35 Burst results for "ARC"

WIRED Senior Correspondent Adam Rogers Talks about the Wild Tech Built into Perseverance

Gadget Lab Podcast

06:21 min | 7 hrs ago

WIRED Senior Correspondent Adam Rogers Talks about the Wild Tech Built into Perseverance

"So adam. Let's start with a couple of notable things about this rover one. It's collecting and to you. Just wrote a story on wired dot com this week about the cameras on perseverance and how they actually perceive imagery much differently than we do. Tell us about this. And why this is significant for this mission will. there's something almost philosophical. You have to address if you're going to send not people to explore another planet but robots which is you're trying to acquire like sensory information and some of that some of that can be quantified can be sent back as data. You know the numbers for certain for certain analyses that you can send an instrument to do and i. I can talk about some of that but some of it. Is you want to send a robot that can look at stuff that can hear stuff in this case they can sense this world. And then that that information through the sensory organs the mechanical sensor organs the technology. That you send the microphones and the cameras and the sensors instruments and then it has to get home has to get back to us somehow. Us not wired reporters but jet propulsion laboratory and then the whole vast team of humans who process all of that through their own machinery and then it becomes something that they can that they can look at. Its this this. Arc of how data becomes information and then becomes knowledge so we humans send these robots to mars to some extent to learn how to send better robots to mars a lot of the instruments on perseverance. That's the rover that's there now are versions of instruments that went up on other missions and now they kind of the scientists that jpl and are all these universities. Nasa know how to make them work to do more what they wanna do which is to look at their surroundings in ways that that we humans would would. Would i be able to identify easily as looking at stuff to to see things in the colors that human is also see we were standing there and also to look at them multispectral hyperspace literally and other parts of the electric spectrum that human i wouldn't perceive but the eyes of this rover is in scare quotes that i'm making on a on a screen even though this audio medium so that's not helpful at all. The eyes of this rover can see into the little bit into the ultraviolet partway into the infrared. And and also can see x-rays and have an are using a laser project light outward to obliterate some bits of rock. And see what what happens when you do it. And to listen with microphones that that might be more sensitive than human ear. Then all of those things get get reduced transformed or changed in some way into meaningful knowledge so that we can understand more about what what's on this other planet where humans have never been but humans have sent a lot of our stuff. You're saying that each brand has gone up tomorrow. At least the ones that we have had progressively better technology on them with each version. And i think it's kind of interesting that this rover that just went up now. Perseverance is essentially the first rover of the iphone era. Curiosity launched in two thousand eleven and it was designed for a period of five or six seven years before that so the imaging technology on it is very representational of like that time in imaging technology the imaging technology that we have now and the imaging technology that we have on. Perseverance is pardon the pun astronomically better than the tech that we had ten years ago. I mean if you think about like how bad your instagram photos. Were in two thousand eleven. And how fantastic they can be now. You can see just like as far as mobile technology goes and just imaging sensors. The leap has been huge. That's a it's a really interesting observation. I think that's right. Although i will also say that like one of the one of the instruments that i wrote about is called the masked kim z. And so it's this. This binocular camera to cameras linked together left and right eye on top of the tower. That's on the rover so sits up a little. Bit high zina's presume because there was a mass cam on curiosity the z. Has zoom capability and it does a bunch of stuff. It's there to identify targets of interesting scientific potentially interesting scientific value and also to be able to look around and navigation and take pictures and do a whole bunch of other stuff. The the ccd the charge coupled device the optical sensor the to in mass are off the shelf kodak cds and they have the they have in front of them the bear pattern of pixels. The probably gonna get this wrong but like the red green blue. I think that that's that would be familiar. That if you if you could look into your phone you would see it. And then mass games does what. The experiment instrument is take advantage of some capabilities that our phone cameras. Don't really do to do much more. Because because the also can see into the infrared a bit and so if you put the right filters in front of them you can do even more science with them so there is some sense that we send up a camera. That would be the same camera that a lot of people have in their pockets right now sitting on their sitting on their desk. I can get sort of derivative about but there's something important i think in the pictures that are starting to come back already. That include parts of the rover itself and people will describe those as celsius as mars selfie camera taking pictures of itself and and nasa among all agencies is very very good at At its own promotional work saying like. Here's the thing. Here's the picture of the thing we're doing. There are pictures. There's video of the landing which was dramatic but also like the video of the landing. Is there to video of the landing has engineering value but also publicity value. But but i think the calling it. A selfie also includes the recognition of the the. It's not personal because of course it's not a person of the machine hood of the individuality of the humanness of the technology that that we sent that has to do a thing there. That's doing technological work and and seeing mars through a kind of filter that's akin to but slightly different than the filters that if mike if you took that billionaire ticket up tomorrow how you would see through the visor of your of your back suit

JPL Kim Z Nasa Adam Zina Mike
If You Sell Your Bitcoin, Michael Saylor and Jack Dorsey WILL Buy It

The Breakdown with NLW

04:37 min | 1 d ago

If You Sell Your Bitcoin, Michael Saylor and Jack Dorsey WILL Buy It

"Before powell spoke investors had started to get nervous in the us around the potential for an early unwinding of the fed's extremely aggressive approach to keeping rates low and stimulus etc. Because of this the market was getting out of stocks and into treasuries driving the yield of treasuries down and by the way if that sounded like greek to you. We're actually going to do a macro one show. And a bond specific show as part of that new kiddo show set as well either way powell gave testimony to the us senate banking committee on tuesday and said that the economic recovery remains uneven and far from complete and the path ahead is highly uncertain the bloomberg headline this morning about it said powell reiterates view that labor market has a long way to go. Pow pointed out that there are ten million fewer people employed. And that's a long way to go to maximum employment and this is really important the mandate the fed is actually two parts market stability. But it's also full employment the tools however that they have to achieve that full employment are limited and what we've seen is that asset prices tend to benefit before full employment is reached over the course of this year. We're likely to shift from the market stability part of that equation to the full employment part of that equation but it still promises a pretty aggressive approach from the fed powell also mentioned digital currencies saying it's a priority and that they'll be reaching out to congress about it in twenty twenty one so we'll have to come back to that soon next up on the brief today trouble in arc land i have discussed kathy would and arc pretty frequently here most recently in the episode last week i find it interesting. How a lot of the macro dynamics that are potentially interacting with bitcoin might be interacting with arc funds as well arc has seen a stratospheric rise over the last year but has been hammered. The past few days in fact it started a couple weeks ago as people started to get nervous about how concentrated arcs of some of their companies were remember. Our funds have specific feces around innovation. So there are frankly. Only so many companies they can buy if their fund owns to high percentage of those companies. The fear goes it could create risk in both directions that an issue in one company could create broader risk for arc or vice versa that arc could create new exhaustiveness risk for the companies themselves over the past few days however the concern has been less about that and more about this rise in treasury yields the innovation. Etf which is their flagship. Fell three sessions in a row. It had its worst today. Drops in september and again basically these yields were reflective as we just discussed of investors thinking that there was going to be pressure for rates to rise and for fed support on wind earlier than expected because of that they were moving out of the pricier parts of the market. I e tak. Now for her part. Kathy would said she wasn't worried said that she welcomed the correction and to be fair. She's gone from three billion assets under management in january twenty twenty two more than thirty in january twenty twenty one to more than sixty billion last week still. I think this is worth watching as a reflection of the bleeding edge of the markets. I don't think. Bitcoin is so correllated that you can watch these things move in tandem. But i do believe that. There's some proxy for how traditional investors might think about bitcoin at any given time based on the macro context lasts up on the today. Let's talk about the latest out of india. India as we've discussed has been very aggressive. Vis-a-vis crypto currencies with that seeming to only heightening right now a couple updates from the last few days rakesh ginger who's likened to an indian warren buffett. The billionaire investor he told. Cnbc never buy bitcoin that. Regulators should step in and ban cryptos in india and called bitcoin speculation of the highest order. So pretty much that. Warren buffett description is accurate at least when it comes to opinions on bitcoin at the same time however he also stated that india should focus on the creation of an official digital rupee. This was echoed by comments of reserve bank of india governor who reiterated that. The rbi has major concerns around cryptos but that they are working aggressively on a digital rupee. I wanted to point this out. Because i think it shows just how much india is going to really draw. This contrast between killing cryptos private cryptos and network cryptos while simultaneously trying to harness that momentum for an official central bank digital currency is that paradigm. That one can't survive while the other one does or are there different ways to look at

Powell FED Us Senate Banking Committee Bloomberg Kathy India Congress Rakesh Ginger Warren Buffett Treasury Bitcoin United States Reserve Bank Of India Cnbc
Wichita State holds on to surprise No. 6 Houston 68-63

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | Last week

Wichita State holds on to surprise No. 6 Houston 68-63

"Outreach Gilbert and Tyson Etienne each scored sixteen points for Wichita state sixty eight sixty three win over number six Houston Gilbert was three for four from beyond the arc for the shockers who were ten of twenty two from three point range it was a satisfying win for a team I was leading the game let's make history Afghanistan let's make history you know in in the guise file do we did just that so it's an amazing feeling to do that it was Wichita state's first home win over a top sixteen since knocking off number two Louisville in February nineteen sixty seven the shockers moved into first place in the American athletic conference at ninety two percentage points ahead of the eleven and three Cougars Dejan Perot led Houston with sixteen points I'm Dave very

Tyson Etienne Houston Gilbert Wichita Gilbert Afghanistan Louisville Dejan Perot Houston Dave
Unmasking a Killer

We Saw the Devil

04:40 min | Last week

Unmasking a Killer

"Let's just start with a recap so far. We have covered. How him hubs best friend. Betsy furrier ended up murdered with fifty five stab wounds. Only five days after making pam hop her life insurance beneficiary. That's free is husband. Russ was tried for her murder and sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole after spending almost four years in prison. He successfully appealed for a new trial and was acquitted of all charges. I discussed the corruption ineptitude and basically the overall nefarious -ness of the police and prosecution when it came to his case. I mean seriously guys if there is this case doesn't make your blood boil. I don't even know what to tell you. I don't know what well it is trifling because this case is so complex with multiple ongoing arcs. We are actually going to backtrack a little bit for part three back to rest free first trial. If you recall right before russ's first trial which began on november eighteenth. Twenty thirteen police. Investigators interviewed pam multiple times. Because obviously she was the last person to see. Betsy makes sense. Police were aware of the life insurance policy change and questioned her about it a couple times. She was always immediately defensive and she ended up bringing up her mother. Shirley newman using her almost as defense as to why she had no motive for money. So here's a clip of pam hop from a july of twenty thirteen pretrial interview with police to moscow. My mom got an accident in and home. I really hate to say it wanted mind. My were half a million that i get when she dies. My mom is dementia. Doesn't have the time now. I am ledge person. But if i really wanted money wasn't easier way than trying to combat somebody gets saying shirley newman pam seventy eight year. Old mother died just four months after this interview on october. Thirty first of two thousand thirteen evening. Just two and a half weeks before russ ferreira's first trial. She had fallen off the railing from her third floor. Apartment in an upscale gated assisted living facility. There had been no witnesses and police deemed it an accident. Let's break down what happened. Shirley's husband and pam's father died in the year. Two thousand when she became unable to care for herself pam and her three siblings work together to get surely into the lake view. Park independent senior living community in fenton missouri. Pam would frequently visit her during the day on october. Twenty ninth twenty. Thirteen surely had a doctor's appointment pam transported her to the appointment and then surely spent the night at her house. Spending time with pam's family the next day. Roughly five pm pam and shirley arrived back at lake park pam instructed the facility staff not to expect her mom for either dinner or breakfast. She then left the next day on halloween at two thirty pm a housekeeper through surely newman dead. Underneath her third-floor balcony there was damage to the railing and she had fallen to her death after two police investigations. The saint louis county medical examiner's office deemed shirley newman's death as an accident. Shirley had died from blunt trauma to the chest from the fall and the medical examiner also found point eight four micrograms of zoll padam generic ambien in her blood. That's more than eight times. What someone her age and size should be taking but still it was ruled an accident. Even though a structural engineer said that there was absolutely zero away zero way. A woman of shirley newman's weight and height could've damage the six individual pieces of railing. Pam hop was the last person to see shirley alive. Yes she was never interviewed her siblings however had been even though they weren't even local to the area or present and hadn't seen their mother in quite a while in his first trial russ was convicted and sentenced to life in prison. Just a few weeks later. Shirley newman's death and pam's presence was never investigated and never considered moving on to january twenty fourteen as we talked about in part to the saint. Louis dispatch in k. t. v. I began a deep dive investigation into betsy for his death. Right after ross was initially convicted

PAM Shirley Newman Betsy Furrier Pam Multiple Pam Seventy Russ Ferreira Russ Betsy Shirley Dementia Saint Louis County Moscow Zoll Padam Fenton Lake Park
Morris comes up big in Clippers' 125-118 win over Heat

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | Last week

Morris comes up big in Clippers' 125-118 win over Heat

"Though down four starters the clippers still managed to knock off the heat one twenty five to one eighteen for their fourth straight victory LA has the league's top three point shooting offense and they hit fifteen of thirty two from beyond the arc Marcus Morris senior made six and led the charge with a season high thirty two points the V. two zero blood turned twenty two Lou Williams scored a team Jimmy Butler with a thirty point triple double to lead Miami mark Myers Los Angeles

Marcus Morris Clippers LA Lou Williams Jimmy Butler Mark Myers Miami Los Angeles
The Worst Video Game Launches In History

Gamepinions

06:14 min | 2 weeks ago

The Worst Video Game Launches In History

"Fallout seventy six. And what makes while it's seventy six so interesting is I i actually really like fought seventy-six like i really really enjoyed that game. I know that it was bare. And i know this story was kind of like i. I was kinda lean like going through and finding like all the different audio clips and stuff before they started adding in other stuff And i know that they kind of made it conveniently based around just like the story of the game like. Hey you're the first ones out like it's kind of it's kind of bullshit like i mean you kind of know that they weren't really i guess planning that from the beginning but anyway there was just there was so much that happened when that game launched and the first part of it that i find really interesting is that people were mainly upset with fall out seventy six when it came out because it was exactly what they thought it was gonna be yet and you know what the backlash on that game started even before the game came out to if you remember when the beta released there was a ton of issues with the beta because apparently it was only playable certain time i for certain periods of the day certain times i think that there is an issue where the beta would not let you uninstall it when you're done with it and i think if i remember correctly too i think didn't something crash where you had to re download it again like so people remember that and then know whatever it was. They had to rerelease the download because was corrupted. I don't know if that's exactly what it was. But something caused you to have to retaliate again. And it's not a small game. No yeah. I mean internet these days you know. Most people have pretty high speed. But this i mean this game came out three years ago. I wanna say at that point so it's kind of funny that leading up. You knew that game was just going to be a giant mess and we bought it because we like fall out and it was okay. I don't know that it was as bad as everybody made it out to be but it definitely wasn't good I didn't buy into that story at all about no. Mpc's it's ridiculous center. They tried to sell that so hard. They're like yeah but in this world there are no mpc's and it's like okay. I don't want this isn't story. I wanna i wanna follow like it's uninteresting. The robots because like that the best thing with fallout is like the different factions. And the people you meet you need that it just got boring. That's why we stopped playing is because we were doing. These quests but every quest was like go here scan if you things download things and read. That was the other thing is is because there is no embassy story was told via like notes and things you discover and i don't wanna do. That wasn't fun. So i think we just stopped because it's just really boring. Well it's funny that you mentioned that. Because i was. I was talking to kim earlier. And i was like. Why did we stop playing fall at seventy six. And she's like there is a main story mission where we had to kill somebody but they're already so we couldn't couldn't advance so i mean we just kind of shrug shoulders and that was that i had seen enough. I was like this is not doing it for me. This is not fallout. It's not it was literally felt like a gain. A totally different game with like a fallout skin. And if you remember you remember the other thing too so do you remember the collector's edition for that game. I do have this written down to think. They got sued instantly because one of the things they had was they advertised. This like this bag. It was supposedly a messenger bag. Yeah and the images that they would show it look like it would be a high quality bag. Have you got limited edition. Which i think was like three hundred dollars. Yes i think. Yeah they got this tiny like little plastic. I can't even call it a bag. You couldn't use it all and people were like what the fuck what is this. It wasn't even funny people like angry. Like what is this. Give me my money back. And yeah they got. They got sued and they had to actually recall it and they had to I had that a district preorder wound up cancelling it. But what i remember getting these emails. Is they You had a form and they had to produce the actual bag that they were gonna make any told you. Hey we'll probably have this in like six months or so. I think that's what it was. I got one ship to me like months and it was still a piece of crap back. It was awful. It was slightly better than i. Guess the one that people had gotten i ever got the original bags. Cancel the preorder. But i did get the replacement bag. I guess because they had a priori file but total mess from start to finish. What makes it even funnier. Is that when they were trying to correct that wrong. They ended up dachshund like everyone that put him a support ticket on their website. So it's like how our best as fallen and just sad todd house. We deserve better. That's the thing though it's like okay. So the game has bugs. But it's really redundant because it's a pathetic game so it's like you know what you expect when when you get it but it's just hilarious that all this other crap happened after the fact is just it blows my mind looking back at that i. It's just insane. And what's what's odd about fought seventy six is that it actually got like a redemption story arc. They added more concert and people said the games. Now so it's it's just hilarious. It's so hilarious. We've been talking about going back and playing it because we never played it after The update the major update. So yeah i mean maybe we can have a redemption You know maybe we can follow up and and Confirm or deny it actually is a good game now but yeah i've heard the same thing with the updates. It's actually pretty playable. I'm pretty enjoyable. Yeah have like a battle royale mode in there too. I think which is kind of you remember. I did want to play that. I remember when they showed the trailer for that. And that did. I was like okay

MPC KIM Todd House
A Conversation with Naketa Ren Thigpen

Extraordinary Women Radio with Kami Guildner

06:36 min | 2 weeks ago

A Conversation with Naketa Ren Thigpen

"Welcomed extraordinary woman radio and the key to it is so great to have you join us today. They can be. I am honored to be here. I have been so excited to talk to you in. Learn more about your work. Learn more about your stories are der mutual. Jessica roads introduced us. And i just adore jessica and the whole interview connections team. Then we already have something in common. I absolutely love them all. Yup yup jessica yup. All of them that they are and It's and it's so much fun to every time every time i meet anybody from that community. It's like they're they're just good people they're people doing good things in the world and they're they're just really they draw the right people into their community. Which makes it feel safe when they recommend someone breaks exactly the same. Yeah yeah well nikita. I wanna start with your story unless there with your personal journey and it you are running an amazing business and i want to know. How did you get to this point What's what's the journey been. Because i know it hasn't been just a straight line from you know from there to here so tell us just a little bit of this this arc way of. What's gotten you to where you're at. No question. And i know you and i were talking before we started about the layers that women have you know people have but it's been lillyman layers mastery that different in that respect lasts of twist in terms of my journey So i started off. My business is almost ten years. Old will be ten in may of this year so entrepreneur relations. Thank you. Entrepreneurship is a decade. For me at this point for a veteran a great. That's a great milestone. i hit ten years i think it just a little a year ago and it feels good when you hit that right it. Does you feel like did you have that feeling when you thirty. You're like a hammer out relies announcing you as a as a business owner in all parts of the process. We love it. Weiner churn we cherish by. It does feel different when you can feel like you're kind of doubts inside your life end in your business. So prior to becoming adult again this My journey started as a licensed clinical social worker. A trauma specialists sexologist relationship therapist. Like all things human behavior. I really just wanted to understand. Why did certain things or didn't do certain things to make their lives full and rich and healthy and whole That were anchored to whatever their experiences where that may have actually ridge dramatic so you were. You love this. Study people and behaviors and that's awesome It was really important for me to be really clear about how defined sharma like some people think. Oh i was sexually abused. Or i wasn't in any kind of intimate partner violence so it doesn't matter to me like that's not why i'm having difficulties or challenges but a lot of people didn't understand as my work got deeper and deeper and i understood the legs that trauma and michael jets that trauma smaller traumas can have as it also includes ways that you might have been violated when someone you and you held onto that and who stored at a certain way Limiting your ability to shy the lack of a better phrase being endure case extraordinary trade. Yeah it it kinda makes um that that emotion or that feeling in your body making you kind of poland. Smaller guest's feels like absolutely And i wanted to know why. I wanted to know not just for the other people but i honestly gambling i wanted to know. Why did it right on my life right. I liked that you say that it wasn't you didn't have to be some big trauma that there can be some instant that happens in our life that that that we carried forward at simply that we here a lot of law you know. All the parts of my life like in terms of our clinician being a being in practice. I would hear people say. I don't have that that we trauma story so that means also will have the big success on the other side because you know we are here it right the quote unquote gurus out there. They've all had something at least reportedly they've all had something family abandoned on raise in foster care right right by major thing happen so other people listening what feel like. I didn't have that. I have both my parents. Were in a nuclear family. Other than my siblings. Getting on my nerves for the most part wasn't hitting major bullying. So there's this meeting that. I can't be successful that i won't have healthy happy relationships so deep studying because i am a hashtag nurture life right so we've really studying that and being removed from my own biasi because we do bring our own biases in every situation. I really got to understand it. Some people were denying bear experience. That was traumatic even if it was a quarter whole smaller although we have to be careful with that were by you know measuring outsource experience but compared to maybe catastrophic right or military level heath yesterday ramble words and ryan there right soon grief and a knowledge that they had something that needed healing So that they could be restored from that just because it wasn't seeing as a what a trauma in the eyes of the news reporting So that really. Let me down the funnel of all things Figuring out why people were kind of stuck in this survival moles as a clinician. I honestly candidate. That was my job is to be with you in your process to help you figure out the route at dysfunction to get you get your legs underneath of you so that you could navigate and start to survive host trauma once you had identified or became aware of it regardless of win. That awareness was unlocked. Not where things got rocky for me by honestly is i wasn't happy during it. I was really good at it. And i loved it but i wasn't in my

Jessica Roads Michael Jets Nikita Jessica Weiner Sharma Poland Ryan Trauma
Cathie Wood Making Stock Picking Popular

Odd Lots

04:50 min | 2 weeks ago

Cathie Wood Making Stock Picking Popular

"So tracy here's something that i never thought i would see again so i i started following markets in the late nineties The dot com era and something that i never thought i would see again in my career after that ended was the superstar fund manager. Okay why is that. Well the actually totally true. What i mean is more the superstar stock picker because of course back. In the old days there are a lot of like star stock stock pickers fund managers. You know Peter lynch comes to mind some of the other tech investors back then but these days with et fs with online brokerages that make it really easy for individuals to buy stocks on their own. It really sort of seemed to me like that era had gone bright so i suppose there was this idea that the time of stock picking has come and gone and that if you want to make returns in the market you should just poor all your money into something like an s. and p. five hundred. Etf like a vs tax or something like that and just stick with it and don't bother trying to outperform the market because over a longer period of time. Even the best stock pickers had eventually underperformed. Right i think this mantra of don't try to pick stocks. A if you try to pick stocks. You're probably going to underperform the index and be if you come across a mutual fund or a fund manager. Who's good at picking stocks. Oh it's probably just luck it's not going to last too. You know even if even if there is someone who can beat the market. How are you going to know whether it's actually worth putting your money with them until like this idea that everyone should just index Trying to beat the market is kind of a lose lose proposition. It's really been drilled into people's heads. And i think like you know for years. They're really we just haven't had a sort of another new peter lynch or buffet. There's star quantum maybe some bond fund managers who are known but the idea of like someone who is just really associated with a great track record of picking individual stocks. Hasn't been a thing for a while and yet and yet a star stock picker emerges over the horizon. Yeah executive obviously that really That for the first time in a long time there is currently a fund manager a stock picker who is a mess and incredible track record an incredible following. And of course. We're talking about kathy. Would she is the ceo and chief. Investment officer of arc invest and there is a total fascination with our and this family of actively traded. Etf a phenomenally well in terms of returns but also ex Attracted an extraordinary amount of investor cash in the last couple of years right so the arche t fs. I mean i'm looking at their performance. They have five different semantic portfolios alone. Ch- that have basically doubled over the past year. Which is pretty amazing if you think about it. It's amazing enough for just one stock to double in price like that in just the space of twelve months but to do it across multiple is really remarkable and i think within their actual portfolio. There's a tiny tiny number of stocks that haven't risen recently. And i'm not even sure there are any actually. It's a really amazing. Performance is really sure to actually. I'm looking at the end of twenty twenty for twenty twenty their performance of a r k. Which is the sort of flagship innovation. Etf that arc has was up one hundred fifty two percent for the year Extraordinary returns and if you look at the holdings they're just all of the companies that have absolutely killed it in the real environment. Tesla is the biggest one but other names square. The payments company phenomenal roku huge winner. Zillow spotify tele doc. Which of course had an incredible year. Thanks to the rise of rome medicine and so forth so it is a Just extraordinary number of winners that this There's a fund and the related funds. There's a related fund for finance and Medicine that have That they've brought it. Just the triggers incredible. If anyone follows. Eric balchunas who's sort of bloomberg intelligence is etf analyst. I feel like three quarters of his tweets. These days are just about. How extraordinary this Family of funds and the performance of arc invest has been lately.

Peter Lynch Tracy Kathy Tesla Zillow Eric Balchunas Rome Bloomberg
Robinson-Earl leads No. 5 Villanova past Marquette 96-64

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 2 weeks ago

Robinson-Earl leads No. 5 Villanova past Marquette 96-64

"Jeremiah Robinson Earl was the star and fifth ranked Villanova's ninety six sixty four pounding of Marquette Robinson Earl poured in a season high twenty seven points on ten of eleven shooting he also shot five for five from three point range and grabbed eight rebounds to the thirteen into Wildcats the five three pointers were a career high for Robinson Earl who wintered shooting twenty seven percent from beyond the arc this season and had made just twelve from long range conical SP added sixteen points and eleven assists and Jermaine Samuels scored fourteen in the Wildcats tenth win in eleven games I'm Dave Ferrie

Jeremiah Robinson Earl Marquette Robinson Earl Villanova Robinson Earl Wildcats Jermaine Samuels Dave Ferrie
Myanmar Erupts in Protests After Military Coup

BBC World Service

05:28 min | 2 weeks ago

Myanmar Erupts in Protests After Military Coup

"Seeing members of the civilian government arrested on military vehicles back on the move has sent a shudder of apprehension across Myanmar people. The BBC has contacted their have spoken of their fear about what comes next. The military coup has taken the outside world by surprise, too. The United States government has announced it will rethink its decision on sanctions, which were lifted in light of the moves towards democracy since 2010 at night people in towns and cities in Myanmar bang pots and pans in protest of the military takeover. Jonathan head. Military coups. Real hunters taking over with uniforms, lots of braid and tanks on the streets. It becomes such an aberration that when they do happen, there is always an element of disbelief. It's as though a part of our breakneck technology driven world is suddenly catapulted back Toe a bad movie from the 19 seventies. One that took place in Mama on Monday was especially baffling as it was carried out by an army which had designed the Democratic system it over through and it kept so much political power under it. Coup seemed unnecessary. And it deposed, uncensored uchi, a leader once idolized as a fearless champion of freedom but who in defending the military against charges of genocide was then denounced as a fallen angel. Gamma is a fearfully complicated country with a history, which has bean traumatic even by Southeast Asia's turbulence standards. Get the rest of the world has bean unable to see it this way because of the overpowering draw of a woman veiled in a mythical aura, combining fragile femininity with steely resolve magnetic charm. With imperious detachment. She was the stuff of fairy tales, holding out a loan against an antediluvian and brutal military and eventually cajoling them into giving the Burmese people free elections. And in huge numbers, they chose her. That narrative, though, has been hard to square with the woman who also appeared callously insensitive to the horrors endured by Muslim RA hinges on her watch. Now we're being asked to reengage with uncensored DCI in military custody Once more. I've seen lively debates among engaged Burma watches over whether she should be supported again as the imprisoned symbol of her people's democratic aspirations. Or not, because of the many undemocratic impulses she showed, is the country's defacto leader. How did we get so focused on this one person in a country of 55 million and in a region with so many other woeful tales of injustice that deserve our attention. Partly it's about timing. Went on sans Souci first emerged as a political figure in 1988 on what was supposed to be a short trip home from Britain, where she lived with her British husband and two sons, Burma as it was then called Was little known trapped in military imposed isolation. A terrible repression of the protest movement. She led on the start of her long incarceration coincided with the collapse of communism in Europe and the rise of a new World order. In which it was hoped Western or U. N. Led intervention could write many of the world's wrongs. She was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1991, just a year after the release of Nelson Mandela from prison, and it was hard not to see similarities in their dignity and fortitude. Like Mandela, uncensored cheese. Long periods of isolation under house arrest meant that few got to know her well, and the world instead projected an ideal ized version onto a complex and difficult personality. She came to embody the optimistic belief that the arc of history in the memorable phrase used by President Obama, whose visit to Myanmar marks the high point of uncensored cheese reputation. Was bending inevitably towards democracy and freedom. Fast forward to this year, and all that optimism has long since dissolved in the disappointments in Afghanistan and Iraq in a global financial crash in bitterly polarized politics. And now a pandemic. Few believe anymore in the kind of miracles that Myanmar's transition to democracy was once thought to be. United Nations Security Council, the embryonic world government that never, Watts has mastered a statement of concern over Mama, which failed even to mention the coup the illegal overthrow of an elected government. On San Souci is now being charged with the laughable a fence of possessing illegal walkie talkies. That will be enough, though for the hunter to disqualify her from the new election. It's promising to hold eventually. Have done this to her before, but she is now 75 years old. If she manages another political reincarnation, the generals are betting she'll no longer be the resolute figure they've bean unable to beat for so long. And perhaps it's time for all of us. Even the party she founded and has dominated for more than three decades to let go of the woman. They still call Mother Sue and the Lady. And to seek younger personalities who can chart Myanmar's future.

Myanmar Civilian Government United States Government BBC Jonathan Southeast Asia DCI Army Nobel Peace Prize Nelson Mandela Embryonic World Government Mandela Britain San Souci Europe President Obama United Nations Security Counci Afghanistan Iraq Watts
RADCast Outdoors Episode #37: Al Lindner Discusses Faith, Family and Fishing - burst 01

RADCast Outdoors

1:05:47 hr | 3 weeks ago

RADCast Outdoors Episode #37: Al Lindner Discusses Faith, Family and Fishing - burst 01

"On this episode of red cast outdoors we sit down with legendary fishermen of famer and co founder of in fisherman lindy equipment co owner of lender media. Al lindor course. Everybody knows al from his days on in fisherman and has seen him on a number of different tv shows including the angling edge and on this episode of rod cast outdoors. We sit down. We visit with him about a number of different topics including fishing family. Fame his faith and of course. What are his favorite things to fish for to this day. We hope you'll sit down. Relax and enjoy this episode of raw cast outdoors. Sean rad cast is on hunting fishing and everything in between this is red cast outdoor from the borders ten cast studio here david merrill and patrick edwards again outlets gay debut on the program. I do wanna a quick shout out the ending curdle cousin for helping. Set this up with al this kind of a big deal. thanks dante. yeah so really. Appreciate danny and I'll just want to welcome you to the shell. Thanks for taking time out of your busy schedule to hang out with this on a podcast for a little bit and looking forward to nothing makes me happier than a cold in minnesota. If i can't be out fishing. I should be talking about the. It'd be well below zero tonight. So that's probably one of the big motivations for patrick and i to start this podcast. We both have young families. And we're both avidly into the outdoors whether it's fishing hunting or of both. So that's our goal is to You know recruit new new anglers and new hunters to the to the outdoors around. The timing is really appropriate for unit. We've got a whole new. Recruitment a coming in because the cold or sport is never seen before experience in the outdoors and they need our need some guidance. in cases do you know respect the resource in S an important part of what's happening now with these whole. Nobody's covering it. Yeah it's it's been fun to watch you over the years. 'cause you you've really helped kind of teach everybody about that and i know as a kid. I always look forward to outdoor life coming in the mail and also in fisherman magazine because that was that was kind of the thing was you know i wanted to learn more about fishing and growing up in cheyenne wyoming. It was like a dead zone fishing. I mean there's there's really not much closer unless you're going to drive like two hours to glendow three and a half hours to seminal five hours to voice in like you just forget about it. There's just nothing there so you're talking about teaching people. I was reading that as much as could. Because i knew when i went. I had to really capitalize on those trips and sell ob. You've done amazing job about that. And i just wanted to know if you could just share some tips with us you know. What's what's in key strategies of getting kids and just other anglers out on the water. What are some good strategies and tips number one number one. Make sure you take him when you can get a bit people. I i mean i can't old is powered pork edges especially with the younger ones. That have a short attention. Spans inter is critical. That baba's going down or something pulling on the end of that line and Are that's one in even with a new adults and we have a lot of those coming into the sport now that have never fished before and yes. They have patients where the young people don't however their patients will wane after one or two trips without getting up by. It's the biggest hinderance that i've seen to our sport and your people neck key is getting a bit a bike. Too late that fire they gotta catch something and You don't wanna take him out in this herbal weather conditions yet the weather good into everything your power to make sure that they get back in there and the reason people fish in continue to fish is they had a good experience and a good experience is something pulling on the end that the wire gets really the reason you're out there. That's what motivates people is the miracle of of this. It is amazing to me. My entire life in this business to see would fish can do this change. Somebody's like yeah. Yeah you know a kid sitting under edging blue gills and all of a sudden nowhere. A two pound bass runs out reminders. That back and grabs your bank. You never had. You're catching a six inch blue gills and having a ball in this best is your hook break where your life forever somebody had never muskie fish. You know they heard something about it. They're they're going out with somebody that knows something about all of a sudden next to the boat. This monster opens his mouth bites on. It's an image yet burns into your into your spirit that change. It never goes away. That's what likes to fire in this sport. And here's why it's so important. That that their two n into good weather to do it in your. That's the key is to get get a matching get a matching get them and then if they're really young after three hours to think to run into live whether you get a few fish rockets there fascinated with fish bouncing around in a live That's the key really. Is the key to keep them motivated. Keep them fishing kit. In a short period of time you know and again with the adult young person after after you know you get them out for two trips. Third time Yeah you're going to say you want to go fishing or meet today too bad experiences them. They're gonna go bad back in play video games. Interests will beer so al. I was fortunate enough to grow up near salt water and my dad in the pacific northwest. We did a lot of salmon and halibut and deep sea and i got introduced very young to fishing. We actually just had a podcast with my dad on talking about starting that fire that you're talking about i'm curious who was the fishing mentor in your life. The person that got you hooked on fishing. Actually my my brother and years my senior and He he took me every weapon time. I was a little kid. Yeah you know. He's seen a bring cash and he shared that he said there was something about it from the time you were little. You're obsessed with fish and fishing and he nurtured that he actually nurtured that dad dad in him being older than i am a yeah you know. He kind of took me under his wing and I had some really good experiences in those years. One of them that that really fed my passion for fishing was my mother and this is kind of strange but a share. That story with you. My brother obviously loved to fish. Yeah yeah you know so. He took me everywhere. Everywhere we go. We fished all pans and lakes and creeks and rivers and between chicago and milwaukee. And there's many of them and we're at every moment we could go go go. He'd be a good way he he took me took me took me My mother really liked to fish and She's seen you know people would ask me at a young age. What do you go to a christmas. Gathering family or friends like this and say l. conference. Yeah what are you do when you grow up bowl recovered. I'm living fishing going to a look at you. Oh okay yeah you don't blow it off my mercury. She she under the guy a brother with it she she at christmas time or birthdays or special event every time all my christmas presents and gifts were the latest greatest fishing tackle in the industry whether it was a ride or real allure magazines books. Anything that that that she fed bed it and never said that's a dumb guy you can make a living in the fishing industry. Yeah you know especially at that time you know that many years ago yeah you know and the only thing you again you know. You had tackle manufacturers at outdoor writers that At that time. What are the inspiring outdoor writers to me as a kid was jason lucas. He wrote for sports afield at that time. And he he wrote a book called lucas on bass and becky. I read it a dozen tanks. That and marked every page variances burned it into i mike and that. So yeah you know. It's experiences like that Then television every member. I n nears our tv tv fishing business. The first one His name was geared about gaddis. The flying fisherman he was the first one hit syndicated television fish and chips and he'd tried different locations all over the country and sheriff is fishing. Experience get out get it and then and then that led diverge award. That was the true Championship fishing and he was the one. Got my fire to get into the fishing industry in do a television show in the business ahead He was here in my hometown. In brainerd minnesota yet We're starting lindy deco company and His producer His name was j jadwin. He gave us a call at the office. What day and he says i am not. I would perjure war championship patient. We've been in the area for three days or even how we went into a well. I want you ask buster and can you help they understand you know the lakes. You're really good bishop. And everybody says go while alkyl corral. You aren't one so says you do show absolutely. We went out and we got a phenomenal show. Shot for hours to get everything done. He's all happy he took off and went back through missouri. And we finished. My brother looks at me at night. We're talking he's internet. Does your television show and talk about the lures that he manufactures. So you know we could do that. We got into. Why don't we start at television fishing. Show and helpless guess what little fire in pakistan. Tv channels that was would but a camera. That's what camera in my brother. Learned how to use it. And how to splice taped together at your rewind these stories and how you get into the game and enter the fishing industry and enter the sport different aspects that are available. All you get these different stories from everybody that that has been there enough to make a living business. But i'll go back to what i say just a little bit. Herb just amazes me. What a fish. A fish do to change. Somebody's stunning to me. How it happens all the time when experience would have been in. Just bam young know. You're right this change. Yeah i agree. It's it's an amazing experience. I i remember catching fish when i was little and how it lit my fire and again i. I promise that i would do this on the podcast. And i hope it's not lost because i you hear this stuff a lot but my friend. Seth ewing who lives in northern idaho and myself we we grew up. Just eating up your your shows and Magazine and and it really did benefit both of us. He's he's an incredible fly fisherman and he he learned a lot from your fly-fishing video that she goes put out with dollberg and You know and i. I love the small mouth and the walleye in those kinds of species and so it's just one of those things where i i hope it's not lost on you when you hear say you know. Thank you so much for doing all of that because it really did inspire a lot of people across the united states in the world To go out and fish to take other people fishing which i think is really cool one of the things that i always enjoyed and my dad and i always enjoyed watching. Fish was just the joy on your face. You were always you know chuckling and laughing and having a great time and we were just living vicariously through you as the wind. Blew about seventy miles an hour through cheyenne. But i mean it's it's just it. It really did make a big difference. And i do want to. I want to ask about this because this is really important to david. Ni- we we both have little kids and we take them out fishing hunting different activities. And you know you have kids of your own. And and i know. He's very influential and big into the fishing businesses. Well but can you talk a little bit about what that was like raising your kids to be fishermen but also you know kind of raising them during that time that you know you're just so busy and you got all these things on with the with the fishing world and the fame that you had going on. How did you manage all those things and still make it a great experience for your kids. They grew up in the business. they did. There's not all all seven right here except in children. I've got two boys all of the kids. even girls. Three of his kids are girls. They all served in the business wing. Some of your friends. At the time we started lindy dako copier reports sinkers learning advertised snow. Rapper mind cars. Were exposed to the business is a family run. I mean all their life you know and they grew up in many different fields yet. You know it other things. But-but-but number stayed in the business in our in the business today like jim. dna billing and mesa troy. Yeah you know and and my daughter niece who worked as a pr rest. For many many years fishermen still welts me A right right material and press releases and things like that you with the gifted in that area but they grew up in the business thing. Yeah and and that way you were able to spend time together so they understood it. They understand the crab and the things that this life style. If you went to make a living a good comfortable living in deficient indiscreet. I don't hurt my myself and i know many people that you and i do not that then ended the business row ripley. Welcome rarities Actor to it these days. It's a lifestyle business that you want to get into anything cup. Lack of time it is. It isn't in ninth the fact you you know you eat sleep twenty four hours or so you go to bed at night thinking in still today at the. That's been in this my life. There is not one and go. That goes by that. I don't read something about fishing. Watch something about fishing. Talk to somebody about dishing. It happens all the time. Not a day goes by where some aspect of it is in touch in my life. A part of my life in My closest friends are pretty much involved in fishing industry. Right closest friends. Are that sparks your question for me. L. and that's you know i'm kinda way way beginning of this journey. I've got a small family run company but it's in the hunting outdoor space. And you know. My boys are being raised growing up when we work right. We have stuff to do. There's it's a small family run business. it's not you know. Dad goes to work at nine. And we're we're done at five and let's go do x and y but my question is long term for me. My dad took me fishing law. And now i go hunting and now. My boys are in a hunting company being raised. How did you see kind of the transition of with raising these kids. In the company in fending fishing industry they stayed on and continued to fish and still thrive as that was our was that a positive experience for them. Oh yes yeah. Yeah for a number of now. There's some of them that was not. I'll use my to poison example. My oldest son george in here in heat you shared with the. I'll give you my first experience with it. needs he. He was raised in the business. He worked in. It works wade through until they went off to college in it but he was interested in fishing gets his passion in his case. Was things that move fast snowmobiles motorbikes four wheelers dirt bikes. This is what he loved to do. Sounds like we'd get along pretty. Well do troy and the other hand off from the time. He was a little tiny kid. You could see the seat of he would be back in front of our h- house here a day and night catching frogs and just running up and down the bank catching he'd loved it from the time he was four or five years old internet. Never change he absolutely left. And i just think again. God created all slightly different with different interests and is a good thing. You had one boy in the garage tinker on motors and going faster and you had another guy you couldn't keep at the house. He was taking his fishing pole and he was to the water at four and five. Yeah in in in you and your the answer. Paracha half have respect know. I respect that. They have to be their own person in in in seek out for thinks the all that you know that those different interest levels impacted their right as they were growing up in reading some cases to to what they're doing today you know again my son toys into it in a lot of different areas of my oldest son and interestingly he he he liked even as a kid. You're living on the edge. He here you love the excitement of the snowmobile races today. He he'd get so pumped on yet in today. He's he's the paramedic he's a wilderness paramedic in he's fighting fires -fornia loves the game. You're whites. He likes ribbon on the edge to me. I like living on the salary to belated contentment. That's what i really like. And you know. I follow troy on social media and that that guy is always out doing something. And he's. he's an incredible fisherman. I mean it's it's yet it just anything anywhere any way any loves digging around in offbeat places for a coupla. He's got he's got pack whereas in no matter where he goes scurrying rats. He sees the body of water anywhere. Anything they could hold the fish he just drives up insider road. And rodney goes spacious anywhere anywhere crapping around the country with him because spent he's spent some time out west and i know he's fish some areas where i've been and it's just kinda cool to see that and i do want to ask you a question about that. Everybody has some of those favorite moments. What it was like a favorite moment for you fishing with your kids that you can recall the years ago with troy. I'll give you a. I'll give you my my oldest son that never got turned onto it and here's winter. Mistakes that make made with the there was a series the best tournament series. Starting in minnesota zillion years ago it was called the northstar bash turned into and when he was about four years old. I took an pre fishing. Mary and i got a cabin on the lake. And i took him pre fishing for that tournament with me and he had snoopy rag. You had snoopy rag. And they had to wait spinner baits. Then you know it was cool. We're up in the morning out. Who day thinking around. He's dragging this spinner baits through the water. And you know. I'm trying to catch some fish. Internet little said something. It's something from we'll get more moves out to have been great you you you hold in iraq ruled colin. He looks at me. it looks at the rad. He throws looked at me again. I got the message. You burn me out so bad. And so i think there's a balance there were so you know. My dad took me steelhead fishing. And i've i've got quite a few steelhead to my name. And if anybody out there knows steelhead there they can be finicky and tricky fish to catch i. I mean the passion for catching them is kinda gone. I've i've i've been out steelhead fishing and i've seen this in the hunting industry where you know you get some guys. That are pretty. Some prowess in are pretty successful. They take their sixteen seventeen year. Old son out. He shoots a world calibre elk and ten years later. He's he's not in elk cutting he's into fishing or snowmobiling or something else does. Ruggles images of the other side of that story would try. What are the experiences a for a number of years we as a family. A number of where we fished in tournaments in canada Rainy lake in minnesota canadian border. Another one at nor tap happened awake to work and we fish team tournaments up there and over the years that we hit fished at is a group together ranch fish with one of his sons. Jimmy and billy clubs voice fish fish together with danny. We're troy and We look forward to these these tournaments every year of up there and we won a number of them in your jimmy and in billy one. Two of back in those weeks the week caprice fishing leading into that terminated. That was the week muster sunday for fifteen years. Yeah you know it was the highlights of of our trip together with all of us as a family together and each one bus us. Everyone about when i talk to the boys inclusive of troy. Now he says that was some of the most enjoyable experiences we ever had and all of us at weren't time and other did really good way. And i did a couple of seconds and thirds internet but did win one with him in california and in went ahead and opportunity. You get fish with you. Those times that we're in those events burn memories that they talk about still in. Those chips are really important with father and a son. I know with my dad. We had an annual trip that we would take to flaming gorge and that always meant the world to me because we'd spend five or six days out on the gorge just fishing and not worrying about all the other stuff you know. The work stresses of life. And you know i had told you in an email about a trip to voice in just those kind of trips. Just make a huge difference in a young english life and death makes it something that makes them wanna come back later ended it burns into your sweet. You get so excited and then you think about it so often you think you keep revisiting that your mind. Our great great great experience. Yep absolutely and i wanted to touch on something else because we do try to help you know young new people into get into fishing and whatnot. And what are some tips that you give people when they're going to a brand new fishery and they've never been there before. What do you tell him to look for. And what are some tips that you give them. You know it's gotten a lot easier these days because of social media into local bites really. I mean you're you're you're deficient research on lake levels in what the bites been like recently. Water clarity stabilized. Image is endless. In comparison to what we had sixty years ago running through the changes that i've seen are gathering in the business of what the liberal. But you could do so much preliminary work you know. Get getting on your computer Checking out google earth. Going to local site Hunting down to let local reports. That give you an idea of what the bite is like what they're biting that. Yeah you know. Even to death preferences that stuff today is is in most cases. These areas have a very dependable week. Al outlet and that retail outlet Is a great source of information. They don't hide stuff from people they want you to have a good experience and they have fishing reports. That are done weekly. yeah you know. There's things that are posted a soon as their retail operation. So they give you the most up to date information you can possibly get and the is saves you so much time by doing a little bit of homework. So i'll you've got fish a lot of places in your lifetime. What was one of your favorite destinations. One place you wanna go go back in two at this point so far i probably one of the greatest place that i would go go bad bad and it was a family of them. Refer went to australia and We fishburne windy and we floated the rivers my wife stay. She didn't go coin with us into the jungle. And we did it three days when but ahead my two boys and We floated the river. spur morning. And we can't detonate banks and stuff and it was going through the you'd see what originally state you with. All these people would come to the river and you see these salt water again. Getting you know we're we're presented teasing experience. We we fish adequate the very typical coins When with the river for and wendy was that the guy that we're with you at a massive john bolt in. And i think if i remember would the sixty four or more on knew we weren't we took Took off at a tipping point when we went out. I don't know how many miles thirty miles or so it was in between darren new canning two oceans. Boil them your. I've never seen so many fish in my life and we got stuck his thing. We had backup quit. I don't even know we've -able experience that in there then we fish. Gt's the great barrier reef. Yeah you know a couple of days we did that tap water fishing critique keys but that was the the most probably the most memorable trip send in the boys rules enough to to remember that and enjoy and i've never been back again but never been back after us really get to do that. Sounds like a lot of fun to me It was exciting. It was really exciting. Every day was true adventure. Oh man that's one awesome thing about fishing is you know whether you're going out your back porch to your little pond or no for for me it was. We went to alaska couple times in my teenage years. Dad took us up to prince of wales island. And those you can either go on a short little ten minute trip around around the corner and fish a canal right by your house or you can go. Halfway across the globe know go to australia does. The opportunities are endless and every one of them is special in. Its own way you know in every fish. Especially it's it's all the way to work with some incredibly you state. Anglers jimmy jeremy hardcore muskie. They looked. I mean this is their fish of yeah this twelve months a year. They're they're on sites. They're always thought worst. What's what's next year. Where their plan. And what is your shoots in that. But every one of us might might bishop choices of small outbreaks. And then i'll go to a wall in allege mouth after that and i enjoy muskie fishing but not like these guys do either yet. It's their deal. And we got guys crappie fish at that looked crappie fishing nets. i'm kinda more kind of favor with troy. I like a little of everything in every case everybody in office sometimes throughout the year goes and jerks and goes a car. What would we are. We'll get a car. Pike in warning to every two to get to tax at least yet you know something different something out of the ordinary it go get some carbon in you know it. It pulled the fun to catch challenging at times. There's a lot of different ways to get him the. It's something i would not want to do every day. Like the mix it up. I like to catch your letter. What types of things. I can't do when thing. I liked the variety but i mean They're so fascinating fish. And i still in our country today in the states. Stay they you know in your up in different places the world there yet. They're big deal especially european nations. You so that's the money. It's like our best here in drives the market. And then he many cases sh- something silly in some off beatles little place in the and trial go round when i visited him. He'll take me shore fishing spots underfunded we mainly corporation jumping. You see him in the afternoon. We'll go think around for two hours or hours a year some place. He'd learned that when he was in arizona for years he went to college. There learned all the inner city rex. He didn't have the both twitter. Invent until i took down with a boat. All during breaks and classes he found every single nook and cranny at fish in and around the entire phoenix area. And believe me. There was a lot of those a lot of little pans and stuff and in and it was you. Carpeting had more more at your standard run carpet. It hit they all had best large mouth bass in your blue gill winner catfish so we just think around shore fishing nets or his wealth of bank fishing for years. He went to school there. All he did was bank fish off it back and it was just fun. I would love to do with you. Know i got the greatest in late. Greatest poison the war world my london. I'm rigged out with everything you can imagine the boat you know. The latest technology and everything enters a full ride at times. It just a whole lot of fun. It go beat a path pine fish for sure. Get some louis. This episode of rag cast outdoors is brought to you in part by. Pk lures pk. Lures make some of the best fishing lures on the market. They're high quality lures shine when others don't by helping you put fish in the boat or on the ice consistently i've been using keilor's successfully now for over twelve years and i can personally attest to their effectiveness. When is fishing. You can bet that. I have a pk. Red dot glow digging spoon or a fire tiger going spoon tied on one of my rods. They've helped me catch many high quality fish of various species from season to season my favorite hard water lures. Pk spoon pk. Flutter fish in tungsten predator for open water. i love the. Pk spinach ig pk. Dakota disk and the next generation. pk ridge line. Crank bait this past season. I was introduced to the pk. Warbler which is also a really effective fish-catching machine from the boat. They also have some incredible video on their website. Pk lewer dot com to show you exactly how to use these wonderful lures. So if you wanna have a little more success out on the water and you want to help support the company please go to pk. Keilor dot com again. That's pk lure dot com and get your pk lures today and please tell them that. The rag cast outdoors. Podcast sent you. So i was gonna ask you. I've always wondered this. And i'm sure you've talked about it before but you know everybody's got their favorite method of catching a fish catch fish in any type of method. Any any species. I know you love the small mouse. I love the small mouse as well but if you could catch efficient any type of presentation what's your favorite. Revered you're absolutely no question. Whoever i remember watching you on the wall i video and a bass video just catching tons and tons of fish on those jigs. I had a feeling it might be jagd merick rigor and well like smaller. My mouth says big big pig. Pike some version of chicken for must be done gun with tubes. Big rubber bates. It's it's a jig gonna jk. There's a better way for all kinds of fish all the time anywhere. Get a one sti- family of bates natural leaders acted under the heading up a chick but she was a piece of red or some kind would addressing the guy if might wait if may wait. Four ounces for watering might be a one sixty four for crappie a purple mylar. Jig will work pretty good for steelhead. But i i'm preferential to to top water. Dry fly stuff. I like to see that fish commit. Come out of the water. That's just i. I did enough. You know wet. Fly fishing. That i patrick knows. We've gone on some high mountain lakes. And i just. I really liked to fool that fish to come up all the way out of the water. He's any kind of fishing for musky. Your small mop mop secure rare occasions. Pike tap water breaks. Those are fun if you wanna be consistent year round. Yeah you gotta you gotta get beneath the surface of the water. Yeah my biggest hike. Was i had a fifty three inch. Pike and this thing was was monstrous and it was lake. Naturally larry larry dahlberg and he was filming. But we're reading and got in fake cockney kakatua water are you talk about a memorable experience with that and You know where he's been everywhere to do everything. Yeah yeah you know. He's still thought at their daddy issues. Deck it was unbelievable scene and fifty three inch this. We figured it was mid thirty pounds. You know thirty five thirty eight pounds something again. Maybe it was. It was jackie gigantic for bike. That was half water. Fish birds played beat of ball. That would be. That would be a lot of fun. I now i'm like. Wow that sounds like a blast. But i wanted to change gears just a little bit One of the things that have admired you for years is that you're not afraid to talk about your faith and i think that that's very important thing and you know i want to see if he can share just a little bit about your spiritual journey and how god is played a big role in your life after the two most important parts of my life. The next year shared all all the time. It's fishing in my unity. Go hand in hand every day. Day is just part of my life. I integrated what we do with the television shows. You know the the impact that it it a try to kind of quickly for you until the time. I was thirty five years old. You know i was a person. It was not an atheist store. Nick knight that nasdaq. I probably would have favored more upper eighty s. And i don't believe anybody that spends any amount of time in the outdoors anywhere can be an atheist. I think that's an impossibility. But i had no really. I was obsessed. And i guess that's the only word i could use obsessed with fisher twenty four seven. That was all that and you know. It gets all in our businesses. Were building at that point in time and At thirty five started giving turkey in my heart to Right to spirit a guy who was just tugging in my heart. I met people that that Turned her life over to the lord. Lord that were hard party hard-drinking people that i knew a hard partier. You know when they were like a different person you night and day and he started to talk to me about about jesus guy stuff i never heard of before the enemy sound comes with a lot of people you gotta understand nothing really new number and then i started the search knowing there's life got you got your busse heart who's much of his life in in one day turned us away lord has given us percents and i says well i i can't do it myself i need help i need your direction. I'm just saying guidance. Any made a confession of faith. Like they're nice and his life and then for about two years you know i wandered around back. Studied the word guide. The bible began challenged thing to me to get through a through know little things like could this really be real. You know like so many people. It's this bible. Could this stuff really. But this this thing is is there a guide the foundation guiding coke. Jesus was the foundation. Is this thing that he really is is. He says he is to be comfortable recently. Said he did from beginning to end. Yeah you know. And i started looking at this stuff. You know one day it got out of my head arc. It was never less years. All i can say is if you truly search is real. He's there you care some words to be. It's a real experience. You know the the point he's got to get out of your head in it. You have become a part of my everyday life. I'm not ashamed for the dash. That's it openly. That's who lamb. And i can only share the experience that i hear. And how would i life. My family My outlook on business. Now look on life right back by relationship with my wife and the older. I get a clearer easier. It is for me out to be more appreciative of of my lord grayson so al. I've got a question. It's a immuno high positive this way in a as starting my own business in the outdoor industry and then walking in faith in how how has that affected you know business decisions and just in a living in the limelight and and outwardly expressing. Your faith is there. You know ever moments of doubt. I mean 'cause i in today's society and day and age is definitely not something that's widely accepted. Are you saying in here by some subject back. But what would you buy. S- i mean as far as just running a business and then walking in faith. I if you look at the marketing partners that i have every single one of a from boat motor rag reels lures lying a wreck. Chronics are the top right at the top of their field in their individual categories. Everyone of and we've been with them for many many many years. Some of them almost my entire career. And i've said in corporate boardrooms all over the country. Go going all over television space over television network and contract saying that we re mega conglomerate and never have. I had one of say anything about my confession of faith and that show it all. Most of them have said they appreciated it and go forward and one of the reasons for that is an and some of them are not people but they businesspeople and the bottom line. Is i self stuff for. That's what i still stuff on. I do my job or am i would absolutely. That's why they don't you know so it's it's a only one. Major major challenge would network. It was who was with a network and and jerry jones johnson. They want forgot about guy that that was the words that they came back came back and they said that it's interesting the way they did notification we played on this network for a number of years and this particular year correct when just the way it always hits in five weeks into the show and it was a wednesday afternoon when it got where got i got contacted by the president of networking. And he said it's gonna pull the show because you're religious stance on it. We don't believe it's we. We went network anymore. This was on a wednesday. We get i managed. They did this going to pull it if we did we. Did we read it. Every i reiterate that we think energy i get contract signed with a bunch of sponsors and i had to deliver the numbers in so we get at that show and euronet weekend in the entire re edited version. And we continue our attorneys. Said you know you've been with. They want to take the court. You can't beat it you got. You ran for five weeks already. You did this for years. They never get it. They can't do for this thing and and they talked iran in in my wife. Laura his wife's no we'll go to thorough. They don't want you. i don't i don't want to be there. they want. They want us to be pulled what they want. They wanted to be this what we did back to show to them. We make the changes in our last of the contract for the television season. We sent them with bill. They said the bill hearing on pitching to us and we sent them the bill. Bill them back or the editing changes. We have to make sent it back. I never heard from them. That i didn't pay for the network in europe. Charge them back for all of the pain and misery went back bent. So it's no legal. Nobody called us back. Matt a single thing the legal. Nobody their legal. Nobody never heard from him since well. I'm really glad that you guys you know you. Un ron have have always been good about you. Know talking to people about your faith and it's been a centerpiece of the show and one of the parts of the show. The actually look forward to a bunch is the very end when you go through whatever god lays on your heart and i really just want to say. Thank you for doing that because we need to be able to talk about these things and i. It seems like culture is trying to move in a direction where they don't want you to talk about stuff that might offend somebody. But it's like you know these are things that we should all be talking about. You know if that's part of your life that's an integral piece. You should be able to talk about it. And there's one one thought i have on that. Patrick is to speak to have speech to have thought. You risk being offensive. Right to someone. And i mean if we're just gonna walk around muzzled and mass and never have a conversation about anything i mean. I'm into big game hunting that that can be offensive. Catching fish can be offensive. So we have to push back. We have to go. They'll run over here if you don't get you know and i'm a big thing an immediate business all my life. I'm a big believer a freedom of expression freedom of speech. Even if i don't with it so am i even. If i don't agree with it you still have a right to share. I understand and i respect it. And i think that's something that people need to remember. Is that just because somebody says something. You don't like doesn't mean you have to agree with them. You can just choose not to listen to that person anymore. I mean there's there's stuff that's put out all all the time that i don't listen to and i don't want to be associated with because i don't agree with what their stance is and you know there's plenty of stuff that i do love to watch and listen to that. I do agree with people that disagree whether you should catch fish on spawning beds are not right in an argument about that or you can easily selena when you can easily get there. But but again. I i like i said i. I respect our our freedom speeches. An expression is an important thing. I've been in the media business my life all my life and in people have a right this year that i have i a right. The like to tune into a cheddar offer. Do whatever i want with it not read it. I can exercise my own decisions. I'm not gonna go in there in equality sponsors sponsor them. Because you're doing this dead. I never do. And i think that's something that needs to be heard and i'm glad that somebody i'm sure a few people here it on this podcast but what you said is very true. We don't need you know this. Cancel culture of of things that you know. Ripples need to be able to share and people need to be adults about it and mature enough to handle it and choose what they want to listen to what they don't. I mean that's it's it's really part of the backbone of what what our country was supposed to be about and Were anyway i do to change gears. Just a little A guy that's been really influential in my life on fishing is pat o'grady. I met pat. Oh man that's probably been twelve thirteen years ago. And he was getting his company started. And i jumped in and helped him out with. Pk lures and here. He had told stories about you coming out to wyoming and doing some fishing. I remember reading. In the law. ally wisdom books About seminole and a few things. So i just wondered if you could share a little bit about coming out to wyoming. Western space are so different than northern or ride scary. Yo it's a whole different world and you mentioned to you mentioned alluded earlier when they get used to is. Never any wind ever ending win in. I mean if you go if you're going to fish you better better get used to win. Better not bothering you. The rick the vote right the handle nbc and being a safe piece the piece of equipment. They handle wind in it. I don't know if you guys ever go through three straight days in a row word you calm day never. I don't think lever happen. I go to archery shoots. And i have people say well. I'm not shooting in the wind and they start playing. Oh the winds blow. And i said well you come to wyoming. If you don't shoot or hunt in the wind just don't go hunting joke. Defeat w. t where we go to the code is as an example. You look at the weather report the night before they they say the win the window. We from fifteen to twenty five. It means it's going to be forty plus asu. It'd be forty dollars. Plus that's what you're going to get the truth. Well you talk about seminar. That is one of the windiest places. I think in the lower forty eight. I mean the the wind speeds on that reservoir are ridiculous. But i'll tell you the fishing is phenomenal. How many winter they put around it. Yeah they put a lot of wind turbines that sucker for good reasons but those western reservoirs growth big fish. Hey we're trying to keep that a secret. Al off carp fish is amazing and even some very. I'm a small mountain. i love smart fishing. The small mouth world small mouth. Fishing is as popular as it's become the tournament organizations. That have the come up north and since two small fishing and a great lakes and now they're coming everywhere yet yet you know you get to experience it in tournaments Love it the small mouth. Fishery that exists. West of the mississippi river is still some of the most unexplored smart fishing in north america systems. I can't you're innocent. At west of the river or to western states many of those reservoirs got phenomenal phenomenal. Nominal bishop i. I liked to tell the story. I've told a couple of times there's a. there's a river in oregon. I won't give the name but an all out to you. We drift boat floated at one day. And i hooked sixty small mouth in a day and i got tired of jagan forum. So i put on a mouse pattern. I tied and i caught. You know half a dozen small. He's on a mouse pattern. Just throw it right against the bank and start stripping out and they'd at that river this drift boat only so motorboats in that that can be a lot of fun i mean those are their sparkling out there and some of the some of the bigger systems pick the missouri river as an example for four. You've got set at saf. You've gotta wacky a. These are massive bodies of water massive massive systems and their in in in in there. I mean the small muppet. Nobody hears coast that they won't see an angler in your role year for small. Nobody'll be their four. Pack four pack is one of the most remote fisheries. I've ever been to. And i'll tell you what they're there have got to be miles and miles of shoreline that never get fished and i mean there's massive massive in their own up in way up at that even at the dry air dry air too short that is about what forty i think. That's forty miles long. And then you've got that main arms like one hundred and sixty miles long. There's very few accesses. Oh yeah you know you're right. I remember we had a pw heat from the tournament. They're in what we we got the attention that anisimov parsons weighed in. It was kabaya. They rent way when came to brought the smart in with his bad fish. So we could wait and it was like a six three or six or this. Was that smaller. That miniature scale in your macro swarm are up in san francisco. I couldn't pull about about have to lead. Somebody's somebody structures. Just drive in his crazy ton of them in there. That's an incredible says. I said there there miles up. It is the most untouched massive untouched mama. Fishing attack. the guy goes through not to mention some of the. There's one night and forget. That warned that they bleed. I think they believe their next record. Birsh sure commander there. I can't remember to saturday with no gather some wells. Old anti yeah. There's some fantastic fisheries out here. And i know just in wyoming alone. I mean you've got a number of really good reservoirs for walleye and you know a couple for small mouth that are really significant and a whole bunch that are good for trout of various species. And of course he got flaming gorge with those humongous lake trout. And that's and that's an incredible fishery to we touched on earlier smarter and they've they've kinda taken a dive the they they think that the Burbot that made their way there. Somehow somebody moved burbot down there into that drainage from apparently around this area and They just haven't they haven't done as well they they were doing really well in the early two thousands. I used to go down there with my dad and we'd catch some up to four four and a half pounds and now it's pretty hard to find them. They're still there. They're just not in the quantity that they used to be environmentally. Then yep There's something to be said for that. You know when i grew up steelhead fishing. You'd spend a lot of hours and when you finally hook into one of those thirty forty inch fish. I mean they they take you for a ride for a while but you can fish for two three four days before you even catch one hook one hook up you go small fishing and have those fisher so dang aggressive are fun. It's fun so that's one of the beauty of them. Yeah there's a there's a little reservoir here in wyoming that kicks out you around five pound fish. Pretty regularly And i i went there with a buddy of mine one time and we are fishing. Top water thing between josh. And i we we both got probably fish apiece just fishing little poppers on the surface in it was just a lot of fun and then that thing that you talked about al that happens in wyoming happened in the wind blowing really really hard to get off their old of the gun the boat for your life. Get your your jacket on. Got what. I'll tell you that much we got wet but so what's what's next. What's in the future. What's what's you know. What do you plan on. what's coming up. What are we. Should we be watching for and getting a little long into or the age also slowing down. A little bit i mean jimmy wego muskie fishing me for four hours. I ain't gonna go in our barrett fats or two pound rubber. Big thing can happen. You're only as old as you act. Al see you know strongest kid. My body doesn't want my five. You don't want to receive that. There are things that are wearing down a little think. That's wisdom speaking to abandon. No too so. I i have to pick pick and choose a little bit a little bit more but i still loved the game. I mean know as long as i can contribute that this sport in a positive way. I'm gonna do it. i'm not gonna. i'm not going to quit. I'm not gonna retire up. Going to crack back. And i mean by cutting that i wanna do more fun fishing on the shows. Jimmy jeremy that the staff and other people we work with. I'd like to see troy get a little more involved with this stuff. These guys you pick up the ball and run every night for long enough to fund fish a little bit more by that go do some things and places a lot of bodies of water that i'd like to play around a little bit now for two hundred and a lot of people don't understand that you know when you're going fishing for the weekend without a camera crew that that can be quite pleasurable when you're going filming for an episode that can be you know when you gotta redo takes a redo when you just wanna go explore to make it happen you gotta make. It's working people don't they. They sit in their living rooms and watch that and go. Oh well they were just they. Turn the camera on and went and had a fun time. There's a lot of hours behind the scenes when the cameras work was in. And then there's a year no it's addressing a lot of times a lacking half and on hot fight fetched but then when you dress the show after that. That's when you get the underwater cameras stuff out to fit. That fit the scene where the fisher coming in in to get the right drum shots environment. Those those all add to the editing and make it a little more exciting the music tracks that that go with it. you know. Music is so subtle in you know a lot of shows don't use music because you have to pay Their cost us thirty thousand dollars a year to use a music so yeah bachelor of music track because their royalties and alma my companies right in this is our very first go. My dad and i went she putting this last fall. We hired a cameraman and we took him. And i'm learning very quickly of the shortcomings of we didn't get you know. Be roll. Shot here and this extra shot here and you know getting that underwater shot or that overhead shot that you need in. It's you know it's really hard now to recreate and get those extra shots that we need to produce the film that i wanna purdue so make a real exciting piece you back. That'd be rollers goals man just putting the actual the actual easiest park. It is actually catching deficient getting their artist on films that easy. Then you've everything else is putting it together. It's all better than that anything. Sweetening the more things you have to compliment. Show the better. It becomes the up on where we're struggling. We're stretching it as as as as we can stay but it's fun man fun. It is a lifestyle worth living. Believe me i if you if you could do it. And you find a way to get your niche in their buck doing it your sizzle lifestyle business for a lot of people if you if money is your motivation and you want to get rich. Don't come fishing industry and here's a lifestyle some of us. I mean you could make a good comfortable but if money is silicon valley and they live in that world out there if you want to be able to go out and enjoy the great outdoors and have a comfortable lifestyle. Fishing industry in hunting industry. Got a better choice. you will never regret. it couldn't couldn't goodness it better myself. I have one more question and this is a really important question. Now because on this podcast we talk a lot about recipes and we talk about food. I'm sure you eat fish i. I'm positive that because it's so darn good but is your favorite fish species to eat. And how do you like it. Prepared real simple for me. I had a free nights ago again. It's just brought up perch beer batter perch sounds pretty good to me. A can of bean beam beam some some cream corn on the sidewalk outside with it. And it's like eating better than a lobster themselves as it gets it. Sounds like there's always it's yeah it sounds like you've into edwards family dinner because that's what we do in my house the fried walleye perch and crappie and some some spicy bangs man purchased it. It they are is still. You can celebrate thinking about my wife. Exciting as getting just guys came back from a leech lake and they were a good perch. Blatancy wentz arch for your prize. Bring them over man. Yeah well that's awesome. And again i just want to say thank you again for coming on the show. We're really grateful for you. You know not just the impact on our lives and whatnot. But just i know how busy you are. And i am grateful for you taking the time to spend with us today. I really really enjoyed the opportunity guys. Like i said If they can't be fishing the next thing to do is talk about fishing. What ten below tonight. I'm enjoying. I enjoyed our time here. Today and You know another rapper. During some that you might want to get. You might get some time. You're looking for another guess. she can. She did older jim. Your jeremy better outstanding and they noted you're ready to get the truck getting some real offbeat stuff. Those guys i jimmy and his muskie fishing jeremy those guys. I'm i'm really jealous. Because out. here you know we just don't have access to purebred muskie's it's just we don't have them so i watch those guys and i watch those shows. I just sit there. And i salivate and i cry a little bit because i really wish i could be there but man. It's your fun. Watch those guys catch them. Windfall muskie by turns out. I'm telling you they get like you know that it's happening. After two pearl they get in their fall formless derise turn glassy. You can't even talk to him out space. I can appreciate that. Patrick knows win. When fall. season rolls around. David gone. david all gone but al will. I'll tell you it or if if you make it out this way we'll put you on some fish instead of just talking about some fish arabic bro. I like it man. i'm in well. God bless you and You know be safe on your travels this year and i look forward to watch and more of the winter media so i appreciate it very pretty opportunities guys everybody habitation. Thanks a lot. So i think we should keep rolling for a minute. We'll wrap this show up and do you have to tell a story about al. I'm really glad he came on the show. In my first and only time that i've al was i cast in twenty eleven and i was working on my laptop and i was up in the las vegas convention center and i was sitting on the side. Which is a huge building enormous. I'm sitting out and kind of of the way trying to find a quiet place. I get wifi and do some work for pat gradient. Pk lure so. I'm working on it. And i see this guy. Come out the come off the stairs. I see that it's outlander. And i'm like oh man that's that's all inter i wanna go say. Hi and say thank you. And so i get up and start to head that way and i kid you not. It was like a stampede. The ground shook. You know the sky got dark. There's all these people just came from every direction and kind of cut me off and you know it was like okay. you know. These guys are more important than me. These our sponsors. You know these are guys that have a vested interest in talking to al. And so i'm like i'll just wait here for a minute. I'm sure clear out. It didn't clear out. The mass massive people just got bigger and bigger and bigger and then that mass move down to where all the booths were. And i was like well. There goes my chance. Shake his hand and say thanks But w quicker next time patrick. Yes but now. He's got to spend an hour talking with him and he's he's a wonderful guy and he's made an impact on my life that you i can only just tell you guys that it meant a lot to me today to be able to talk to him when i was younger. My mom passed away. When i was fourteen and after my mom passed away one of my things that it was kind of an outlet for me was fishing just to get away clear my head get away from life and my dad. I remember one saturday. He took me down to cabela's in sidney nebraska which is about a hundred miles from cheyenne. So he went to sydney. Bought some fishing gear but we also went and we found that they had a rack of in fishman. Vhs tapes and books and so we picked up those things and brought it home. And i mean. I was in those things. Like you wouldn't believe you know on those rough winners of shan that i keep talking about you know with the wind. Cystic crappie fishing. That was there. And i don't mean the fish you know we we would watch those videos. And we'd get amped up for that next trip to the gorge to catch small mouth or that trip that we had that next year where. We just clobbered the ele- perch walleye at poison. So you know those kind of things really mean a lot to me and just al and just the way is just how he has so much. Fun has so much joy around fishing. It's just so inspiring to me and so having him on was a big deal. You know for me today so it was great but i learned that and positively right. Vate faith and fishing is what he said. But you if if you're not having fun in this industry and he really did hit the nail on the head. Yes it's it's nice to be able to get to a point. You could make a living at it. But if you wanna make money go to silicone valley go go go create the next app or whatever the next thing is you make money and live that lifestyle but you know he touched on it. He's been in the industry for longer than about anybody and he still working i. It's it's crazy. He's seventy six years old and he's still going and just definitely an inspiration to a lotta people and one of the things. I wanted to pass along as if any of you wanna try to win a trip to go fishing with al. You can actually put in for that right now if you go to. England edged dot com. Which is there lindor media fishing page. So it's angling edge dot com. You can actually enter to win a trip to go with al which i highly recommend you at least in the show notes yet. So i'll have that there and then of course go check out their website. I mean they have so much information on so many different species of fish. It's kind of mind blowing because there's just tons of it and you can order. Dvd's and a number of other things but definitely support them. They're great family. Great group of people definitely take a kid or a new person with you fishing. Pick a go. Pick mali's yeah. It'll catch some mvm. Some of these dvd's are shown. Their youtube channel for over magazine cited in fact last night before doing this stuff. I showed the kids i said. Do you wanna see who are going to have on the podcast and the kids were like. Yeah i do. And so. I pulled up youtube and just played one of their one of their walleye videos. And they're like oh man that's really cool dad and they were all excited so definitely get people inspired. Get him out there. That's the whole goal. Patrick exactly so again. Thanks everybody for listening to this podcast. It doesn't happen without support of our listeners. And david and i definitely appreciate it. We do sorry you have to listen to me some days Or for that matter so as not all there but definitely go to our website. We have shown notes. We have a lot of different episodes on tons of topics. Bears elk in wall. Is you name it. We've got a little bit of everything. And then of course you can check us out on the social media. You want to support us. Computer read cast hat. Give a half ship it to you. They're pretty cool. A pretty sharp and of course. Go out and subscribe you. Know if you're on apple podcasts or spotify or any of those places that you gave your podcast subscribe to the podcast like podcast. Pleased definitely leave us a review. Tell your friends your friends. Yeah so anyway just wanted to say thank you again again. Check us out at red. Cast outdoors dot com.

Troy Minnesota Fisherman Lindy Equipment Co Lender Media Al Lindor Sean Rad David Merrill Patrick Edwards Jason Lucas Cheyenne Lindy Deco J Jadwin Seth Ewing Lindy Dako AL Wyoming
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05:15 min | 3 weeks ago

Why 10 Super Bowl Appearances Won't Satisfy Tom Brady

"Hey thanks for joining me man. Good to be here. Seth wicker sham is a senior writer at espn and he's covered. Tom brady since his rookie year in the nfl. Words with you. Seth you are. Espn's resident. tom. Brady you've been covering brady for nearly twenty years. I believe at this point. You're the first person to report. That brady was looking for a way out of new england back when that was on thinkable and honestly kind of dangerous to suggest in the boston area. But your piece out. Today ahead of. Tom brady's tenth super bowl in tampa bay with the buccaneers. It actually begins a decade ago back in new england. What happened a couple years ago. I was in tom. Brady's house and we were in his living room and he was telling a funny story about bill belichick. It was a saturday morning meeting before a game against new york. Jets and bella. Check was watching film of mark sanchez. Running out of the pocket rolling to his right players it is heels and he had a wide open receiver about sixty yards downfield on the opposite hash. So that's an almost impossible. Throw to attempt. I mean few quarterbacks ever would try that throw even fewer would complete it and the way that brady told it to me. That ballot check was just watching the play unfold and he was like just throw it. He's wide open. Why isn't sanchez. Throwing the ball and brady's little thought bubble was hilarious because he was thinking. I would never even attempt that throw. Do you have any idea how i would look in. Tried to throw that ball. And meanwhile checks just like can't get even more open. He can't get more open. Just throw it in. The way that brady explained to me later was very interesting because he said i see each play within my limits at the time. I didn't really see the significance in that statement. But when you watch. Tom brady now aged forty three years old and the entire sporting world asking how. He's done it how he's been able to get another team to the super bowl. I looked back at that statement. And i found a lot of answers in it was brady frustrated with ballot check. Invalid check suggested as much. I wanna get deeper into. Brady's thought bubble there. I think he thought it was hilarious. He he saw it as a defensive coach who had no bearing on the reality of how difficulties throw that ball. He wasn't frustrated with ballot check. He was like a little amazed that bella check thought that that type of pass would be so easy i mean. That's that's a john elway throw. That's josh allen throw mahomes through. There's very few people who could ever even try that and here. Ballot check was talking about mark sanchez. Saying he's not going to get more open than that. Just throw the ball. As kind of an indictment on the quarterback where brady saw it as you know something that was hard to believe. Couldn't believe that that his coach thought that a throw like that with that easy. And when you look at tom brady look at the arc of his career. He's someone who's kind of always understood his limits and by understanding them so well he's found a way to transcend them so those limits that he has this keen understanding of and that being this superpower. It is something that we can. Plainly see in contrast to josh allen and john elway and patrick mahomes and lamar jackson. These absurd physical talents. And that's been clear set ever since we saw brady with shirt off to be honest at the combine in two thousand but because he is also the greatest of all time without real serious dispute at this point playing more super bowls than anyone ever by far at to ask if you fully buy his explanation that that superpower is in fact and understanding of his own limitations. At first i didn't. And i remember. I was once in his house in two thousand thirteen back when we thought he was getting old. 'cause he was going to be thirty seven when the season started. And you know he can't play forever and he said something really interesting. He said there's nothing that will be able to replace football. And hopefully it gets to appoint where there is when i retire in nine ten years and he said it so offhandedly and so smooth that it was it went right over my head. It was a shot across the bow. Here was a declaration to play until he was aged forty five and he someone who has made a mockery of conventional wisdom. And so i thought there is no way when he said that that he was someone who learned how to play football within the scope of his own limitations. But as you watch him play you actually see it on the field. And i think that it helps define him as a football player because he can't do what aaron rodgers does. He can't do it. Patrick mahomes does these sort of amazing acrobatic throws but what he can do and what he's always been able to do is pick apart a defense and bleed teams to death. And i think that that's what he was getting at when he talks about playing within his own limits because he's so deadly an accurate when he throws short.

Brady Tom Brady Seth Wicker Sham Josh Allen Mark Sanchez New England Super Bowl TOM Bella John Elway Bill Belichick Buccaneers Espn Seth Tampa Bay NFL Jets
Rockets hit 11 3s in 48-point first quarter, rout Thunder

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 3 weeks ago

Rockets hit 11 3s in 48-point first quarter, rout Thunder

"The rockets hit an NBA record tying eleven three pointers in a forty eight point first quarter that sparked a one thirty six one of six romp over the thunder Eric Gordon scored twenty five in Houston six straight when the rockets were eleven of fourteen from beyond the arc in the opening period they finished twenty eight of fifty two shooting fifty four percent from three point range John wall scored the first eight points for the rockets who finished with eighteen six rebounds and five assists Christian would also scored eighteen and had eleven boards for Houston which is eight and three cents dealing James harden to the nets I'm Dave Ferrie

Rockets Eric Gordon NBA Houston John Wall James Harden Nets Dave Ferrie
Jokic has 47 points, Nuggets end Jazz winning streak at 11

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 3 weeks ago

Jokic has 47 points, Nuggets end Jazz winning streak at 11

"The jazz had won eleven straight before Nicole you'll catch with the mop in the nuggets one twenty eight one seventeen victory over Utah the okay to match his career high with forty seven points shooting seventeen of twenty six from the field and four for four from beyond the arc he also made nine of ten free throws grabbed twelve rebounds and had five assists Yogiji had thirty three points by halftime will Barton added eighteen points for the nuggets sixth win in seven games boy and Bogdanovich had a team high twenty nine points for the jazz whose previous loss was January sixth against the Knicks I'm Dave very

Nuggets Yogiji Nicole Utah Bogdanovich Barton Knicks Dave Very
Warriors beat Timberwolves 123-111 to sweep 2-game series

KCBS Radio Morning News

01:25 min | Last month

Warriors beat Timberwolves 123-111 to sweep 2-game series

"The Warriors after sweeping that two games set from Minnesota are back in action against the night in Phoenix to take on the sons and seven o'clock and then back on the host Detroit on Saturday night Warriors now 10 and eight on the season after winning last night, the Sun's eight inmates after losing both teams playing at home, the Warriors Beating Minnesota again. 1 23 21 11. They were flat early down five early in the second quarter and then got hot. Thanks in large part to kill you Break Junior who had 16 points in that second quarter, they led by seven at the half. By 20 after three and by 25 in the fourth quarter, again, winning by a dozen they shot the ball well at 53%. They shot the ball well beyond the arc. It 44% 15 of 34. They moved the ball and moved without the ball. Very well indeed had 31 assists on the night, led by rookie James Wiseman. 25.6 boards to assist in 24 minutes. You Bree had 20 with nine rebounds in just 24 minutes because of foul trouble. Weekends had 19 David leave. Damian Lee rather had 17 and Steph had 16 all the two of those points in the second half. In fact, he was scoreless until the final minute or two of the first half step, also had six rebounds and eight assists. The G

Warriors Minnesota Phoenix Detroit James Wiseman Damian Lee Bree Steph David
No. 14 Wisconsin weathers Maryland comeback in 61-55 win

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | Last month

No. 14 Wisconsin weathers Maryland comeback in 61-55 win

"Michael potter led all scores with twenty three points and yanked down twelve rebounds to help lead number fourteen Wisconsin it was sixty one fifty five win over Maryland the badgers led by eighteen points at halftime only to see the Terrapins cut the lead to three in the second half at forty three forty hotter then converted his third three point play of the game and added one from beyond the arc to help build the lead back to ten potter won eight of twelve from the floor and four of six from three point range Aaron Wiggins led the Terrapins with eighteen crack heist College Park Maryland

Michael Potter Terrapins Badgers Wisconsin Maryland Aaron Wiggins Heist College Park Maryland
The Book of Genesis: Looking At The Book Of Beginnings

Knowing Faith

04:31 min | Last month

The Book of Genesis: Looking At The Book Of Beginnings

"Is the book of genesis. Well it's the book beginnings and so it's telling us what happened at the beginning of the story that is going to form the entire arc of the biblical story. But it's important to remember that it's not just telling us what happened in the beginning. It's telling us what god did in the beginning and so it keeps god as the central figure of all of the action and that can actually as we head into this Season that lovey. Who wanna keep top of mind because we start to talk about whereas in the first eleven chapters. We talked about four events Creation fall flood and babble now in the second half of the book which is actually much longer than the first half. We're gonna talk about four. People abraham isaac jacob and joseph. I'm so mad at you right now in this present moment because when you say stuff like that it makes me. Did you have that going into next. Because i have been preparing episode run sheets and not one single time. Have you said we'll call. You know the first eleven chapters are really four events and the next forty eight chapters or thirty eight chapters for people because that would have been a great line from somebody else. I mean come on. It's not like i sit around at night map in this stuff out. Yeah and i'm never up to snuff so it asked the story. Arc moves toward a description of people. We do want to bear in mind that the central figure is still going to be y'all way and how he's acting in the earliest recorded Stories of human history for us so But but again it's a book beginnings meaning that all of the and i think we said last season. The genesis is often referred to succeed. Pot of the bible is where all of those themes wanna see go. All the way through to revelation are being set up for us. So that's what we spent a long time last season and we'll do this season doing is looking for what are those. What are the threads in. How can we begin to see them with greater ease and regularity as we move into the rest of the scriptures us great so okay so genesis book of beginnings first eleven chapters four people. Next section. Twelve through fifty is for events but jt. Why would why would. Why would we spend all this time studying. Yeah i did just get it backwards. And i said it backwards. Genesis eleven four events genesis. Twelve fifty four people in residual. Okay so jt. Why would we spend a whole season studying genesis. I mean like why not. Just get to the good stuff in the new testament and just roll. Yeah so. I mean. One of the things that i i think. The lord's really teaching me right. Now that i'm trying to learn in my ability to be a bible reader and a bible teacher is to see how really the whole story of scripture is in those first three chapters. It's also in those first eleven chapters that we did last semester. It's then it's in the next fifty minutes in the pentateuch. The first five books of the bible that really when you look at genesis to revelation the whole story of scripture which we think forms hold disciples wanted list hopes in this podcast. Is that you just know. The story of the bible may be able to participate in be participants in the story. And you can't. You can't participate in the store. You don't know is that they would see they would see that. The story of the bible really finds its seed form all of its hyper links through the rest of scripture. Here in the book of genesis genesis. I don't want to say that there's any book that's not foundational. We love all sixty six. The bible not including third corinthians kyle but all six bucks at arrival We we need to know. We need to love. Because god has put treasures there for us. But i i i do wanna say this carefully. Genesis is one of those primary pillar books that you don't get it right. It's going to be hard to get the rest of the story right. Yeah i think what you're saying. Jt makes sense. And i think one of the interesting things is when you read. Genesis is with somebody that you're playing and maybe you've also read a gospel or you're helping them read through the gospels. At the same time you start to realize that a lot of the the themes or the The images of the pictures or the the concepts of the theology. That's in genesis. And a really pronounced way is deliberately being communicated in the gospels and that those connections sometimes are really on the

Abraham Isaac Jacob Joseph Kyle
5 Steps to Jump Start Your Diet

Living Healthy Podcast

22:58 min | Last month

5 Steps to Jump Start Your Diet

"Your diet or what you tend to eat every day can play a major role in how you feel and how you handle the pressures of everyday life so to get you back on track with your nutrition. Our guest today is gonna share five steps to jumpstart your diet and of course our virtual guests today is none other than registered. Dietitian debbie james. Welcome back to the show. Debbie thank you again and what a wonderful time to think about something new in this new year absolutely yes gonna jump. Start those diets for everyone. Okay we had. We just made it through the holidays. So let's get back on track here Like i mentioned a lot of us got off track last year. Probably with our diets. So as we were kinda lamenting this fact. Debbie good idea to come up with some simple steps to right the ship get back on track and create some good eating habits. So you kind of came up with these five steps What's the first step to getting back to a healthy diet. Or you said good eating habits and so i actually put them together in the acronym habit h. A. b. i. T. so the age is for healthy diet. Define what eating healthy means to you. 'cause it's not the same for everybody. It could be smaller portions to be calorie controlled. It could be more plant-based maybe it's low fat to deal with your cholesterol. Maybe it's unprocessed so whatever healthy diet means to you or healthy eating means to you frame it like it out. What does that mean for each type of food group or eating situation or meal so that you're actually defining that healthy diet that h okay so once you define what eating healthy means to you. What would be the next up that you would suggest taking. So you're a your age. Abt your ace step would be ask yourself. What's in the way of you. Achieving that healthy diet so is it. Circumstances is the situation is a bad routine. You can't say the healthy diet is this. And i want to get there. You have to say what ask yourself what is in the way. What are my obstacles. So that i can address those. You know. it's interesting with the obstacle thing. it's kind of like when we write narratives like in the film television world. You're always trying to put obstacles in your characters way so that they have to overcome them which leads to some meaningful narrative arc changing their characters. So i suppose in this way you just need to you know kind of creative writer and discover in your own life. What are those obstacles that right. Like a speed bump Sort of yeah. You need to self reflect. Basically this is your assessment. The a could also be assessment Right agree so once you've honestly assessed what your pitfalls are. What do you think you do next to avoid those. So then the b of the h. a. b. It is behaviors so rather than thinking about the individual foods. You actually have to look. Habit is behavior. it's a matter of choices of what we do. So what behaviors. What actions do you need to change. What are the ones that you're doing poorly or that you're willing to shift. And then you have to identify the alternatives of what it is you want to do. So there's a behavior change specialist. Bj fog he's a phd from stanford and he's author of tiny habits. He says that you have to identify the ones that you want to do. You can do. That are impactful to be effective because it wouldn't make sense. Let's say if i just said oh. A healthy diet means eating more fiber. And i don't get enough salad so therefore i'm going to eat more coleslaw right. Why would i choose that. If i don't like cabbage that would be that would be like making myself. Gag it down. It's not one i want to do. You have to identify the ones that you're willing to do the our chief -able that you can do and that are live as a replacement. It's not enough just to say. I need to stop doing acts. You need to identify what actions you are going to do to to implement. So what what what. What would an example of that be perhaps like in. Maybe someone that you've done this with or someone you know that's gone through this with the behavior change. What's an example of that okay so first. Let's say that someone is looking at getting more calorie control diet so a healthy diet to them energy balance and they've identified They've asked themselves what's in the way that eat too big large portion. They drink sweetened beverages. Maybe they're mindlessly eating between meals so that mindlessly eating between meals are going to address and their behavior instead of randomly grabbing something from the kitchen to snack on instead they're going to choose to drink water or chew gum if they're not really hungry so they've said this is what i'm going to do instead. This is the behavior the alternative. I'm willing to implement so. Is that like when you think when you catch yourself doing that behavior that you want to get rid of you catch yourself doing that and then you go okay. Here's what i'm going to do instead of you try and build that in your mind your mind so exactly. That's the that's the eye of the of the habit is the implementing that change. And it's deliberate choice that you consciously have to make repeatedly like practice makes perfect until it's it becomes unconscious. I was trying to explain it as a brand new drive like a brand new student driver. You have to tell them. Okay you're gonna pull into the parking space and that your foot got to be depressed on the brake pedal all the way then. You're going to shift the car into park. Then you can turn off the ignition right and so there's like this process and they have to think about it because they're not used to it and for me to do that. It's like half a second. I can do all of those and i haven't even thought about it. I've done it so so so many times. So making those alternative actions is a deliberate choice repeatedly until it becomes second nature interesting all right well before we get too much further into the final steps here we just remind people that they can subscribe. If they aren't already subscriber always got a break in here with us subscribe message. You know me But it's the best way to get new episodes delivered straight to your phone as soon as they come out which is every other monday. We always bring on nutrition. Experts fitness expert general health experts to talk about variety of topics. That will keep you motivated. Keep you healthy so hit. That subscribe button. Not really sure if it's bud and it might be a drop down whatever it is. Whatever the case subscribe to the show if you like what you hear and join the living healthy army. Do you think that brittany. That's a little thing. I'm trying to get going here. Got a name our podcast listeners. Living healthy army. You you you with that or dig it way if you the la che all right cool. I like our army living army. All right well great. Well welcome to the platoon. everyone Thank you for subscribing. Now let's get back to the so so we covered the ha be but now we need to find out about it. The it right so you kind of touched on the i a little bit. You said that was implementation. Is that right. Yeah implementing change so the swapping of the when. Poor behavior for the improved. Okay so real quick just to recap so we'd first of all you got to define what health healthy diet means to you because it's it's different for everyone. It probably shouldn't be ep pizza. All the time probably shouldn't be Then you gotta ask yourself. What's in your way of achieving. That kind of diet you know. What are your obstacles. Be honest about that. And then he got to address those obstacles by figuring out what behaviors you need. A change can or what actions he needed to take So you know that you've got to implement it. What are some of the most. I guess i think you mentioned. Maybe that there's with implementations you deal with triggers. But what are some of the more common triggers. You know that gives us the urge to eat Like you mentioned mindless eating for example. Like you just kind of get up and you want to the kitchen and now that you there you open the fridge and grab a snack you know. So how do we kind of some of the most common triggers that lead to that kind of stuff. Oh man we're we're so easily tempted to eat. It could be the smell of something it could be that you. You hear the little chime of the ice cream truck. It could be a sound on serious. What so true britain. Let's let's let's do a quick one brittany. What do you think is a trigger for you like do you do. Have you identified any triggers for you. I can tell you you think of one. I'll tell you what. I think i think of mine. One of mine is definitely like just watching television. Which is i assume. Maybe a big one for people but watching tv like in the evening. If i like just put on family guy or something where it's like. I don't even really have to be paying attention. I literally sometimes like turn the show on started. And i will walk. Divide kitchen to go. Get a snack while the show plays. It's like what am i doing. Not even watching it. So is it the act of watching tv and at the same time. You're by the tv. No it's not because fans guys like a snack now. I don't see something delicious. And you're like oh i wanna go eat that like no no no. I don't think it's that it's not so you've already paired those two associated them. From the moment you click the remote. Exactly it's literally. Yeah its relationship with food. i know it does. a little bit are true. They're all kind of connected. But that is one that i've discovered i'm like i need to like stay active and not watching television because it like it literally is so paired. Now that i it's hard for me to fight it. It's very sold so so. Yeah we're talking about that. That few pairing. Oh britney came up with one. Okay go ahead. No i could just think of a few like naturally. When i'm at the movie theaters popcorn i mean you smell it everywhere and instinctively when i'm there i just feel like okay. It's time treat yourself. Get some candidates and popcorn. Enjoy you know. Enjoy the show that guy taking a. That's a silver lining for me. When you're you have. Hey when you're at home. And i'm sitting on instagram. I follow a lot of food accounts. And whenever i'm looking at it long enough it always causes need to go downstairs and get a snack or makes them eat. I'm always hungry after. I mean i guess that's and looking at food. Obviously so then you'll have to pare. Pare the action that you want to do something. So in the example. I gave before of the person that's mindlessly eating between meals and they said okay instead of my Wandering into the kitchen that they're going to drink water gum instead will. They're they're triggered. wanna pair. That with is every time they change room. So if i get up from the desk and i'm leaving my home office i'm gonna grab my water bottle to take with me. It's already in my hand and easy. You know to get up to my mouth or pull the chewing gum out of my pocket or something. so that's an example of pairing it with an action so andrew. I'm gonna ask you in yours of turning the tv on and wondering to the kitchen for some people that staying on the sofa all night because you said be more active instead. So are you in your. I'll say comfy clothes kind of your house pants pajamas. Whatever when you watch tv or you wearing workout gear. I that's rapidly in lounge. Wear it's i now. I've done more. My workouts are now more in the morning so yeah probably lounge. Yes that is that is true accent. Why do you break that me. Very comfy chair lazy blades. Put your feet up. It has yeah. I know about that thing. As long as it doesn't have like a food tray. That would the food trade. That i do not have that but yeah that is interesting so i wonder i do need to figure out like i've also found like i almost like if i just don't go in my kitchen i can get over it but like if i go in my kitchen it's all over and so i'm like just don't go in my kitchen. Sometimes we need a distraction. That's actually helps get in the way so for example if this is an after dinner time that you're talking about and brush teeth. Maybe than if you did teeth whitener or you did your dental rants or you put on your retainer or any of those things that really you know your mouth has to be fresh and pure clean for all the things to work so if if you do those as an interruption before you sit down that might help you break that association. That's interesting do have a night guard. So maybe i get in bed do yeah. That's not a bad idea. Yeah that's that's bright. That's that's really interesting Yeah maybe. I will definitely have to try that. That's definitely one that stood out to me that i'm like. This is a trigger for me. That i don't even almost realize it just creates this like urge and i almost feel like you know if children sit down and eat a meal in front of the tv. They start to develop that kind of Connection you know to where it becomes like this like you said paired thing and it's you've got to really work a little bit hard to break that perisher or like or like the expectation of dessert like since when since when did we have a desert following every single meal like excuse me it's supposed to be a precious treat to enjoy not okay lunches over piece of cake. Dinners over ice cream lunch over cookies. Dinners over pot now. That was awesome. that was almost. I feel like that's like a song. That's getting ready to start to there. You go that's awesome okay. This is a little bit of a side note on dessert. But i thought about it. And i thought i now when we order food and bring it back home. We eat the desert. If we get it we eat the desert. I hear me okay. And the reason is as it's like Nutrition is probably tear body but it has ice cream so it's like a position okay. Love that so we eat a first because my thinking is look that thing's gonna it's gonna melt. It's not gonna last. You can't really save it. It's not going to be the same so eat it now and the food your main dish you can save half of it for tomorrow or the next day so like i've kind of restructured my eating hierarchy. I guess when it comes to take just totally random. I'd desert i i. We don't have a dessert after every meal. Or here's my question. Would you do that with every type of dessert. Or is it only because ice. Cream's going to melt as i was saying i was thinking about that. I think it's just all about. Will it be okay if i save it for tomorrow. If i can't right the ki won't be the same hours you put it in the freezer for an hour while you eat the cookie cookies. Not warm anymore zelina. Reheat it all of a. You're using like energy. You know you gotta like pay. Your bill. And i don't know goes into making having that desert. Yeah but this side because we need to get back to habit but as there there is some justification to At least children to have whatever we would consider the dessert item to be served with dinner. So that it's not regarded separately. It's not a reward. it's not You have to eat your vegetables in order to get axed that when i worked for head start and that's a preschool program It was it was done at the same time. So if you serve the tacos and you serve the orange slices and you serve the little sugar cookies and you had the milk out and you did it all at the same time family style. The kids didn't down all the cookies before they ate the rest of you know. They chose the tacos and they had some carrots and they really places. Yeah hi brian. I'm sorry but i'm going through. This live right now and i cannot stand by listen to this perfect world situation. I honestly that's amazing for those kids. And maybe kid is just wild but because because they they knew that it was there that it was available that it was part of the meal and they would each get one well that i think that was in no matter. What exactly they just didn't put it on either. Played a few right. I've seen my niece and nephew. Though were they know they're going to get dessert at the end but half to finished their meal too. I mean i guess that's not quite sent them all at once but but here. Here's why i think we've gone to the desert comes after you finish your meal because you put it on theoretically it makes sense to me but in practice you put everything there and the kid eats the desert right off the bat and then they don't finish the important protein on their dish. And then you're in this big battle like you need to finish all of it. I give you the option you went there. I fine because we're trying to be all good like everything's available and then but then you didn't finish and now you didn't eat which you needed to announce a big argument about it and now you don't sleep well. Something's going on here time. Did it take time for the kids to create a behavior like that or was it something that they initially did the first time that you put it all out there also key also keeping cookie end of this is this is a a small portion controlled item. It's not like an eighth of a cheesecake. That has like a whopping five hundred calories than just plays the meal. I'm talking about the size of an oriole. i'm talking right. It's something modest. I can see that over time. Okay if i eat my food. It'll still be there. So i'll do both or or not but yet battling to finish the plate. Have you ever seen the little psychology films where they put kids in room with a secret camera and they left them with a slice of chocolate cake or and they said if you don't touch it you can have twice as much after ten minutes and the patients chance right. Yes watch all the mom. And dad's go through during quarantine with can't some of these kids amazed me others them going back to the habit thing that wasn't so much an intervention that that or behavior that the children chose but that was presented to them and like we talk about getting kids to eat right role modeling presenting it to them in a very neutral way but repeated multiple times. And that's what i was talking about the the implementing. The new behavior is repeated multiple times so that it becomes that becomes the second nature. It becomes the expectation of not sitting down and stuffing your face when you watch tv but maybe popping in that that night guard right right. Yeah exactly yeah and that's where it takes. I think practice with these things. Implementation is okay. Now you have to exert some discipline in sticking to your plan of how you created the plan with hiv. Basically you're implementing the plan and that's where it takes that discipline to follow your plan and not deviate too much from that. I imagine exactly okay. So that's that's h we gotta get to the t. Step five and the last step in the process t is tailoring the plan so that means you can tweak What triggered youth parented with or the alternate behavior to overcome. Whatever obstacles might come in the and so you have to monitor and evaluate to get there. So i'm going to give an example of Another h t a whole nother scenario. So let's say the healthy diet. This person says okay. I need something high in fiber and low in saturated fat to help lower cholesterol. that's their healthy diets. There a is. Why can't i get that done. Well i'm asking myself i'm assessing. I don't have time to cook. I end up eating out and frozen meals etc. So be they say. Okay the behaviors. I'm going to do instead of fried foods and heavily cheesy items instead of ordering those a water you know salad and vegetable side dishes and things without dairy so they plan that intervention. They said okay so now. I'm trying to order those things and i find myself when i'm scanning the menu trying to get lean select us leaner selections and get more fruits and veggies I'm out of time. it's. I'm i'm actually getting to my meal so late that i'm ordering quickly can't find them blah blah blah so then they have to tweak their plan and say okay well if the menus too overwhelming alternate now they need to maybe download apps that they can save favorites on the. You know the preorder menu or identify the pdf menus for sit down restaurants of of what they're going to get once they get there and so maybe it's not at the moment of ordering but they're making their decisions ahead of time and that's their tweak is they have to be able to do something a little different but still follow the same Objectives

Debbie James Debbie Stanford Brittany Britney Army LA Britain Andrew Brian HIV
"arc" Discussed on The Final Furlong Podcast

The Final Furlong Podcast

01:56 min | 5 months ago

"arc" Discussed on The Final Furlong Podcast

"You don't need to feel <Speech_Music_Male> as though <Speech_Music_Male> something <Speech_Music_Male> odd is going on. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> It happens to all <Speech_Male> of us and <Speech_Male> I employ <Speech_Music_Male> to listen to Kevin <Speech_Music_Male> he gives <Speech_Music_Male> his time. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Freely <Speech_Male> to you. <Speech_Music_Male> And <Speech_Male> whether <Speech_Male> you're going <Speech_Male> through something <Speech_Music_Male> or family <Speech_Male> member or a friend <Speech_Male> of yours <Speech_Male> that you're concerned about <Speech_Male> then <Speech_Music_Male> listening to Kevin <Speech_Music_Male> Story and <Speech_Male> his advice <Speech_Male> is <Speech_Male> highly recommended <Speech_Music_Male> for you and <Speech_Music_Male> I, hope <Speech_Male> is <Speech_Male> beneficial <Speech_Male> as well. <Speech_Male> It's available now <Speech_Male> and soundcloud <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> an old podcast <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> APPs. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> The is <Speech_Male> live on <Speech_Male> sky sports racing <Speech_Male> every race <Speech_Male> live from prairie longchamp. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> With Lauren <Speech_Music_Male> Bob, Iran and <Speech_Music_Male> the team as well <Speech_Male> and K. <Speech_Male> Tracy will be back <Speech_Music_Male> on Monday as we <Speech_Male> review the action <Speech_Music_Male> and moguls <Speech_Music_Male> outstanding <Speech_Music_Male> our <Speech_Music_Male> victory. <Speech_Music_Male> Looking <Speech_Male> forward to <Speech_Male> discussing that. <Speech_Male> With <Speech_Male> Rory back <Speech_Music_Male> with his on Thursday <Speech_Male> as well. <Speech_Male> Rory pleasure <Speech_Male> as always take <Speech_Male> a friend. <Speech_Male> On U <Speech_Male> K Tracy <Speech_Male> pleasure as <Speech_Male> always chetty <SpeakerChange> Monday. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Lost <Speech_Male> then invested like at <Speech_Male> room for the weekend <Speech_Male> and thank you <Speech_Male> for listening <Speech_Male> to the podcast. <Speech_Male> Thank you for <Speech_Male> the kind words and social <Speech_Male> media. <Speech_Male> I'm sorry that I haven't <Speech_Male> been able to respond to everybody <Speech_Male> It's <Speech_Music_Male> been a bit of a <Speech_Male> Manic Day <Speech_Male> and. <Speech_Male> I'm now going <Speech_Male> to after edited <Speech_Music_Male> applauded <Speech_Male> on, they're going <Speech_Male> to sit <Speech_Male> back and watch TV, <Speech_Male> but <Speech_Male> I will do my. <Speech_Male> To <Speech_Male> respond to everybody <Speech_Male> on twitter <Speech_Music_Male> via <Speech_Music_Male> DMZ and <Speech_Music_Male> twitter <Speech_Male> and facebook and instagram <Speech_Male> tomorrow <hes> <Speech_Male> an email says welp <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> by the way <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> So thank you all <Speech_Music_Male> very much for the kind <Speech_Music_Male> words. It's. <Speech_Male> It's <Speech_Male> It means <Speech_Male> a lot <Speech_Male> We'll jetty soon have <Speech_Male> a great weekend <Speech_Male> come on mogul <Speech_Male> in the ARC. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> From Kate <Speech_Male> from rory from <Speech_Male>

Rory Kevin twitter prairie longchamp facebook Tracy Lauren Iran
"arc" Discussed on The Final Furlong Podcast

The Final Furlong Podcast

02:16 min | 5 months ago

"arc" Discussed on The Final Furlong Podcast

"Our friend. Ricky. Putting her opposite selection resumes an awful lot of sense. She was fifty to one I think he put it on a fifty was absolutely crazy I think the assumption there was she wouldn't run because Andrea fundraiser. But she's been an obvious chance on paper. That was a career best performance from her seeming to benefit from being held up, which would ridden a bit more prominently in earlier racists. Has always been held in quite high regard but yeah, the she's five pines better off light. She's like. Ten. Times his price is absolutely bonkers. I say ten times he she was twenty times his price. Couple of days ago. Not that means no sense Happens here is like interests drifts the second favorite, and then he's a player. Is a player anyway because you look at his career record and it's very good. He's just been very well pleased to win. We greases twice this season and his very, very best ever performance was in finishing fourth when favourite for the more suggest that might be good enough to win this. Always very strong contest. And he's he's entitled to come forward because he had a list this season. And that form is. Finishing behind space flew, and then literally Fernandez is perfectly decent form on paper. But, it does not deserve him to be anywhere near a short. Be the same price as for another shouldn't he? Bumpy short necked behind that horse agreed. Yeah. So whatever price Louis Fernandez is you can't really argue that should be an awful lot shorter. Now, there are no excuses for on the data said, that is literally his best ever performance. As he was a master trainer you'll probably find a way to improve them again, but you know Louis analysts not trained by an idiot either. So the price is this stage, don't make sense. I'm not saying for second that Earth like can't wear and. But. Just. Hold off because you must get a better price thirteen to is obsolete bunkers on. on forum. Deal Safe Oysters, crimes he. Is An absolute superstar. The only time that he's The.

Louis Fernandez Ricky Andrea Louis
"arc" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Scribes

Sci-Fi Talk Scribes

05:02 min | 8 months ago

"arc" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Scribes

"What giving anything away? What what major kind of turn in direction I think? We wanted to tell like a hopeful story where we had a character who seemed to be you know the poster child for the way things are the way things were. Right and when she finds out that things are the way she thought. You, know she she takes action and does something good instead of you know we? We seem to see a lot of stories about people finding out bad things, and they covered up, or they ignore it or you know it. It felt like. It would be nice to have something a positive reaction to finding out something pretty. Well yeah, I mean like a lot of cyberpunk is also very dark, very cynical and. We wanted to tell a story where. Someone could admit that you know what I've been wrong. I've believed these lies about. This minority group that I should not have an I can change. I can try to atone for what I've done. I can try to make their lives better, so it's A. It's sort of tied in with the whole. You know thing we were trying to get at where. Society shouldn't be treating. You know different minority groups in these horrible horrible ways. Then once you realize when you wake up to that fact and you know it, you can do something about it. You don't have to just accept it. You can make the decision to try to make the world a better place. Writing this How did this work out between the two of you I mean? How have you had the two of you work on a story a lot of yelling? Work out the outline for our stories you know as a group, and then one of us does the verse draft, and then we go back and forth between drabs, so it's pretty organized. I think we've got it pretty down. We've been doing it for quite a while now. So young comes when when you get down wherever. Live by. We're. Repeating each other religions well, this line sucks and this line could be better right. There's a lot of that. Yeah, it's a lot of compromise. Relation have like a little deck of cards each give each other one for each thing that we really feel strongly about. That's what I feel like we. Take, like okay I'll give you this thing if you give me this. How many issues is this going to play out to hours? It open ended. It's It's wrapped up the first story ARC right now with a four issue monthly sort of monthly. The virus sort of threw a wrench in FIFA. Miniseries that has been collected in a trade paperback graphic novel, which is now available and..

ARC
"arc" Discussed on The Insightful Astrology Podcast with Maria DeSimone

The Insightful Astrology Podcast with Maria DeSimone

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"arc" Discussed on The Insightful Astrology Podcast with Maria DeSimone

"Is expecting the chart right so so solar parks. Like if you WANNA find a new job right. We'll we'll look at the Trans but then we want to look at the mid heaven and see if there's any solar arc planets affecting the mid heaven or if the mid heaven is affecting some planets by movement so it's a little bit of celestial mechanics involved but it's another layer it adds a huge layer and I actually think that you can make the these major major life predictions looking at Seoul Arc's alone and then use the progressions in the trans. It's time it Partha true because the solar directions marked the year in which event could take place so an active six months before in six months after so they just give us the year. Yes that's an important distinction. You know. I'm I'm coming off of a of an incredible high of a solar arc. Venus being conjuncture my son and so that happened that that's that's gone now and now. I'm approaching solar arc son conjunction Saturn so. I'm in a very different energy right now but it's not it's not negative. It's just a different energy but it's it's so funny because that year of the Venus on that it was an amazing year for me. It was on so many levels. You Know I. I made more money than I ever did. As an astrologer I bought a house. I had all these. Taurus things happen to in my world but these solo. Arc's the timing. You take that arc. Okay like that Venus Sun Ark for example. And then you you want to know. When am I going to move and so how you time it is? You take that ARC and you you're looking in the six months in either direction like you said and then you look at the person's will the question was. What am I gonNA move so then? You look at the person's fourth house. Fourth House Ruler Forth House cost and it. It was so simple Jenny. It was literally Solar Eclipse Bang. On my Fourth House cusp activated the actual move and I moved was not a week of Eclipse so the Solar Ark was the big picture of wow. Marie is going to have an amazing year. All this great stuff is happening but Part of it was buying a house. But when you're gonNA actually move and the eclipse told the story of that so there is such a nuance with timing and You know what I want to talk to. Jenny is when I are you teaching right now or are you just doing consultations not not not now already writing a book your writing books. You're busy okay. So I so I actually just finishing up teaching a a midpoint therion Solo art class with my advance students so this is like the last class that I teach them. We start from the beginning. And then you know it takes far as you want to go. And so it's so fun to teach the sole arc's because by the time you're with a student teaching them solar arcs. They've already studied trans. They've already studied progressions and so the solar arcs are so easy that they're wait a second what you've been holding out on me for so long and and so. I WANNA illustrate with you. If it's okay just how easy it is for everybody listening to to take a quick and dirty look at their own chart and this only works by if you are looking at events that happens in your life before you're thirty years old and the reason why it has to be before you're thirty years old is because of some kind of complicated math thing that happens with the sun and the timing after your thirty that changes this slightly from exactly one degree equaling a year and I apologize. I am not the nerd who could explain that. But I'll tell you that that is the reason why you have to do this by in your chart by events. That happened under thirty so so I WANNA just illustrate this and I know you could do this with your chart too. I'm sure maybe you have an example that you could share but I'll share. I'll share one example very easily. Is You take you need a precise birth time? Okay you really. And if you don't know precise birth trump but you're a little off Seoul arts can help you rectify and and find that right birth time so my ascendant. Jenny is.

Arc Seoul Arc Jenny Solar Ark Venus Sun Ark Seoul Partha Marie
"arc" Discussed on Arc Benders

Arc Benders

26:31 min | 2 years ago

"arc" Discussed on Arc Benders

"Shirt? Maggie Kane is the founder and executive director of a place of a table in Raleigh, North Carolina, a nonprofit, social enterprise that provides community and healthy food for all regardless of the way place at the table. Works is customers have multiple options to pay and to pay it forward. They can pay the suggested price K at least half of the suggested price or pay by volunteering with them to pay it forward you can tip to help fulfill their mission or you can buy a ten dollar token to can. In the community in recognition of the amazing work that they do in community Maggie and a place at the table were featured on the today show and Kelly Clarkson, totally tweeted about how amazing dispersion Maggie IDs. So we're here today with Maggie Cain, founder and executive director of a place at the table in Raleigh, North Carolina. Our hometown, really Maggie. Thank you so much for being with us today. Thank you for having me on and I'm really excited to be here. You guys are wonderful. I immediately smile when I saw you full up Gela here. A place of the tables, a nonprofit, social enterprise that provides community and healthy sues for all regardless of means. And it is one of my favorite places in the world. So not only is the mission inspiring, but their food is so good, and I just ate here. Did you get? And so I tried these squash soup, and then your house alad on point. And then I also had a soy cappuccino which. So God, I know so good. Oh, my going. I okay. I forgot that. I put my name on this. All right. So what initially inspired you to launch a place in table. And how did you approach getting it started prior to this? I worked at love winds ministries. So love winds was a day shelter. We had people coming in every single day to get a Cup of coffee to get off the streets on the people without means, primarily primarily people experiencing homelessness a place to just be in the day while I was there via was there. I got to know a lot of people I got to to be friends with people who were different than people who lived outside. And during that time, I started to go wherever they went. So we'd go to the kitchen for lunch. And when I was at the soup kitchen with him. I realized that, you know, the soup kitchen fit hunger need, but there was something missing. Yes. They were serving over three hundred people. But there was this piece that I had. In my life that a lot of those folks do not get to experience so out of soup kitchen. If y'all have been wait in line for a good ten fifteen twenty minutes, then you get handed a plate. And you don't could you choose what you want is whatever they have that day, which is great, and it's again, filling people's bellies, and and helping people with food need, but you handed a plate you sit down. And then you have eaten about five minutes. Someone else can come in and eat. And so every time I left there started to wonder what more could we do? And I started to ask folks. Let's go let's go out for a meal, are you? It's your birthday anniversary. Where would you like to go? And a lot of times we go to places like golden corral or do. You know, the canned w cafe. Yep. I there a lot we go to places like that. And I started to ask why are we at these places, and what I found was we were there because of choice, they could choose whatever they wanted. On a menu. And then they could sit for a long time and be treated with dignity and get served and have the coffeenated come around and fill their coffee multiple times. And it was a nice experience. And Reema spend hours just sitting there talking and sharing conversation and getting to know one another and just because I had means, and they did it did not mean that we could not be friends not mean that we could be in this world together. And so at that point, I started to research anywhere from nonprofits to restaurants to nonprofit restaurants and found the pay what you can system and found that there were over sixty pay what you can restaurants across the country. And that's how we started working on. We went to visit the the closest one in Boone North Carolina. There's actually a few folks from Boone here today, which is so special when when they come down to visit but Boone and learn from them and said actually went up a couple times just to to see my crazy for thinking. We could do this in Raleigh. But I learned from acetone of questions, I probably annoy the hell out of them. But they are Magritte's friends now today, so thank you for that. But we I ask them questions. I learned from them volunteered with them. I brought probably five or six different people up with me every time. I went to tell me now you like you're crazy don't do this. And then they never did people believed in that from the beginning. And and that's that's where we are. What was the place in Boone called? A farm cafe which is feed all regardless of means. And it's right on king street right across from apps state. I wouldn't top state. So it wasn't there. When I was there there and twenty eleven how long have you been working at this before the before place at the table opened? So people come in all the time, and they say Maggie I've been following since the beginning like this. It's so beautiful. What you're doing? Thank you for. I've been following you for so long. I'm like oh for the whole four years. Like, no, six months, right? So no, we have been open for nine months officially I actually made a Facebook error, and you probably call this Christina because you're who you are. You're wonderful and catch these things and good social media. And and I said happy ten months to a place the table, it's up Tober. So what I think at ten dash ten right? We opened January tenth or something like that. No. It's the ninth month. Okay. I did this. July two. That's what makes it so bad. But never right. Right. Right. And no one told me that's the word until three days in this. Pose feel like Nagy, you know, you mess it up. You didn't tell me deleted it. But we have an open nine months, and it it's just great. But we've been working on it for four years. So it took a lot of time to build and to take something from the ground up. We incorporated in February of twenty fifteen and incorporated. His business started forming a board of directors and then just started spreading awareness. We applied for nonprofit status, and we were seved our nonprofit status in November of two thousand fifteen so we've been profit for three years and have just been working tirelessly to open this. So what if some of the biggest obstacles that you've ever come? Definitely number one was finding locations. So for a couple years fighting location was tricky because people thought of us as a soup kitchen, they had this this bad image in their mind of what we would be which. A whole nother point. I could talk for hours about it. But they had this vision and image that this is gonna be a place where where people are going to be standing out front and one lines and everything and and we knew we needed to be in downtown Raleigh. So finding a place in downtown Raleigh was hard for that reason finding people to to let us rent their space was tricky because because they again, they thought of that. And also, we were just this this concept. Right. We weren't a product. They couldn't see it. We didn't have video have anything that showed that we were going to be this this nice cafe where you actually want to come in the food is good. So finding someone to allow us to rent their space was hard. So that was number one. Then finding the donors number two finding people to to give bigger money to make this happen. You know, we didn't just need twenty thousand dollars to open this. We. My original budget was for the first one built was fifty thousand dollars. So I'm like, oh, yeah. Only needed fifty thousand dollars. We let me go fund me campaign. And we know we didn't get anywhere near fifty thousand. Oh, yeah. It took a lot more than fifty thousand open this lace, but you couldn't really ask for money without having a space. So that chicken egg that that fight of how do we how do we ask for money? If you know of a space. How do we get a space if you don't have money? So those are probably the two biggest challenges, and then the third probably be keeping people engaged for three years people engaged without because people get bored people lose interest. If you don't have something to give them they lose interest. So we just tried to keep it fresh and kept going, and and luckily people stayed with us. I love your persistence. Most people think it was crazy. But you know, what no one ever told me Maggie that terrible idea. If someone had said Maggie terrible idea and was never gonna work then we would have stopped. We would have just been trying. So now that it's opened what has surprised you most about a place of the table. So far surprise me a million and one things first and foremost that the model works and it works beautifully. And it's amazing and people are happy to be here. And there's been incredible community that has been built here people with means or eating here people without means or eating here. All people feel welcome the model works, and it's it's I just don't think we ever thought that my manager we fulltime staff, so we have a manager on staff to manage the cafe and everyday operations and in about the fifth month. He said I asked him that question. What is the most? And none of my staff has been with me since the beginning. So they've only come on we've opened up, and he goes, and he said, it means that Maggie sorry clapping. We have a group upstairs was great. So he said to me he said. Said s Josh what's surprising, the most he said that people actually eat all the time that I'm not just sitting around twiddling my thumbs and coming up with things to do. He's Maggie never in a million years that I think that we'd have people coming in every day all day and eating and supporting and paying forward. So honestly that the models worked people supported us by either paying by paying the price paying more and paying it forward or by volunteering are paying less. So everyone has found their place here, and they've found their way to be a part of this community and Sally's my second point that this really is a community cafe we are known as as the place that that is of presence in downtown Raleigh where you can come. No matter who you are an everyone has been open to it and receptive and loving and welcoming the pay what you can model does really work we have anywhere from twenty to forty people every single day volunteering for their Mueller paying a little bit less. And so it works and it there. Most of the time, you never know who's volunteering for their meal and who's just simply, volunteering volunteer. And everyone's volunteer together people are eating together. So it's just so awesome. And it's only been nine months was I love that you're talking about community. And then right now, we're sitting next to a staircase. And there is a community of people that were using the upstairs of the restaurant and they're all walking down the stairs. And it's just so powerful to know that this truly is like in many ways, the heart of downtown Raleigh. And I also love that you told us this is a slow day. And I can't I can't even imagine. It's incredible. I mean. I've seen how biggest of stairs. Just really just keep coming on the stairs. Sure. So cool to see your vision come to life and such beautiful way. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. So appreciate that. Yeah. We this is not me. And I will say that every day. This is not me. I'm the crazy one who just kept pushing it and and make people help, but it truly is this whole community people have really chipped in where they where they fit and where they feel a part of it. And we have a thousand people more more than a thousand people who are involved in some sort of way that make this possible every single day. And and it's just amazing really humbling to see this is something that we've talked about. So and social impact carrying so much about your baby. Which is your vision is so inspiring and get up every day. But at the same time managing your energy. Like, I got an Email from you making sure we were on today at five thirty in the morning. I was up two hours before that. But I was like she's gonna think I'm crazy if I Email her at three thirty no, but I wouldn't. But that like my question is how are you taking care of you? And I mean is okay of the enters you're not and you're working on. But I think that's one of the things that we're trying to talk about on here is like how can we as leaders and social impact manage ourselves put in those boundaries. I am a huge preacher of self care. Self care self software, and I maybe don't do it every day one hundred percent. But I really am just such a believer and taking care of yourself first. And then you can take care of everything else. I wake up at three thirty because I'm a runner. I I completed my first marathon this year, which was crazy. I would never do it again. No, thanks, but a second greatest achievement after opening a place of the table and Running's important to me. And if I don't run in the morning, I know that my day is not going to be a successful. I'm not gonna feel as positive. I also am Hugh. Believer in quiet time and some sort of meditation. And I also know if I don't do that every day, then my day is not going to be a successful. And as great. So those two things every morning before I start my day are really important to me. I I also am a huge extrovert, but I gained energy on my own. So I like to spend a lot of time with myself at night. I I'm not gonna lie. I do like some net flicks. I I read a lot, which is awesome. I'm always in between some sort of leadership book, and some other fun grow novel or mystery novel. And but I also love to watch shameless and the newest shaneco. I'm all shameless. I just can't believe there. But also, I just started this new show. What's the plane the one with the plane? Have y'all seen this on ABC? It's whatever CW over channel is it's manifest. I think. Oh, yes. So I am tune in every week. I don't have cable, but I wait until Tuesday morning, and I watch it. So I believe in self care. And I know that if I don't do that. Then this place will not be what it is. And I'm not also I'm not afraid to say that that happened. You know, the first couple of months, I didn't take myself, and I was really worn down and that showed in a place that table so self-care so with having worked on creating a place at the table for three years before you even opened you talked a little bit about some of the obstacles that you had about getting people to kind of understand what you're going for and bringing them on board. How did you get people on board your vision? You've got this thing in your head. You know, you want it to look like, I'm sure doesn't look exactly. The way that you pictured at first. But how do you get people jump on that again with you? Good question. You just start telling the story people will listen when you start telling the story, and it will it will spiral that way it'll spiral down. And I again, like I said this would not be possible without the community of people that have believed in this. But your community is there to support you and aback you and people if they believe in if they believe in someone they believe in something to so if you if you tell the story, and and say why and why it's important people will follow you. And that's what I found here. People followed and people people started to believe in it and saw that this really could be a place that could impact a lot of people. And so I don't know if that answered the question, but I. I think I think just beginning to tell the story and not being afraid to tell the story. I was so passionate about this. And I've thought about this for years and years and years, and until I said something out loud at first I thought no one's going to get this. This doesn't make sense because in my head it didn't make sense that this could actually be something. We we accomplish do. I never looked at myself as a leader. And and then I started telling one person time people were people can relate people need to know how they can help too. So once once I started to tell the story and say, hey, I need I need help with this aren't need help with this need help with this people started to come on board and say, hey, I have those skills or I have this thing I can donate or I have this people really want to help. They just need to be told how knowing that. You're vision was to make an impact on the community and to bring together where are you out so far like Howard things going, and and also like what is. That meant for you. And your staff impact to me is a lot of things, and I usually all day everyday. I will tell the impact of people's stories and of that that qualitative or quantitative because I really believe that the impact we are making is is on this community. It's the community building we are doing. So our mission is to provide community and healthy food for all regardless of means. And there's a reason why communities I because everything we do we are trying to build community whether it's eating together volunteering together. And so here we have had a million and one people step up and be a part of that community, and it works right now, we have a guy who you can see right now. He's in the dish room. He's been here since seven AM in the district. He doesn't have to be doing dishes for that long and he's volunteering. I mean, and he just loves being here. He loves being a part of it. And that's his way to be a part of it. And we just have a ton of people that they don't they come to. Sure, they come to volunteer for. Our meal. They don't come for the food. They come to the community. And it's been incredible to see that we have a a woman who comes twice a week to volunteer, and she loves this place. She loves the food. Sure, she's on food stamps. She loves to salad because on stamps. You can't really afford a salad because it goes bad so quickly, but she more than that. She loves it schnauzer feels a part of the place that he will family my staff. I'll I think I can speak for them because they would say this. You work with our staff is different. I'm not the average nonprofit who hires a staff of really caring social work majors in college. Right. We are restaurant we run like a restaurant. I'm the only one that that would to school for some sort of humanities degree. And so our staff they come in and every day is crazy. Right. So they're running around they're working with long, tears, everyday is different than ever the same volunteers. They asked the same question of thousand and one times in the day. It's really tiring, and it's exhausting but day check in how are you doing? And they say now they've never been a part of something like this before. And this has changed my life. I have never felt like I was a part of a community of I've lived here for two years. I've never felt like a part of community. And now, I can't tell you how loved and how appreciate it. And how welcome die feel and I guarantee every staff member said that here, and so for the staff to to say that I mean that just is so transformative me. See that to know that they have a place here. Just as much as anyone else is wonderful, and they want to be here. And I always thought the kicker was paid a living wage like, yeah, they wanna fresco he paid a living wage. No. They wanna work for for us because they have a list of three hundred volunteers. They can call and ask to take them to the doctor. They have a list of people. They can say, hey, I'm looking for couch rhino apartment. Do you have one? Like, we have had so many things happen between all different people. So it just we're building this awesome community. And and all I think all of us are really appreciative of it long story short short, but long. What is some great advice that you've received that has helped you along this long journey? I think well, I know particular advice, but more just like people have contributed where they fit so I have on my board of directors and indifferent. Volunteer circles that we have here we have restaurant owners. We have lawyers. We have architects we've approached architectures and working for four years. He's drawn up like fifteen different plans for different spaces. We looked at and dill we came here. And he's doing it for four years for us. So they all have given their own set of advice that has made this place happen. So I like to note that because all of those folks have really brought in where their skills are my accounts as my life. I can't tell you. She doesn't for free and she's amazing. And if I didn't have her I wouldn't even know like, I didn't even know what a budget was before this. And she's brought in all of that advice and knowledge for me. So it's all individuals that have brought specific. Vice I think got me started. If there was one piece of advice, my old mentor said to me Maggie, and this is prior to a place at the table. Maggie your greatest your greatest passion meets halfway with the world's greatest need. And I know that's already a quote from. Of course, I don't remember who quotes it right now. But that to me it really stuck with me. And and that's why the tables here. My greatest passion is loving people. My greatest passion is making people feel included and welcomed and and loved and cared for. And and that means people with me and the people without means. And I think raleigh's greatest need was a place like this place that really brought the has and the have nots together. And so that that really stuck with me and that launched me forward into working on this just FYI. I for all who don't know me. I knew nothing about restaurants, or nonprofit. So there you go what? To say someone starting out to say someone hasn't quite founder thing yet. But they're getting close with figuring out what they're passionate is like if someone starting like, what advice you have for them to take that first step who I could talk for hours on this one. I could do you wanna call me you can call me. And I will I will help you with anything, but truly lean on your community lean on your community. It's the people around you who are going to get you through this. If I did not lean on my community of the people that loved me, the people that were they advice givers than this would not have happened lean on your community to help you support. You advocate for you. The your champions in the community, you need people around you to do things to do anything. Everyone needs people around them. Everyone needs a community support system. So lean on the people around you and ask for help. Don't be afraid to ask for help. Kind of what I said earlier is people want to help. They just have to be asked. How? How so ask and don't be afraid to ask good things happen when communities come together, and when people come together, so don't feel like you have to do this alone. That is perfect. Vice so Maggie thank you so much again. And thank you for sharing your story. And just thank you for being you, you're such an inspiration. No, you guys all the inspiration. Now. I just I truly in the luggage on that gets to do this every day. I I slow note. I told you I told them earlier this but had a really rough day yesterday. And then came in this morning and rain into someone who is experiencing poverty and homelessness and hadn't seen him in in six years since since the first time I met him. And and he said, hey, Maggie. He said, thank you so much for having a place here and for y'all providing a meal and letting me volunteer I like found the feel like I said, and so, you know, I'm the lucky one that gets to do this every single day. Like, it's just such a great reminder. And another big thanks to Maggie Cain for being our guest and for welcoming us to your table. If you live in triangle or planning to visit rally, definitely checkout place at the table, west Harford street, also you can follow a place at the table on social media at table Raleigh. Have you're not local. You should definitely check out the one world everybody eats website and find the closest K what you can't fade near you. We'll be sure to include these links and the show notes if you wanna get plugged in and meet other arc vendors. You should join our Facebook arc benders IRL. And if you have any ideas for topics that you'd like to see us cover in future episodes. You can leave us a voicemail at nine eight four four six four zero two five four or Email us at Hello. We are the ark vendors dot com. So our next episode is Pierce free lawn. Professor musician and social entrepreneur, he's a founder of black space, but digital maker space. Actress features he's also the front man of jazz and hip hop group beast and co-founder slash host of beat making lab. An EMMY word blame PBS series. Y'all are going to be fascinated by Pierce. He's so can call if you love our benders and want to help please spread the word with your friends and rate us five stars on apple podcasts. You can also find us online at we are the ark vendors dot com and on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook music for today's episode is by the one and only Brian Levin. Thanks so much for tuning in. And don't forget every little thing you can do to make a difference matters.

Raleigh Maggie founder and executive director Maggie Cain Maggie Kane Facebook North Carolina Kelly Clarkson Boone founder Gela EMMY Boone North Carolina PBS Reema Magritte Nagy Josh Mueller
"arc" Discussed on Arc Benders

Arc Benders

07:53 min | 2 years ago

"arc" Discussed on Arc Benders

"Know that I would have gotten done. Yeah. I definitely wouldn't have part of it was like just setting aside the time for it. But also. Thinking about how I'm afraid to see those numbers because then I know either how bad it could be or how good it could be obviously having a clear picture is the better path, but you know, been reflecting on it a little bit. Like, why am I afraid of this? What is my interviews telling me about how his minor voice answering that question about why am I afraid in? How can I kind of change the script around a little bit hackley able to set goals is is really scary. You know to say like maggots case like I'm going to open this restaurant or whatever. Like or for me? I'm like, I'm gonna grow grow my company to this number in. It's like, it's terrifying. But you know, it's okay. If you don't meet the goal you have to try in. If you don't meet it when you think you want to maybe. A reason but could change it. You know like you can change your goals. Yeah. You can always pivot it, you can always read Iraq. But the thing is the reason the reason I decide to the or if I fail. I don't wanna fail because there is underlying fear that I didn't deal with that. How me back, and I think that's really important whenever you're taking on anything. That's huge. And we have any really ambitious goals and also. Inherent to this all is also becoming deeply vulnerable. And that's actually one thing that I'm working on is essentially, I'm going to watch this accelerator program in September to create a safe space entrepreneurship for people that the program's called figure shutout, and I started as a joke gonna call figure out, but I was talking to a friend who is a graphic designer. And I was like, yeah, I'm gonna create this resource. And it's gonna be great. And it's gonna be early stage entrepreneurs, and we're gonna come together figure shut out. And she's like, hey, have you thought about calling it that, and I was like how harsher? But I couldn't come up with a better name. And so I decided to whenever you're trying to do something. It's always a good idea to test it, and so I decided to test this model with six different businesses this year, and I couldn't come up with a better name. And then I realized it really kind of is a perfect name. We can we can simplify we call Faisal. So Faisal meets weekly. And and for me, it's been a really big lesson and the feedback that I've been getting his yes, it's helpful to have structure, and yes is helpful to count ability. But a lot of the greatest value has just been having support because not all onto preneurs have their version of Lisa if that makes sense, and even when I was first starting now when lease at least we're getting to know each other I didn't have that either. And so I know how is lady is to be tackling something in to try to live your dreams and to be. Able to make that progress on something that's really daunting and scary and uncertain to Italy. Yeah. Well, another thing that's been really hard. Or like another fear that I've been working on has been we talked about it last time, but it's been boundaries. Like, I've really been leaning in to the boundaries challenge. Can you fill in on how that's going for you? Since the last episode. I'm doing. I'm doing it. But it's so hard. I hit a coffee plan with the friend this week. I'm going to shout, Heather Hooper. I love you. And I knew I needed a canceling I needed some more space that data doom work. And so I pushed it back a month. And there was another call. I think you can your shadow there's dog. And then there was another call that was with an amazing starting block fellow and I had another meeting Scheffel than I just knew I couldn't do it. And I was feeling overwhelmed, and so I- postponed it, and I've also been working from home. And you know, and I know when I know some people would prefer that IBM person. And I'm having to set aside like this desire to want to give and give and give and realize that to succeed at what I'm trying to do I have to be selfish with my time. And then I have to put these boundaries in and that I have all amazing and impactful work I want to do and the only. Kamina do it as if I have six hours a day to do it. And that's on top of, you know, Clio work. So that's just it a lot of those feelings or fear. It's fear that I'm letting people down that fear that I should. I think the other words that I've thought about this should. Yeah. Stop shooting on yourself. Yeah. Numerous should I should have gotten more done. I should have done this. I should go to this event. Now, you should do you deepen your gut? No you need to do. Yeah. Oh my gosh. Since the last episode I've been really good about me, not good. But I've been a little bit more brave about setting my boundaries and doing things that make me a little bit uncomfortable. Because I know that in the long run. It'll be better for me. So one example was that I had a commitment to go to conference with Christina in DC. And I'm really looking forward to it. And we're going to do this podcast recording stuff there and Christina still doing it. I add is perfect con-. Yeah. Run by an amazing are Fender. Yeah. I was gonna go to that with you. And then you found this conference that you're like Lisa if there's anything that you're gonna put your money towards this year it needs to be this conference. And it just happened to be the same exact time in my home state in a city that I love Asheville, I'm going to mow summit the momentum summit, and I'm so excited to be going. But I felt so bad cancelling on my commitment for going to purple con-. It just made me feel so bad. But I do honestly believe that I made the right choice. Were you did? And then we're team. So we're going to divide and conquer and represent our benders into cities. Yes, we offer and they're both mission driven impact princes. So, you know, totally. We do the best we can. But I was really proud of you. I mean, you knew deepen your gut that like it was a place you need to be. And also you need to go represent unity to. And I mean, that's one thing that we've talked about with podcast is like this is our gift to the world. But also the only way it's going to succeed is if we also take care of our mission driven companies as well. Right. Exactly. And I know you hate the word hustle, but I have been calling this our side hustle. Yeah hustle. I mean, it is or side hustle. But I don't like the word hustle. I say it's our passion project, and that's a good one passion project our gift to the world these stories, which oh my gosh. Really? It's just sharing these amazing inspiring people who intern will totally help change your life. While speaking of do we want to get onto the interview? Let's do do you want to do the Andrew shirt?

Lisa Faisal Christina Iraq intern Heather Hooper Asheville IBM Italy DC six hours
"arc" Discussed on Arc Benders

Arc Benders

07:17 min | 2 years ago

"arc" Discussed on Arc Benders

"You're listening to the art vendors podcast show created a challenge you to be bold enough to live an extraordinary life with impact I'm here with Lisa her. And that's Christina will now sit back find your happy place and get inspired PS. This episode contains a bit of salty language. Welcome back to the ark vendors podcast where so excited you hear me to we have been those OA now, I'm interrupting okay? I I know I was just going to say I was like we have the most inspiring guests today. But that's just maybe dramatic because all of our guests are fine. But I will say Maggie is insanely inspiring. She is I love her. I was actually a big fan of her before she even launched the restaurant. How did how did you know about her? I used to work with her sister-in-law. Oh, so heard the story about how she wanted to start a place at the table. And it was so intriguing to me that I've been following her from the beginning a place at the table is this amazing restaurant in downtown Raleigh, North Carolina. It's a pay what you can cafe and they serve alongside more than sixty other pay what you can restaurants in the global one world everybody eats network. Yeah. And so you've never heard of pay what you can cafe essentially whenever you go in is this beautiful. Cafe you've definitely should check out the show notes, we'll have photos, but it's a normal restaurant, and it has menu. And all of the prices are suggested a maggie's gonna talk a little bit more about what that means. But it is to me one of those magical places I've ever been and Maggie is an example of how essentially like if you have a big dream of how you want to change the world, and you're nervous about whether or not you can make it happen. This is essentially. Interview for you. This is a story of someone who had a vision, and it took her three years to really realize it, and I think that's incredible. And I think that she was so much persistence. And there are so many people who looked at her as this young woman who is naive and yet she made it happen. She helped people see her vision, and she launched something that's really special in our community, and in many ways, like a beacon of hope it really is. And I do agree that one of the really impressive things about her. There are many, but one of them one of the things is this commitment that she has to her dream just know it. She knew that she was on this something she knew that. It was something that even if it didn't work she had to try just because she didn't always wanna wonder and this the barriers that she ran into she'll talk about this in her interview. Just the fact that it did take so long for this cafe to get launched. I mean, it's really incredible. That that she stuck with it. You know, like, the persistence, and I think that a lot of times we have fear that if something's taking a long time that means that it's not gonna work or if enough people tell you that it won't work that it won't work. And I I'm so impressed by Maggie that she didn't let that Stocker. So there's kind of a big. Like, a big movement around impact metrics, I think the one thing that's really great about maggie's story is the fact that you get to really define how you wanna measure impact. There's a lot of trends and impact invest in this idea that the only way you can change the world is stemming exchange. In fact, there's a book called that actually recommend you re is called winners. Take all the elite charade of change in the world. And I will say it is definitely worth the read because it will open your mind, and they're doubly points made in the book that are worth exploring. But my one critique of the book is that it kind of writes off social entrepreneurship, and it somewhat writes off small local change, and our guests today in a place at the table really challenge that because I think that storytelling and helping people connect with their humanity and changing even one life is dole. Noteworthy. Eighty and is still worth celebrating. Absolutely. Yeah. And I mean, her metrics are crazy. And we're going to talk about it again in the introduction about it. Now. Oh my gosh. In less than a year. Opening a place of the table had over eight thousand meal served more than that was served to people in need more than twenty five thousand patrons made the decision to pay it forward and donate a meal, which generated over one hundred thirty six thousand dollars donation, and they had over twenty four thousand volunteer hours or volunteers came into the cafe and dedicated their time just to help keep it running and often times they would earn a meal and heard of the impact metrics, I love it. They include this on the sign in their restaurant is they served not served, but they have over a million smiles hugs laughs. And the community that they're building their part of the impact that they're that. They're creating through the cafe at it's not just about the money. And it's not just about the know counting heads or whatever. It's really about the spirit that they're putting into their community. And the other thing about Maggie that is so impressive to me. Okay. Gotta gotten I feel like same thing. It's like one of the many things that have press me. But I feel like one thing from impact standpoint as she is just doing on outstanding Java is storytelling. So I received her. I recently of place of the tables emails, I highly recommend you sign up for their newsletter and is flare. Okay. This might not be the best sales pitch for for me. It's a compliment. I cry like half the time, they sent an Email and actually even getting interview I was going back and Email and reading some of her emails, and I just started done because they're so touchy, and so just to give you. A blurb of one. So after hurricane the hit in September magazine out this amount. And she goes last Thursday was a hard one for me all day pace back and forth. Making the decision to open or close on Friday. And the end we had to close because it did not want anything to risk the safety of staff before I left for the day one of our community. Volunteers Darryl was about to leave within t shirt on his back and bag with half a sandwich. I knew he would not go into the shelter for many reasons and new he would do what I was doing pace back and forth, hoping it would not keep raining all night. I knew it was not going to be fun. Couple of days for him. There really was no answer to make the night better for him. But we decided

Maggie Christina Raleigh Lisa North Carolina Darryl Stocker one hundred thirty six thousan three years
"arc" Discussed on Arc Benders

Arc Benders

09:18 min | 2 years ago

"arc" Discussed on Arc Benders

"Strengths. Fagin Harris is the president and CEO. Baltimore core. An organization that enlists talented people in public service and social entrepreneurship in Baltimore City. Fagin co founded the organization with west more in two thousand thirteen because he believes deeply in every individual's right to opportunity and is committed to realizing a more just and equitable society growing up Fagin overcame culture of low expectations, which pervaded his working class community as he puts it I grew up in Baltimore and lived the reality of post industrial America. I was educated in public schools that barely graduated half of its students and watched close family members battle addiction engaged life. I lost friends forces carrying individuals pushed me to reach higher, which led me to Stanford University Fagin is a graduate of Stanford University and the university of Oxford where. He was a Rhodes scholar. He is received numerous awards including fellowships from Shoka echoing green and the Aspen institute. But despite all these experiences and qualifications. It was the six months that took him to land a job in the nonprofit sector and his return to his native Baltimore that finally spurred him to focus on reimagining for social impact sectors talent pipeline. I wanna know all about often require like what is your journey? Like, how did you get here? What inspired you to do this? So back in twenty eleven me to colleagues. Started a business planning to venture around cruising public service social section careers. Social good, and we wanted to go out. Do you build a really effective marketplace for John? How do you support the millennial generation going into them? What is that really? To really cut it. I would say the beginning of like the purpose of thing. But it kind of the start of this latest ration-, I would say, you know, coming out of the great recession. And I think a lot of people really thinking, what's. So we did that from twenty seven twenty thirteen as what I kind of concluded in that was that orientation at actual solution was not gonna work likely markets are too complicated and their two regional. To actively was like the holy grail is like the orbits for social impact jobs, and like everyone in the country can dislike go fine. What makes sense for them? They can like selected efforts. It's vast it's to nuance. So I settled on a place based model in thought, you know, what if you go, hyper, local, you actually could pull this out at a local scale get it done. It's from this area. Also saw were Baltimore had just all the writing mediates position itself is like a destination for social change. It's so with that kind of background after two years of business plane research published a bunch of robots launch twenty thirteen and then that's been like a real. Journey because. Newly basically started out running the fellowship program. I would say today. The bulk of our revenues Oregon of we also run like a search in executive search business, really. That we've had to like all on the sustainability question how to get out of just solely looking for grand dollars dollars. But also figured out like what's our product. What are we selling turns out? There's a ton of demand for what we do. So like sure that we like meet that demand responsibly still alive with our mission. But meet the demand. The revenue of the business. So you're working. On runs. The gamut we run with social sector companies profit sector. So we just did the search for like Roka. You've heard about the real good thing. Coming from malls, aerobics like a big kind of crime prevention thing than they are pretty down from Boston. We did that search search the innovation center Louis university's so higher. Add we'll do to your price brought advisory. So mean private while Blake there shoul higher? Hospitals. Nelson pirker. News super small is ten fellows. I I mean, we didn't have staff who didn't really do it. That I grew. They were just troopers and helped us really divine. Like, what is the experience force Harry coming through a try? I think we learned that is like. The head of capital, the weight, and I was trying to understand how they settled on their talent development model. Yeah. And he was like, well, you know, it's about the five seats and be like random off. It was you know, it's it's clarity consistency. And that I dislike it dawned on me. I was like wait you guys just like make up the five CS. He's like well. Yeah. All this is like internal marketing. So like, no one really knows how to develop people, and that's realize like really knows how to develop people. So like, let's just do the best. We can let's listen to our customers. Build something that they would want. But I really thought that there was actually like best practice out there, everyone does it wildly different. So once I heard the five sees it the late, then I realized like all right? We need to take it seriously. But let me not this pressure on myself to go. Finally, the magic answer honors. Versuns- every organizations. Yep. No magic answer. Okay. So you went to the with Graham, but I'm guessing that was a highly revenue-generating transition was naturally like some executive shirts or do. We basically started doing the fellowship that we quickly. He came over subscribed. So like a call for like thirty thousand eight hundred patients. You know? And then like we reach out employers get like a hundred twenty employees application, so it was clear that there was a really strong marketplace sharing, but we fellowship infrastructure was not told to skilled admit that like at bats. It was always gonna meet fifty people a year, which is still a humongous fellowship, but still the drop in the bucket compared to what people what they were demanding so fast. So then we're just like all right? Well, we got the thirty or fifty people here, but we're saying no to like nine hundred fifty cycle. How good are those people and we have a twenty percent or just as good as the people get into the fellowship. We saw that. We would probably not matching sixty percent of the businesses that are cute. So that it was like all right. Let's just build a business line around the excess demand here. And then you differentiate your search product rights like fellowship is like early era. So we didn't decisively with into like two executive level. Yeah. Stuff because the margins on that are better. Sharon. So mentioned imply love that I'm talking to you. Because you're the first person who's like articulated this hypothesis or like my legs. I don't think there's numbers to my experience. But I feel like I meet someone every week. That's like, I love CISL impact. I want purpose in my life. What do I do? You know, I'm one of the people mandate program that pulled it off. But then the problem is I'm like, yes. Like don't give up. But I, you know, there aren't many jobs yet. You're probably gonna have to create a. See now that I'm creating this shit show. Yes. That is true. Yeah. All of that is true. I think the photo shift person foremost ISM mechanism for creating those opportunities like those the other thing we did Allison on like the quality of the opportunities of realized that. Most eighty percent of the polish slots were not filling existing roles creating clown until it became this. Great vehicle for attracting like third party capital to underwrite creative stuff. And like we're gonna kinda solid is like we could take a chance group person this and try something on a trial basis. We didn't really even intend all of the need to kind of the market took it into direction that surprise all of us. But once it got going it was like, all right? That is a great program that products. Awesome. But we're definitely not like tapped into the full potential search business like they're just a lot of existing roles that like we need to be Philly. And we have the talent that so they're more differentiated than they would look like on their surface.

Baltimore executive Fagin Harris Stanford University Baltimore City president and CEO Aspen institute Shoka America university of Oxford John Nelson pirker Oregon Louis university Allison Blake Boston
"arc" Discussed on Arc Benders

Arc Benders

06:33 min | 2 years ago

"arc" Discussed on Arc Benders

"Solution. It's it's unbelievable. And yet he cared so much about mission cared so much about its community. He went out and took loans that like cost him financially until it gets not even just burn out of your time. It's also burn out on like, what does success look like to me. And how much of like should I be giving? I mean right now, my businesses like real talk. It's not profitable. I'm breaking even and at the end of the year. I was negative about about negative three thousand and. And people don't understand the stress with that. And I think with Fagin I mean, he made a meager salary for all these years where he worked around the clock towards something that who so passionate about and yet I mean that takes breaking toll. And so when I quit my job. I was burned out. And now as an entrepreneur, I go through periods where I'm burned out. And and we have to start talking about what this is. And it can't just be a hashtag self care. It has to be a looking at the root cause and stopping stopping the pattern. Right. Like, really analyzing our lives, and realizing what sustainable, and I mean, I I was laying in bed with my husband. I'm like, I don't know what to do. And he's like what you have to do is you have to less. So for me saying no to a bunch of things. And for me continuously is gonna mean me say, no to even more things. And every no still hurts like I feel guilty. Every time I send a no. And yet every time after I sent an Email. I'm like. Thank god. I said now, I'm always so relieved. Yeah. But at the time it just hurts. It's hard like I hate it. I know exactly what you mean. And also to everyone that's trying to arc bender knows a gift in. It's a gift to yourself in as a gift to the person that you're saying too. Because if you're saying yes to anything it should be because it's something you feel really passionate about. And it's because it's a decision that you feel good too. And you're not doing anyone a service if you're saying yes to things that you don't wanna do because you're going to get resentful and resentment isn't good for anyone and also like run deeply this goes back to their careers. An arc bender. What advice that Fagin gives on this podcast changed my life? I think of any arc Benner interview. I have had this far. That's over fifty interviews with people who've changed the world bagan hit. Upon something that I think is very deep and very meaningful and profound, and I think the most important lesson if you wanna change the world, and that is the only way to make those work is to really understand what you're setting out to do. And how you want to do it. What is that role? Like, what is the type of work you want to do? Because if you're not doing the work that you want to do and the way that you want to do it. You're gonna get blown out like just inherently doing work. You don't like doing it's going to new out. And and I don't think enough people talk about that. I think there's yet again, it's like the Mother Theresa complex that you should give in giving give and that that should be enough. And I just don't believe that's true. I think that it people do the work that they are best at that's really powerful. I'm actually kind of curious Christina because it's the kind of advice that a here. I actually do hear that a lot do what you are good at and what you like doing. But what is it about? How Fagin said it like, why did it resonate so much with you? When you heard him say it, I think that is a great question because I have heard it before. But there was something about this interview that was still real. And I love that that vice was coming from a place in coming from a person who's reaction to social impact was when people are like, oh, I wanna do social impact I wanna do social entrepreneurship his first reaction at dote. Do it. And honestly right now, I feel that we would people are like to start a pub cast, and my immediate reaction is to do it. And I think that goes to anything that's a lot of work. And if you're going to do something that takes a lot of work, and if you're gonna do something that takes a lot of energy and resources of passionate time commitment, you need to be very careful that it's playing to your strengths. And like in the case of the podcast. I mean, we're still haunting our process, but I love this part. I love talking to you. But I don't always love some the editing parts. Yes. And and and is just a lot of time. It's just like lot of time to do it right to the show notes to be thoughtful. And to do you all is service in telling these stories, and this compelling, and and so I have to be really careful to try to minimize the stuff. I hate doing. Yeah. Well, because I'm gonna get burnt out. Yeah. And I actually I don't mind editing. What I hate doing is the promotion, I do all the promotion, and I don't mind that as much. And it's funny 'cause like I actually haven't I haven't even put anything about the last episode of my own social media, but I also hate social media. So there you go. And that's why I haven't a tomb good idea. Yeah. It is seriously because. And it goes back to that. Like elevate delegate thing where it's like if you're doing what you love the things that you're good at than things are going to be much better in your life. And so the idea of like somebody being like, we'll I you know, I wanna do you did. Because look how successful you are in. It's like, okay. Well, I did this thing that I love and I'm good at and that's why it's successful. But if it's something that you just see the success, and you want the success and Leedle you're not passionate about the what the why then you're not going to get there. Because you're going to like you said you're gonna burn out faster because you're gonna hate it. You know? And so like, even those stuff's hard even though you and I both have these like, oh my God. I'm just hide under my bed covers in cry. And not get up even though we do that we still love what we're doing. And the only reason we're still doing it is because we actually love it. Yeah. Not I don't love the burn out part. I don't. The feeling crappy part? But I do when I'm doing the part of the job that

Fagin Mother Theresa complex Benner Leedle Christina
"arc" Discussed on Arc Benders

Arc Benders

05:32 min | 2 years ago

"arc" Discussed on Arc Benders

"And. And here's the thing. Like when it comes to burn out. I love one of our mentors. We gave her shot at last visit to Maria Kangari was we were talking with her about performance, and you can work at one hundred twenty percent. I mean, you can't like in. Sometimes you will. And you should but you can't do that forever. And there's a reason that Google has an eighty percent twenty percent free time policy because like we operate better when we have space debris. And so this whole burnout thing isn't even just about happiness or selfishness. It's also about how do you reach your alternate potential like how do you be a high performer, and like for me, I know that the one thing I'm still working on his boundaries and and get into a place where I'm okay putting those boundaries on. And if someone doesn't like it, then that's on them, not on me. And I'm actually doing them into service when I give my time away when I don't want to. Because it angry and frustrated, and then I kick myself because I'm like, my intuition told me that this is going to be huge waste of time. And this is going to be someone to sell me something then I'm not interested in and yet sometimes I'll still go to the meeting, even though I know better because I don't want to upset a friend or I don't wanna be impolite to a stranger, and we have this culture of networking to like as entrepreneurs is almost a sexploitation. You should be networking she connecting with people, and you should be getting out there and yet like right now and my business. No, I need to be strategic like I need to leave the house as little as possible and just do work like work on this podcast work on my consulting firm gun work with unity and. Anything that's diverting from that distracts me, and wouldn't you distracted? Then you come back, and you're not as focused, and it's just a systemic issue. You got to put your blinders on that is Michael in life right now is to put my blinders on pert of wonders if silly traditionally entrepreneurs, I think that I think it was in the two bobs podcast. They were talking about this for like traditionally entrepreneurs would be in your early twenties. And unlike if you're if you're past thirty you're too old for it. And I wonder if it's because of that we've settled endure lives for the squishy in comfy good, even though I I started business in my thirties. And even though I have a family into kids and a husband and all of this like life around me. I wanna do all of those things. But if I was in my early twenties. I might just have the business. And then select I wonder if our age factors into the burn out that we're experiencing where it's like there's more than just the business that we're trying to do. And granted I have not trying to create a fast growth business. It is a lifestyle business because I don't want to sell it. But I also wanna have a comfortable lifestyle. I wanna have like a good lifestyle. And so I'm not trying to grow up fast. I'm trying to healthily. But that doesn't mean just because I'm trying to do it in a sane way. It's still an insane thing starting a business is an insane thing to do. It's really hard to do. Well, and that's why I am so excited for you guys to hear the view with our guest today fake in Harris is the CEO Baltimore core and the founder, and and the interesting thing is and he founded it he was starting to run the organization when he was twenty six I mean, he did the thing in his twenties. And he's still got burnt out because I think yeah. Because I mean, I do think that this life as is trickier because I don't have a family yet. But we're we're trying to and so that's at the forefront of my mind. And I think some of that also is probably contributed to the burn out because I feel the sense of urgency to want to get as far as I can before we have maybe that things are in place that there's like a solid foundation that I can grow from. But I feel like I'm guessing it's probably like how I freaked out when I was turning thirty. I remember like having this minor panic for like a month about all the things I had it done before. I turn thirty and then. I turn thirty. And I realized guess what you can still live. You can still live all of your dreams. It was not too late. It's just a milestone, I think having babies the same thing for me. But yet, I'm so hungry. Like, I know that there's this impact. I know I can change the world and and real talk. I want my business to work. I I joke about that. With Fagan I talked about I mean, guilt is nine inches burn out guilt. And so one of the things we talked about our interview is the fact that I felt guilty about funding. So in Fagin case, I mean, he took on risk capital to start a breaking nonprofit that is like one of the most amazing impactful organizations I have ever seen. And he's incredible. Like, everything about begging is amazing. He's an amazing person. You'll hear his story. And it's so compelling, and it's so smart how he went from trying to start the orbit. It's a social impact jobs to then coming up with a regional solution.

Fagan Harris Maria Kangari Google Fagin Michael CEO Baltimore core founder one hundred twenty percent eighty percent twenty percent nine inches
"arc" Discussed on Arc Benders

Arc Benders

07:40 min | 2 years ago

"arc" Discussed on Arc Benders

"You're listening to the art vendors podcast show created a challenge you to fold not living extrordinary life with impact. I'm here with Lisa her, and that's Christina. Noel, sit back find your happy place and get inspired. PS? This episode contains a bit of salty language. All right Cristina. Let's just talk about burnout. Let's just get real. Yeah. This Vulcan to this show like a. We're not doing that today. There's no there's a pretense of cheer. Just like driving home today thinking about how we should do the show. And I was like oh right now is just so hard, and you and I have some really good real talks. And I was like me Christina having real talk on a podcast sort of. It's like a big big big vulnerability moment. But I think it's really powerful to have people here your former ability minutes moments too. I think so too when I think it's so timely that are episode that really does discuss burnt out is right now when both are definitely getting this place where were pretty rundown and any burn out happens normal people. I think sometimes it's inevitable. If you have big dreams and big ideas. But when it becomes a pattern, which in my case, I sometimes struggle with it becoming a pattern then you have to recognize what are the things that are actually causing it. And in my case it is a sin. Essentially that I need to say, no more. I literally need to put him boundaries. And yet central impact. There's this assumption that because I just the change the world and my work exists to make the world better. I'm going to say yes to everything and I wanna help everybody. And yet that is not sustainable that is not. Okay. It's tricky because. Well, okay. Actually, just deep down. I'm a people pleaser. And that's something I've worked on I'm a recovering people pleaser, and I and I wanna make people happy, and I wanna bring joy, I wanna make the world better place. But I know I have to be strategic and yet I also don't want to fend people. And so for example, my latest like life has been Callan -ly, I have the calendar app for all these different types of meetings. And now my new policies of stranger. You're getting thirty minutes on the phone on the phone on the phone unless there's unless there's a compelling reason. Like, we clearly do the same work. And there needs to be like thought leadership share of of knowledge, otherwise we're going to get like a screening call. Yeah. I feel really bad. Like, I did that once and it didn't go. Well, like, I think she was kind of like, oh, I think it was actually seen as a bad thing. I mean, and that's on that person. But. I get the impression people are like, well, who do you think you are that you're soon portent nearly giving me thirty minutes of your time. And I'm like, I'm someone who's trying to make the world a better place, and I'm doing a lot of things, and I need to be strategic, and I need to focus and everything I do a distraction distraction that I've told my kids recently is like you're the most important person in your own life, and you have to love yourself. And you also have to be with yourself all the time it, you're never alone because you're always with yourself. And sometimes I think that we end up because we're with ourselves all the time you just get annoyed with yourself. Sometimes, you know, and you're not nice to yourself. But really when it comes down to like one of the best ways that we can be kind or selves is by respecting our personal time. And like, I know hashtag self care is such a big thing. Thing. It's probably big right now just because of its being trend in a hashtag. But I mean, it's also something that is timeless and important when you have a mission a personal mission bigger than yourself, and you wanna make an impact in the world, and you wanna make other people happy you often end up sacrificing yourself in like that doesn't really help anyone. I would say that. It's more commonly talked about in the business world that in order to have a business that has impact you have to have a sustainable business. Like, you have to take care of your business before you can take care of others. But I don't think that we talk about that as people like we should in order to to make an impact of the world in order to help other people you have to help yourself I, but then that makes us feel selfish. And then it's like, oh, well, you're not a good person 'cause you're selfish. Like, no, the fact that you make sacrifices in other ways. But in the. Ways that you have to take care of yourself. I in the way that you prioritize yourself is the way that you're allow yourself to make sacrifices in other ways that impact the world. And here I am saying this in like having I feel like I'm having panic decorate. Now, just thinking about how bad I am at this myself. But it's like it's the kind of thing that's just really really really hard to like actually live. 'cause there's this expectation in this pressure that we have in. I I do think that it has that there is little bit of agenda component here because women are expected to be nurturers and historically even like women are the caregivers in. So women are expected to sacrifice themselves to help others. Even though our society is changing and gender quality is becoming more of thing. I am in a relationship where hell I'm the one that does less, and that's a problem. I mean, gender equity wise like my husband, and I are on pretty equal footing. When it comes to like with caretaking and all of that. But we both get burned out in. I know Christine, I know that you're in a relationship to where like it's not like you're expected to be the one that takes care of everything at home. And then your husband like goes in makes money brings it home. You have a very equitable relationship as well. But still as women we have pressure on us radio. Yeah. It's it's not our spouses that are putting pressure. It's interesting. My husband Jason is the best. No, my husband's actually, the Beth now mine is not. J k they can put their space for them both to be the best. He's the best husband in my life. He's also the only one. Granted when we were dating. I like made sure I set expectations. About who? I am. And what I stand for in my dreams and goals on the fact that having career is really important to me, and I wanna family, and that's important to me too. And yet if I'm gonna be apparent that? I'm really proud of one day. It means that I also wanna have hopes and dreams and do great things as well. And I don't want to sacrifice my entire life for my kids. And only way that you can do that is if you have a partner who's truly a partner, and that means that sometimes things are going to be equal. I mean, there were definitely time in a relationship. He did more chores and.

Christina partner Lisa her Cristina Noel Callan Christine Jason thirty minutes one day
"arc" Discussed on Arc Benders

Arc Benders

03:07 min | 2 years ago

"arc" Discussed on Arc Benders

"Me. If you'd like to learn more about Caitlin, you can find her online at Caitlyn Cava Gucci dot com. That is IT L I N K A W A G U C H. I dot com you can shop for beautiful getting back jewelry at burden stone dot com. And you can support collaborative journalism advocacy for young people at spark action dot work in case, you didn't get any of those these links in the show notes right now. As a matter of fact, I'm wearing this beautiful bracelet set from burden stone that Christina gave me for Christmas. And there's this like really beautiful stamped bangel that says the futures female, and then beaded bracelet, the kind of goes with it. And this week thing about this is the give ten percents Planned Parenthood of New York City to support access to family, planning and reproductive health services. Thank you stone. Thank you for Stena speed, awful, beautiful and impactful, thank you and love it. I love branding into the Cleopatra. Bannon. On point. And if this episode changed anything about your perspective or life in any way, we are collecting listener questions at insight to share on future episodes. So you can leave us a voicemail. At nine eight four four six four zero two five four or you can afford voice memo on your phone and Email it to us at Hello at. We are the ark vendor stock com. Also, if you wanna hang out with us online. You can join us on Facebook. We have a group called Arca benders. I R Al I R L as in in real life, which had to explain to my mother, which I joked about last week, and I'm still she still hasn't listened to the episode, and I'm like slightly afraid. She's gonna call me out. She does in case, you didn't know now, you're like cool. And it's a great group. We share articles we have conversations, and let's get to know you more and our next episode. We have incredible guests his name is Fagin Harris, and these the CEO of Baltimore for an incredible organization and lists talent. To celebrate social innovation in Baltimore and advance. Citywide agenda for equity and racial Justice. You guys Fagan is one of the most inspiring people I've ever met his story. We'll Blair mind. And also, we talk a spout burn out. And I love it. I appreciate it. Because we're having an aborton conversation that needs to be had don't forget to shoot at another big thanks to kaitlin cow Gucci for being a fantastic cast the music for today's show is from the one only Ryan Levin. Thanks so much for tuning in. And Joe forget every little thing you can do to make a difference matters.

Caitlyn Cava Gucci Baltimore Caitlin Christina Fagin Harris Ryan Levin Facebook Bannon New York City Fagan Joe Blair CEO
"arc" Discussed on Arc Benders

Arc Benders

05:04 min | 2 years ago

"arc" Discussed on Arc Benders

"You're listening to the art vendors podcast show created a challenge you to be bold enough to live extrordinary life with impact. I'm here will be her, and that's Christina. Noel, sit back find your happy place and get inspired. Just a quick. Disclaimer we experienced some technical difficulties while recording the insurance for the show. But because we believe in progress over perfection, we decided to just run with it. Hi, everyone. Welcome to episode two. The art vendors podcast to kick things off. We wanted to start with if you haven't listened to episode one. It is amazing. And we highly recommend that you start there to hear a little bit about our vision for the show and get caught up. But otherwise flow gum. Well, we're really thankful for all of you who have been leaving us ratings and reviews and special call out to Johnny four a really amazing and heartfelt review that you left on I tunes. Yes. Seriously, Johnny we really appreciate it. One of the things that we really appreciate it. Especially is that you talked about how sometimes you're concern will listening to podcasts that the hosts are living in a bunker. And part of your review is dedicated to letting people know that from your perspective, we actually are trying to live and breathe and do the things that we're talking about. And so. So that meant so my stress we really really appreciate you taking the time to let us know what you think about the show. We appreciate it. When you're sharing your connections to the show and your own stories about our vendors what it means for you in your own life. It's it's just it's really sweet. And we want to share this with our whole community. And we hope that you feel the same way and wanna show this show at your community as well. So some other feedback that we got after the last show is that people have been wondering a little bit about what is this whole arc benders thing. Where did it come from? And pursuant is the one and only who can answer that. So let's not at Christina. Man where did art vendors come from? Well, I reached a point in my life where I was so tired of hearing bad news. And I was at a point whereas filling about lost. And I knew I wanted to do more and instead of getting angry. I think it's a lot more productive to take that energy and make something amazing and turn a negative into a positive, and that's for under started. It started as this idea. Actually, I was learning photography. And so I started as a talker project where I was like well to good news thing, I need to to do the things. So I needed to take photos, and who better to take photos of people who've changed the world around the time. That idea started. I realized that it was a problem then I noticed that in the news. They didn't actually tell these stories amazing people that I was finding myself surrounded by every day. Who gave me so much hope for about a world and so much hope for a brighter future? And it's amazing how this project is evolved. Because I already these people I was working in an a b core by was doing mission driven work. And I was like, oh, yeah. I'm just gonna share this type of worldview with other people to give them hope and let them see what's possible, and instead art vendors evolved because it changed my life completely transformed. The way I saw the world and getting to know these people in a deeper level and their advice in their experience and their lessons completely shifted my perspective so much. So that I knew it wanted to be a social entrepreneur. And I had always kinda put it off of is like oh in two years. I will quit my like stable job and become as those entrepreneur and on a Friday I interviewed to our benders and on Monday. I put in my notice because I was so inspired. My husband was like, you know, what are you waiting for like, go do it? And. It's become this thing from there. So in that process, I met Lisa a Corp of. And I let her know what I was doing. I was like I'm doing this crazy thing I'm quitting my job. And she's like, oh my God. I did that like what were you like a year and a half into years on? I think was about a year and a half in. Yeah. So you're like a little bit of head of the game. So it was awesome to St. what was possible to meet someone that was at a similar life as and from there. I I mean, literally when I quit my job. I knew I wanted to do marketing strategy for mission driven companies, and I wanted to mainly due arc vendors like I just wanted to interview people, and he'll and do photography and figure out. If

Christina Johnny Noel Lisa two years
"arc" Discussed on Arc Benders

Arc Benders

06:35 min | 2 years ago

"arc" Discussed on Arc Benders

"Eyelashes. The. It's so fun. It is so fun so subtle and then people catch and they're like ward happening. Oh my gosh. I mean, you'd be embodiment of unicorn is truly magical and. Just you're like my rockstar. Not a the like, you can't put a dollar value on personal freedom. You know, I'm an African American sort of biological woman. Now, I'm data fine now is gender non-performing. So I'm now they then there's and that's that's been an amazing journey. But you know, my hair right now is I'm calling it labrador I colored so it's like teal and Brian bright blue, and as a black woman, I would not be able to do this and work for someone else. It would have been a huge as much as I would have wanted to have rainbow lashes and blue hair, I would not have been a freedom. I can have it. And it's not just a black woman thing. There are lots of white women who would love to have green hair, but don't feel like they can because of their job. But that, you know, being an entrepreneur one of the things that is incredibly powerful. Again, you can't put a price tag on it. The ability to have that personal freedom to express yourself. And be who you are like I remember I had I had law dreadlocks for twenty four years. My my tired dealt life. And they will vary well-kept and dutiful. And I think it was at the time right around the time that I I right around the time, I successfully completed my third marriage. That's reframing that I've successfully completed three marriage. So the end of the last one I shaved new gonna shave my hair off I shaved three quarters in my head, and I had to show up at a very conservative clients. I and it was definitely jarring for them. I can see that they were like, you know, what's happening here. And I'm you know, it was a great experiential lesson on by and still Dr Jonah you've still benefited from the successful revolts that you've achieved. And there is nothing different about my qualifications. And what it is that I bring to the table. Don't be alarmed by or confused by how I look and how I show up and how that makes you feel. It was a reflection of who. I am on the inside. My qualifications remain the same. And I'm sure that was you know, point of conversation for them. But really really powerful lesson in in this diversity, diversity and bias base. What are some of the biggest challenges in diversity inclusion that you're seeing in business today? So historically, the biggest challenge have been that diversity. Self has been seen as a dirty word. I made it's an uphill battle. You know, I'm I'm selling diversity in the capital of the confederacy for all intents and purposes, it's not exactly something that people have historically gotten very excited about finding up for, you know, wonderfully exciting when we get a, you know, a visionary leader whose proactive and decides that they want to define their employees experience and provide people with the tools and the skills that they need to avoid some of the nasty stuff that you see on the front page, those amazing clients to work with the folks who just get it. And they're like, let's let's add this as a skill set. 'cause we can do that you can give people the tools that they need to function well within a culture. So. Yeah, that initial challenge is just getting over the stigma of diversity has to be associated with something negative. So we kind of in some ways consider ourselves a branding agency for diversity equity and inclusion because when you're looking at it from the Athol 'rational instead of the deficit model, it's phenomenal thing. And you actually have a tremendous amount of creative. Control over dictating, what kind of culture you want to have. So now some of that is being mitigated because the conversation is moving into the forefront and very overt very different way. And people at this point are starting to feel like maybe they're a little bit negligent or not having the conversation. So what was historically? The challenge is moving a little bit out of the way. And we're seeing a massive influx of requests for support and business part of my business. You know, my business model is is really putting getting traction behind the business case for diversity. Because the social Justice model is really insufficient. This point the versity equity and inclusion can actually help your bottom line. You can actually make more money be more relevant reach more customers and clients and constituent bye bye bye. Embracing the the equity and inclusion in a way that is awesome. I mean at the end of the day fill the right thing to do. But if your business minded person, and you're worried about ROI need to be investing in diversity equity and inclusion because when you get it, right or business become. Way more relevant and more sustainable over time. So it's a really good solvent. The approach if you know, it's also doesn't work for you. We have mountain the data to tell you that. It's actually going to help your business to make so much sense. You think it really does start with the top? So it starts with leadership buying in. It starts with the understanding that it has to be a course or teaching priority. So it doesn't have with or at the top. Okay. Great win. It does. It's great. When it does. And and in order for it to be successful and sustainable, the top has to eventually get onboard in very meaningful way, the reason that I wrote overcoming bias and erasing institutional bias is because there is a way for individuals to empower themselves to engage in behavioral shifts and attitude they'll shift, and then create kind of energy around pulling pulling like minded, people could gather and leveraging the levers of change sort of accessing data, I define where institutional bias might be happening within the organization and getting traction, even if you're not the CEO, so you can create grassroots and our g that instigates change. But eventually yes leadership have to be wholly on board in order to get that systems integration that. I was talking about. Okay. That's awesome. When I love it. You've written those books to help be a resource that can help you start that change from within. I love that. There can be a grass roots approach. But it does make sense that ultimately the decision makers. Yes. I mean, and it's great because what I'm seeing more and more. So initially, you know, like like in the first years coming almost fifteen years old now, which is bananas because I see myself as a young person.

Brian bright Dr Jonah CEO twenty four years three quarters fifteen years
"arc" Discussed on Arc Benders

Arc Benders

11:12 min | 2 years ago

"arc" Discussed on Arc Benders

"You're listening to the art vendors podcast show created a challenge you to be bold enough to live an extraordinary life with impact I'm here with Lisa her, and that's Christina. Noel, sit back find your happy place and get inspired PS. This episode contains a bit of salty language. Can you believe that this is finally happening? We are finally kicking off the first full episode of the arc benders podcast. Yep. And we've gotten a really great feedback from our inter episode already. We've heard from so many people that have shared it with their friends and are just so excited to be able to share their story through it platform as well. Yes. Speaking of great feedback. We finally went live on I tunes, and we were so excited if feels like it's real now and we've received Hindle of five star ratings, and if you haven't done so yet if you could take two minutes, we'd be grateful and also. Wanted to give a special shout out to Tim Yarbrough for his amazingly thought for review ten shared the he's been following this team since they got started. And he loves how we're filling the void at a much needed area of inspiring an entertaining, everyday people to break out of their molds take on the mystery of how to actually make change happen and experienced the support community in levity that come from incorporating this work into one's life. He's looking forward to laugh solutions real talk about arc bedding tem. So sweet you seriously made her day. And if you are enjoying the show, we would be grateful if you could also share your thoughts as well. We wanna co create a show with our listeners. So even hearing from people already after the trailer has been really exciting. So we want to hear from you. What are hot topics and social impact we were experts in social entrepreneurship, but there's a lot of different ways that people can bend the arc. And so I want to hear from you. What do you? Think so another one of the goals for this show is re to get inspired. But also, it's really important to us that we get super honest about what reality is we think that if you're going to change the world, we have to be honest about what's actually happening and having a safe space of truly honest discussion. And so we realized that this might be a bit tricky balancing inspiration with real talk. But we're gonna try to make it work and part of being honest man's that we are speaking from our own truths. And that means that we're going to get things wrong because we're not all knowing. So when we screw up we want you to call us out, and we need to know this. Because a big part of what we're trying to do. Here is open. Our own is open our own minds and share progress through the podcast with you in another way that we thought about structuring the show is each season. We're going to have a theme. And so we're starting with the theme of how to design a life of purpose for season. One. And the reason we're starting there is because the last year has basically been a big focus for both Lee said is so last year, I quit my job and started to pursue social entrepreneurship. And so I've been thinking a ton about how to design alive with purpose. This is just a starting place will be tackling systemic change, entrepreneurship, burn out self-care authenticity. And along the way, we're going to be learning advice from the people who are in it, and what has changed their lives and made this doable for them. And the last thing you need is another boring podcast and another reason to get depressed. So another big thing that we're going to focus on is taking actual change and changing things to step by step by bit and finding your own path to making change in a way, that's really meaningful to you this week. We're kicking things off the topic that we're both extremely passionate about diversity and inclusion and we have one of the world's leading experts to share their. Story and their advice and Christina's taking the lead on this interview. Because I had a last minute conflict come up, which is a very neutral way of saying that I had a very disastrous like five minutes right before. Started where I was on a phone call, and it was the sales rejection call and I was taking my dog out. And she pulled on the leash so hard that I fell down and broke my phone screen, and then she ran into the bushes and grabbed a bunch of deaths girls out. That was what habit? I was like well the complex. Oh, yeah. It was the squirrel competition where you're like forget it. I have not have space to do this interview, and that's life. But then my doc. It was in this dramatic thirty minutes. I've ever had on a phone conversation with the Lisa stunts. And I'm trying to remember why was it home alone with my children like what it was about that day. Like it was at a holiday or was it was Matt Matt was working on the hurricane. So like a Lisa's husband was out of the house doing social impact where helping prepare North Carolina for the hurricane. And here's ios like super Bob working for home taking sales rejection calls trying to change the world and her dog first brings out the Doug squirrel, which startles her on the phone. And then the talk runs away all in the span of like an hour. So I mean, actually, I love the story because it kind of gives you a look into like, there's all these beautiful resumes about how you change the world. And then the real world is shit show. No, it was it was pretty I like conic moment of lake. Yeah. I mean here we are. Are like just trying to get through our lives. And then like this shit all happens. And it was like disastrous come in threes, the kind of doom. Yeah. But it worked out it still got to interview Tiffany and just to give you little bit of background. I met Tiffany, John. Why I actually saw Tiffany Jonah speak at the beach hampions retrieve and Burlington Vermont years and years ago. I was so blown away by their be inspired talk. Which will definitely include in the show if you'd like to check it out, and if you've never heard of the champions retreat, it's the global gathering of leaders within the be court movement you will quickly. Learn through the show that Leeson I R B Corp obsess, so be Corp is to an entire business, but USDA organic is to milk or fair trade certification is to coffee the BNB cure stands for benefit. And essentially whenever we talk about be corpse, their businesses that exist as a force for good, and is a global movement of leaders. Are trying to redefine success in business. Tiffany is a leader within the equipment, and the court is really passionate about trying to drive systemic change Tiffany, I've really got to know each other years later when the equipment shifted its focus trying to promote an embrace diversity inclusion and it went to a session that Tiffany hosted. And they did an amazing job talking about what it actually takes to promote true inclusion and where to start, and so whatever we thought about launching this show. It seemed perfect to bring Tiffany on to really like give you a sense of the power of one person to really drive change. At least an I took us many road trip to Richmond to go to a local happy hour, where at least I Tiffany. And. Yeah, I just I fell in love with them. Tiffany is one of those people that you see across the room, and you're just I just gravitated. It just knew I had to talk to this person and get to know them. They really are that incredible. Yeah. So a more formal intro. Dr Jonah is founder and CEO of TMI portfolio a collection of socially responsible and interconnected companies working to advance more culturally inclusive and equitable workforce's. They offer interacted digital tools along with a full suite of diversity and inclusion services like organizational assessment strategic planning and employee trainings. Dr Jonah is the author of two clamped books on institutional biased, overcoming bias, building relationships across differences and their new book a racing institutional bias how to create systemic change for organizational inclusion. Tiffany. Thank you so much for being on the show today. Thank you for having me. It's such an honor. Appreciate it. So mean to get things started. I want to kind of go back and ask you what initially inspired you to want to make a positive impact and find purpose in your life. So I am definitely not unique in the world in his much of. I was inspired by my mother's physically. Both of my parents, really. But I like to say that I do what most people on the planet do, and that's what their parents, do that's kind of the typical human pattern, although in our more individualistic culture in the United States. A lot of, you know, find our own path in a different way of but historically speaking people follow the track of their parents. And that's what I did. My my father's physician a pediatrician. So he helps people stay well and get well. And then my mother is behavioral psychologists and also entrepreneur. So I grew up watching her make the world better place. I one person at a time. And then she started a consulting firm as. The diversity and inclusion industry was being created. She was a pioneer in the space. So she was helping stand up office of multicultural affairs, and universities, and she was one of the early people who went into organizations and help them navigate the conversation post civil rights movement. Like now, we have lots of different people. We have to create room for them in the workplace. How can we do that? Well, I grew up watching her administer us -ment on and change hearts and minds than it was. It was an inspiring thing to see. Wow, that's amazing. I'd actually love to learn more about like your personal story and the obstacles that you've had to overcome along the way as on furniture, and what lessons have you learned. So I mean, it sounds like I know you've had a very diverse career and in its own, right? And how have you pivoted? How have you changed? And what challenges have you had overcome? Yeah. So interesting, I've probably I don't I didn't wake up one day. And just say, you know, I wanna work for myself. I wanted to good life. I wanted to contribute. My my actual my first priority really was. It'd be a mother. I wanted twelve kids at one point. Actually, I have been a lot of things about my life. Very young to do that. Like I in eleventh grade twelfth grade and my freshman year of college in one year, so that I could have twelve children. And at the time I wanted to. A child bike Hijra and didn't want to be pregnant during my internship and residency so accelerated my program so that I can have children I only have three now. And I'm happy to say I'm on.

Tiffany Jonah internship and residency founder and CEO Lisa her Christina Tim Yarbrough Noel United States Matt Matt Richmond Lee North Carolina Bob Hijra Burlington Leeson USDA R B Corp Vermont
"arc" Discussed on Arc Benders

Arc Benders

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"arc" Discussed on Arc Benders

"You're listening to the arc vendors podcast show created a challenge you to be bold enough to live in extraordinary life with impact I'm here with Lisa her, and that's Christina. Noel, sit back find your happy place and get inspired. I don't know about you. But I got to place where I was so tired of hearing bad news that I wouldn't even turn on the radio in the morning, and I basically banned my husband to listening to the news by himself because I didn't want that to set the tone for my life, and because of everything that was so depressing in the news, I found myself at a place that I wanted to be doing more. I wanted to change lives and make the world a better place and yet at the same time, I found myself really struggling with balancing my own needs with the needs of others. I also banned my husband from watching the news or on me because they hated having my head felt from that when Ernie had depression, and that was already bringing me down I needed to surround myself with positivity and the only way that I could find that. I could do that was by putting myself in places where I'm doing positive things for the world the way we work needs a complete makeover. And I think we need to be talking about systemic issues like racism, sexism, white supremacy and bias Illini to work to find ways to change the systems. And so that is why we started arc benders. How can we a band together as opposed to just feeling sad? All the time, historically, the biggest challenge has been diversity of self has been seen as a thirty word unless I live in it. I couldn't see out to overcome. I. I think burn out in office. Former common that should be acceptable. Everything we do we are trying to build community whether it's eating together volunteering together. These people are freaking amazing. I mean, they're they're everywhere. They're everywhere having an enormous impact on the lives of others. The name arc banners comes from the quote, the arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends towards Justice, which comes from Theodore Parker a nineteenth century abolitionist. In unitarian minister. It was made famous by Dr Martin Luther King junior. Every episode will be bringing you interviews with inspiring arc benders who are blazing new trails in driving positive change. We hope you'll subscribe to our podcast inter favorite podcast app. And if you like what we're doing and want to help please rate us five stars on I tunes. You can also find us online at we are the ark, benders dot com and Instagram Twitter and Facebook, thanks so much for tuning in. And don't forget every little thing you can do to make a difference matters.

Noel Ernie Lisa her Dr Martin Luther King Theodore Parker Christina Instagram Facebook
"arc" Discussed on DLC

DLC

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"arc" Discussed on DLC

"Arc's was avert beginning of forming the studio and you talked about the player character being the reader and there's very much a story book aesthetic you open pages of a book in eu dive into that story each chapter is a new you part of the book um talk to me about the the sort of fairytale aesthetic and and what how that informed what you actually do in the game so we wanted to make sure that in the process of doing our world building we included enough layers that if if people respond to cohen our world we have more things we can talk about after the first game in so we did spend some time building a methology end we got to really focus the mythology by virtue of the design of the game mechanics and by virtue of the design quilt we got to focus the mythology around little things in of course there's rich history is all over the world of of little people in little magical beings in so i in that you know that comes from very tales and so we just we really liked that tradition that that fantasy in that kind of magic is certainly present in popular media but is explored quite a bit less and so we wanted to explore some of that in in all just kind of fit together the scale of the game mechanics in the scale of the story in all of these mythology that we like just kind of all were complementary to each other as we were developed in the game and that's what we end up with moss.

Arc