35 Burst results for "AOL"

VOICE ALE Founder Aimi Nakajima on the Future of Voice Technology in Japan

VOICE Global 2021

01:27 min | Last week

VOICE ALE Founder Aimi Nakajima on the Future of Voice Technology in Japan

"Both aol we. We are in has voice. Finale amboise market a lot so editor. We are on the pioneer of the japanese market. But still Yeah it's immature Da watt boasting mundi independent. But i am sure that there are fewer potential avoidable The healthcare for dairy Digital jessica you may know that we have our aching operation Percent of appropriation of my country is over. Six years old and more and many of them live along edition. The fatigue overcome caregivers become So i think this is quite typical program. Games have been. I've showed at boys. Technology should be arabia setbacks. Both mentor in physically. But still you know. There are so many issues to solve for example the air diary health discarded to set the smartphone app in the smart speaker. Nick multiple app to control right anyhow phase. so i think it's not relevant Voicing must control revia boyce different idea.

Da Watt AOL Jessica Arabia Nick Revia Boyce
Verizon Sells Internet Trailblazers Yahoo and AOL for $5B

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | Last month

Verizon Sells Internet Trailblazers Yahoo and AOL for $5B

"Verizon is selling a couple of internet trail Blazers one was once the face of the internet but young who was overtaken by the likes of Google and Facebook another name being sold is a well you've got mail it was a dominant name during the internet's earliest days Verizon bought Yahoo and AOL about six years ago for nine billion dollars they're selling to Apollo management for five billion their attempts to jumpstart the brand's didn't work the ricin is refocusing on its wireless business I'm a Donahue

Verizon Blazers Facebook Google AOL Yahoo Apollo Jumpstart
Verizon Sells Yahoo and AOL to Apollo for $5 Billion

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:20 sec | Last month

Verizon Sells Yahoo and AOL to Apollo for $5 Billion

"Been sold again, this time to a private equity firm. Verizon is selling its Verizon Media unit, which consists of those pioneering tech platforms that's going to Apollo global management for $5 billion Rise and says it will keep a 10% stake in the new company in the new company will be called Yahoo. Guess Prices,

Verizon Media Unit Apollo Global Management Verizon Yahoo
The 26 Words That Made the Internet What It Is

The Indicator from Planet Money

01:55 min | 2 months ago

The 26 Words That Made the Internet What It Is

"In april nineteen ninety-five. Kansas phone started ringing and ringing some more. It just wouldn't stop lots of calls. It wasn't like every second but it was just lots of calls. Ken had no idea what was going on. He ran a real estate magazine in seattle. But these calls had nothing to do with that. These callers were angry. This was the era of landline phones. No caller id so he'd answer and it would just be people screaming and cursing and they'd hang up before he could even figure out why they were so mad. He'd eventually learned that it had to do with the post online on the internet service. Aol or america online and aol. That time was filled with loss of message boards and someone else had posted this message under the screen. Name kenzi with cans real phone number. This early internet troll was purporting to sell great oklahoma t shirts and this was just days after a domestic terrorist bombing in oklahoma city killed more than one hundred and sixty people. These shirts they were just awful. They had slogans making light of the bombing and saying tasteless things about the victims and the ads infuriated people. How could you do this. What a loser you are. I'm just paraphrasing. all of now you could use your own Sense and And think of what they might be saying given what had just happened in oklahoma city in the post one troll wrote quote. Ask for ken due to high demand. Please call back if busy but not only can know nothing about this ad. He didn't even use aol so he called. Aol and basically i told him you know. My phone's ringing off the hook and i can't get anything done and it saw all these people Upset about something that they saw on. Aol aol took the post down but another popped up then another and another a familiar cat and mouse game.

AOL Kansas KEN Oklahoma City Seattle Oklahoma
League of Legends Patch 11.7: What's New?

Four Wards Podcast

01:50 min | 2 months ago

League of Legends Patch 11.7: What's New?

"With that. Let's get to our main topic for tonight. Which is patch eleven point seven. We're going to highlight some of our changes that we want to call out here. I'm going to kick it off. I usually throw it to one of you guys. I'm changed i'm going. I deal with it. My favorite change this by far. Is that a mugabe buffed. And he got buffed in a way that is actually relevant to letting him be a champion again. Because momo got a second cooldown removed off of all ranks of his tantrum his e that is enormous enormous clear. Speed improvement his e refunds. Half a second every time he gets hit by anything. So reducing that base down creates this like feedback loop where you just get more and more tantrums. While you're clearing. That is way more of a clear speed buff than it seems just knocking second off one ability because of how that works with the refunds the sooner it cools down the sooner you can refund start the refunds again on your next casting. You just keep getting more casts. Yeah i recognize that that some single mothers. that's actually good strong. that's specifically the reason. This is such a big deal as this significantly buffs his clear speed. It does almost nothing to his ability to fight champions. Yeah it's pretty scary though. 'cause having a move in the game with that huge. Aol stein is just. It's a little scary for team fights for sure. And i'm highlighting him here because i think our listeners should be playing a moma if you get in the jungle. He's easy to play. He's extremely effective. And just got a massive buff.

Momo Mugabe Stein AOL
Eastern Australia Is Facing Worst Floods In Decades

Environment: NPR

02:07 min | 3 months ago

Eastern Australia Is Facing Worst Floods In Decades

"Less than two years. After bushfires blazed across australia the countries east coast is seeing its worst flooding in decades. Some areas accumulated over yard of rainfall since downpours started last thursday. Tens of thousands have been ordered to evacuate on sunday alone. Five hundred giga leaders of water. The same volume of water and sydney harbour spilled out of sydney's largest dam even as rain subsides. The floodwater will still post trouble for weeks to come joined now by laura chung who has been reporting on all of this for the sydney morning herald. Welcome thank you for having me. Thank you for being with us. So what are you hearing from people on the ground there. Can you talk about the scope of the damage that they've seen so far of course say unlike the bush fires. We don't actually have a clear image of how much has just been damaged or destroyed. We know it's significant part of the state but what we do know is there has been water. Everywhere we've heard and seen houses just picked up floating down rivers that used to be farms and paddocks we've heard of livestock just being completely washed away their videos and of cows and horses just trying to make it through these really heavy floodwaters and what used to be straits and headaches just now yet completely flooded with water right up to where the pow lines off so if you can imagine that it is very striking image. What about people who didn't weren't able to evacuate and are now stranded. I mean how are rescue operations going right now for a lot of people who live in these low lying plains. Floods aunt anything new to them. They've lived with them before they know how to prepare for them. But there are a lot of people who would just not quite ready for how quickly the water would come up So we've got thousands of volunteers from the state. Emergency service who out there along with police on an interstate help as well. Who are rescuing people in. Bart's people saint helicopters being deployed to try and aol if people out of certain areas. And you're not only are off volunteers having to deal with the really intense flooding conditions. They're also having to deal with the wildlife. That's coming their way as

Laura Chung Sydney Morning Herald Sydney Harbour East Coast Sydney Australia Bush Headaches Bart AOL
"aol" Discussed on Let's Talk Bitcoin!

Let's Talk Bitcoin!

02:46 min | 5 months ago

"aol" Discussed on Let's Talk Bitcoin!

"Right in. The moment has never been a good thing. So much as in inevitable thing is this. It are we there and if this isn't it then what do we think it'll look like when it does arrive. Yes we are definitely there. I think maybe we were even there before this at the last major run up in what was two thousand. Seventeen up to twenty thousand. We saw a huge unprecedented spike in new user. Adoption point awareness of bitcoin and crypto currencies spiked as well as the guidelines. The regulatory space became more kind of fleshed out. And you know sure. There were still plenty of half baked projects some of which turned out to be scams but i think a lot of people learn about crypto was the scams included in how to protect themselves from it and people are still learning about it so i think we've already sort of reached at least the first milestone. Aol moment. but i've been on this journey for a while. And i remember a lot of moments like this. You know that were exciting for example. I don't know if anyone remembers this. But remember when bitcoin got like this first article on slash dot twenty ten or something like that and i remember hearing about it on a talk radio show back in twenty eleven or twenty twelve i think from gavin andresen going on the show. So you know. I've seen a lot of exciting moments with quite disappointing moments too. But this does feel like a special moment that we haven't yet seen so far and i think it counts as the aol moment humbug. When do we go from banking the on banked and it's all about the other six billion to simpson for investment banking billionaires. I mean you know. I'm a bit disappointed. I think that happened the same time. Block streaming integrated tether probably. I know i know listen. I'm really happy that bitcoin is getting the attention. It's getting positive negative. And i'm really happy for a lot of people who waited very patiently and are seeing agree return on investment but at the same time like applauding j. p. morgan for finally finding in the pits of the dark saw the opportunity to praise an acknowledge bitcoin. Because it might make the money really. That's what we're doing a year ago or a little bit more than that the ceo. There was saying something really negative about big code but <hes>. Bitcoin do you guys remember that. Yeah bitcoin is dead says j. p. morgan before saying it reaches one hundred thirty thousand sometime in the near future. How here's the thing as much as i'm excited about the excitement that everybody's excited about. This is really the kind of fickle attention that is going to go away as fast as they came.

forty thousand dollars jonathan melhem tens september Today Stephanie murphy twenty percent today above thirty four thousand dol hundreds of hundreds of millions of dollar first micro strategies three hundred million users p. morgan half a billion dollars billions of dollars Andreas adam levine earlier today
Is This The AOL Moment?

Let's Talk Bitcoin!

02:46 min | 5 months ago

Is This The AOL Moment?

"Right in. The moment has never been a good thing. So much as in inevitable thing is this. It are we there and if this isn't it then what do we think it'll look like when it does arrive. Yes we are definitely there. I think maybe we were even there before this at the last major run up in what was two thousand. Seventeen up to twenty thousand. We saw a huge unprecedented spike in new user. Adoption point awareness of bitcoin and crypto currencies spiked as well as the guidelines. The regulatory space became more kind of fleshed out. And you know sure. There were still plenty of half baked projects some of which turned out to be scams but i think a lot of people learn about crypto was the scams included in how to protect themselves from it and people are still learning about it so i think we've already sort of reached at least the first milestone. Aol moment. but i've been on this journey for a while. And i remember a lot of moments like this. You know that were exciting for example. I don't know if anyone remembers this. But remember when bitcoin got like this first article on slash dot twenty ten or something like that and i remember hearing about it on a talk radio show back in twenty eleven or twenty twelve i think from gavin andresen going on the show. So you know. I've seen a lot of exciting moments with quite disappointing moments too. But this does feel like a special moment that we haven't yet seen so far and i think it counts as the aol moment humbug. When do we go from banking the on banked and it's all about the other six billion to simpson for investment banking billionaires. I mean you know. I'm a bit disappointed. I think that happened the same time. Block streaming integrated tether probably. I know i know listen. I'm really happy that bitcoin is getting the attention. It's getting positive negative. And i'm really happy for a lot of people who waited very patiently and are seeing agree return on investment but at the same time like applauding j. p. morgan for finally finding in the pits of the dark saw the opportunity to praise an acknowledge bitcoin. Because it might make the money really. That's what we're doing a year ago or a little bit more than that the ceo. There was saying something really negative about big code but Bitcoin do you guys remember that. Yeah bitcoin is dead says j. p. morgan before saying it reaches one hundred thirty thousand sometime in the near future. How here's the thing as much as i'm excited about the excitement that everybody's excited about. This is really the kind of fickle attention that is going to go away as fast as they came.

Gavin Andresen AOL Bitcoin Simpson Morgan
Vols firing Pruitt with cause after investigation

The Paul Finebaum Show

03:07 min | 5 months ago

Vols firing Pruitt with cause after investigation

"Butch jones suddenly looking better. Jeremy pruitt gone today. John joining us. These senior sports editor at aol dot com and john. It is great to have you with us. We've talked about the possibility that pruitt would be gone. He is now gone. Fulmer out as well. Your reaction another stunning day on rocky. Top back on again paul. You know. I think that the part that i guess is maybe the most surprising to me is the phil fulmer component Because as you know we talked about the past you know there's obviously been you know. Rumors swirling about tennessee. Possibly moving on from jeremy pruitt for a while. I think a lot of people in the industry thought when that first report came out that tennessee was looking into Potential recruiting violations under pruitt that was signaling that they would like to fire pruitt with 'cause a four forecast which you know they've made very clear that is what they are doing. The former component is a little different because he is such legendary person with that blake department From his time as a football coach and you saw today in that press conference just the these university leaders really going out of their way to praise him and talk about how he's at tennessee. Ledge all those different things. So i think you know fomer kind of getting pushed aside Calling it a retirement. But i think there's a little more to that is probably the most interesting component of this to me because now it means you not only have to fire new. Find a new football coach but you also have to find a new ad. Do you think john. It was the contract extension. That former gave jeremy pruitt attorney was the final tipping point for him. I would imagine it's probably a lot of different you components to it because you know hey we have to remember this. Was you know fomer higher to begin with you know as that whole crazy. Coaching search point out and former becomes. Ad then hires jeremy pruitt. I also think. I mean if you were watching that press conference today paul. You know felt like you know so. It's still in some ways defending pruitt. They're asking him about how pruitt would be remembered and he talks about how you know recruiting had been good Which is obviously ironic considering that they fired him in part because of recruiting violations and fired nine people in total also tied the recruiting department But also just the way that he was talking about how pro had rebuilt relationships and all these different things it felt like to me at least that former was not out on pruitt as a higher to that point. So you know part of it could have been simply that you feel wasn't ready to move on from pruitt and it s part became what we're gonna make just wholesale changes here and i think if you remember paul you know one of the reasons why earlier in the year before we knew about all these recruiting violations. I was always a little skeptical. Pruitt getting fired in part because it would reflect poorly on former. And i didn't think four would want to move on from his higher Like you said he just gave an extension to after only three seasons as the head coach

Pruitt Jeremy Pruitt Butch Jones Phil Fulmer Tennessee Blake Department Fulmer AOL Paul John Football
Is the internet breaking your parents brains?

The Big Story

05:27 min | 5 months ago

Is the internet breaking your parents brains?

"I'm jordan rowling's. This is the big story. Bonnie christian is a contributing editor at the week. She also writes a column entitled the lesser kingdom at christianity. Today and she is a fellow at defense priorities. Hello bonnie thank you so much for having me. You're very welcome. I think we have A common thread. And i think a lot of people listening who are about our age Probably have it too. So why don't you start by rewinding to a time for me it was late. Ninety s maybe a little later for you but take us back to how the parents of our generation approached the internet. Yeah well so my experience. And i think many people's experience it sounds like your experience was that there was a real Caution a real concern about the early internet particularly children and young adults using it on their own without supervision and you know without good judgment to recognize what could be dangerous concerns about the amount of time that we spent online. There were concerns about I think the the fear back then was like you'd be in an aol chat room and someone pretending to be your peer who's actually like a an adult pedophile is going to lure you out and kidnap you There were concerns about porn. I remember In my high school computer class. They they really drilled into us that yours needed to google before you went to a website because if you just typed in a url and maybe you misspelled it. All the pornographers bought up all the misspellings of the websites. That kids want to go to. So you misspelled disney dot com just like boom. It's going to be the worst thing ever. I never heard that one yeah. I don't think it's shoe but there was a lot of concern and in a sense. You know i think real concern that. There are a lot of bad things on the internet. Did we know At the time what. The real dangers of the rest of the internet would be. I don't think anyone back then anticipated. I mean maybe professionals but in in sort of like the common Understanding don't think anyone anticipated what social media would be like And how it would us and how it would really affect our thought patterns and and the way we consume information and the way we that information Anyone really guessed what that would be like. How did we learn. Exactly what The internet but yeah in particular social media was doing to our brains. And what do we know now about what's happening in our heads. Yeah so there's been there's been increased attention to this For some time. Now one Book i mentioned in my article with his A good read though. I wonder if he's going to put out an updated edition to address more of social media. Because it was it was published in two thousand eleven is about called the shallows what the internet is doing to our brains Written by a guy named nicholas carr and he focuses really on the effects of the medium. How it it changes how we think It makes it shortens our attention span at it. Interrupts our ability to concentrate our ability To just sort of contemplate or meditate with their own thoughts And you know he wrote that a almost a decade ago now You know before twitter was really a thing and the way it is now. Instagram didn't exist. Facebook was was very much like a place for just sort of meaningless little friendly interactions and so since then i think all of the trends that he identified early have only accelerated and The the introduction and increasing ubiquity of social media You know it really is designed to addict us in a sense. I don't think that's too strong a word. It's all very carefully designed by very smart people for return usage to get us picking up our phones five hundred times a day and that's not an exaggeration. Pick up our funds hundreds of times a day. We go to these sites dozens of times a day that that can't help but change how we think and what we think about who is most vulnerable to that kind of manipulation. I guess if you want to call it that yeah we're i think we're all vulnerable. That said i did write the article with a generational angle and did focus on older people My p- my parents are in the boomer generation. As our i think you know The parents of most of my peers. And what's what's different generational only Is that we do find that. Older people are more likely to share misinformation And that like to share it. Unwittingly and that age more than other demographic indicators like education or political perspectives Wealth things like that Age is the by far and away the the most determining factor of that likelihood and anecdotally. That is something that I've encountered again and again with Friends of mine with readers online both before this article came out and certainly after that this is a a a problem and again by no means exclusive to one generation. There are plenty of younger people who have very dysfunctional internet habits In which i very often would include myself but there is a an a sense in which older people can be more vulnerable because of the lack of Digital literacy despite the pure happenstance of how old they happen to be when this stuff came

Jordan Rowling Bonnie Christian Bonnie AOL Nicholas Carr Disney Google Instagram Twitter Facebook
NBA looks to sports betting to fill the gap

CNBC's Fast Money

03:08 min | 6 months ago

NBA looks to sports betting to fill the gap

"The nba season kicked off with a bang last night. The brooklyn nets beat the golden state warriors. One thousand five hundred ninety nine in the first game of the season with no fans in the stands looking likely anytime soon. The league is looking at new media strategies and sports betting to fill the gap and they aren't the only league doing so. How could that look. Our next guest has ideas. Let's bring in paul rebel. Founder the premier lacrosse league Paul great to see you again. Of course. The pl just merged with major league lacrosse. You say that this provides a singular destination for fans. I would imagine this. This gives the sport an advantage as well in terms of selling itself whether it be media coverage or streaming rights or any other kind of rights to carry the games. Yeah absolutely it's back. Happy holidays I think with sports in particular the ability to coalesce that have a singular message is important and for us when we look at future road profitability and just larger revenue Looking at the commercial opportunity of on now entering our third season twenty years or pro across history. That's looking like close to four thousand hours of twenty years of games at the mo of played that we can provide streaming service package as well as part of the announced we said we will get span to eighteen. Which is additional commercial assets and market now and as we continue to grow. We'll catch up to the legacy leaks. Hey paul dan great to have you back but in congrats on the deal. Quick one for you here you guys. You had that that bubble season this past summer very successful you know it was all over. Nbc all their properties. That sort of thing. Obviously no fans of how important was the sports gambling integration. You guys had done a deal with draft kings was that did that help engagement. And do you see that as a really important part of the offering the media offering going forward. Yeah it's huge allow. The sports properties have learned that we need to be more nimble. And not as reliant as call it major league baseball the traditional path to building a sports league on ticket sales the nba. What you reference malas typically rely on twenty or thirty percents of their revenue on tickets were looking at a modern sports age where it's meteorite sponsorship now sports betting merchandise in many cases the epl leapfrogs ticket sales and on the sports betting front. Dan we did a deal trap games last year and it was huge. I think what the sports betting this new gaming offers looking at now is live broadcast. Live odd integration And we're seeing networks now. Cut deals with gaming operators. If you look at espn's draft or mdc in points that so the properties are going to wedge their way and that's part one part two is i think in twenty twenty two to twenty twenty one. We're going to start seeing the entrance of bio data Related to players. So where will technology like lou on players that integrated the broadcast experience leaning more viewership and a larger handle sports ban in october. Three billion dollars legally registered. So we'll see that number continued to grow and more league revenue opportunity and board network revenue opportunity into twenty twenty

Brooklyn Nets Paul Great Major League Lacrosse Golden State Warriors Paul Dan NBA NBC Baseball DAN Espn LOU
Interview With Marla Beck of bluemercury

Superwomen with Rebecca Minkoff

05:46 min | 6 months ago

Interview With Marla Beck of bluemercury

"Everyone welcome superwomen. Today's guest. I'm very excited. Talk you a superfan. And i haunt her location near my office frequently marla who is the co founder and ceo behind plumer the nation's largest and fastest growing luxury beauty retailer and spa in the country. So hello and welcome. I thank you for having me. I am super fan of you. Also so the feeling is mutual. So i would love to kind of go back to the beginning because i know you were acquired but i would love to go through kind of the initial idea that you had for blue mercury and your skin care lines but where did you start off. So i actually grew up in. California was a junkie. There were little beauty shops. Where people made handmade things in berkeley which is about five minutes from where i grew up and when i was in high school is a new brand called german logica and so i always knew what was new on what was going on in beauty When i moved east to go to graduate school in boston a chance to drive forty five minutes. Divide act lipstick which was only sold at bengals in one place and on top of that it was the beginning of the i e commerce bom in fact we had just gotten our own email addresses and google and all the search and all the businesses that are here today did not exist. There was an obscure moore came to business school to talk about his business. He was talking about how he was going to bring books to the internet. And i was completely floored. jeff bezos. Only thirty people came to his talk. I was inspired by this new potential world out there that i couldn't even imagine and so started to think about what products i could bring to. The internet moved to dc after grad school and started blue mercury to bring luxury beauty products to the internet so initially inspired by jeff bezos in my obsession with beauty and we were one of the first to bring brands to the internet. Act of nineteen ninety. Nine week quickly realized that were too early. Not everybody was shopping online in fact everybody was on. Aol dial up and it used to take forever to get online and so we were just too early with that idea and so we pivoted and i laugh because were pivot didn't exist then we we were actually. Almost bankrupt realized we needed to do something different. And so we opened our first beauty store in washington. Dc georgetown back then you could only buy cosmetics at drugstores or department stores. There was no such thing as a free standing beauty store and We thought why not create this environment. Where staff were trained in all france where you could touch and feel products and that You could get makeup application and spa services in one place if you think back to them and i know a lot of people up did not shout back then who may be listening but everything was behind glass counters at department stores and you go up to the counter and ask someone to touch things to try things and i was in my twenties and i felt like no one really wanted to help me because i will spend money so this idea. The freestanding neighborhood beauty store was revolutionary at the time. And i remember i was so happy. Our first clients used to come in and screaming that they could touch products find find obscure brands get advice on a bunch of brands in their beauty problems and also get spa services in the same location as so now is the start of blue mercury. We wrote a bunch of different ways. The ecommerce wave and this move from buying beauty products at at department stores to buy beauty products in specialty stores so it was really the beginning and it took us a long time to build business. I've been at it for twenty one years so excited to have been building blue mercury for all that time. I love that. What seems as an overnight success to people when they read about your acquisition is like oh no. I've been doing this for twenty one years. I almost went bankrupt. You know it just goes to show you. And i and i. I like to talk about that. Because i think people think that i'm an overnight success and i've been doing this for twenty years. Now there's a lot of blocking and tackling around and usually your initial idea is completely wrong right. I think you have to have humility to realize that you're wrong. You need to change directions and we were humble in the first year pretty quickly and made. It's really sort of try to deal in truth and build a real business that had value for customer saying i think we got caught up in the first internet craze and it was exciting and fun and then we realized that we had to spend our time knowing and understanding what people want what they need and beauty and then just really took our time building the business and building an enduring company so when you were faced with bankruptcy being too early to the e com days how did you guys have the bravery or even funds to open your first brick and mortar. It's it's a great question. In fact we had received investment for the e commerce business and our investors hated the idea of doing a store because back then all value was pure play e commerce. And so my husband. I barry actually used our own money to do the first store.

Plumer Jeff Bezos Marla Bengals Berkeley Grad School Moore Boston AOL California Georgetown DC Google France Washington Barry
Voice AI 2020 Year in Review with Botmock, Matchbox.io, and Willowtree

The Voicebot Podcast

05:38 min | 6 months ago

Voice AI 2020 Year in Review with Botmock, Matchbox.io, and Willowtree

"So sarah. Why don't you give a quick introduction for What you're doing We can talk about your rebranding to if you want. But maybe that's for another day. But i'll just tell people about what you do and and how you came to be here today. Yes i'm the chief content officer at matchbox i. Oh and we are the brands behind a twenty voice. Applications on amazon alexa. Google assistant in samsung bixby and this past year. We've branched out into podcast website and mobile app as well got it perfect. Okay brielle hide. I am real. I am box head of product so my entire career has been kind of at the intersection of design language technology and we have an interactive canvas with drag oxes for anyone to create Choctaw waste at or an yards. Look so he's reading here today. But i'm glad to have you do your second appearance. And the voice podcast. Thank you rod and what we are podcast movement. A couple years ago to be us. Tell us about you. Yeah i hate to be as dangle. I'm the ceo of willow tree. We are a digital strategy design and development company helping clients like fox. Cbs hbo Synchrony bank schwab at jones etc with their apps in their websites. We believe voices the next big thing in the next two three years we think all those websites and apps are going to be voice powered. I've been working in digital and specifically around voice for a long time. I i got exposed to voice when i was at. Aol in the late nineties. I worked on the tell me acquisition which was one of the early really lay in ninety eight ninety nine. Yeah i remember. I remember driving home from from dulles to dc in testing out playing. You could play a black you could call in and play blackjack on a voice at the time right. Yeah yeah we've had a lot of tell the alums On the voice about podcasts. Over the last couple of years. So that's great. I didn't know you had that experience all right. So let's talk about the urine review. That's what we want to talk about. Twenty twenty twenty what happened. What didn't happen I think both things are probably true. It's been a strange year But it's also been dynamic urine voice. Here we'll start with you. Because i think there might be an interesting angle here. I assume the biggest story and voice this year is co vid because it's the biggest story at everything maybe not the big story invoice. We'll see But we should talk about covid and let's let's talk about the global pandemic. Did it change anything for you. What you saw in the industry at the time that we were sort of just entering into this and has that persisted is it still is. Is it the same difference as it anew. Difference is back to normal. What do you think yes or. The world changed trait in march. I mean we're all in a different place than we were thinking about. Voice applications thinking about hard portfolio in specific specifically at matchbox. So we saw right away when everyone. The entire world went into lockdown that the usage of voice applications shifted so during the week monday through friday pre covid. We had like peaks monday through friday. Seven am seven pm. Those were like the certain applications the the main peaks of usage. And then over the weekend it would be kind of spread out throughout the day But once everyone went into lockdown we started seeing that weakened usage throughout the entire week and it was slightly increased usage. stickiness increased as well So that was really interesting. There wasn't a massive spike. Everyone was talking about. Oh everyone's going to be at home and there's gonna be no smart speaker. Usage is going to dramatically spike. We didn't necessarily a huge spike. But we did see overall an increase in usage that persisted. Is it been the similar. Did we go back to normal higher different. Yeah it's persisted since since march and it'll be interesting. You want everyone at home and i know. Excuse me i know is gonna have to take a drink here in a second. Sorry sorry i know. As as vaccine becomes more available race and people star we all start coming out of lockdowns and people start returning to their their free cove lives. I think will see another shift. And as people start their commutes again we had a lot of discussions right before kobe. Hit with in-car experiences like talking with different manufacturers and that kind of thing in-car experiences and that's all been on hold and i expect once commute. Start up. I think we're going to see a really interesting spike. In use cases they're

Schwab Sarah Samsung Dulles Amazon CBS AOL FOX Google DC Kobe
Should investors 'let it go'

CNBC's Fast Money

04:48 min | 6 months ago

Should investors 'let it go'

"Is the time for investors to let it go sure. So you know before the charts. It's really all about who you are in the market and what your timeframe as there have been plenty of where disney as gapped up like this today up thirteen percent. It's q one beat in two thousand nineteen was about twelve percent. Move on vaccine day november ninth. We know at jumped about twelve. But what we do know is after big jumps like that. It's pretty Sideways fallow on a week over week basis. But let's look at some charts. The first is the breakout. Conventional kind of thing everyone agrees is well recognized stock that moves above a well-defined range with a gap. And you can see it. There is the definition of a breakout. Now second chart look where the stock stopped. It stopped to the penny at the internal trendline in effect for the past year. And a half. I mean literally stopped on that line in fact it peaked. Essentially around eleven o'clock and it spent the rest of the day going sideways so it was aggressively rated but didn't really progress now to more charts. Where are we in relation to the hundred and fifty day moving average. You could use the two hundred and you could use the fifty but if you were to look at this chart disney is trading some thirty nine percent above its hundred and fifty day. Now take a look at the next chart. This is going back for the past ten plus years and you can see here again. The relationship of price with average price over one hundred and fifty days. So in the history of the stock going back to the nineteen seventies it is only traded farther above the hundred and fifty million one other time and in principle that gets the timeframes. Long-term this is hugely bullish tactically. I think you fade the move. You take profits all right. It's a carter says let it go. We'll see in a bit car options action. So you've got the fundamental story. You got the technical take from the chart master. How would you trade disney here. Brian kelly what do you say. So i with carter on this when i really like his take on this because if you think about it. This is a long term fundamental. Play here because not only are they going to have more movie streaming online. But we know about disney's that they have tremendous leverage in their platform right so they can go to the parks. The parks are going to reopen their cruise. Ships are going to reopen. They're going to be able to take what they do on disney plus and bring it to all of those places but that does take a bit of time. And you priced in this surprise here and so where it's trading now and remember. The stock was seventy eight and a half or so back in april march april so it has had a tremendous run this year. It is priced in an awful lot of good news and so for me. I think you get a better entry on this. It doesn't mean that. I don't like disney. In fact i think it's going to be one of the better ones coming out of the pandemic but i think you get a better entry. I would wait either for today's gap to be filled or for the low of today to serve as your support and then wait for that breakout so you like it long term. But do you think that there could be a pullback shorter-term james mcdonald. I think part of the betting here is that is that this is a premium product. That people will pay for it in fact they. They announce a price hike of a dollar in the united states. Twenty nine percent in europe and a bet on the management team a ceo. Bob shape may be new to the role. He's not new to disney and he's still got executive chairman. Bob iger around. I in terms of this execution which is a dramatic change in how the business the structure and how the business considers an executes content. Well bob eiger remembers the old days when you had a lot of customers and you had a big brand. You had a lot of action and there is a firm back then called. Aol that got everybody's attention stock ran up on potential and we saw where that happened and i love carter's technical analysis and always spot on with his fundamental outlook. But my grandma told me use common sense you know right now. The pe ratio is at eighty seven There's more forward-looking upside for this netflix. Which masters this game. Netflix's out similar subscriber growth from the boom from cohen. And look what happened. That sub growth then cooled off for the next three months in this covert level. Growth rate is not usable for the long term with disney. Netflix shows that more content equals more subscribers. And that's a good thing but we're shifting attention away from the other weaknesses with this company. This is not a tech company The media only makes up forty percent of the total revenue parkson products. Make up twenty three percent and they're gonna take massive hits here with the new lockdowns over the holiday seasons. Let's use commonsense international segments twenty three and a half percent of the total revenue. It's going to be suffering. There's no fed overseas to save them. So let's use our common sense and stay away from disney here up one hundred seventy five bucks. No way no way no way. We can't worry about the long term. We've got to survive this recession. That's coming not

Disney Carter Brian Kelly Bob Shape Bob Iger Bob Eiger James Mcdonald Netflix AOL Europe United States Parkson Cohen
Bitcoin Bounces, Alt Coins Follow

The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

07:24 min | 6 months ago

Bitcoin Bounces, Alt Coins Follow

"Roddy so small. Watch this today. I mean the market con of played. What are we not. I mean we. We certainly saw off Throughout the session in fact from the break of yesterday's law yesterday now the die before we move roughly three percent low so you know it was continuing that selling momentum it was starting to increase in the price of which it was coming off but then it reversed and now we've got bullish candles now. The interesting thing for mayo. The most important thing for me is how far we recovered from the low. All of the die we recovered about five point four percent now as much as the only closed off what it close up one point two percent. It's way price came from. Its reading the information accessible on that shot but that candle align its tokes to make it says a lot to me and it's now bullish candle. It's in the cradles. Aren't certainly not a crime. Tried from our point of view given the fact that we do not have that wonderful. Simplicity fantastic trend. But it's there The two days also in that cradles iron as well now not decide that they want further not at all but if we were to move higher i six three. I think thousand six hundred thirty We go to break but this looks like the market is still a little bit on will at wants to do and that the guy in comes from that daily candle it was selling off it had broken. The pride is low. it was. The friday was down. Four point five percent down over three percent at one stage there yet. We bounced back. I want to look at the journey of bitcoin. What it did throughout that some threat session. All to for example there was a little high low in ohio and of course it's not the cleanest clearest transnational another trend that. I'm looking to try but a detroit. Sell off a guy from the cradle zayn and filed. It did not get to move law. The market decided out to the market saw that not. We're gonna continue to move higher. All is it just david pullback before the next ditlow these are things that are right now right now. I certainly still short tried. I have a couple of the that are their modest but a guy. It's the clarity of direction is just not really strong right now especially given yesterday's selloff in pull back up to closing strong will was closing strong close than where it was at its lows of course and of course the ball. We've got something very similar again. Bitcoin was up one point. Two percent closed. I ten thousand five hundred forty. Where now down point four four hundred and seventeen and not ready telling me too much a guy like i said the The cape point ready. The high obviously is closed. Eighteen thousand six hundred thirty bragged that with what you see it. Climb back towards nineteen thousand but again the the there is not a real strong confirmation there of trend on a theory actually looking for short. Yes tonight closed up three point four percent and the guy just to talk you through. I will let kendall tells me from. Its lies to its close. It recovered point full sent. That's my main fate. That's a big move under though it didn't close up three point six percents nothing to be studied that Dying in that cradles the two days still hanging in there with could continue to console it for a while but if the high of yesterday's candle for seven twenty six we might see further nothing really special that exile pay close up four point two percent yesterday which ends up being recovery was on its lies. Fifteen point five percent a big recovery from excel pay still continues to be a quad volatile. Dies saying some big moves up and down quite frequently. There are fifty seven point six cents carney game and one percent today so far with them only just opening about forty minutes ago Bitcoin cash. I'm not really interested in bitcoin. Cash still back within that channel and it's very messy now. It closed up point full of percents stick with the same fame That was a recovery from its lies of five point six seven percent where two hundred and sixty nine dollars right now which is flat on the lot going closed up point five of a percent and as much as there are lower highs and lows and a twelve hour clearly showing downtrend. There's no notebook leah a great short traits to meet the staging a guy and just requires a little bit more patients and two white to say if that market can deliver. What is that. We're off to in terms of confirmation of direction. A guy from its lawyers to where it closed way recovered seven point five percent at seventy seven dollars and eleven so right now down point four percent on the day Still busy guy. Still very messy shot up point three percent yesterday. The recovery on yesterday was fox. Six percent there's not much interest for me for aol. Still it's just not ready. Got himself in any sort of position to be. I guess capturing more tension to eighty rot now. This one of the closed down it closed down one point six two percent now the recovery for they a very messy job was also six point two percent. It's a very horrific looking shot. It is really really ugly. It's lacking a great deal. The four there is a down trend. somewhat it's just not very good in. It's not a child i'm really Sorry considering for any directional trading he hundred sixty nine ninety four Cost to buy one right now. bonnets pulled back the twenty seven dollars closing the One point seven percent which also recovery was from its lows on that support roughly around about full point seven percent. It's the only one in the top ten currently up at some point one of the percents not a great deal and at the twenty eight dollars and nineteen cents a game. A market looked trend. Number four is not bad but without support twenty seven. It's not one that i'm going to be. I'm able to thrive myself out. If i'm honest. Cow donna no no the daily it was up. It was well full point eight percent at a giant recovery from its lies and thirteen bounce back. Thirteen point eight percent from its To where it closed a guy hip. It is a bit choppy. It is a bit messy much assignments. You pretty much majority of the market. There is potential for a shorts It's just it's the now that's really the one that would have more attention more than any of the other time frames at this stage but a guy white for that confirmation. Fourteen point six cents is what will cost you to baucau donna right now which is down point. Six seven of sent yesterday for lake. It was well a three point. Eight percent and the recovery from its lows. It isn't a bit of a downtrend. Rotten handle the smoothest but today recovering from life is nine point six percent of a strong rejection of those laws which is pretty much saying across the entire market yesterday so much we have seen a little bounce off. We're gonna continue haro Pullback for more down with momentum

Ditlow Roddy Mayo Bitcoin Detroit
Karine Jean-Pierre: The History-Making Lesbian on Biden's Staff

LGBTQ&A

05:24 min | 6 months ago

Karine Jean-Pierre: The History-Making Lesbian on Biden's Staff

"Is so much being said right now about the incoming administrations communication seem to also celebrate. Especially on this podcast. Is that two of the seven names that been announced so far are queer. Airspeed towbar and corinne jean pierre. We're going to have to queer women of color in the white house and leadership positions acting as the face and voice of our government. It's wild that think about and for that reason. I wanted to bring you this interview. That i did with corinne that originally aired on a luminary app. We spoke almost exactly a year ago. When corinn's book moving forward was first published. The message of book is that all of us no matter what you might think of as a typical background or story for politician. All of us have a police in politics. If corinne jean-pierre a queer woman of color who immigrated to the us as a kid can make it in politics. She says so can you. When we spoke corinne was also appearing as a political analyst on nbc and msnbc. So you'll hear talk about that. As well as what she learned working for a wide wide wide array of politicians including john edwards anthony weiner and of course resident barack obama from the advocate magazine and partnership glad. I'm jeffrey masters. And this is lgbtq. And here's shop. Thank you for having me. Of course excited thank you. Let's jump in right that your story is not the typical political story. You're immigrant you're a woman or one of color you're a and that is not what we typically see in politics. Yeah and yet. I think it's easy to soon. That's changing with high profile examples. Like alexandria ocasio cortez omar and yet. Those are very much outliers right. Yes nor it is the norm and and like you were saying. I walk in so many different communities if you will like i present so many different communities and that was one of the parts of writing this book i wanted to. I think people get really afraid when a here politics and getting into politics or getting involved and so that's one part of it and they think the other part of it is that people always ask me even young people. They ask me all the time. I teach at columbia university. So i have young people taking my class yearly. And they say how did you get here. How did you get into the white house. Like how did you work in politics and get a different presidentials. So the purpose of the book is also to show. There's not one path and also as a person of color gay person a woman an immigrant. I wanted to show people who are all. Those things are one of those things like. Hey you know she did it. I can do it too. So i lay that out in a very detailed way. You know as an immigrant. I grew up being told. Oh you're going to be one of those three professions doctor lawyer or engineer. And that's i think anybody who's listening in. I grew up in an immigrant. Family could understand that and that didn't work out. I talk about that in the book. And then i talk about. I didn't get into politics until my mid twenties. And so but you're right. there's representation matters and there's not a lot of representation. Even now there are like aol see as you just mentioned others kind of outliers. It's still a very small percentage of women of color of people from different identities that are more diverse that's in the political arena. So the hope is that can encourage inspire people to not be afraid of the word politics And to just get involved because the way you make change is if you get involved you're yourself and you know watching tv even though you don't mention being gay every time it is a part. It is no secret nearly no. I've been out for a long long time. Yeah and i think that's something that is easy to see about you. Bring that up because i. I think there's a tension between you bring. Being gay does not need to come up in every conversations right. Yeah and yet. I think it so powerful to know that there is escape on tv. Like i also want you to for. He never really. I'm so glad you brought that up. Because i think about that sometimes because i'm like i'm out. It's not hard to know that. I'm that i'm out. I talk about my daughter. I talk about my partner in interviews. And it's out there but i don't lead with that you know it's like it's part of my multiple identities. I have multiple identities at so. It's a very interesting kind of way to be in the space and it's actually kind of funny when people are like. I didn't know you were gay. And i'm like how do you not know i'm gay. I've been out for a long time the like. Wow and so it's just. It's funny. But i am aware of it. I am conscious of it. I want to respect all of said all of the communities i represent in. Were you to bring it up every episode out. Say like oh my god. She brings every time he was like. What's wrong receiver. Don't bring up at like one like she didn't bring yeah. It's like you. Yeah yeah it's over. I don't know how people like majority of people feel about it. But i i just want to lead with my experience and kind of my smart. There's a reason at this table and everything else just complements me.

Corinne Jean Pierre Corinne Corinn Corinne Jean John Edwards Anthony Weiner Advocate Magazine Alexandria Ocasio Cortez Towbar White House Msnbc Pierre NBC Jeffrey Omar Barack Obama Columbia University AOL United States
This is Apples secret weapon to make you care about AR

The 3:59

10:40 min | 7 months ago

This is Apples secret weapon to make you care about AR

"With need. Scott stein are guru on virtual and automated reality reality reality to welcome scott a thank you so i'm gonna reality or a are has been something that tech companies trying to make a thing for years and the best example that we still point to which is several years old now is pokemon go which really drew people into this world at least for this kind of gimmicky game. Where are we couple years since then. I know there's some folks are so played a very many as as during the peak was the state of aol. Right now transitional. You know. I feel like what we're looking at We you know we had these the magic leap in all lens that we're talking about how that's all going to be coming soon. And it's not and those expensive multi thousand dollar headsets ended up being slotted into business use. And you never see them in the real world the things you see our vr things. Even those are pretty rare and are kind of like a special treat that people get themselves so the air on phones has just been continuing to evolve and apple has been doing this all along. Google has a our tools That are baked in. And i think what we're seeing now with with a are is a move to more practical things in the in the past. A i got to talk to to apple mike. Rockwall alexandra mcginnis and they're saying that the first goal was just get you to get it to exist in the world in two thousand seventeen so that was your whole like pokemon dinosaurs things that you know. Oh this magically appears it's cool by their latest focused similar. Google is to do something productive and whether that's helpful information or creative stuff. It's like two different pads on the lighter side. Apples made a big deal of lighter sensors on the iphone twelve pro on the ipad pro. Those are opening up into basically creative. Augmented reality yeah. Let's let's slow down for a second there. Let's talk about light art because light are really is the eastern referred to as one of the secret weapons. That apple has a to make a are thing but just for listeners. Who don't know what lighter is. Could you sort break it down for us. Yeah absolutely. I mean stuff like this has been around for a bunch of years of being following tack Google tango. If you're if you're a technical you follow this stuff Years ago had same idea where you would scan the world. It's shooting out. Little infrared dot dot array like like like the face. I d camera or the microsoft connect with that technology way. Back on the connect was shrunken down in one of the makers that was incorporated babble was a bob apple So what it's doing sending out this like these little things. Is there a light pink measuring the space and you get like a dot matrix. A measurement of the space really fast and that meshes meshes is the term for creates a a basic map that space and instead of just saying oh. I recognize a floor. It's like throwing a blanket on the world where it's like. Oh i see where the chair comes up. I see where the walls are. I see where everything you know. And then that combines with things like computer vision which is like recognizing stuff like people you know where the camera like. Google does a stewart's like that's a person that's dog that's so it's a combination of those two things. That's what light are is. Helping do is mapping about five meters away from you see. I've seen this impractical cases where the aca Use your phone to scan living room in the flyer. Central recognizes though. This is a couch. This is the floor is your tv and it'll not consistently put your whatever i hear. You can't pronounce names anyways. The whatever the cabinets and intellectually know that the cabinet will will slot in there in between your tv. Your couch how he said lighters been around for a while. It's just coming into these phones or death on twelve lineup. now we've had a offer while. I'm just curious. How like what does light are do. Now that like these phones couldn't do before. Yes so that's where like when i was mentioning the super weapon in the story. It's kind of double. It's double edged. Meeting one is that it's lighter. But i think apple's real secret weapon is scale so when i talked to developers it's like you go. Oh there's already bad here what's the deal. Well it's kinda like when you see a technology and you go will. It didn't feel like a got there until it got there. Like i feel like what apple is doing is the same idea but refined and pushed into a lot more devices so the iphone twelve pro and the ipad pro but much bigger footprint than google tango was on just two very fringy phones and but but what google in the other thing that track. Here you're right like what really does for a are is. It makes things speedier and better like it gets a ping on stuff faster but it's simultaneously happening with computer vision getting better at doing the same thing without that so google has been doing this with just cameras. Were vr headsets. Do this with four cameras and like they can approximate a lot of that really fast. So it's a dance between that and the more advanced sensors. That's get under the hood. But like i think just means it's faster and better recognizing the world but the second part that i think is interesting is this whole like three d. scanning movement that has been around for a while but is about creating three d objects that you can then share with other people that's getting more of a groundswell in is becoming less fringy and nerdy with every passing year. Interestingly enough to the we're talking about this on phones there's constant rumors. That apple is going to release a headset. At some point of. Do you think the future of a our lies it glasses or in our phones. I think it'll be both. And i think what what you know. Talking with adobe briefly about like their head of a are about what they're doing air creative tools a very interesting observation. He made where they haven't thinking for a while is that it's very hard to enter the ar vr space Until it works with the stuff you already got all your apps like an oculus. Quest is a game console. it doesn't interact with like your phone apps. And so you wanna open like zumra wanted open document. It's a pain. You have to huggins so google apple. Google did this with daydream. Kind of but google and apple needs to approach having work with the phones and qualcomm is already laid this groundwork out. The qualcomm makes the chips in like all the air vera had set right now apple could be the other big competitor in that space. But what they've been talking about is plugging phones in headsets with usb c or wirelessly there already a few emerging anything that's wet provides the power but also like you say the app compatibility so i guess like we the reason i say yes and is like so your app on your phone could do a lot of it and then you plug in your headset like headphones for your eyes. And you're doing the rest of it. I think that extends it and then you think about apple that makes a lot of sense because like the apple watch it becomes another peripheral that makes sense in the sense. Like you're relying iphone is really the brains of the muscle powering experiences but ultimately you view it on your headset or your watch or whatever that doesn't require heavy lifting isn't required you don't necessarily wanna processor heating up right by your exactly and that gets you to things like five g because like talking to developers about five john headsets. It's very slow. Get for that exact reason like qualcomm has has the roadmap for five g. Headsets but it adds a lot of battery drain. You got to build more of a thing on your head No one's really done it yet. But like you're five g phone powers that gets to all the five g. Ar in the cloud stuff. That like microsoft. Google apple. like everyone's going for that. So i think it makes a lotta sense that that would be the path and then like apples processors. Like we're seeing the mac book and the am one like they just keep getting more crazy powerful and you kind of say four. What but like a are is a very intense said a processes and so. That's the stuff that those those processors could drive a lot of that. And then you again. You're not sticking it on your head. Otherwise i don't know will make something. That's like sleek on your face. It'd be hard if you had to put all the stuff in there you talk about a are as a creative tool elaborate on this idea of what. What exactly can visiting with a are so like when i downloaded the first set of like light are unable apps. It really surprised me going back to the ipad pro in the spring. Like the first bunch of a our apps again. We're like pokemon go dinosaur you know dinosaur play game. A lot of these are three d scanners and they are. They're pretty alienating at first. 'cause you're like you bring it up and suddenly you wave it around and you're creating this measure of your room and then you get this like crazy kind of dollhouse three d. model. And if you've never done it before you might wonder where to start how you create this. Some of them look kind of broken. In an interesting way spoke to like one of the bigger repositories of three d objects stock like it. Sketch fab saying it takes them finessing to get there so like these things and that's the stuff that's happening now with lighter. It's not there are some like. Oh the games run better. You can have like a remote control car now your table and like the table blocks it right and it can like hit a wall or like a it could hit like a box like recognizes all the things in your world which is like air. Headsets are going to start doing. But i think it's the creative part. That's interesting whether it's like really scanning in creating tools. And then both adobe and apple have a our creative toolkits with reality composer ero where. They're trying to get people to do this too. So that's what i mean by that. But it's so interesting to me when i look at the iphone. How little of that is at the forefront of what you see on a daily basis like you would never be aware of it and that's the hard part to get on board like apples. Camera doesn't have three d. Scanning it just but it uses light are for focus like in the background so apple definitely hasn't like made it a main part of ios yet but it's in the background

Apple Google Scott Stein Rockwall Alexandra Mcginnis Qualcomm AOL Zumra Scott Microsoft John Headsets Stewart Cabinet Huggins Adobe ERO
What if when you took your hat off it was full of spiderwebs

What If World

05:33 min | 7 months ago

What if when you took your hat off it was full of spiderwebs

"Hey there folks in welcome back to what if world the show where your questions and ideas inspire off the cuff stories. I mr eric your host. And today we're starting off with question from patriot named izzy crashed and could hat fourth buydell. Wild that is truly something. I've never imagined and it makes me want to check my hats. But first we've got one more question from miriam. Hello my name is. Miriam and i six years old. My wife question is what if the dog had a bike in how wings and fluid all over. What if city by dan you so much miriam but before i get to that i gotta shout out for james happy. Belated birthday james and hello to your little sister lucy. Liu i've got a big bit boop to oran from riverside california. He likes minecraft and legos. Well not a shout from owen. Who seven from of michigan. And he likes to play super. Mario arrive. Got me al out. Far from san francisco. She's eight years old and she knows how to spell jfk f. correctly j. f. k. a. Aol we spell out the now. Joe joe burrow seed while my lash out is atlas. Age eight from bellevue washington. Either very special final shout out to a grown up boy named rin rennes daughter. Abby wanted to give a shoutout to her father who absolutely loves legos playing with his five children. wow rinse. sounds like one. Lucky dad indubitably. Now let's find out what if when you took your hat off. It was full of spider webs. And what fred. The dog had a bike and it had wings and he fluid all over. What if city fair release was enjoying a dinner at home with her partner. Sprite and their daughter pixie cotto tonight they were breaking the dinner rules a little bit by having the radio on so they could hear who won the what. If world presidential election below those hero parody on the radio. Now papa lose. Voice came out of a tiny speaker in a little old fashioned radio box or i'd after a lot of kids voted all over the world. Although wetter i'll add slide is odds they for dramatic effect. Not because i misplaced the envelope as that as a buck barker oak mexico. Let's just ten the radio off and enjoy our dinner. Martha it's ever so important. Who looks after. What if we're gonna have to agree with pixie. Gato find but we're shutting the radio off and enjoying odd in a moment. He announces the president. While it's bad at excited two hours of may search out by house looking for the envelope. That good tapes. They answer to that question. You all bad. Asking all the search for the oval lopa. I forgot what my question was. Who's going to be president of farrelly. Did he hear me through the radio. I did just hair you through the radio. It's your day but they all below okay but you clearly me that time to anyone else who baby shower. They got their radio right now. Yes i did just it. Faira lease god bore boats by far that eddy other candidate. But i didn't know. I was running for president. Just dead farrelly's didn't even know. She was roddick. Ver- president laura. He must be able to hear me right. It seems likely mother. Yes all right. Let's set up all ladies. Gentlemen people of all kinds off giant on a magical creature of horror as just burst. Its way into my studio and snow. These into war of the worlds type peak. Dc's actually happening gotha go. How dare yo break at studio. This is very clearly a tool shed. The owen porter biker afforded. A place ed's a studio by jabba. Said so what i said. You said that the wherever microphone adds up odds studio. I said that to get you out of the house. Well i'd had a nice rageh must've been some mistake with the presidential election. What did you hear the will say ads right here. No amount of paper wrinkling would make me believe that. The people voted against. I didn't vote against a lot of them voted for you. They have it. I have of dow. I just tried to soften the blow. You lost you lost big time.

Mr Eric Miriam Rin Rennes Pixie Cotto James Izzy Joe Joe Oran LIU Riverside Lucy Bellevue Owen Abby Mario AOL DAN
How Girls Night In Founder Alisha Ramos Started a Stay-at-Home Movement

Latina to Latina

03:34 min | 7 months ago

How Girls Night In Founder Alisha Ramos Started a Stay-at-Home Movement

"You say you'd love to coding and learning. Html what did you love about it. And where did that love. Come from the love of coating came from just being an indoor kid all my childhood. Yeah you're raising your hand. Yeah i would say like by choice. But also i think my mom was like pretty wanted to keep me very sheltered and secure so i was home all the time with my computer and aol. So that was it like though is my social interaction in my world and From a very early age. I learned the power and the beauty of online community. I remember code Websites for neo. Pets which i don't know if you were of that era but it was a virtual. It was so silly. It was a virtual game where you took care of these little mythical creatures and there's a whole community around it of kids who loved that same game we would all make websites guilds and share and chat with one another about yoga so very early on. I had that experience. It was this really important channel for self expression for connecting with other people. Because like i said i was very sheltered. Not really allowed to go on like sleepovers and my mom had a very tight grip on how i spent my social life so that was my social life in some ways. It's like you had a latino mother human the you did not. Yeah what was the initial inspiration for girls. Lighten so the ordinance story is really. I went back home one day or like for a week and i sat down at my parents. Dining table in just started brainstorming. All the things that i was passionate about or all these different ideas. And i still have the notepad actually where i wrote down all the ideas and i can share with you but they were things like or games for twenty. Something women like flurry street. Classes or millennial women or like paint painting wine night and like bringing that into the home instead of going to wind paint studios as you can kind of see like they were all very similar ideas of creation. Ray tippety being in the home the audience was like me. Basically millennial women were inherited love staying home and so i had all these. Like berry jumbled ideas. And i didn't really know how to launch this e com business. I didn't have any money to do that. So i said okay. Well i know how to write and writing. Newsletter is free. So i'll just call this thing girls. I didn't because i think that's the general idea of this feeling that i'm trying to capture and i'll start with a newsletter and see if anybody even resonates with this message at all and it went out to like three hundred people in february of two thousand seventeen and then it just started taking off from there.

AOL Ray Tippety Berry
"aol" Discussed on The Dave Ryan Show

The Dave Ryan Show

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"aol" Discussed on The Dave Ryan Show

"Out. Continued, breathe deeply. Taking time to focus on your breathing how it feels. Now..

"aol" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

04:52 min | 2 years ago

"aol" Discussed on TechStuff

"And by that, I mean oath so right now, it looks a little grim in the short term for people who work at both Verizon is offering up a voluntary separation program. That's a nice way of saying we need we need some of you guys to leave. We need a lot of you guys to leave and we're offering up a package if you take this package, you're going to get some compensation, you're gonna get some severance pay, and we don't have to have the pain of going through a list, and deciding who we're going to lay off so this is to try and take as many of those people out of the decision making process of hoodoo layoff as possible. But if they don't meet the goal for the number of people who depart they will start laying off employees the estimate right now is that the company expects to shed ten thousand four hundred employees total. This is Oliver is not necessarily just from oath by June two thousand nineteen as for oath specifically. And that filing Verizon said that the company quote has experienced increased competitive and market pressures throughout two thousand eighteen that resulted in lower than expected revenues and earnings. These pressures are expected to continue and have resulted in a loss of market positioning to our competitors in the digital advertising business into quote. So in other words, what sort of saying is, hey, those guys who were in charge earlier, you know, not us. But those other guys who used to lead the company they thought we were going to do way better than what we actually are doing right now. Now, but they weren't able to an -ticipant the market conditions or how well our competitors. We're going to do. But we, you know, the new guys who are in charge. Now, we have to deal with the mess that they left, and we also understand it's going to be really tough over the next few years. That's essentially what the filing says. And it's a warning this that says don't expect us to turn this around overnight. So what is going to happen next for oath or specifically to ALL? That's something of an open question as a record this episode. And maybe by the time you hear it. It will have been answered it may be that Verizon will decide to spin off the company after all because Vesper doesn't really seem all that interested in developing a media company, it's not likely to go away because the companies still does generate revenue it's not like, it's hemorrhaging money left. And right, and it's just not the transformative property that. Verizon was hoping it would be when it made the acquisition. Which again, I think you could argue convincingly would be the full history of AOL Behrens, by the way has an article that cites Wells Fargo analyst, Jennifer Fritz, and she wrote that quote, the hype of oath has been over for some time while we believed in the white board concept of oath, offering a new digital advertiser of choice beyond Google and Facebook, we think this has been an uphill fight for Verizon without a significant amount of scale and content ownership end quote, and that's the story of AOL so far from a startup in the nineteen eighties. The provided a bulletin board like service to Commodore sixty four users all the way up to a cog in an enormous multibillion dollar global corporate machine that's giving off a little smoke at the moment. The upcoming departures and layoffs will likely mean things will continue to change. For folks over at AOL. But hopefully, those who are working in the content side will continue to have gainful employment as someone who creates stuff for the internet podcasts, the occasional article. I feel a lot of empathy for people who work at other companies that go through these big changes, I've gone through changes like that multiple times myself, I've been very fortunate so far, but you can't take that for granted those things can really shake things up, and it's a huge impact on the lives of real people. So I hope it turns out for the best for everybody concern that is the conclusion of the AOL story so far America on line probably has several years left in its history. Sure. Hope it does hope it doesn't just go away. So I'll probably have to do an update a follow up episode at some point in the future. But this was a really fascinating story to look into very complicated from a business. Perspective, but interesting and connected to so many other companies whether directly through mergers and acquisitions or through competition, if you guys have any suggestions for future episodes of tech stuff..

"aol" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"aol" Discussed on TechStuff

"Better in quote, AOL had also changed in another way, it changed from corporation into a limited liability company. Now, they get into the differences between an LLC and a corporation in the United States is more than a little beyond the scope of tech stuff. But it mostly has to do with how profits and losses are handled. And it also has to do a lot with how accompany is taxed so we're not going to dive into all that. I'm sure most of you don't really care. Honestly, it gets pretty dull pretty fast, but the following year AOL made another big change in moved its headquarters which had been in Dulles Virginia ever since the founding of the company now it was going to move to New York City. It also laid off about two thousand employees or about forty percent of its. Entire workforce. This move was largely to refocus AOL on its advertising business as the dial upside continued to dwindle, though is still generating revenue at that point. This was two thousand seven and and just for reference two thousand seven also when apple introduced the iphone. So the iphone comes out people are still using dial up modems enough for ails division to be profitable. That's not the last humble talk about dial up though, anyway, ails new headquarters were closer to Time Warner's H Q, and it was also much closer to the advertising world in general the advertising world in the United States is almost entirely based out of New York City. So this was putting AOL close to where the advertising businesses thrived AOL also would change CEO's Jonathan Miller who had been leading the company up to that point was replaced by a guy named Randy Falco AOL made some acquisitions many. Of which did not turn out. So well, so for example in two thousand eight A O L acquired a social networking site called Bibo. It's not that well known in the United States, but it was the second largest social network in the UK after Facebook back in two thousand eight Bibo could boast twenty two million unique visitors and they spent an average time of forty minutes a day on the service, which sounds like a pretty attractive bargain. You can go to an advertiser and say I can guarantee you the millions of people are going to look at this for forty minutes every day, and you're going to be able to sell a lot of ads so Ayla would.

"aol" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"aol" Discussed on TechStuff

"After the dot com crash. However that value dropped to five billion, according to some accounts. Although honestly, most accounts say the value was closer to twenty billion the whether it's five or twenty both of which are enormous numbers. Get don't get me wrong billion as allot that's such a huge drop from two hundred billion by two thousand five the number. According to some sources had climbed a little bit. It was moving in the right direction. Both still. Will a fraction of what AOL had been prior to the merger and the time of the merger. AOL had the higher market capitalization between the two companies, but Time Warner was making way more revenue. So you can look at this as indicative of the whole dot com problem in the first place yet these internet based companies that were valued much much greater than what they could actually pay off in. They their value was greater than they're worth. And that was really the issue that led to the dot com bubble bursting in the first place, the culture clash never settled down between the two companies. They weren't able to find a good equilibrium. The AOL executives felt their traditional media counterparts. Just didn't get how business on the internet worked. They were probably right. But the Time Warner executives saw AOL as wasteful and filled to the brim with hubris. Accompany just was convinced that the way it did things was the right way. And that it was building a business on a product that was clearly on the way out that being dial up service than the Time Warner executives were kinda, right? No one was holy in the wrong hair. Other than the fact that this partnership was holy in a wrong. In fact, by two thousand three just a few years after this merger AOL Time Warner began to drop the AOL part from its name became to just call itself. Time Warner again, keep in mind AOL was the company that technically made the acquisition. It's technically the company that bought Time Warner. But now the collective entity was casually ignoring the online part of its identity in two thousand five AOL and Tele pictures productions a division from Warner Brothers would create TMZ. And if you're not aware of. What that is. Consider yourself fortunate. It's a tabloid news website, that's mainly focused on following celebrities around and publishing everything it can about the celebrities and has been one of the more successful properties to come out of the AL and Time Warner days. So I'm pretty snarky about the whole thing. I don't really like TMZ and the way they do business. However, I cannot deny that it's been a money maker. It has been very successful. Whether I like it or not. So I mean, you know, they they're the ones who became really rich on it. So what do I know and two thousand six America Online officially changed its name to ALL CEO. John Miller said that the reason for this change was that getting America Online would bit that had been the old mission of the company to get America Online. So that's why it called himself America Online. But he said the company did that we've done. On that already. We achieved our goal. So this new name indicates the quote expanded mission to make everyone's online experience.

"aol" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

03:11 min | 2 years ago

"aol" Discussed on TechStuff

"Com. Bubble bursting and be pretty much on track for what about to say. But essentially, you had an intense era of few years in which investors were speculating wildly on the performance of various internet connected businesses. Many of those businesses flush with cash from investors realize that they didn't know how to make any money they failed to become profitable. Some of them failed to even develop a coherent business plan companies achieved a market value that didn't reflect their real value. And eventually there was a reckoning the house of cards grew too heavy, and it crumbled as investors lost confidence that they would ever see long term returns. And they began to try and retrieve their investments in pull out of the market. This led to an overall economic recession and AOL Time Warner was hit just like everyone else, then they lost a whole lot of value because of it in the wake of that economic stumble AOL had to write off forty five point five billion dollars in the fourth quarter of two thousand and two and that led to the loss of another forty four point nine billion dollars in all it was a nearly ninety nine billion dollar loss. When the dust had settled Steve case stepped down as chairman of the board, though, he remained a member of the board of directors. Ted Turner who had founded Turner Broadcasting resigned as vice chairman of the board one big development that people at AOL and Time Warner perhaps should have realized before talking about a merger was the. General trend toward broadband service. Because ALL was a dial up service. You would connect your phone to a modem and your modem connected to your computer, and you would actually dial up to connect to AOL servers. Well, broadband was slowly gaining traction. And this would allow an always on connection. You wouldn't have to dial up. You just would turn on your computer. And then away you go like most technologies. However, it was really expensive when it debuted. In fact, prohibitively expensive for most people, and it was also very limited in its accessibility. Not very many people had access to it. But as years went by and more companies invested in building out the infrastructure. The accessibility improved prices began to come down the number of households in the United States with broadband connections jumped fifty percent from two thousand to two thousand one that is it increased by fifty percent. That's great growth, but it doesn't necessarily tell you anything about numbers because if you have four customers in two thousand and six customers in two thousand one that's an increase of fifty percent. But by two thousand. Three the FCC estimated that just under forty percent of American households were subscribed to broadband services and ails main business was quickly changing..

AOL Time Warner Ted Turner Turner Broadcasting FCC vice chairman United States chairman Steve fifty percent ninety nine billion dollar five billion dollars nine billion dollars forty percent
"aol" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"aol" Discussed on TechStuff

"But one designed by a leader in the space for some people halo meant the internet. That was what they thought of it some people called AOL internet for dummies. But a lot of people just thought AOL, that's how you get on the internet. So on the surface, all of the seemed incredibly attractive other companies were worried that this merger was going to mean, there is going to be a new giant media company and soon it was going to become a monopoly, and it would either run you out of business or it was going to gobble. Oh, you up and acquire you. That's something that love folks are saying right now about Disney not to mention some other pretty big companies like AT and T, but this all came from a high level conceptual mindset when it came to actually bringing the two major companies together things fell apart pretty quickly. The corporate cultures were drastically different. Time Warner executives saw AOL executives as being impetuous, brash and arrogant, AOL executives viewed their Time Warner counterparts as being stuffy and conservative and risk averse to the point of complacency and this mismatch in perspectives meant there were very few instances of people actually working together across company lines. They were frequently feeling like they were at cross purposes working against each other making things even worse was the general economy now as I said the deal. Happened before the dot com, bubble burst. But then that bubble did burst. And I've talked about the dot com. Bubble so many times, and I'm sure some of you probably could pause the podcast right now and give an overview in my voice about the dot.

AOL Time Warner Disney AT
"aol" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"aol" Discussed on TechStuff

"So your family always comes back to a well lit home. And one of the wonderful things about Caserta is that it's not like other smart lighting systems. You might think you have to replace all the light bulbs in your house. And that's not the case Caserta by lutron makes regular bulbs smart by replacing the switch not the bulb. And here's why that's great. The average home has about forty five light bulbs, but only about twenty switches, so it's not nearly so much work. And it's not as expensive either. All you need is a screwdriver and about fifteen minutes. Now, I've done this in my house. I've replaced a switch. It was way easier than I even -ticipant it'd and before I knew it. I had the smart light. System working in my house. So get smart lighting, the smart way with Caserta by lutron searched for Caserta, that's C A S E A Caserta by lutron. Welcome home to peace of mind. In November nineteen ninety eight AOL announced it was buying Netscape Communications corporation, which was the company that created the Netscape Navigator web browser. Netscape Navigator is a fascinating story all on its own and I'll have to do a full birth to death episode on it in the future. But here's some highpoints market-driven who while it college had worked on an early web browser called NC SA mosaic saw the potential and a web browser for the average person. He partnered with Jim Clark of Silicon Graphics to start a new company ultimately called Netscape Communications corporation and bring this vision to life. The first version of this browser was called mosaic, but after some threats of legal unpleasantness, they would change it to Netscape Navigator. Now this all started in nineteen ninety four by nineteen ninety five it had become the dominant web. Browser largely because there wasn't very much competition. If I'm being totally honest Netscape became a publicly traded company in nineteen ninety five and had a company valuation of almost three billion dollars of very early startup unicorn by ninety nineteen Ninety-six things were different because Microsoft started to really go after the web browser market with its own web browser Internet Explorer, then there's all the different stuff about Microsoft, incorporating, Internet, Explorer into windows, and and then also downplaying the ability to use other browsers on windows based machines, we won't get into all that. But in ninety eight Netscape announced it would release the source code that the company had used to build Netscape communicator, which was a suite of programs beyond just the web browser. This. Intern would become the action that would bring Mozilla into being and Mozilla would have inch. Produce the fire FOX web browser who by the time AOL announced intention of acquiring Netscape, Internet Explorer had already caught up and taken the lead in the web browser market share. But it wasn't like Netscape was down for the count. It had been the dominant player. It was now number two. There was every reason to think the company could come back with a new version of its browser and went back some folks, so go back and forth between Netscape and Internet Explorer. So it was definitely still an attractive company when AOL made its proposal which was for four point two billion dollars a princely sum. This deal would end up being a not so good one for either party, though, it's not the very bad deal that I referred to in the episode title. Anyone who has been through a merger or an acquisition knows? There's always an adjustment as different departments hash things out cultures attempt..

Netscape Communications corpor Caserta AOL lutron Jim Clark Microsoft Silicon Graphics Intern Mozilla three billion dollars two billion dollars fifteen minutes
"aol" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

03:13 min | 2 years ago

"aol" Discussed on TechStuff

"And then got wildly popular now might as well stick with aimed for right now before getting back to AOL at large ale would go onto by miraculous, which operated the icy cute chat app. Aim would power apples. I I chat app, although that would change in later versions of idiot and Microsoft in an effort to take some of the steam out of AOL's engine built a version of MSN messenger. That could communicate with aim users. So you could use MSN messenger and send chats to people who are using aim, and they can talk back to you. This actually made the aim team, really? Angry because it meant that people would be able to communicate with aim users without actually downloading aim themselves. And so began a back and forth war in which AOL would block Microsoft's chat app and Microsoft would engineer new version of MSN messenger. That would get around this block, and that happened more than twenty times back and forth until the AL team sent a threat to Microsoft. They essentially said if you insist on making the MS N messenger app compatible with aim we will use that connection to infect your servers. With malware the threat convinced Microsoft back down also. Yikes. That's like some sort of nerd gangster stuff right there. This is a nice computer database. He gut he it'd be a real shame of someone. I don't know infected with viruses. Apologize for the terrible. Accent aim always existed a little outside of ALL because it was a standalone app that wasn't in the walled garden of the AOL experience. It was seen by AOL executives as being a bit risky over on the AOL side, the company could curate the customer experience the stuff that they would see before they would connect to the internet at large was completely under the control of the company. So they could censor it. They can make sure that there was no objectionable material showing up in front of people. Right. They would just make sure that it was all company approved content, but aim was outside of this garden, and you couldn't control what other users might say or share and kept in adding features like file sharing voice support stuff. Like that. Many of them would be copied into later, tools like Skype, but over time and began to lose influence other tools were. Coming up. Some would allow users to communicate through multiple chat services using a single client. Some were connected to the blossoming social networking sites. And that was where LA the chat was moving to aim became less relevant over the years starting in two thousand and two AOL began to scale back the aim team this happened each year from two thousand to two thousand five then in two thousand twelve the only team members who were kept on were support staff who just made sure that the service wasn't going to collapse on it self by then aim had less than one percent of the market share of customers.

AOL Microsoft AL Skype engineer one percent
"aol" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

04:28 min | 2 years ago

"aol" Discussed on TechStuff

"And so it was user overload that caused the problem if that's the case, it's a great problem to have because it's better to have to scramble to meet demand than to have to hustle to get enough customers to scrape by you want the problem of having more demand than you have supply Kinsey had stepped down in nineteen ninety five in ninety six Mark Saraf. The other co founder would resign. His position of senior vice president with the company and leave to go do other stuff which meant that out of the three co founders only Steve case remained, although to be fair Kinsey was on the board of directors for a little bit in nineteen Ninety-seven bolstered by grown. Customer base and a solid performance in the stock market AOL began to stretch out a bit it made a move on one of its major competitors. A company that had been around much longer than a oil had it moved to acquire. Compuserve. The two companies had been competing fiercely over customers for years, sometimes one would offer special deals to lure people away from the other service than the other service would do the same and it went back and forth year over year over year between the two companies ael L had the larger number of customers by far by nineteen Ninety-Eight, which is when this acquisition would become final AOL hat around eleven million subscribers and CompuServe was closer to two and a half million. The acquisition was a little bit on the long and winding side. In other words, it got complicated. So let's explain because it's one of those fascinating corporate maneuvers that as a. A person who loves tech and has a history in liberal arts education. This was new to me so before the acquisition. Compuserve was part of ancient are block. The the tax preparation company agent are block purchased. Compuserve back in nineteen eighty for like twenty million dollars by nineteen Ninety-seven agent. Our block was going through some major changes at the executive level. They were having real issues, which is a fascinating story in itself. And I can't really tell it on tech stuff because it doesn't really tie into tech. But maybe I'll tell it on the brink one day because I think it's a fascinating story. Anyway, they were going through some stuff, it got complicated Facebook style. And so the board of directors for h R Block decided one of the things the company needed to do in order to streamline stuff was divest itself of CompuServe. ALL expressed interest right away saying we would very much like to take that off your hands, and we'll make an offer and they offered to purchase the company with shares of AOL stock, but the board rejected this offer. They didn't feel that AOL stock was valuable enough for this to make sense, they prefer to either have stocks that were more stable more established. I guess is a good way of putting it than AOL or they wanted to do it in cash Ehlo do it at cash, but then a third company came into the picture. The third company was WorldCom, which is another company. I'm going to have to cover at some future point WorldCom had an offer for both agent are block and ALL WorldCom offered to by CompuServe from HR in exchange. Worldcom would give up some of its stock that stock was seen as being more stable. Title and more valuable than AOL stock and agent are thought will we can turn that around and sell it right away and get the money we want. So the age NAR block board agreed to that term. And CompuServe was sold to WorldCom for one point two billion dollars worth of WorldCom shares which h and R Block then sold the very next day after this exchange between world combination are WorldCom sold part of CompuServe to ALL specifically, it's sold. The information services part of CompuServe, and it retained CompuServe's network services business because that's the business that WorldCom is in is in network technologies. In addition ALL sold to WorldCom its own advanced network.

Compuserve h R Block AOL WorldCom Kinsey senior vice president Mark Saraf co founder Facebook NAR Steve ael L executive twenty million dollars two billion dollars one day
"aol" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

03:42 min | 2 years ago

"aol" Discussed on TechStuff

"But in thirty one states, it's still legal to discriminate against LGBT Americans. Simply because of who they are get the facts at beyond I do dot org. Now, the internet as a thing that the general public could readily access has been around for nearly thirty years, but before that it was a network that only a relatively small number of people knew about let alone had access to if you were on the internet before let's say nine hundred ninety you were likely a college student and most likely if you're a college student on the internet, you were probably enrolled in at least one computer science class and employees at a research facility might have access to the internet people in the military had access to the internet. They also had access to mill net the military specific network that is built on the same architecture. So there were a few ways that you might have access to the internet, but just a few. It was just it was not readily accessible to the average person. Then you had these online service providers go beyond their own internal networks to connect. To the network of networks. The reaction was not overwhelmingly positive on for the people who are already on the internet. That is veterans online were greeted by a flood of new users who had no inkling of how things would work on the internet. They hadn't been part of the culture that had been forming. They didn't know the lingo there were noobs in other words, and the veterans weren't necessarily kind to the noobs they resented this. Flood of the uninformed who are way worse than the annual introduction of college. Freshman those were bad enough. These people were even worse there was a bit of an online culture war. But then again, while I call this a culture war, you have to remember at most this affected may be a million and a half two million people AOL didn't even have two hundred thousand subscribers yet. So most of the mainstream world had not dipped to toe in the internet and viewed the whole thing as a big fuss with computer nerds. And I guess it mostly was. But a oh well was trying to expand beyond that narrow niche of computer enthusiasts. They were trying to encourage adoption of this. And do it the company took on a new marketing strategy that became about as famous as the you've got mail line AOL began to produce CD's compact, discs that could install the AOL interface onto a computer, then they began to send those CD's out. They put them in magazines, and they would mail them directly to home addresses. And it got a little out of hand anyone who owned a computer and some people who didn't begin to accumulate collections of AOL compact discs. There were jokes about using them as Christmas decorations or coasters or frisbees. They were everywhere the strategy was pervasive. It was annoying, and it was affective in nineteen ninety-five Jim Kimsey retired as CEO he. Stayed on board as the chairman of the board for AOL for a couple more years. Steve case became the news CEO he had proven his worth numerous times by positioning the company's services in a way that appealed to the end user one of the big differentiator is in the AL service compared to competitors like prodigy and CompuServe is that AOL's focus was on the ability to create communities online that tied back to that book. I talked about earlier the one that inspired case when he was in.

AOL Steve case Jim Kimsey CEO chairman CompuServe AL thirty years mill
"aol" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

04:00 min | 2 years ago

"aol" Discussed on TechStuff

"Around nineteen eighty nine the company launched its first instant messaging service a precursor to what would become AOL instant messenger or aim. I'll talk about aim more later on in this series of episodes. One other super important moment happened around nineteen eighty nine according to the official AOL history. That's when the you've got mail alert debuted. So if you've ever heard that phrase, it comes from ael L, and specifically comes from nineteen eighty nine the phrase would become icon IQ in the early days of the internet. It became a bit of a cultural Meam folks would mimic the notification or they would use it as a punchline to a joke later on when people had smartphones that could actually play soundbites that would become some people's message. Hurts system you've got mail. The man whose voice says you've got mail for AOL is Elwood Edwards. Now Edwards is wife. Who was a customer service Representative for quantum computer services had overheard. Steve case say he really wished that. They could have a voice component to the online service interfaces that the company had something to differentiate their service from other products. So she came home, and she told her husband Elwood about this and Elwood was a voice over a performer as well. As a broadcaster. He had a history in this kind of thing. So he according to the story went into his living room and got a cassette player, which was a thing back in those days and a cassette tape and he recorded himself saying several phrases, including welcome, and you've got mail and lots of others, and they send it off to Steve case. And he got the gig. He's obviously done lots of other work. Like, I said he's had a long history in broadcasting. But Steve case liked it. He said this is the tone the technique we want then they went with it. So the phrase would become intrinsically linked with AOL services in those days. It was famous enough to become the title of a romantic comedy film in nineteen ninety eight starring Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan AOL. Got a lot of mileage out of those phrases as Elwood in two thousand sixteen he popped up in online culture after a woman named brandy Barker uploaded, a video of Elwood cheerfully reprising his famous line. He was driving her around because Elwood had sort of retired from broadcasting, but was working part time as an Uber driver in Ohio. That's actually a sweet little video. If you look it up, and that's pretty much everywhere. Online by nineteen ninety one the leadership of quantum computer services felt that the company. Needed a rebranding to better reflect what it did what its products were. So Steve case held a contest internally to rename the company and employs got to vote on the various nominees and the name that won out over all the others was America Online and so quantum services. Quantum computer services ditched its name for AOL that happened in nineteen Ninety-one. Now AOL was not the first online service provider as I said, the first of those came out more or less in nineteen seventy nine these dates are also kind of fuzzy because it really depends upon when you would consider the beginning of the service. There was some limited services in nineteen seventy eight when you could call into computers after a certain time because the computers during the day would be used for one purpose. But in the evening, they could when they would otherwise be idle they could be put to use for this kind of stuff. Seventy nine was really when things were starting to take. Effect and one of those early services was CompuServe one of these days, I'm going to have to do a full episode just about CompuServe. Another one was called the source..

Elwood Edwards AOL Steve case CompuServe customer service Representativ ael L Tom Hanks Meam brandy Barker official Ohio America
"aol" Discussed on This Is Success

This Is Success

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"aol" Discussed on This Is Success

"So the even though the startup was a failure, the, you know, the some of the relationships I forged there and some of the insights we be gleaned their ended up helping in terms of the creation of an arc online. When we started AOL nineteen, five, only three percent of people are online and their online an hour a week. And so it was the concept. The reality is people weren't online. Most people didn't think anybody would want to bother getting on my like, why would somebody go the trouble buying a personal computer so they can like type message on a keyboard somebody when you know they pick up the phone, call somebody, I get why that's not gonna ever work and that skepticism was there for more than a decade. If finally idea the internet, you know, kinda took up and thankfully at that point AOL as well positioned and kind of got a got America Online at our peak about half of all the internet traffic, the United States went through through a well, but for a decade. Most people didn't believe I have that similar sense that deja-vu sounds while I'm talking about the rise arrest. I recognize a lot of people are skeptical, but we hope to prove them wrong. We will prove them wrong and the and maybe there's some part of my personality that would have you know when people say it can't be done. That's sort of the challenge and okay. Well, we'll see about that head of AOL when you're at a quantum computer services. This was your first tech company that you're helping build up. You're saying how that didn't work out. Well, you were working with apple, but there was a lot of bumps along the way. Just looking at that experience. What did it teach you ahead of AOL. How did it prepare you for building a company that became huge? Well, the early days of we started what's now known as AOL well in nineteen eighty five. Initially, the name was quantum computer. Services and the initial strategy, and it was true for the first several years was essentially to partner with personal computer manufacturers to create custom, almost private label online services for each of them. So that really was our strategy. We didn't weren't able to raise much capital. I think our initial venture capital raise with about one million dollars at the time. There is a company called prodigy backed by IBM and Sears, and they committed one billion dollars to launch prodigy. So are one million dollars was not going to, you know, beat the prodigy, one billion dollars. So rather than try to compete head to head, we decided to kind of have this strategy of partnerships. And so for the first several years, that was how we built the the company was on the back of these these partnerships. And so they actually worked quite well and took us from this start up to actually being a real company. But one of the key partnerships was with apple with licensed their brand name to create this apple Inc service and. Not long after launching it, they decided they didn't really like the idea of kind of having some other company used their brand. They had licensed their brand anybody else before. I'm not sure they have since. So it's frustrating and and kind of scary because you know, we, we thought that was going to be a big part of our growth for the next few years. But it was clear that apple is firm about that. And so we negotiated kind of settlement to go our separate ways. And since we couldn't call it apple Inc anymore. We said, okay, we need to call it something and you know, little internal contest and it ended up being America Online was the the winning brands. So the challenges of that partnership with apple and kind of let us to have to kind of relaunch as America Online. And then over time, you know, that service really gotten traction and we ended up, you know, kind of changing the company name and you know a couple of years later taken the company public. So you know the lesson was those partnerships were critically important to get us going. We would not have been successful without them, but. There was a point where we kind of had kind of stand their own two feet and move away from being so reliant on these core partnerships..

AOL apple apple Inc America United States partner IBM Sears one billion dollars one million dollars three percent two feet
"aol" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

02:07 min | 4 years ago

"aol" Discussed on Acquired

"So basically aol everything valuable about that company is completely an illusion and wall street notices and so it it's announced what is it january two thousand by december of two thousand one jerry levin steps down the ehlo people are still thinking that they're in charge at this point so they wanna take over the ceo ship of aol the control of aol this up specifically and actually that's where bob pittman really was the guy that thought he was going to take it because he was feeling like steve case would step down at some point but no as we know it went to dick parsons and so bob pittman is out by july of two thousand two steve case finally leaves in may of two thousand three september 18th 2003 time warner officially drops aol from its name that the combined company was called aoltime warner officially but just three years later aol time warner basically wants to pretend like aol on it and at this point they still on the asset like they're they're not saying in all in one fell swoop organise spin it out liked it is still on the company it's just not doing anything well you as we always hear those numbers now and again about however millions of people are still paying every month for aol dial up i mean it's all yeah i i've i've actually got the number i as of rising bid in may 2015 there's still making six hundred and six point five million dollars in dial up revenue i looked up some it really actually hasn't shrunk much today so they're really actually still maintaining that well you know there's other there's other assets in their member they bought netscape only too little company called netscape i mean the so i you know every there's a reason why kerris which was book is called there's a pony in here somewhere it's.

aol bob pittman warner aoltime warner jerry levin ceo steve dick parsons netscape five million dollars three years
"aol" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

02:19 min | 4 years ago

"aol" Discussed on Acquired

"But but like literally outta who's no pun intended who they are truly practical things about culture clashes like if in one of the books like sports illustrated just refuses to play ball like we're not going to give our content to you were running our own in fact with sports illustrated famously never really gave much to the web anyway or think of there's a story about like warner studios after the merger refuses to let a awhile take over the harry potter website and the online promotion further the harry potter movies are just getting going right so that's why werner studios is the is so in aol says them okay let's take this over werner studio says no right and then the thing that aol wanted the most like to save their skin was air wells or i'm sorry time warner's cable division time warner had roadrunner famously which is another thing like they do they couldn't even get warner to give them licensed them the roadrunner cartoon that's that's the infighting that is at timer but so when when aol says okay listen let's let's brand air well into your your your expanding cable internet service time warner cable says get bent right so even though there the acquiring company essentially the the entrenched powerbrokers at time warner just tells these guys to screw off and basically weights them out until the the disaster of the merger becomes evident and get kicked out what went and if you think about like the the power dynamics generated by the the revenue like i think a oh well total revenue in 2000 right before the merger was like nine point five billion her somewhere in that neighborhood and and you know time warner had a much more narrow price to earnings ratio where they you know of that what we're they were they valued at one hundred fifty million or something there billionaire yeah harass our eight hundred sixty billion like they had real material revenues such that that had to be like a a three acts or something not like you know ridiculous multiple like aol.

warner studios werner studios aol warner roadrunner warner cable harry potter
"aol" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

01:58 min | 4 years ago

"aol" Discussed on Acquired

"So listen these are crazy times these are fat times for aol again i want to bring up this idea of culture and aol being scrappers and doing whatever it takes to stay alive so why do they stop when all of a sudden there and like in the cat birds seat they seem to be the next this of of this new internet economy and they're bad pitman's army of dealmakers you know basically basically dr what is essentially the thing that really makes wall street go nuts so we're we're going to get into this again later but everyone thinks that the alewa it will went away because people stopped doing dial up or paying for dial up and they move to broadband and things like that but the thing that we'll see actually has the deal sorta collapse and aol stock price collapse and things like that is the fact that what may their stock appreciate so much was that they had this insane growth in advertising and that's where the money was coming from that's where the actual cash flow is coming from sure it's great to have in the background this recurring revenue of the you know the subscription revenue but that's not what was actually moving the needle in terms of why wall street loves them yep it was all of these all of these deals they were doing with all these dotcom startups that we're doing them all of their money exactly well interestingly enough to transition here because they're doing all these deals with these dotcom companies they have sort of their ears to the ground and they can start to see when you know the money starts to dry up these see money starts to dry up ipo start to go bust they're the ones that no before anybody else that listen this bubble might be bursting.

aol pitman cash flow the deal
"aol" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

01:39 min | 4 years ago

"aol" Discussed on Acquired

"So again we're going back to the 80s it's not till the early nineties when they cut a tie themselves to microsoft and windows that they sort of leap to the head of the pact there's a whole pack here there's compuserve there's genie there's prodigy there's all these an and compuserve as on compuserve it's my dad was a beta tester for compuserve and for aol so he's got free accounts and i remember being on compuserve and thinking it was better but i my understanding is that it was like only sort of four the super internet savvy nerds and aol was much better reaching the massmarket does that does that feel like sort of why aol one their 100 percent oil had the derogatory or pejorative name of training wheels for the internet but they actually embrace that and it makes sense i mean i've said on the show like you know a lot of people's first email was was a oh well in a time when you you didn't have email unless you're at a college or or at work or something like that but also a oil train people how to live online like they gave you a screen name and you went into the chat rooms and you did thirty sexchat and things like that and uh you could create an online identity like and and and this is what we should talk about what ails business was you know they eventually basically made their money by allowing people onto the web but they were also trying to cure eight the web and create this online experience that would like handheld handhold people into it.

windows compuserve aol microsoft 100 percent