm doing the part of the job that

Fagin Mother Theresa complex Benner Leedle Christina
"arc" Discussed on Arc Benders

Arc Benders

05:32 min | 3 years ago

"arc" Discussed on Arc Benders

"And. And here's the thing. Like when it comes to burn out. I love one of our mentors. We gave her shot at last visit to Maria Kangari was we were talking with her about performance, and you can work at one hundred twenty percent. I mean, you can't like in. Sometimes you will. And you should but you can't do that forever. And there's a reason that Google has an eighty percent twenty percent free time policy because like we operate better when we have space debris. And so this whole burnout thing isn't even just about happiness or selfishness. It's also about how do you reach your alternate potential like how do you be a high performer, and like for me, I know that the one thing I'm still working on his boundaries and and get into a place where I'm okay putting those boundaries on. And if someone doesn't like it, then that's on them, not on me. And I'm actually doing them into service when I give my time away when I don't want to. Because it angry and frustrated, and then I kick myself because I'm like, my intuition told me that this is going to be huge waste of time. And this is going to be someone to sell me something then I'm not interested in and yet sometimes I'll still go to the meeting, even though I know better because I don't want to upset a friend or I don't wanna be impolite to a stranger, and we have this culture of networking to like as entrepreneurs is almost a sexploitation. You should be networking she connecting with people, and you should be getting out there and yet like right now and my business. No, I need to be strategic like I need to leave the house as little as possible and just do work like work on this podcast work on my consulting firm gun work with unity and. Anything that's diverting from that distracts me, and wouldn't you distracted? Then you come back, and you're not as focused, and it's just a systemic issue. You got to put your blinders on that is Michael in life right now is to put my blinders on pert of wonders if silly traditionally entrepreneurs, I think that I think it was in the two bobs podcast. They were talking about this for like traditionally entrepreneurs would be in your early twenties. And unlike if you're if you're past thirty you're too old for it. And I wonder if it's because of that we've settled endure lives for the squishy in comfy good, even though I I started business in my thirties. And even though I have a family into kids and a husband and all of this like life around me. I wanna do all of those things. But if I was in my early twenties. I might just have the business. And then select I wonder if our age factors into the burn out that we're experiencing where it's like there's more than just the business that we're trying to do. And granted I have not trying to create a fast growth business. It is a lifestyle business because I don't want to sell it. But I also wanna have a comfortable lifestyle. I wanna have like a good lifestyle. And so I'm not trying to grow up fast. I'm trying to healthily. But that doesn't mean just because I'm trying to do it in a sane way. It's still an insane thing starting a business is an insane thing to do. It's really hard to do. Well, and that's why I am so excited for you guys to hear the view with our guest today fake in Harris is the CEO Baltimore core and the founder, and and the interesting thing is and he founded it he was starting to run the organization when he was twenty six I mean, he did the thing in his twenties. And he's still got burnt out because I think yeah. Because I mean, I do think that this life as is trickier because I don't have a family yet. But we're we're trying to and so that's at the forefront of my mind. And I think some of that also is probably contributed to the burn out because I feel the sense of urgency to want to get as far as I can before we have maybe that things are in place that there's like a solid foundation that I can grow from. But I feel like I'm guessing it's probably like how I freaked out when I was turning thirty. I remember like having this minor panic for like a month about all the things I had it done before. I turn thirty and then. I turn thirty. And I realized guess what you can still live. You can still live all of your dreams. It was not too late. It's just a milestone, I think having babies the same thing for me. But yet, I'm so hungry. Like, I know that there's this impact. I know I can change the world and and real talk. I want my business to work. I I joke about that. With Fagan I talked about I mean, guilt is nine inches burn out guilt. And so one of the things we talked about our interview is the fact that I felt guilty about funding. So in Fagin case, I mean, he took on risk capital to start a breaking nonprofit that is like one of the most amazing impactful organizations I have ever seen. And he's incredible. Like, everything about begging is amazing. He's an amazing person. You'll hear his story. And it's so compelling, and it's so smart how he went from trying to start the orbit. It's a social impact jobs to then coming up with a regional solution.

Fagan Harris Maria Kangari Google Fagin Michael CEO Baltimore core founder one hundred twenty percent eighty percent twenty percent nine inches
"arc" Discussed on Arc Benders

Arc Benders

07:40 min | 3 years ago

"arc" Discussed on Arc Benders

"You're listening to the art vendors podcast show created a challenge you to fold not living extrordinary life with impact. I'm here with Lisa her, and that's Christina. Noel, sit back find your happy place and get inspired. PS? This episode contains a bit of salty language. All right Cristina. Let's just talk about burnout. Let's just get real. Yeah. This Vulcan to this show like a. We're not doing that today. There's no there's a pretense of cheer. Just like driving home today thinking about how we should do the show. And I was like oh right now is just so hard, and you and I have some really good real talks. And I was like me Christina having real talk on a podcast sort of. It's like a big big big vulnerability moment. But I think it's really powerful to have people here your former ability minutes moments too. I think so too when I think it's so timely that are episode that really does discuss burnt out is right now when both are definitely getting this place where were pretty rundown and any burn out happens normal people. I think sometimes it's inevitable. If you have big dreams and big ideas. But when it becomes a pattern, which in my case, I sometimes struggle with it becoming a pattern then you have to recognize what are the things that are actually causing it. And in my case it is a sin. Essentially that I need to say, no more. I literally need to put him boundaries. And yet central impact. There's this assumption that because I just the change the world and my work exists to make the world better. I'm going to say yes to everything and I wanna help everybody. And yet that is not sustainable that is not. Okay. It's tricky because. Well, okay. Actually, just deep down. I'm a people pleaser. And that's something I've worked on I'm a recovering people pleaser, and I and I wanna make people happy, and I wanna bring joy, I wanna make the world better place. But I know I have to be strategic and yet I also don't want to fend people. And so for example, my latest like life has been Callan -ly, I have the calendar app for all these different types of meetings. And now my new policies of stranger. You're getting thirty minutes on the phone on the phone on the phone unless there's unless there's a compelling reason. Like, we clearly do the same work. And there needs to be like thought leadership share of of knowledge, otherwise we're going to get like a screening call. Yeah. I feel really bad. Like, I did that once and it didn't go. Well, like, I think she was kind of like, oh, I think it was actually seen as a bad thing. I mean, and that's on that person. But. I get the impression people are like, well, who do you think you are that you're soon portent nearly giving me thirty minutes of your time. And I'm like, I'm someone who's trying to make the world a better place, and I'm doing a lot of things, and I need to be strategic, and I need to focus and everything I do a distraction distraction that I've told my kids recently is like you're the most important person in your own life, and you have to love yourself. And you also have to be with yourself all the time it, you're never alone because you're always with yourself. And sometimes I think that we end up because we're with ourselves all the time you just get annoyed with yourself. Sometimes, you know, and you're not nice to yourself. But really when it comes down to like one of the best ways that we can be kind or selves is by respecting our personal time. And like, I know hashtag self care is such a big thing. Thing. It's probably big right now just because of its being trend in a hashtag. But I mean, it's also something that is timeless and important when you have a mission a personal mission bigger than yourself, and you wanna make an impact in the world, and you wanna make other people happy you often end up sacrificing yourself in like that doesn't really help anyone. I would say that. It's more commonly talked about in the business world that in order to have a business that has impact you have to have a sustainable business. Like, you have to take care of your business before you can take care of others. But I don't think that we talk about that as people like we should in order to to make an impact of the world in order to help other people you have to help yourself I, but then that makes us feel selfish. And then it's like, oh, well, you're not a good person 'cause you're selfish. Like, no, the fact that you make sacrifices in other ways. But in the. Ways that you have to take care of yourself. I in the way that you prioritize yourself is the way that you're allow yourself to make sacrifices in other ways that impact the world. And here I am saying this in like having I feel like I'm having panic decorate. Now, just thinking about how bad I am at this myself. But it's like it's the kind of thing that's just really really really hard to like actually live. 'cause there's this expectation in this pressure that we have in. I I do think that it has that there is little bit of agenda component here because women are expected to be nurturers and historically even like women are the caregivers in. So women are expected to sacrifice themselves to help others. Even though our society is changing and gender quality is becoming more of thing. I am in a relationship where hell I'm the one that does less, and that's a problem. I mean, gender equity wise like my husband, and I are on pretty equal footing. When it comes to like with caretaking and all of that. But we both get burned out in. I know Christine, I know that you're in a relationship to where like it's not like you're expected to be the one that takes care of everything at home. And then your husband like goes in makes money brings it home. You have a very equitable relationship as well. But still as women we have pressure on us radio. Yeah. It's it's not our spouses that are putting pressure. It's interesting. My husband Jason is the best. No, my husband's actually, the Beth now mine is not. J k they can put their space for them both to be the best. He's the best husband in my life. He's also the only one. Granted when we were dating. I like made sure I set expectations. About who? I am. And what I stand for in my dreams and goals on the fact that having career is really important to me, and I wanna family, and that's important to me too. And yet if I'm gonna be apparent that? I'm really proud of one day. It means that I also wanna have hopes and dreams and do great things as well. And I don't want to sacrifice my entire life for my kids. And only way that you can do that is if you have a partner who's truly a partner, and that means that sometimes things are going to be equal. I mean, there were definitely time in a relationship. He did more chores and.

Christina partner Lisa her Cristina Noel Callan Christine Jason thirty minutes one day
"arc" Discussed on Arc Benders

Arc Benders

03:07 min | 3 years ago

"arc" Discussed on Arc Benders

"Me. If you'd like to learn more about Caitlin, you can find her online at Caitlyn Cava Gucci dot com. That is IT L I N K A W A G U C H. I dot com you can shop for beautiful getting back jewelry at burden stone dot com. And you can support collaborative journalism advocacy for young people at spark action dot work in case, you didn't get any of those these links in the show notes right now. As a matter of fact, I'm wearing this beautiful bracelet set from burden stone that Christina gave me for Christmas. And there's this like really beautiful stamped bangel that says the futures female, and then beaded bracelet, the kind of goes with it. And this week thing about this is the give ten percents Planned Parenthood of New York City to support access to family, planning and reproductive health services. Thank you stone. Thank you for Stena speed, awful, beautiful and impactful, thank you and love it. I love branding into the Cleopatra. Bannon. On point. And if this episode changed anything about your perspective or life in any way, we are collecting listener questions at insight to share on future episodes. So you can leave us a voicemail. At nine eight four four six four zero two five four or you can afford voice memo on your phone and Email it to us at Hello at. We are the ark vendor stock com. Also, if you wanna hang out with us online. You can join us on Facebook. We have a group called Arca benders. I R Al I R L as in in real life, which had to explain to my mother, which I joked about last week, and I'm still she still hasn't listened to the episode, and I'm like slightly afraid. She's gonna call me out. She does in case, you didn't know now, you're like cool. And it's a great group. We share articles we have conversations, and let's get to know you more and our next episode. We have incredible guests his name is Fagin Harris, and these the CEO of Baltimore for an incredible organization and lists talent. To celebrate social innovation in Baltimore and advance. Citywide agenda for equity and racial Justice. You guys Fagan is one of the most inspiring people I've ever met his story. We'll Blair mind. And also, we talk a spout burn out. And I love it. I appreciate it. Because we're having an aborton conversation that needs to be had don't forget to shoot at another big thanks to kaitlin cow Gucci for being a fantastic cast the music for today's show is from the one only Ryan Levin. Thanks so much for tuning in. And Joe forget every little thing you can do to make a difference matters.

Caitlyn Cava Gucci Baltimore Caitlin Christina Fagin Harris Ryan Levin Facebook Bannon New York City Fagan Joe Blair CEO
"arc" Discussed on Arc Benders

Arc Benders

08:20 min | 3 years ago

"arc" Discussed on Arc Benders

"Buzz, and I would stay out for like lay there like on average like I was three hours and then as navy like two hours, and then I mentioned it to my chiropractor. And he's like, oh, yeah. He's like I have a notebook by bad for that. And that helped me get it down to an hour. So I put an ipad next to my bed, and then anything my brain freaked out about I would write it down onto the ipad. And that was actually very helpful of if you're a stress insomniac, just a fun backed said, do you? I assume there's like a blue light filter on there. 'cause like there's that whole thing with technology. Oh, yeah. So I have that on my computer. But also I highly recommend any glasses. I I also four Bs. I love where beater social enterprise, but worries currently don't offer blue light blocker codeine. But for women it's a big deal with circadian rhythm to. I mean, not really affected by that. Oh, interesting something that I've found to help me with not being able to fall asleep. And I think I actually credit this for the reason that I I don't have that problem right now is his head space nap, and they have these like great sleep tracks, and like sleep meditations, and one of them sets you up I think you're supposed to count backwards from thousand and I used lose track of it around nine hundred eighty six. Like, I don't know it number on anymore. Like, I can't think back. Oh, okay. Nine eighty six. But it's actually been really really helpful to have something like that. That's awesome. I think. Yeah. Using the strategies other thing for me is just straight up burn out. Like, I am a recovering perfectionist in a recovering overachiever and part of his excitement. Like, I'm so excited about what I'm working on. I wanna get it all done and every aggressive timeline. But then when I do that I do things like I worked until right before bed. And then that's when my executives drug are like my I literally like around like nine PM. I'm like we're about to head to bed, and I'm feeling highly anxious. And so I now alarm at freight pm every night. Up working and like all neither read or watch TV. That's so real challenge. No hard. I just went and sometimes you have to write like, that's not realistic. Every once in our lives kick away from it's like, you have to notice the patterns, and I was definitely getting very unhealthy patterns, and it went on for like more than a month. And guess what I've been sick like all of January, and my body is like s you nam, you know, about our self care. I so another thing that I've noticed about you. And it's the same thing with me like the entrepeneurship spirit is strong us both. And I noticed that for me like are get an idea that oh you're really excited about and it doesn't really affect my sleep. But like, it sucks men draws me in. And so I think for you. I've really noticed that a lot with our vendor shorts like all have idea. I've idea I have an idea that kind of thing comes up today to. Yeah. Well, the interesting thing is I've really struggled with focus and to really solve a problem. You have to focus, and you have to be patient and persistent and one of things learn from James today as he spent three and a half years on research and development of what he's working on. And that's amazing and in his head. It started like five years before that. And so sometimes, you know, I feel like in media you hear these success stories, and it just sounds like a happened, quote, unquote, overnight and nothing happens overnight. I think that's be asked. And that's story arc that is said time and time again is just false for most people at what about you with unity. It's so hard because I have ideas and I wanted implement them, but there's so much else going on that. It's just really hurt when the train is moving. You can't stop it to like fix the train. And so you have to fix it in motion or like add on. Let's add more cars. Let's like convert. This from a steam engine to electric engine that is impossible in the trains moving. But you just can't in a business that is moving you just can't stop it. And that's the hard part for me were Mike I want to change something. But in order to change it all at once which is like 'cause I have an idea, and I'm like, okay now is the time to do this immediately. I have no patience for it. It's really hard for me to like, let's just to one little bit at a time. But that's just the way you have to do it. I think that is the way a lot of change happens. I mean granted like I am trying to get better at bashing things. So like really taking a half day to work on something that's really important, but most of his don't have time to stop the train and and have a hack up on. So I I really liked that metaphor because it makes sense to make things work. You have to keep going. Yeah. But you have to build in space too. Yeah. And every train the train stops every few towns. So another thing that's really neat about this interview. They're excited for you to hear about is this idea of open source and building a community to solve a global issue. And so I think it's a good idea for a Lisa to talk about that since by the way of check out her original, art, vendors interviews, all about up and source now us, though, I highly recommend you read up by at least that what is this open source thing. And what does it mean for social impact? Well, I had actually never heard of open source being used in this way. So it was fascinating. As soon as he started talking about he didn't he didn't even use the words open source the beginning. This was an interview with somebody that we were just connected to friend of friend, and we didn't really have background either of us like he didn't know about us. And we didn't know about him until the interview. And I mean, it was fascinating. Because we started the call thinking, we're gonna talk about one thing, and it just turned into a whole other. Thing. And it was actually really funny because we ended the interview like three separate times. And then just kept talking. It was just this long phone call. We thought it was gonna be twenty minutes turned into an hour. But James is creating this amazing amazing system. It's like an open source architecture. So open source is about allowing the community to contribute to a project. And there's intellectual property that's part of it. But it's shared and a lotta values around open source include collaboration and even failure and valuing contributions from others and not thinking that your way is the right one and only way but having the foresight to know that things change over time. And so I think is really cool about by Bill is that it's this open source technology where he. Did this? There was like Christina said there were three and a half years of research development, where you'll hear James talk about his inspiration for starting this project out of all of that research and development. He knew that it wasn't going to be one person one company that could solve this issue about sustainable development. And he really wanted to create a platform that would allow community to come together to work together to create this prototype with him in just it's a really really cool. And as a big of really big value. I think of what we're trying to support encourage with aren't vendors is there's a lone wolf math. And it's again, a BS because collaboration truly makes things better. I think if we're gonna make the biggest impact you need more people, and you need to think about things on a systemic level. And that's what's so. Exciting about James.

James codeine Bill Christina Lisa twenty minutes three hours five years two hours
"arc" Discussed on Arc Benders

Arc Benders

05:04 min | 3 years ago

"arc" Discussed on Arc Benders

"You're listening to the art vendors podcast show created a challenge you to be bold enough to live extrordinary life with impact. I'm here will be her, and that's Christina. Noel, sit back find your happy place and get inspired. Just a quick. Disclaimer we experienced some technical difficulties while recording the insurance for the show. But because we believe in progress over perfection, we decided to just run with it. Hi, everyone. Welcome to episode two. The art vendors podcast to kick things off. We wanted to start with if you haven't listened to episode one. It is amazing. And we highly recommend that you start there to hear a little bit about our vision for the show and get caught up. But otherwise flow gum. Well, we're really thankful for all of you who have been leaving us ratings and reviews and special call out to Johnny four a really amazing and heartfelt review that you left on I tunes. Yes. Seriously, Johnny we really appreciate it. One of the things that we really appreciate it. Especially is that you talked about how sometimes you're concern will listening to podcasts that the hosts are living in a bunker. And part of your review is dedicated to letting people know that from your perspective, we actually are trying to live and breathe and do the things that we're talking about. And so. So that meant so my stress we really really appreciate you taking the time to let us know what you think about the show. We appreciate it. When you're sharing your connections to the show and your own stories about our vendors what it means for you in your own life. It's it's just it's really sweet. And we want to share this with our whole community. And we hope that you feel the same way and wanna show this show at your community as well. So some other feedback that we got after the last show is that people have been wondering a little bit about what is this whole arc benders thing. Where did it come from? And pursuant is the one and only who can answer that. So let's not at Christina. Man where did art vendors come from? Well, I reached a point in my life where I was so tired of hearing bad news. And I was at a point whereas filling about lost. And I knew I wanted to do more and instead of getting angry. I think it's a lot more productive to take that energy and make something amazing and turn a negative into a positive, and that's for under started. It started as this idea. Actually, I was learning photography. And so I started as a talker project where I was like well to good news thing, I need to to do the things. So I needed to take photos, and who better to take photos of people who've changed the world around the time. That idea started. I realized that it was a problem then I noticed that in the news. They didn't actually tell these stories amazing people that I was finding myself surrounded by every day. Who gave me so much hope for about a world and so much hope for a brighter future? And it's amazing how this project is evolved. Because I already these people I was working in an a b core by was doing mission driven work. And I was like, oh, yeah. I'm just gonna share this type of worldview with other people to give them hope and let them see what's possible, and instead art vendors evolved because it changed my life completely transformed. The way I saw the world and getting to know these people in a deeper level and their advice in their experience and their lessons completely shifted my perspective so much. So that I knew it wanted to be a social entrepreneur. And I had always kinda put it off of is like oh in two years. I will quit my like stable job and become as those entrepreneur and on a Friday I interviewed to our benders and on Monday. I put in my notice because I was so inspired. My husband was like, you know, what are you waiting for like, go do it? And. It's become this thing from there. So in that process, I met Lisa a Corp of. And I let her know what I was doing. I was like I'm doing this crazy thing I'm quitting my job. And she's like, oh my God. I did that like what were you like a year and a half into years on? I think was about a year and a half in. Yeah. So you're like a little bit of head of the game. So it was awesome to St. what was possible to meet someone that was at a similar life as and from there. I I mean, literally when I quit my job. I knew I wanted to do marketing strategy for mission driven companies, and I wanted to mainly due arc vendors like I just wanted to interview people, and he'll and do photography and figure out. If

Christina Johnny Noel Lisa two years
"arc" Discussed on Arc Benders

Arc Benders

06:35 min | 3 years ago

"arc" Discussed on Arc Benders

"Eyelashes. The. It's so fun. It is so fun so subtle and then people catch and they're like ward happening. Oh my gosh. I mean, you'd be embodiment of unicorn is truly magical and. Just you're like my rockstar. Not a the like, you can't put a dollar value on personal freedom. You know, I'm an African American sort of biological woman. Now, I'm data fine now is gender non-performing. So I'm now they then there's and that's that's been an amazing journey. But you know, my hair right now is I'm calling it labrador I colored so it's like teal and Brian bright blue, and as a black woman, I would not be able to do this and work for someone else. It would have been a huge as much as I would have wanted to have rainbow lashes and blue hair, I would not have been a freedom. I can have it. And it's not just a black woman thing. There are lots of white women who would love to have green hair, but don't feel like they can because of their job. But that, you know, being an entrepreneur one of the things that is incredibly powerful. Again, you can't put a price tag on it. The ability to have that personal freedom to express yourself. And be who you are like I remember I had I had law dreadlocks for twenty four years. My my tired dealt life. And they will vary well-kept and dutiful. And I think it was at the time right around the time that I I right around the time, I successfully completed my third marriage. That's reframing that I've successfully completed three marriage. So the end of the last one I shaved new gonna shave my hair off I shaved three quarters in my head, and I had to show up at a very conservative clients. I and it was definitely jarring for them. I can see that they were like, you know, what's happening here. And I'm you know, it was a great experiential lesson on by and still Dr Jonah you've still benefited from the successful revolts that you've achieved. And there is nothing different about my qualifications. And what it is that I bring to the table. Don't be alarmed by or confused by how I look and how I show up and how that makes you feel. It was a reflection of who. I am on the inside. My qualifications remain the same. And I'm sure that was you know, point of conversation for them. But really really powerful lesson in in this diversity, diversity and bias base. What are some of the biggest challenges in diversity inclusion that you're seeing in business today? So historically, the biggest challenge have been that diversity. Self has been seen as a dirty word. I made it's an uphill battle. You know, I'm I'm selling diversity in the capital of the confederacy for all intents and purposes, it's not exactly something that people have historically gotten very excited about finding up for, you know, wonderfully exciting when we get a, you know, a visionary leader whose proactive and decides that they want to define their employees experience and provide people with the tools and the skills that they need to avoid some of the nasty stuff that you see on the front page, those amazing clients to work with the folks who just get it. And they're like, let's let's add this as a skill set. 'cause we can do that you can give people the tools that they need to function well within a culture. So. Yeah, that initial challenge is just getting over the stigma of diversity has to be associated with something negative. So we kind of in some ways consider ourselves a branding agency for diversity equity and inclusion because when you're looking at it from the Athol 'rational instead of the deficit model, it's phenomenal thing. And you actually have a tremendous amount of creative. Control over dictating, what kind of culture you want to have. So now some of that is being mitigated because the conversation is moving into the forefront and very overt very different way. And people at this point are starting to feel like maybe they're a little bit negligent or not having the conversation. So what was historically? The challenge is moving a little bit out of the way. And we're seeing a massive influx of requests for support and business part of my business. You know, my business model is is really putting getting traction behind the business case for diversity. Because the social Justice model is really insufficient. This point the versity equity and inclusion can actually help your bottom line. You can actually make more money be more relevant reach more customers and clients and constituent bye bye bye. Embracing the the equity and inclusion in a way that is awesome. I mean at the end of the day fill the right thing to do. But if your business minded person, and you're worried about ROI need to be investing in diversity equity and inclusion because when you get it, right or business become. Way more relevant and more sustainable over time. So it's a really good solvent. The approach if you know, it's also doesn't work for you. We have mountain the data to tell you that. It's actually going to help your business to make so much sense. You think it really does start with the top? So it starts with leadership buying in. It starts with the understanding that it has to be a course or teaching priority. So it doesn't have with or at the top. Okay. Great win. It does. It's great. When it does. And and in order for it to be successful and sustainable, the top has to eventually get onboard in very meaningful way, the reason that I wrote overcoming bias and erasing institutional bias is because there is a way for individuals to empower themselves to engage in behavioral shifts and attitude they'll shift, and then create kind of energy around pulling pulling like minded, people could gather and leveraging the levers of change sort of accessing data, I define where institutional bias might be happening within the organization and getting traction, even if you're not the CEO, so you can create grassroots and our g that instigates change. But eventually yes leadership have to be wholly on board in order to get that systems integration that. I was talking about. Okay. That's awesome. When I love it. You've written those books to help be a resource that can help you start that change from within. I love that. There can be a grass roots approach. But it does make sense that ultimately the decision makers. Yes. I mean, and it's great because what I'm seeing more and more. So initially, you know, like like in the first years coming almost fifteen years old now, which is bananas because I see myself as a young person.

Brian bright Dr Jonah CEO twenty four years three quarters fifteen years
"arc" Discussed on Arc Benders

Arc Benders

11:12 min | 3 years ago

"arc" Discussed on Arc Benders

"You're listening to the art vendors podcast show created a challenge you to be bold enough to live an extraordinary life with impact I'm here with Lisa her, and that's Christina. Noel, sit back find your happy place and get inspired PS. This episode contains a bit of salty language. Can you believe that this is finally happening? We are finally kicking off the first full episode of the arc benders podcast. Yep. And we've gotten a really great feedback from our inter episode already. We've heard from so many people that have shared it with their friends and are just so excited to be able to share their story through it platform as well. Yes. Speaking of great feedback. We finally went live on I tunes, and we were so excited if feels like it's real now and we've received Hindle of five star ratings, and if you haven't done so yet if you could take two minutes, we'd be grateful and also. Wanted to give a special shout out to Tim Yarbrough for his amazingly thought for review ten shared the he's been following this team since they got started. And he loves how we're filling the void at a much needed area of inspiring an entertaining, everyday people to break out of their molds take on the mystery of how to actually make change happen and experienced the support community in levity that come from incorporating this work into one's life. He's looking forward to laugh solutions real talk about arc bedding tem. So sweet you seriously made her day. And if you are enjoying the show, we would be grateful if you could also share your thoughts as well. We wanna co create a show with our listeners. So even hearing from people already after the trailer has been really exciting. So we want to hear from you. What are hot topics and social impact we were experts in social entrepreneurship, but there's a lot of different ways that people can bend the arc. And so I want to hear from you. What do you? Think so another one of the goals for this show is re to get inspired. But also, it's really important to us that we get super honest about what reality is we think that if you're going to change the world, we have to be honest about what's actually happening and having a safe space of truly honest discussion. And so we realized that this might be a bit tricky balancing inspiration with real talk. But we're gonna try to make it work and part of being honest man's that we are speaking from our own truths. And that means that we're going to get things wrong because we're not all knowing. So when we screw up we want you to call us out, and we need to know this. Because a big part of what we're trying to do. Here is open. Our own is open our own minds and share progress through the podcast with you in another way that we thought about structuring the show is each season. We're going to have a theme. And so we're starting with the theme of how to design a life of purpose for season. One. And the reason we're starting there is because the last year has basically been a big focus for both Lee said is so last year, I quit my job and started to pursue social entrepreneurship. And so I've been thinking a ton about how to design alive with purpose. This is just a starting place will be tackling systemic change, entrepreneurship, burn out self-care authenticity. And along the way, we're going to be learning advice from the people who are in it, and what has changed their lives and made this doable for them. And the last thing you need is another boring podcast and another reason to get depressed. So another big thing that we're going to focus on is taking actual change and changing things to step by step by bit and finding your own path to making change in a way, that's really meaningful to you this week. We're kicking things off the topic that we're both extremely passionate about diversity and inclusion and we have one of the world's leading experts to share their. Story and their advice and Christina's taking the lead on this interview. Because I had a last minute conflict come up, which is a very neutral way of saying that I had a very disastrous like five minutes right before. Started where I was on a phone call, and it was the sales rejection call and I was taking my dog out. And she pulled on the leash so hard that I fell down and broke my phone screen, and then she ran into the bushes and grabbed a bunch of deaths girls out. That was what habit? I was like well the complex. Oh, yeah. It was the squirrel competition where you're like forget it. I have not have space to do this interview, and that's life. But then my doc. It was in this dramatic thirty minutes. I've ever had on a phone conversation with the Lisa stunts. And I'm trying to remember why was it home alone with my children like what it was about that day. Like it was at a holiday or was it was Matt Matt was working on the hurricane. So like a Lisa's husband was out of the house doing social impact where helping prepare North Carolina for the hurricane. And here's ios like super Bob working for home taking sales rejection calls trying to change the world and her dog first brings out the Doug squirrel, which startles her on the phone. And then the talk runs away all in the span of like an hour. So I mean, actually, I love the story because it kind of gives you a look into like, there's all these beautiful resumes about how you change the world. And then the real world is shit show. No, it was it was pretty I like conic moment of lake. Yeah. I mean here we are. Are like just trying to get through our lives. And then like this shit all happens. And it was like disastrous come in threes, the kind of doom. Yeah. But it worked out it still got to interview Tiffany and just to give you little bit of background. I met Tiffany, John. Why I actually saw Tiffany Jonah speak at the beach hampions retrieve and Burlington Vermont years and years ago. I was so blown away by their be inspired talk. Which will definitely include in the show if you'd like to check it out, and if you've never heard of the champions retreat, it's the global gathering of leaders within the be court movement you will quickly. Learn through the show that Leeson I R B Corp obsess, so be Corp is to an entire business, but USDA organic is to milk or fair trade certification is to coffee the BNB cure stands for benefit. And essentially whenever we talk about be corpse, their businesses that exist as a force for good, and is a global movement of leaders. Are trying to redefine success in business. Tiffany is a leader within the equipment, and the court is really passionate about trying to drive systemic change Tiffany, I've really got to know each other years later when the equipment shifted its focus trying to promote an embrace diversity inclusion and it went to a session that Tiffany hosted. And they did an amazing job talking about what it actually takes to promote true inclusion and where to start, and so whatever we thought about launching this show. It seemed perfect to bring Tiffany on to really like give you a sense of the power of one person to really drive change. At least an I took us many road trip to Richmond to go to a local happy hour, where at least I Tiffany. And. Yeah, I just I fell in love with them. Tiffany is one of those people that you see across the room, and you're just I just gravitated. It just knew I had to talk to this person and get to know them. They really are that incredible. Yeah. So a more formal intro. Dr Jonah is founder and CEO of TMI portfolio a collection of socially responsible and interconnected companies working to advance more culturally inclusive and equitable workforce's. They offer interacted digital tools along with a full suite of diversity and inclusion services like organizational assessment strategic planning and employee trainings. Dr Jonah is the author of two clamped books on institutional biased, overcoming bias, building relationships across differences and their new book a racing institutional bias how to create systemic change for organizational inclusion. Tiffany. Thank you so much for being on the show today. Thank you for having me. It's such an honor. Appreciate it. So mean to get things started. I want to kind of go back and ask you what initially inspired you to want to make a positive impact and find purpose in your life. So I am definitely not unique in the world in his much of. I was inspired by my mother's physically. Both of my parents, really. But I like to say that I do what most people on the planet do, and that's what their parents, do that's kind of the typical human pattern, although in our more individualistic culture in the United States. A lot of, you know, find our own path in a different way of but historically speaking people follow the track of their parents. And that's what I did. My my father's physician a pediatrician. So he helps people stay well and get well. And then my mother is behavioral psychologists and also entrepreneur. So I grew up watching her make the world better place. I one person at a time. And then she started a consulting firm as. The diversity and inclusion industry was being created. She was a pioneer in the space. So she was helping stand up office of multicultural affairs, and universities, and she was one of the early people who went into organizations and help them navigate the conversation post civil rights movement. Like now, we have lots of different people. We have to create room for them in the workplace. How can we do that? Well, I grew up watching her administer us -ment on and change hearts and minds than it was. It was an inspiring thing to see. Wow, that's amazing. I'd actually love to learn more about like your personal story and the obstacles that you've had to overcome along the way as on furniture, and what lessons have you learned. So I mean, it sounds like I know you've had a very diverse career and in its own, right? And how have you pivoted? How have you changed? And what challenges have you had overcome? Yeah. So interesting, I've probably I don't I didn't wake up one day. And just say, you know, I wanna work for myself. I wanted to good life. I wanted to contribute. My my actual my first priority really was. It'd be a mother. I wanted twelve kids at one point. Actually, I have been a lot of things about my life. Very young to do that. Like I in eleventh grade twelfth grade and my freshman year of college in one year, so that I could have twelve children. And at the time I wanted to. A child bike Hijra and didn't want to be pregnant during my internship and residency so accelerated my program so that I can have children I only have three now. And I'm happy to say I'm on.

Tiffany Jonah internship and residency founder and CEO Lisa her Christina Tim Yarbrough Noel United States Matt Matt Richmond Lee North Carolina Bob Hijra Burlington Leeson USDA R B Corp Vermont
"arc" Discussed on Arc Benders

Arc Benders

03:06 min | 3 years ago

"arc" Discussed on Arc Benders

"You're listening to the arc vendors podcast show created a challenge you to be bold enough to live in extraordinary life with impact I'm here with Lisa her, and that's Christina. Noel, sit back find your happy place and get inspired. I don't know about you. But I got to place where I was so tired of hearing bad news that I wouldn't even turn on the radio in the morning, and I basically banned my husband to listening to the news by himself because I didn't want that to set the tone for my life, and because of everything that was so depressing in the news, I found myself at a place that I wanted to be doing more. I wanted to change lives and make the world a better place and yet at the same time, I found myself really struggling with balancing my own needs with the needs of others. I also banned my husband from watching the news or on me because they hated having my head felt from that when Ernie had depression, and that was already bringing me down I needed to surround myself with positivity and the only way that I could find that. I could do that was by putting myself in places where I'm doing positive things for the world the way we work needs a complete makeover. And I think we need to be talking about systemic issues like racism, sexism, white supremacy and bias Illini to work to find ways to change the systems. And so that is why we started arc benders. How can we a band together as opposed to just feeling sad? All the time, historically, the biggest challenge has been diversity of self has been seen as a thirty word unless I live in it. I couldn't see out to overcome. I. I think burn out in office. Former common that should be acceptable. Everything we do we are trying to build community whether it's eating together volunteering together. These people are freaking amazing. I mean, they're they're everywhere. They're everywhere having an enormous impact on the lives of others. The name arc banners comes from the quote, the arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends towards Justice, which comes from Theodore Parker a nineteenth century abolitionist. In unitarian minister. It was made famous by Dr Martin Luther King junior. Every episode will be bringing you interviews with inspiring arc benders who are blazing new trails in driving positive change. We hope you'll subscribe to our podcast inter favorite podcast app. And if you like what we're doing and want to help please rate us five stars on I tunes. You can also find us online at we are the ark, benders dot com and Instagram Twitter and Facebook, thanks so much for tuning in. And don't forget every little thing you can do to make a difference matters.

Noel Ernie Lisa her Dr Martin Luther King Theodore Parker Christina Instagram Facebook