35 Burst results for "AOL"

LINK Is Back

The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

05:07 min | 1 d ago

LINK Is Back

"Why would you try crypto? Well, look at the end of the day it comes down to profitability liquidity. The volatility that we've got in this market is just insane. Now, what that means if you take ten tribes and you have six loses that six percent down if you're managing properly was to try to break even so you know you get stopped out the Europe percent loss the other to try that got go onto Mike one likes five percent. Which we nice very, very, very easy to do in this market, the other hit six percent. Now you go net Sarajevo gross eleven percent gained six, percent loss, yacht five percent. You don't tend to get numbers like that in traditional markets now that still gone on sixty percents, lose rights and the other twenty percent they is break even. So what I'm saying is if you work on the probabilities increasing in your five through these courses, you'll the potential is just. An. Almost so most guy. WHO In the market. Currently as way save but not a lot look. I. Wouldn't be surprised bitcoin continue on little to Saad wise run spoken of this quite a bit of liked and it is continuing not bad. It's not bad. It's holding around that eleven thousand mock eleven thousand be the new handle all night. It was still hovering around that Criollos I'm with these sought wise marketed one often does is it allows us to have opportunities to try for sats. Think. That's a worth much but I can tell you now the sats that I made when Bitcoin was at full thousand, five, hundred a now with more than double what they were of a bank two, thousand bucks them Oh it's now over two thousand. So as banking for the future profits, in Sats, is what I love. When I can get the mind with markets. saw that's where I'm looking at Bitcoin to the mom once I saw wise I'm just talking about the last few days rots in Sunday. A bitcoin at the moment eleven thousand, one, hundred, sixty, seven, standpoint, three today yesterday. It was also down point three so much movie Yes not much volatility not much to work with this Syrian. Now it did close the Dow up one percent. It's a three, hundred, ninety dollars and thirty full sentence down half a percent right now, a guy needs to push above the high that I'm looking at four a full. Coverage around around that four hundred, the last couple of days with exile play it did pull that yesterday two point nine on December list is keeping keeping on too much. Actually move it's had a booming move high. And You know a little pullback is it to be well, I'd sites to be fairly Wilkins it's at one point three percent now just under thirty cents twenty, nine, point seven and not much really. They've me to work with very similar on bitcoin cash. It was down yesterday three percent at six fifty is down point seven. Now, a guy, it just sort of slowly slipping off. And it's still holding to seven FAV old. Top Channel. Area, it has broken into these above walls does that all the continuing to kick off lungs? Like. Coins holding pretty well as well and we're looking at fifty seven dollars and forty cents down half of a percent wrought now at fifty seven, forty not macho guy and it's going to get above. Sixty dollars ready for me to have. The trend is explicitly backing. The gang may be interested once more. BITCOIN is vague is. Currently two, hundred, twenty, four, dollars sixty, it was down one point seven percent yesterday currently down point six the one in the top ten that's up right now in fact, these Donna. And look as much as it's not really that tradable for me at the minute I'll talk about you know. The contract to our does have a bit of a trend To something that would capture more attention it fourteen point four cents at the moment, and it has been sort of pretty comfortable consolidating over the last couple of weeks sort of between the high of fifteen five around thirteen or two cent range. I widened to save does have a big push hearts up point seven, three, all of a percent now. Bottlenecks also, yesterday it was up one percent, but it's looking really strong there on that daily kind of. The four hours consolidating at the moment not quota a level for breakout try just yet although very much trying it's hottest to do. So the resistance is around the rage twenty, full forty, five ish around that sort of region if a breaks above their them for sure, I'll be looking for opportunities where Bush is the pullbacks in the one hour and two hour. We my focus stand its down point three, twenty, two dollars and twenty four cents. AOL's holding above three bucks right now down point three, five, a percent yesterday it was pretty much flat on the Diet. and link yesterday had a great performance reading up six point, two, three percent which full it from the day before eleven percent at link Look as a watch list It's a fantastic looking trend and I'm waiting for pool bikes on that four hour as timeframe of choice, full cradles. So again, like I say there's opportunity at the. End of the market's getting normal bullish

Bitcoin Europe Sarajevo Bush Saad Wise Mike One Donna AOL Wilkins
Study: Experimental J&J vaccine protects monkeys in a single dose - AOL

Mark and Melynda

00:26 sec | 6 d ago

Study: Experimental J&J vaccine protects monkeys in a single dose - AOL

"Johnson and Johnson is launching human trials for a potential Kobe vaccine Doctor Deb Roberts of the White House Corona virus Taskforce is what makes this one different is that one single dose has been shown to protect monkeys against infection. To be able to show protection and monkeys, like the other vaccines have shown with two doses does short in the time period for a development. Meantime, Congress is still deadlocked over anew, Corona First relief bill with nothing indicating they're any closer to making a deal.

White House Corona Virus Taskf Johnson Deb Roberts Congress
A Fun Alexa Routine

Voice in Canada

01:16 min | 2 months ago

A Fun Alexa Routine

"Today I, want to follow up on what we talked about yesterday and that was. How do you create routines? And that was all I went to a lot of detail in the podcast by the way. If you want to listen to that podcast, you just to AOL A in Canada dot ca slash one twenty nine. So since creating that I've been thinking myself. How can I create some cooler teams? Do some fun stuff and I thought maybe that can use it to. Call, a practical joke, but just something to interact with my kids with, and so what I did was set up routine when I say Lexi and my son's name is in the room or my daughter's name is in the room. Then Lexi will respond with some sound effects like an air horn, applause, cheering that sort of thing and say something like my son like you're the man ad I know it seems kind of silly when I say it out loud like that, but he got a real kick out of it, and so I wonder if there are other things that we could do that would be really fun ways and you could use Lexi to. To surprise some people in your home when they say certain things so thinking about that I'd love to hear your feedback on that. sent me messages on twitter Dr Terry Fisher, Dart are Fisher or on the facebook community page. AL A in Canada. Dot Ca Slash community I'd love to hear that things that you're doing with your

Lexi Dr Terry Fisher Canada DOT Facebook AOL
"aol" Discussed on The Dave Ryan Show

The Dave Ryan Show

02:11 min | 2 months ago

"aol" Discussed on The Dave Ryan Show

"Out. Continued, breathe deeply. Taking time to focus on your breathing how it feels. Now..

"aol" Discussed on The Dave Ryan Show

The Dave Ryan Show

04:50 min | 2 months ago

"aol" Discussed on The Dave Ryan Show

"Are you serious I gotta Party and this all started with Jenny because at this new boyfriend is basically, he's the Scott Duncan of Wisconsin yet. So you go out to your mom and dad's house, and so this guy. Can we say our guys name that his name? Andrew, so Andrew goes out meets Mr. Mr and Mrs Luton Burger and he's like Oh, hello, sir, how are You my? That's certainly a fetching ensemble. You're wearing this evening. Mrs Luton Burger oh G-. Good evening. Sir, how are you? Is there anything you need? Help with around the house going to take the garbage out then when your mom and dad aren't looking, he's stealing money out of your mom's Persian go to your dad's desk. Go to eat, so I appreciate that he doesn't. All right I'm kind of exaggerating who we got bill on the phone bill. We're talking about your. Suck up friend, or is it? You Idol? Hi, what's going on? when I was in high school, had a hockey coach called me Eddie Haskell beautiful wife and I was always very polite to adult. simply because I was raised with good manners. I was doing kids stuff. So I stole the keys from. We broke into where he kept a spare key to his house. Went into his house and stole the keys to the local hockey rink and make copies. Two or three years, we would break into the hockey rink all summer. All Winter, play hockey, drink beer and hang out of high school. Kids see this is awesome. This is back in the day before security cameras was. Absolutely and it was a rural area so. Do so not only. Did you think you were a kid? You were the kid that broke into his house. Did he ever suspect you bill? He found out later 'cause like ended up giving him to his nephew, a couple years younger than me when I graduated from high school, and then those kids got caught, and they routed me. He found out anything or just. Nothing, he wasn't upset about it. They changed the locks, and then they locked the hockey player, locker or hockey player entrance to the rank. Builder you still just a shifty shady as you were back then. I think I've grown up a little. Thirties now. I? Love it. Thank you bill. Here's a good way I got a text that said I had a friend who is super sweet to my mom, and all the other moms in our friend group then when it was just us guys, he would say how he wants to do our moms. Dude. Your mom is totally so hot. She's into me. And of course the moms all thought he was the nicest young man I hope. He actually wasn't doing our moms. Funny do all right if you got one Texas Acadia. Maybe one five, three, nine, two one I went to the dentist yesterday because I had a little thing inside my mouth, and I was like it was like a little white bump. The wouldn't go away and I was really nervous about it. Because as you guys know occasionally for the last four or five years I do a little lum chewing tobacco Yep. Anymore because Falun gets on you every single time, even though you love that little rush, fallon is like day. spit that out right now, yeah! What are you, my mom, so then yesterday I go to the dentist and I'm like okay. There's a little white lump. Here won't go away. It's got a little bit bigger and my dentist. She so great. She's like she looks like she's twenty four. She prospering thirties, but she's amazing, and she looks at it and she's like now. It's probably just a swollen saliva gland, and that's probably it's pretty common. That's all it is. Is She anything about that shoe I? Didn't bring it up a man. She didn't ask you. If you've been hanging out in more in parks, you lately. Really serious so I. Don't hang out there nearly as often as I used to since the virus exactly. Probably smart all right, so you're office okay? I'm okay, but I I went home yesterday and I think yesterday was my day that after all of this like everybody's got their point where they just kind of not broke, but they just. They had had it like everything from the extra work. We're all doing extra work. We've all got this trash. Where all check in the news has been two months of really go, go go while at the same time. You don't really have anywhere to go. Does that make any sense? Yesterday. I just broke I fell on the couch of lay down the couch yesterday, and I slept for like five hours I could not I could not lapse A. You didn't have a town I. Have Little Temper Tantrums. Temper tantrums, but I just broke I just yesterday. I like all of this at built up and I was out, and I could not get up for whatever reason you feel any better today. Yeah, I feel fine today I. Think for ready for another two and a half months of hell but. I don't know as anybody else gotten to that point where you just had had it. And I think after going to the doctor and just being relieved that everything was okay that it was just like I, just broke Jenny. I don't think that I've gotten to that point, but I did get out and I bike for two and a half hours last night..

hockey Mrs Luton Burger Jenny Andrew Scott Duncan Wisconsin Mr. Mr Texas Acadia Eddie Haskell Falun fallon
Bitcoin Flirting With $10k

The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

04:14 min | 2 months ago

Bitcoin Flirting With $10k

"Four dollars sixty three so very close anyway. Have a go at that. Put the trying to call injury referral area and we both do out of that. Pretty psyched to get the con- actually. I'll be doing that after doing this. Podcast will have an actually go set up on the hill. Well what's happened yesterday? Will yesterday? I didn't talk to you at all. My apologies it was a very busy dying and I just forgot I have not done a podcast on the day that a mentor. Really and Yup just on I'm back now. Never Fade on around and Look we seen exactly what else hyping to say from bitcoin. And I'm talking to the daily now. Go is what did we see what we saw the daily print that littlest channel break the hall on the list lost today. We've had the break of the haunt which is SORTA run back up into ten thousand right now and really really really locking the look of this market. I WANNA say push you high highs which gets US above what what ten thousand one hundred on the F. T. X. perpetual contract so what it's not looking too bad things can change very quick look at it weekly currently at the mine route. Nine point four percent on the way that is the wake of the hardening will the having. At least. It's out of the way so I'm pretty pretty a wild and you WANNA get my rap on the wake. We'll go to my youtube page because on the Youtube page today later on on going to be doing the this week in Crypto. Show that I do every week in Oregon. You should get on a day squads tone of the cash instead of watching. Share it round facades. Funday bit different. We're alley right now. Answer well we just sorta. Spock down quite brutal. Actually we went Bam all within a ninety two forty two an hour at ninety five fifty so wave Three and a half percent move in the loss to the forty. Five minutes pretty brutal. But what I'm saying is more on a daily that I'm focusing on down. Tape Point five percents at nine thousand five hundred fifty five onto a theory of two hundred dollars and thirty cents hanging on to that two hundred mark wrought as I speak to you. It's up so is down. One point four percent rotten deal going on except pay twenty cents. Yup that levels made significant for quite some time. It is significant still and it's hanging and holding vaunting down one point four four percents to twenty cents. Bitcoin cash has been absolutely disgusting. Awake to Thirty Eight Ninety Cents Down Warren Hoffa simple who says because it is completely solved by with bitcoin cash. Our bitcoin as we actually have a downtrend. Aloha on dial into the future shots at a sign of represent potential opportunities to short. Maybe tomorrow on the close of that daily candle for the cryptic cradle trading strategy base phase. One of them. I think will take you through the rest of the in. It's down one point one percent at one ninety one dollars. Lot Coin forty-three and twenty nine. Another one in the down trend. Barry's channel on the daily within one point six percent at forty three twenty on this woman that I ought to shine a candle. Big Spot on that now It wasn't it'll small bearish channel in the cradles and now would that spark that we saw down on the market. Maybe that just a few out because from that low on a specially instant bounce back of two point eight. Five three percent now Very very brutal pool. Back there. On a very quick turnaround. Aol So we could say some momentum carried through today yet white and say to two dollars and sixty cents. It's down one percent as I speak new donat swept down one point. Two one percent just grinding away. Pretty SLOW PRETTY QUANTUM BONNET. Sixteen dollars and fifteen cents. An hasn't been a rule move for the month so speaking of not real movies we did say a rule. Bul Out of the gate Through the back end of April there on cow Donna. Ready strong run. Seifollah month of my man just full of Chop sorta working between five point three cents and four point six cents banging around and tonight we still sit within that range. Kodama to five cents and its down point. Seven seven of a percentage theorem classic. Six twenty one of our looking shot. They're

Youtube Warren Hoffa Spock Oregon Chop Barry AOL
The Logic of People

Between the Slides

08:13 min | 3 months ago

The Logic of People

"Everybody welcome back to the people process. Progress PODCASTS I'm your host Kevin Panel this episode twenty the logic of people in. We'll see why I'm calling that here in a little bit as we talk more with my Matt Schmitt. Ceo OF PEOPLE DOT AI. And thank you again for everyone. That's listen download subscribe. Please give us a rating out. There obviously more stars as good. Help US bump up to the top and share more great stories. Like we're GONNA get today talking with that and so today we'll learn about Matt where he grew up those kind of things Matt. Thank you again for being on the PODCAST. Really appreciate the opportunity to speak with you this evening. No Problem Kevin. Thanks so much for having me cool. So he mentioned. Let's you know the people process progress right so we're learning about you. Cover in the people component obviously a lot of process which is great. I'm excited to have that conversation and share that with other people all the processes you've been through in in in the industries that you've been part of and then of course share with folks As we make progress so kind of jumping into it. Where where are you from? And where did you grow up? Yeah so grew up in eastern North Carolina North Carolina's one of those interesting states. That has this island in the middle between the beaches and the mountains and everything in between is a farm country in in SPLAT and So I grew up in the farming country and was driven to build to get into technology and build a way to escape from the lack of of technology and progress in So came up to to the island here in Raleigh and went to College at NC State. That really kick me off in my My Journey Nice did you were you into technology. Maybe a lot. Were you excited about it or into it when you were younger like did you enjoy like Atari intendo or things like that? Did you have kind of a? You know an attraction to that and I'm GONNA be dated. I'm forty six. I may be older than ordering us. No totally totally had had all those things and you know we had. We had dial up internet. Remember getting my first computer and being intrigued by the potential of that and quickly taught myself how to program and That was really the first you know way to to begin. Escaping on started helping people build websites Back when I was a teenager and so that I've always had that sort of that entrepreneur. Draw ever since I was really young and That seems I've carried well for me did you. Did you get into any particular kind of code you know doing websites begging HMO or or just kind of a little bit everything a little bit of everything early on You know heavily into html and you know even before this was before there was really CSS and early into Java script and then quickly into building programs in basic and And then moving into languages like Java as I taught myself more and more about how to program it was really the I in the early days. It was really driven by You know funny enough as I had a an early computer and we had this. We had the dial up internet and I was really one of the things I was really driven by was. Hey you know. We don't have Microsoft word. I really think I could build something like that. That was foolish of me in the early days while ambitious vision ambition. Never Was Never Short on my in my youth man edge and that with Imagine right now what we're going through with dial up all. I don't understand the true pain that that is a you know when you had to have a separate phone line just so you get kicked off right Yeah that I I think I told some of the other day guys. We head this pandemic during the eighties or even the early nineties How much worse it would be and you didn't get your free Internet. Cd in the mail may trying to figure out how to get into AOL right. You're it'd be along in. Would you know what that's also included that bug of doing that making Got TO NC state and so did you major in computer science or similar a major there. Eso majored in computer engineering and computer and electrical engineering because Foolish me I thought I wanted to actually build the parts of the computer that I wanted to program them until I learned that I hated. Physics hunts so that that really kinda pointedly you know. I still went through with the computer engineering and the electrical engineering but was really focused on programming. And the more computer science aspect of it was doing that all throughout college and That was really where I found a guy connected with my partner. These on Long before it was called We started to build a business together. So were you you met at college. Yeah so he had a business that was had relocated from New York and was in Kerry and he was looking for some people to join his team. And this was in. You know I guess. Mid Dot Com crash Here And so you know. I joined in. You know everything plummeted as know. Our customers lost their customers. And so on and we had this great website called Java lobby and We figured out how to sell ads around and that was really the start of it as we built some interesting technology and learned how to publishers in turn that into a building one of the world's largest developer portals Diese wow I mean that's pioneering stuff right and then there weren't as many tools right to be able to that kind of wrote a lot of scripts for you or helped you along. So did you all have to do a lot of you know just a lot of hours in front of the keyboard. And you know mapping and work like that. Yeah this was you know long before you could really you know there were You had to build everything in those days send so there were know the early days of even things like Google ad sense in go blab words in those types of things. But you know we were. We had to build our own community software And so it was. This was even probably before the May have even been before blogs but certainly before blogs became the place that everybody Trying to put their communities. How did you find Many like minded in in school folks at school they are or were you able to against still pretty. I guess earliest days kind of reach out to other where their user communities than that you all could kind of bounce ideas off each other as well. you know. So that's what we provided primarily and so job lobby had been started by my partner as we scanned it. But in those days you know. The the developing world is much more fragmented job lobby really provided a place for developers have an independent voice in an independent community that was separate from the vendors who were really controlling the messaging Peru tools and development. The is in those days Which is is somewhat different than than what you get. These days and open source was what it was. You know what it is now. It was a big deal if he were open source back so everything is sorta come much further much more quickly than it was in those days.

Matt Schmitt NC Partner North Carolina Kevin Panel United States CEO Raleigh ESO AOL Google New York Developer Kerry
Tough Airports with Pilot to Pilot

The Finer Points - Aviation Podcast

06:11 min | 3 months ago

Tough Airports with Pilot to Pilot

"I'm GonNa Bring Justin. See here he comes. Hey there's my man has then. Are you actually looking up at four flight up with my computer? And I was looking up bested when you're talking about it because I know seen it before in my mind is not like I don't even know if I WANNA fly. They're like Oh yeah. You know it's funny. Some sometimes that stuff's really intimidating but the rules you have to follow making for example. If you're coming down through Elgin and Valparaiso there I think it looks. I mean obviously be having to talk to their tower Roy. Once you're talking to their tower than your you know everything's Kinda worked out for you with the floor capabilities. File Easier that's funny. I was going to ask you about that because you're flying into so many different types of sorts. That's pretty much what you guys do. All the time right. It's just file a far. Yeah we will most are flights Are we can't take off the far far up in the air but we like to keep it many times. It's awesome just because it does help the have. Atc talking to you. We're GONNA get a busy airports. I never even expected to be really busy. There's one in Minnesota really crazy student training area. And there's like six or one seventy two pattern at a time mixing via far in just the Afar general. It can be a lot safer going I- Afar when you have the opportunity to do so. Yeah I totally see that Aspen. Airport there any over. It's like that that you guys going to where your company says we're GonNa have to do extra work with you guys or you have to fly in their inexperienced captain. I or something like that. We do similar trading on ask than we have a whole like Aspen lesson where we have to to land at Aspen. Show that we can do that. Another one's called Ocean research is a private airport down in Florida. And it's a really skinny and kind of severi interesting airport which we have to get checked out in the simulator. I I think we have to do it. Every every couple of years just to get retrained because our wings actually hangover the hedges when we go into land so it's very interesting but it's a very popular destination. While can you say just briefly? What's so challenging about aspirin? I that's SORTA aspirins just very interesting place. I mean if you even just look up the approach tar and you can see the glide. Slope like seven degrees. Maybe maybe it will literally feeling like you're going straight down at catch it. The site pictures just so messed up and then you have like a mountain right here. Airports a little bit farther forward. You can't get the glide slope warning fear when you come here I. It's hard for me to really explain it unless you're going. There are other chart in front of me. But it's there's a lot going on at Aston you gotTa be under your pointed down so far that you're speaking to come even if you have the Steve Breaks out so it's a very interesting airport for sure. Yeah that's wild. I mean we flew in there all the time in one. Eighty Two's mountain checkouts in Eagle Aspen than through loveland. Pass out toward lead though and all that now one eighty two. It's not a huge big deal. It's totally different. When you've got a jet can handle up pretty well so it's not too big of a deal but it definitely interesting. We don't take it down to the purchase so that we have the the airport site at a certain fixed remember. Stop ahead now. But we have special charts going in there and then. There's some other mountain airports where we don't need to be checked out in but we have a special area in our. Aol were read up about it before released before we go so we know the challenges that airport could cost. That's interesting I think. The last accident I remember at Aspen was a challenger from that mistake and landed with a tail rent. That's yeah that's very commonly. I WANNA say they landed on the taxiway almost other grass remember astronaut now or another airport. Another airport was. They didn't know that the runway was just pay. They thought the runway was covered in snow so they saw a freshly paved runway but their mind. They thought that it was supposed to be snow-covered sir. Lynden to the right or to the left of the runway landed on grass. Wow that's so fascinating that you just said that because somebody else I think it was. Brian Shift pigmy the other day he was doing lecture for Nasty. Just wanted to know if I thought about something. He was calling expectation bias in training right and I didn't really know any man I was like. What do you mean by expectation bias? And then he told me a little more it was basically what you just described. It's like how do you deal with when your mind is set on seeing one thing? That's what you're expecting. And then something different is happening and to be honest. I don't see it very much in training but what you just described was perfect. Exactly what the talk about do you guys talk about that at all in your training that specific conflict We'll make a big deal about going over all the threats that could be going on so as soon as we brief all the threats. We kinda talk about all the threats. This threat might be kind of one that comes up on the fly. But if there's ever a moment where you feel any kind of confusion or you feel any dow it's like immediately go around this. Go take off. We'll talk about last hour. The runways taped or not paved or regain rebrith. We WanNA do. We can go somewhere else. We can talk about some things especially to ask them because the weather changes so often. We have a very strict kaylynn limit were. Some operators may be part ninety one. Maybe they don't relate abide by that but we do not go in there with a win more than two not talented. So if we're coming down on finally tell us that the tailwinds do high will do out and go around and go somewhere else. So it's definitely safety. And you always going to err on the side of safety so one person was real comfortable. You go out now. That's awesome and there's two things that you just said that I always hammer on my students about so I just have to act on. One wasn't aboard point where you're talking about having a certain way point if you're not on glide path through or whatever then it's just an automatic and the other is that a superior if it's eleven knots. Tailwind you're out you don't think about it. It's not ten anymore. It's eleven soared on once really good. That's good stuff. I feel like so many of those things that we can cement those for GE pilots. You know there was a guy that flew into Palo. Alto in a mean. I don't know if you've ever flown a Moonie but it's like doesn't want to stop flying. I mean not only. Is the wing like six inches off the ground at slamming her flow. It won't quit and twice in my career I've seen people come in and Mooney's and just go around late in one case and hit the trees on in this last case Palo Alto literally just floated till he went right off the end of the runway and that was a fatal accident. You know people say like what would happen. How could he avoid it? I mean abort point in any airplane is a great idea right. No absolutely and it's something that like you said when you drill down and generally aviation to create that kind of mindset. You always think that it's not going to happen to you but it can happen to you. You're gonNA find yourself in this situation. You don't feel comfortable. Then you gotta go around just like no if saying like you can't succumb to that mindset

Aspen Afar Elgin Eagle Aspen Moonie Valparaiso Lynden Aspirin Palo Alto Minnesota Ocean Research Aston Mooney Brian Shift AOL Palo Florida Steve Loveland
Yesterdays Tezos, Ethereum & Binance Went Well

The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

03:39 min | 3 months ago

Yesterdays Tezos, Ethereum & Binance Went Well

"What are you know another one day? So yeah they passion for quite some time telling you about staying out of the market and I have been but yesterday the tide did turn the markets as well and this young fellow wrought here admittedly not all that young go back in and I'm happy. Because bitcoin sitting up it sitting up three point nine three percent today. Seven thousand one hundred and seventeen still needs to break above the high of seven thousand. Three hundred and seven dollars and fifty cents. Should I say that the next time we get that love uptrend we gotTa Smash through that seventy six thirty seven region? Nothing really committed tried to Bitcoin as it stands right now. There are some good trends out the next good trend is a theorem. One Ninety four thirty five is acting as resistance. Then we'll see how he got busted three one seven five. Yesterday we sitting at wanted to Four six right now. That is a guy in a six point. Seven five percent that is a trend. I do like the daily is still there. I allies and high is gaping simple. Guys keep it simple. That's what it is and that's what's happening exile paid look at underperformed yet. A guy that consolidation is just hideous. It just sucks staying. It's ugly is I point nights since it's only up two point five percent okay. I silently up. Because it's a it's the most underperforming of all of the top ten at the moment. Alexa wake up. Bitcoin cash three thirty to five five. Five point seven eight percent representing a pretty good move. The AD still a pretty ugly jot their bitcoin cash that can change will. When will that China will? It'll change if we can break the hive to forty eight spot. I five Bitcoin as they preside As well but it's off went one five percent at one ninety two spot full one can't compliant AFA FAA percent gyn. Lot going petula up two point nine three percent only just performing exile pay some of the Jays of the bucket except hand like Quinn still on performing the rest of the Maga theorem being the strongest of the lot. Today Lot coins. Forty one dollars. Ninety one sense of the moment as I said it's up two point nine percent. Aol saw would resist the title. Seventy dollars sixty one right now. Three point seven two percent crab walking along into that resistance. We might actually get a bitcoin breakout Dr Dino what that strategy is what you do not want to get by. Nance fifteen dollars and sixty seven cents up three point seven six sir. Lots of squeezing on that one. Yeah it's a molested. I Walk Daily Trend. Still over there are high alerts and high highs although not a massive movement bonnets today it has moved and has moved. Har- Katana approaching resistant. Saran at three point seven percent. Mark Keeping Pretty close on that as a matter of fact. I'd love to see it just a little tap tap tap aroo on that level because I'll tell you what that could be a Break fully old kitty Looking quite good there on the petrol contract. You haven't got your F- Checks Account Gauze and you WANNA get access to the education and whatnot Laura We do have access to give you that Just jump on to the Youtube page and you'll find all onto a classic was sitting on Budweiser so I don three point. Six six cents up fought At their classic Dole's spot thirty eight up three point. Four took pretty hideous job on the daily trump's sign. Pretty ugly it's up three point nine percents. Nothing to be sniffed that but it's only at one point two nine cents and the daily Chart Is. He

Jays Alexa Youtube Dr Dino China Nance Saran Dole AOL Quinn
NCAA cancels all winter, spring championships over Coronavirus concerns

The Paul Finebaum Show

04:53 min | 5 months ago

NCAA cancels all winter, spring championships over Coronavirus concerns

"Welcome you to the final hour. We came on early today and We could probably be her all night and we still wouldn't Maybe get everything in for those of you just joining us It has been another one of those days. The conference tournament started getting cancelled About eleven o'clock today the SEC. Making it official about an hour and fifteen minutes before tip off and then the big one came down late in the day the NCAA canceling not only the men's and women's tournament but wiping out all of their winter and spring. Championships are commissioner. Greg Sankey joining us about ninety minutes ago reacting quite quite negatively to what he was hearing At the same time most of us were John. Who's been covering this story? Four for days if not weeks The senior sports editor at AOL DOT COM in Alabama. Joining us. John. Thank you very much as always I mean it's there's so many layers of this Of all these fast moving events What has stood out the most to your well. Let's start with what you're talking about. I think Greg's common illustrates something that I find fascinating about what happened in the last forty eight hours and I think she's really illustrates the fact that you're the NCAA and its member conferences. I've not been on the same page about things. I think that the NCAA's outfit yesterday that it was GonNa be carrying on. Its TOURNAMENTS ABOUT FANS. Caught a lot of these different conferences off guard and really. Kinda put him on the defensive because all the pressure and attention to turn to them you know. Why do you having these days with fans and the kind of dental fad? And today you saw all the different conference tournaments within like an hour of her so cancel and then I turned all kind of pressuring attention back to the NCAA. If you've just seen in the last twenty four to forty eight hours these you know the NCAA which represents confidence not doing a great job communicating. Its decisions and and decision making process which I think will certainly illustrated in the conference of Greg. Yeah and John. Yesterday I thought it was even more on display when Everyone Was CAUGHT OFF guard. All the commissioners were caught off guard when the NCW dropped the original story And I know Mark Camera. Got A lot of praise for that but that was before we found out you in particular being a reporter. What was really going on that Greg Sankey in Nashville and John swaddled in Greensboro and and Kevin Warren in Indianapolis and everyone else didn't know anything about it. Yeah you MTA got Yar Win. Visit and could be fair. I think they've made the right decision. But you could've given some of these different conferences or a heads up to give them a chance. You know to to try to do something out. And then you have the come out their decision and we've got reporters Nashville trying to track down Greg. In fact people To get you know. What are you guys going do? And I don't think they were ready for that. And you kind of had to see all these different conferences really have to kind of come together very fast. It's trying to figure out what was going on it. You know it definitely put those conferences and it's tough spot. I don't think they would've allowed fans in if they had given you know they had a better able to come out with the announcement that it did. But you know again. I don't think that there's been a lot of great tricks patient's doctor people outside the SEC. including the SEC. I don't think there was a lot of great vacation between the NCAA CONFERENCES. And that's kind of why you're seeing all these different. Come out at different times. It's everybody's not all on the same page about what they want and what they're gonNa do to prevent this pandemic running further. John is Thursday and it seems like this week has been going on forever and I WANNA I WANNA go back to earlier in the week. You are communicating on Sunday About the crisis That was literally going on all over the world and especially Closer to where we live in this country and I just wonder I. It seemed like the sports world. Was you tell me if this is the correct word? Maybe just a little bit tone deaf or slow to react because at that point in time. I don't think really anyone was thinking about this worthy. I totally agree with you. I know you and I were getting and you know I think people when I was reaching out to different people about what I feel about it. It was treated as a warped that you know. Maybe it's not a good idea to go to these different conferences tournament. You know early something which that only a few days ago that was treated that way out there and it was at the further you and a hamster popular people on social media on TV shows kind of continuing to these opinions that the viruses that big of a deal worth the flu and all these different opinions protecting

Greg Sankey Ncaa John Commissioner SEC Nashville Reporter Official FLU AOL Editor Alabama Indianapolis NCW Mark Camera Kevin Warren Greensboro
Make Life Longer

The Daily Boost

05:56 min | 5 months ago

Make Life Longer

"All have the same hours and minutes in the data. We agree with that. I've not met anybody else who has amoral any less than I do. Maybe during daylight saving time during the transfer it's like during the time zone. Transfer there you go. That's what happens when it springs Ford. Our in the springtime right we spring forward and the time zones are going around the world as they go into daylight saving time. Maybe for just a few minutes. Somebody actually has sixty minutes less than you do. But that's the only time I can think about that but if you notice the weeks in the month say they seem to be passing faster and faster and faster and faster. And if you're if you're young if you're a kid life seems like forever. Just ask any kid. It seems like Christmas must be a lifetime. They just had one man. What's IT GONNA come again? It seems like a lifetime to get there. But if you're in your sixties or seventies or Arabia's happened yesterday wanted to why Abdelghani go put your lab coat on White One. It's okay or scrubs if you have a more just pretend okay. Einstein's theory of relativity states the rate. At which time passes depends entirely on your speed and acceleration at any given moment. But we're not going to talk about Einstein's physics today that would be too easy talk about technology and perception. You have an iphone. Do you have a computer? Do you have an IPAD? You have all of them. Are they all connected? These spend a Lotta time on the computer and and sinking everything up so everywhere you go wherever you go. Everything's right there only molly. I've been doing that this week. Driving crazy what happened to the days of being able to just to kind of disappear when you were a kid? Did you go out and play all day long and it just seemed like the day lasted forever. Maybe he didn't have a watch back then. Didn't even know how to tell time possibly. Have you ever been on a vacation? And after a couple of days you finding unwind a lot of people never get a ticket two week vacation but I promise if you do. It's different takes you the whole week to unwind the first week and after that it's like I can't stay here two about the seventh or eighth or ninth day. You're like I could stay here forever. Days Begin seem like forever. They begin to slow down tall about that. Motion thing writes all relative. But there's some new evidence out there that is saying that our technology is affecting us. I think that wouldn't be a surprise to you. We can feel it and I'm okay with that I it's GonNa help but you know it's relatively new. It takes about twenty years for society to adapt to any kind of tech thinking about what we've done in the past twenty years. I mean the Internet is technically I guess. Aol came out when made back in the late. Ninety s when AOL came out. Iphones only what eleven or twelve years old now. It's relatively new so when you think about that. We really haven't quite figured out how to adapt us and bring this into our world. It's GonNa take some time to do that. Some folks are starting like. I've got a flip phone these days. I do Kinda feel like Scotty. Star Trek communicator. There I use my flip phone when I don't WanNa be bothered. People laugh all the time. I feel cool with it because I can flip it. Open talking then. Flip it close. That's a lot of fun by the way sidebar fast growing bone segment is the flip on because the new evidence. That is coming out. The surveys have been coming out all the scientists studying fancy Dante. Things at constant use of technology is making your brain. I ready for it more efficient and processing information. Let me say that against get at. Your brain is getting more efficient at processing information. If you take the amount of information you consume in what ten minutes or even even just getting out of bed and glancing at your phone if you were to look that you swipe through a couple of things check your email. Check facebook check your social media. Check everything that's going on. If you just take sixty seconds do that. You're just putting more information in your brain. Then somebody one hundred years ago probably would do in a year. Have you ever thought about that? They would can you imagine I think back about two hundred years maybe gets Quebec three hundred years? If you want to and imagine somebody you Hanwha smartphone and say here. What would they do they probably go? I have news for you. You're still kind of in the middle of the stage. Technically speaking evolution wise but your brain is learning to process that information quickly. Now when we at information quickly in your mind. It's tricking you. It's tricking you into thinking. Time is passing faster. If you don't believe me just don't check your email. Your social media for Kenya make ten minutes. Try Day try a weekend. I actually very often on a Friday will flip off my smartphone. Internal my flip phone and it's kind of weird. If you haven't done that you might want to try. You won't get about a half mile down the road in your car without wanting to check your email. Try It some time. Time isn't speeding up. It's not going any faster. Your brain is speeding up how it processes information. That's giving you a perception that everything is going faster so so if you wanNA perceive life as as Short. I highly suggest you stay busy and spend all your time on your phone your computer your IPAD. It will fly fast before you know it. Of course you could watch one of those slow moving netflix movies. That'll slow. Yeah a little bit and go right back to your phone. And your tablet ipad. Steven jobs invented the IPAD. His his vision was that the the IPAD would be used in front of the television said. No thanks Steven appreciate that. So what do you do if you want to perceive life as well as long really long? Well I think you probably already figured it out having. You don't have to be a smarty pants to do this. You got more common sense than most people I know and your common sense is telling you right now. The do exactly what you don't WanNa do. Drop that keyboard with that telephone down. Turn it off and maybe been networks. Maybe listened bursting. It's springtime in our country. Right now. That might slow things down just a little bit for you when you slow down life slows down

Tricking Einstein Steven Jobs AOL Hanwha Netflix Arabia White One Scotty Abdelghani Kenya Quebec
We Are Now the AI in Business Podcast - An Update From Dan

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

09:21 min | 5 months ago

We Are Now the AI in Business Podcast - An Update From Dan

"I'm going to be breaking down why we're changing the name. What's been new with us here at emerge and what's coming up to give you a little bit of a preview of where we're headed wanted to be able to serve do justice to our longtime listeners and give a sense of where we're going and how their feedback has played into Where we're design a focus. Things moving forward so I'll be quick here over the course of the last two to three years. We've seen a lot of growth in the show we went from somewhat middling downloads with Ai. Not being nearly as popular to over the course of the last three years growing upwards of sixty thousand downloads in a given month which for a business show is quite a lot. We don't really attract engineers attract kind of techies. We attract functional business leaders. And it's tough to actually get that critical mass so we're really grateful to have the listeners. We have but we're changing things up a bit. Who served decided so in terms of what you're GONNA learn in this little short session here with me. I'm going to be covering three main topics I serve. Why the Name Change? What's new? What's coming up etc? What's new at emerge so in other words? Serve what we've recently focused on as well as where we're headed in the future. And then lastly we kind of wrap up with getting a little bit of your feedback at the end if you'd like to send some along to me We happened here from our folks where longtime listeners. So we'll talk first about the name change of the program so the show for years now has been called. Ai Industry that's been intended to be a broad name. For sort of any given industry could be banking. It could be manufacturing. It could be whatever the case may be but we find that the term a industry has connotations that time more to heavy industry time more heavy equipment etc now we have plenty of listeners from financial services that's our main sector banking insurance investing wealth management. The these are the folks that listened to a lot but the connotation would be a look at the show from the outside is that we're GONNA be talking every episode about oil and gas and about trucking and about manufacturing because industry often implies those kind of terms so really. The show is a in business. This is a program for business leaders who do not know how to Code but they need to marshal artificial intelligence to leverage artificial intelligence to drive results in the bottom line. They're not here to learn. Coding they're not here. Learn theory the her to learn about the real precedence of USA and how they can leverage that in their own businesses meant so a in business. We just felt as a more apt name for the show. Some of our listeners agreed and so we decided. Okay we're going to actually do the name change so this is now the AI in business podcast in terms of the actual focus. We're going to keep things the way they've always been in other words. We're going to appeal to business leaders. That could be. Vp's executives managers could even be consultants that are working within the enterprise or mid sized companies. Folks who are leaders of digital transformation leaders of change who need to marshal ai to make a difference in their business so when we talk about topics that's going to mean it's going to be use cases diving into different individual sectors. It's going to be best practices for adopting a I for finding R. Y. OF AI. And it's going to be real stories of actually leveraging the technology within a company and figuring out what's hard what's easy. What are the trends that matter? So if you're interested in use cases discovering basically what's possible and what's working with a across businesses in addition to the best practices for making it work. This is going to be the show tune into. That's been our value prop for a while and I think we're GONNA be doing a better job of at this year's we bring on a really strong cadre of guests in Twenty Twenty. I'm very excited about our guest lineup. In the next two to three months we've got some big names in the in the hopper as well which. I'm sure you'll be hearing about once. There live on the program rather than doing month long themes for I am business. We're going to be doing shorter. Individual episodes about different topics keeping things. Different keeping the variety up. So if we have a bunch of episodes within let's say banking fraud or compliance and we do a lot in financial services here instead of having them all in a row for a month. We'll kind of sprinkle them intermittently amongst other sectors looking at other best practices other trends are other aspects of AI. So we want every week to be a little different a little interesting a different kind of guests different kind of topic. Sue people really get a good S- play of what's happening with artificial intelligence across sectors and how they can leverage themselves so that's another change will be doing moving forward. I think people really liked the variety. That's been the feedback we've gotten and so we're GONNA be doing it better than ever and in fact I think for some of this year we're going to be doing two episodes a week because some of you had asked for that as well in terms of what's new here at emerge so little quick update on what's happened recently and then where we're headed here just as a company just updating you our loyal listeners last year was pretty exciting year for us so a couple of big things happen there. We've increasingly become more involved with the large intergovernmental organizations last year. We presented our research on deep fakes. Some of you familiar with fakes. Basically taking somebody's face making them say or do something that they never did using artificial intelligence to programmatic generate. Someone's face moving or someone's voice. We presented our research on deep fakes at the headquarters of the United Nations last year presented some of their counterterrorism events as well and presented our research on a in the life sciences sector for the OECD down in Mexico City. In addition to presenting an Interpol World Interpol world is the largest police in law enforcement. Serve event for the international community. It's run by Interpol which is the intergovernmental policing organization. We presented our works on deep fakes. They are as well. In addition to that we've continued to focus on our research work with enterprise so last year was year of really seeing kick up. A lot of that work has been with big banks with multibillion dollar insurance companies with players and financial services but some of it has been in other sectors in professional services in life sciences and other sectors as well the commonality is working with businesses. Who essentially are aiming to make better fruitful use of artificial intelligence in their company and they need to know the current precedence of. Roi Within the field. And that's essentially where our research comes in so this year were served doubling down on what we've been called upon not only speaking at presentations but for our client work in the past. Let's say eighteen months and really focusing their so. We've titled Our what was previously called our AI capability map research. We've we've titled our AI. Opportunity Landscape Research. We've improved the process. We've broadened out what we look at and really the focus is three things so when you think to yourself what has emerged do ultimately what we do is three things we help. Companies develop or validate a winning strategy. We help companies pick the right high. Roi Projects of finding low hanging fruit. That's going to be a win. And we help. Companies pick the right vendor for their particular needs. This is essentially where our work comes in and some of you have already seen the video. You can actually go to E. M. E. R. J. DOT COM Slash A. O. L. That's a opportunity landscape so emerged. Dot Com slash. Ai Aol you can watch a two minute video on what? Our research process is with this sort of updated process. Actually looks like in terms of the research deliverable you can see that emerged. Dot Com slash. Aol But the basic gist here is. We're taking really what our strengths are in. Our strengths are mapping the vendor use cases of AI within a given sector of the total vendor use case could be companies in Europe and the United States etc and looking at their various capabilities. And then doing the same thing with the enterprise. Let's say we're talking about insurance looking at Geiko looking at all state looking at the global top. Fifty insurance providers. Asa and mapping where they're a investments are mapping they're known use cases these level of traction of their various use cases and being able to use both of those sets of data that is to say the startup landscape and the enterprise landscape to find. Where is the evidence of our? Why where are the ease of deployment in terms of AI? Applications with our own proprietary scores? Here it emerged. That's exactly what we do. We look across both landscapes. Look at all the vendor providers. All the enterprise folks and get a sense of where is their current adoption now. Where's the evidence opportunity for us to drive our whereas at Roi already happening by really layering data on those key questions of where the Roi is? We can present a visual map to clients and essentially allow them to make smarter decisions. Moving forward advise them in recommend where to go. What COMPANIES TO PICK? What initiatives are going to be quick winds on informing that strategy moving forward? And so. That's the crux of our work against the bulk of last year's work that's why we were called upon by the bigger organizations and that's why we did our work in the private sector this year. Were only doubling down there so many of you already read the content at emerge dot com. Because you wanNA understand what's possible and what's working the Iowa services essentially the very high level version of that it's the version of that that allows companies to truly inform their strategy to back their suppositions with data and to be able to move forward with data back confidence when it comes to where they're investing their dollars and how they're going to compete in the market when it comes to leveraging artificial intelligence

AI United States Interpol Twenty Twenty VP United Nations Fraud Iowa Oecd Mexico City Europe E. M. E. R. AOL Geiko Professional Services
Brewing with Fire: Carillon Brewing Company

The Feast

09:46 min | 5 months ago

Brewing with Fire: Carillon Brewing Company

"We also of course had to talk about the brewery itself which as I mentioned at its heart is one giant fire. This multi story brick fireplace essentially takes up one entire side of the Carillon brewing building in full view of the rest of the restaurant. Now if you're having trouble imagining that you're gonNA want to check out some of the pictures we put up on our website at the feast podcast Dot Org to appreciate an full. But if you haven't had a chance to check them out yet imagine a giant multistorey brick fireplace with a giant fire at the bottom level and yet another fire going on up top now. Needless to say this giant fireplace needs constant attention. A fire essentially has to be going at all times to keep the operational and well. It's a fulltime job so this is kind of crazy but we basically we opened up in August of two thousand fourteen As part of just a bigger living history exhibit for the larger part of Carolina's horrible parks. We had not talked about the eighteen fifties Dayton other areas of the park. So that was one of the reasons. Why chose the team fifty to replicate here in the brewery and the other reason was that we hadn't told the story of German immigration and Dayton. It's kind of a changing city in the eighteen fifties. We had new transportation routes that were opening up the Miami Erie Canal which runs right through. Caroline Historica Parker would have run through there when it was active was at its height by the fifties in Dayton In the later fifties the railroad finally came into town. So you start to see industrialization coming into this region Prior to that beer was being gruden has been done thousand years but beer wasn't being made on a commercial scale in the city of Dayton Until the eighteen fifties prior to that most of the beer is being home the housewife just a chore like any other and a essentially as safer source of hydration than the drinking water was often as a source of nutrition categorically Sosa Nutrition and the finished products is actually a fairly sterile product. Once it's produced that actually nothing really wants to live in it that's going to harm said so severe is important but by the eighteen fifties you start to see these purpose built industrial commercial brewing setups. coming up and so we replicated this building off of those early gravity fed. Industrial Brewers So what we're standing in is our brew house right now which relocated giant three tiered brick fireplace that. Actually it's not just one single heat source that has four different fire boxes free of which he parts of the brewing process one of which is a wood fired oven that we do our spangler and sour dough bread baking and about three or four days a week so dan is up there right now trying to get the fire going so we can go upstairs law. Show you everything. Here gets fermented in American White Oak barrels a little unique compared to a modern brewery which is using stainless steel and our pre. Kettles are copper. In Ohio by company called The Sun. So we had to have commissioned. You have three kettles up here kind of breaking down. The brewing process where essentially heating up water taking malted grain screens that have been sprouted and then dried trying to get the starches in the enzyme generated that can break down starch into sugar. By the malting process. We take those grains mill them in a stone mill here on site Bring them up to the top of the fireplace and we take our hot water. Mix It with the grains steep them for about an hour break those starches inside the grains this complex sugars down into simple sugars and then we'll translate into a third kettle which is directly heated by fire. That will be our boil pedal so once we start boiling. The words is liquid. That will become beer. That sugary liquid from the grain We add hops to it For most recipes we can add other ingredients like in our case coriander AOL that has coriander seed and Chili pepper. we do a squash. Butternut squash added to it so it can do a lot of different things in the boyle in terms of getting flavor into the beer. Of course boiling is what you're safely drink in water once we're done with that will cool the liquid down through a big cooling coil and then we'll ultimately end up in our barrels or or liberal. So it's a big process but we have these three giant copper kettle ones. One hundred gallons are Mash Tun. Excuse me is not directly heated but it is surrounded by so it's insulated so it can uphold that heat during the mash brought us and then our boil. Kettles his wealth can ask questions. You mentioned that it's handling rain. Who GETS THE QUARTERBACK? So that's a little bit in the beginning for the first about three years. We did have a mill that it's kind of funny it was a it was a steel roller mill which is a little bit more modern but housed in a kind of a historic looking setup and that was hand cranked so we actually were hanged cranking one hundred fifty pounds of grain every day for brewing process. That's like an intern. Yes exactly so volunteers. So there's three of us they get paid to do this full-time and we have about twelve men and women who actually come in and help us grew so those on tears are awesome and they help us do a lot of that kind of grunt work but we have since installed a stone mill in here with a little bit more appropriate to the eighteen fifties however that stone mill was designed to be hand cranked. We handmade the gears actually our presidency. Oh built that. He's a pretty skilled. Woodworker and with the gearing ratio. We found that the momentum of those large stones would actually kept the crank arm flailing on its own for about fifteen minutes so a little bit unsafe to you so right now we have a stone mill. That's unfortunately powered by electricity. It's kind of a mishmash so every once in a while we have to kind of put a little bit more modern twist on things just to keep things a little bit safer. But we'll hall up about anywhere between one hundred and a hundred and fifty pounds for per batch and we're a two barrel system so we we make about all things said and done about forty five gallons at finish beer of one batch so and I mean as far as your your other ingredients I mean hops obviously classic ingredient. Where are you sourcing Your House? So we get them from all over unfortunately still moat. The majority of hops are used for the brewing industry in America on the West Coast. So you're Valley Lamb valley places like that over in Oregon Washington and just interested you know from the nineteenth century. Perspective brewers who were working in Ohio Dayton in eighteen fifty would. They've been getting hops from Ohio. Where having from Wisconsin or west coast right so they were growing hops in Ohio for sure so in the eighteen fifties. It was kind of the opposite from now. We'll get them from. The West does in the fifties New York. State UPSTATE NEW YORK. Kind of in the cooper sound area was one of the biggest hop growing region for America Wisconsin but eating sixties with a huge hop growing regions. Ohio state have a significant hop culture? Well brewers would have been getting locally if they could but you also like you talked about earlier with the industrialization of brewing because of those transportation routes he could get hops from all over the place. A lot of brewers were importing hops from Europe from Germany and England. So can apprised tops. Like Hallertau in east can buildings Kim from overseas and so they would ship them and they would bring him in to those transportation route so they could get them smaller. So I mean there's still a little is brought to a certain extent. And then you know your your coriander seed and then you mentioned butternut squash. She kind of what brought you to those ingredients for the historical inspired. Imagine yet definitely so we spent about a year doing research prior to this facility being open just to figure out what we should be brewing. How To brew it? What equipment we needed but we need to build all those things and so we were talking about the year eighteen fifty here which is kind of the very beginning of industrialization for brewing in Dayton. We also have one foot in that early industrial style which would have been a little bit beers that were more used to today or credit more. Commercial Beers. Don't have all those crazy ingredients in them and then one flight back in the eighteen thirties housewife brewing methods. So we find a lot of these recipes. Coriander Ale came from A receipt book Recipe Book from the Eighteen Thirties so it was published in Cincinnati Ohio and it was basically a manual for how to raise a family. Todd receives proper seats for the Husband Minute Housewife Cincinnati. There's a chapter of the book of Brewing Essential part of raising a family and at that time in the eighteen thirties and found listed under the brewery section. Another way to make Ale so there wasn't even a name for it but it just described taking a Bushel of grain and a certain amount of water. Heating it up boiling it to a color which is kind of a funny Whatever that means so that's going to buffer interpretation with that meant back and then a culture coriander seed in Canada Seemed like exotic ingredients. And I think a lot of people think on the frontier wherever people just didn't have anything but then by the eighteen thirties they had the canal system so they could bring in pretty much anything. They want to get so coriander would have been available. They would have been growing slot tro in the and their gardens as well so they could have collected their own grain or seed so Chili Pepper capsicum Chili peppers. So they were bringing those eventually growing them too. So I imagine veterans Washer be something similar like right exactly or or even in the middle of winter. If you didn't have enough grain on hand sometimes these pumpkins. Soi shells even potato or beat. Beer would be dale here as well In January those representative of Beers that you were doing when you run out of grain so you're searching for other starchy from animal sources. And if you had grown wash harvested in the fall you keeping you root cellar and you can take it out and cut up in

Eighteen Thirties Dayton Ohio Wisconsin Carolina America New York Miami Erie Canal ALE Caroline Historica Parker Cincinnati Brewers Gruden Spangler Boyle AOL Cooper Sound Sosa Nutrition Intern
Blockbuster deal: Red Sox agree to trade Mookie Betts, David Price to Dodgers

The Herd with Colin Cowherd

01:38 min | 6 months ago

Blockbuster deal: Red Sox agree to trade Mookie Betts, David Price to Dodgers

"So the dodgers Red Sox have agreed to a blockbuster deal two thousand eighteen. Al Mvp Mookie. Betts and pitcher. David price have been traded to Los Angeles. Is it monkey the second best player in baseball. My crazy I thought it was Mike. Troughton mookie Betts might not now in the three-team team deal the dodgers. Since outfield Alex Vertigo to Boston and Kenza Majeida to the twins and the Red Sox also receive pitching prospects bruised doc from Minnesota clearly. Obviously a money thing for Boston it has they WanNa get below the luxury tax threshold price as a three year. Ninety six nine dollar deal and mookie designed a Deal as well okay. Okay I got a taste of first of all dodgers are very well run and in the dodgers do not spend. They're very smart. They spend a lot more than they do. They have a ton. The dodgers have great farm system and everybody they bring up works like everybody so they spend a lot of money on research and development development. They have passed. They passed on Harper. They passed on Zach grinky they passed on somebody else. That was expensive. Manny Machado. That didn't go all in on him. So for the dodgers to go in on McKee bets. It tells you he's a he's a day. One changed the franchise talents superstar or star. Yes he is the second best player in the sport. I don't know what his war consecutive gold glove last year. Obviously when AOL. MVP and she says. How are the red sox struggling struggling with money? I don't get it. I thought it was the Yankees made the most money because they have the necessary they have a regional network. That's a cash cow so yankees make the most money. Isn't it like dodgers Red Sox.

Dodgers Red Sox Al Mvp Mookie Mookie Betts Manny Machado Yankees Los Angeles MVP Boston Baseball Alex Vertigo David AOL Mike Zach Grinky Kenza Majeida Minnesota Harper Mckee
Bringing Voice to the Elderly with Maarten Lens-FitzGerald of Project Zilver

Bixby Developers Chat

04:16 min | 6 months ago

Bringing Voice to the Elderly with Maarten Lens-FitzGerald of Project Zilver

"I'm with Martin Lens Fitzgerald Martin. Money tell us what you do so bill for over three years now. I'm a voice evangelist. So I helped companies find their way into this new channel. Maybe even a new medium and I do this in Amsterdam so most of Europe is where I work customers like Vodafone. KLM TALL POW all kinds of companies. That I talked to that I help inspire action. He gets simple skills skills or actions going or even help them scale. AWESOME UNWARE HAIR project voice What are you doing a project voice? What do you do you like will here? I am actually sleep tech talking to people about project silver which is my project that helps elderly people yeah get better life uplifting there live using voice technology and it's consorts you. Mike created together with Google in Holland as well as the local AARP and insurer and the government ban and what we found. I'll be sharing this research tomorrow. Is that over. Twenty one percent of the elderly had talked to the vice is already up and running and yeah basically it's a very promising medium medium for them so with the consortium and trying to get customers are basically trying to get organizations to create services for the elderly because Handy Handy. That's great you know. I M super bullish on the elderly invoice because it's not technology they need to learn just talk and and it just works and I think it's one of the. There's such an opportunity for the voice industry to get in and help Italy and have them lead a better life. I it's what I've found with snow already for a year and a half is that it's a flywheel effect I found platforms. They get more users at more of a positive a PR angle. It's not just light bulbs on and often buying flowers knows making people's lives better. There is so much impact their customer or the organizations get more customer service purpose than better and then the elderly whose lives get ab- lifted so and that together it creates like a magic potion if you will and we started now also in Denmark. I'm looking to start in Germany in the UK as well as in the US news. So that's my mission so you touched a bit with talking about your project and silver and elderly but where thirty one of the voice and what do you see it going in next year five years. Where would you like to see it so if I was younger? Now I would steady the anthropology collagen emerging tech. So how do you emerge a new channel like voice. This is my fourth new medium or fifth new medium. started out web did email we all did. Mobil did augmented reality. And now this and so where are we now. And what's going to happen. It's Daily. I wonder I ponder that so on one one hand I think are we still. I wonder are we at the gopher stage of see remember ads. Remember that this tree whip creates are are we at compuserve and AOL live at further was walled gardens which suites the platforms aren't or are we at the stage age. Where you had just Nokia blackberry but no iphone or android and I think we are before the iphone moment of voice and Actually Salihi standing in the sand or that? I think the approach that bixby house is one of the key next generation approaches that we need that is different than almost the APP model. which you find with Amazon with herbals? I'm really yeah following. Let's go on with gigs. Because I think that is very well. Thank you very much. Yeah we're trying to push the industry forward and you know we have very able and great competitors and I think it's all it's all just a rising tide for all going on right now. So Martin. People want to follow what you're doing project silver or yourself. How would they keep in contact with Zilmer with a z dot com where we will publish publish our research results next week? We'll be launching tomorrow here in formerly the next we could we Downloadable as a pdf and then if we want to know more about me use me in your company any any which way as a talk as it were jobs or helped me help. Create Services Lens Dash Fitzgerald Dot Com. Everything's they're awesome pleasure talking to you. Martin

Martin Lens Fitzgerald Martin Amsterdam Aarp Vodafone Europe Mobil Google Bixby House Holland Zilmer Compuserve Nokia Italy Denmark United States Germany Mike Amazon
How Tech Has Changed Over the Past 10 Years

Talking Tech

02:30 min | 8 months ago

How Tech Has Changed Over the Past 10 Years

"Listeners already. So hey it's that time of the year when we look back. Get some of the great things that happened. But Hey it's twenty nine thousand nine hundred twenty twenties right around the corner. Let's look back at the decade at Beg from USA has just written a great piece. About how tech has changed in the last ten years. And he's here with US ed. Hi I'm doing fine. So when you compiled old ten years into one little article what jumped out at you. Well it's Funny Jeff. The very first word of my articles what jumped in my in my head when I look back at twenty ten Dan Alexa in twenty ten beginning of the year. If I said you Alexa you'd go. WHO's that some female name right? Well of course we know Alexa became through the decade. The Voice of the Amazon Echo and numerous other products Alexa helped Echo in some of the other voices. We've gotten familiar with like the Google assistant so on so that was not not around at the start of the decade. How about Uber? Had anyone taken a an uber ride in two thousand ten. nope not yet. That was still a ways off and even facebook which was starting to get really popular around the start of the decade. You know that's when he started notice. Wow everybody I know is starting to show up here. You know kid kid I went to elementary. School is here in person. I went to summer camp with his ear. That started to become a big deal at the start of the decade of course later on on facebook Not only got really big but started having all these privacy and data scandals and and all of that so those are some of the things that immediately leapt to mind and we we can talk about particular products. The IPAD hadn't even launched in twenty ten in early two thousand ten it. It was introduced by Steve Jobs in January that year and then came out in the spring and of course instagram. The other big up that a lot of people use yeah instagram. I mean you can go down the list of things that were not there in two thousand ten and certainly and you know we're something of a big deal by the end of the decade chrome Os and Chromebooks for example Warren around yet And think also about some of the companies that were dominant at the start of the decade. No longer the case obviously blackberry. Nokia nose or to to that immediately leapt to mind. I'll give you two more Yahu. AOL I mean they're still around but their shells of their former self. We used to wake up every morning and look at our Yahoo and do my yahoo you know to a portal

Alexa Dan Alexa Facebook USA Echo Nokia Yahoo Google Steve Jobs Blackberry Jeff AOL Chromebooks Warren Ten Years
Former Wall Street Analyst Goes All-in on Crypto w/ Lou Kerner

CRYPTO 101

09:24 min | 9 months ago

Former Wall Street Analyst Goes All-in on Crypto w/ Lou Kerner

"Give the one on one on Lou Kerner. Who are you in? How did you come? into the CRYPTO world. Sure will real quick The first part of my career was a Wall Street analysts last four years Goldman in sacks I then ran a couple in companies including the top level domain dot TV and the social network vote which was largest social network in the world before my space Angel invested for a number of years before starting a small DC in two thousand twelve. After a couple of years I became a Ortner at a firm called flight ventures We did about ten percent of everything on the list was a one of our deals And I I ran. The Israel Founders Syndicate for flight has invested in companies founded by Israelis wherever they live and that was awesome. And I saw the your yeah. I joked that I'd gone down. The crypto rapid whole long enough two thousand thirteen two thousand fourteen That Wall Street Journal wrote a story on Bitcoin. Quoting voting me as wall. Street's Bitcoin expert but as I say you know I looked at the light look polite but I did not see it in June twenty ninth two thousand seventeen that I the crypto light in Crypto twenty four seven. Ever since that's really fascinating. So what are your ears on the ground back in the traditional finance world saying about crypto these. Today's is still being left out or are they treating it. I imagine like all the all your buddies over at your old trading desk or whatever They still laugh at it or they. They think it's a real thing what's their deal. I mean I think they're largely laughing at it. I think like most people. They don't understand it. I think it's really funny. That go there are obviously a lot of naysayers but not one of them ever points out. I mean there are a lot of negative things you can say about bitcoin. If you really understand bitcoin but the naysayers they say never say any of those things because they don't really understand it I think there was a more motivation for them to understand it when Bitcoin was twenty thousand. Now that it's eight thousand. They conceal they. They feel like they were right not suspended anytime one hundred percent I mean. What do you think come defy? We talk about defy lot decentralized finance and what's kind of your vision for how this is going to progress and you know there's one side of the the camp that maybe thinks that defy is going to you know in the next ten years re architect all the traditional financial structures that are currently apparently in place. Right where you're gonNA have no longer. You no middlemen and you know but for exchange brokers and all this stuff. It's going to be all peer to peer and encounter. The other camp is that there's just going to be an alternative system but the traditional structures will still be in place so just kind of interested just off the bat to hear what your your opinion would be sure. So I'm a big believer in Marez law. He was a professor at Stanford in the seventies when he coined it. No Maris law is the fact that the impact of all great technology crypto is overestimated in the short run into underestimated in the long run. So yeah people get really excited I did. And then when it's not huge overnight people say oh it's not a thing and I think to some degree that's where we are and you know I think whether it's five years Kenya's for twenty ears. The impact is technology's going to be far greater than anybody sex but I also think that that what it ends up feed is also different than what anybody thinks it's going going to be and generally things don't totally rebuilt new things generally don't totally replace old things. Mike is is that you know what you'll see is an emergence urgence of a new way of doing a new asset class similar to your forty years ago there weren't any junk bonds and then Michael Milkin created in every other bank on Wall Street said it was trash and garbage and they would never do it and now forty years later. It's the exact same thing for the exact same way traded the exact same places as everything else house and I believe. That's where CRYPTOS. So what can the average person do to change their financial fate today. I mean you know exactly how all the systems work is there any really simple things that the average consumer can really do to change their life without getting a brand new job or up ruining their house and moving short. Look I'm I'm a big believer in a lot of the very trite seines. Would pop says about get off zero a big believer that you know the ideas. Even if you don't I don't understand it The way to understand it is to start investigating start reading and start understanding what it is and the I believe in science sir something called Portfolio Science and it would tell you just by a little bit. You know every period of time whether it's every day week month on said state you cost cost average over time and you know depending on how you risk averse or risk seeking you. Are you know you should only put. A percentage edge of your assets. Encrypted shouldn't be one hundred percent in it I know Ansi pompilio talks about like half his assets speeding crypto. And that's that's a very very very aggressive. I think if you put ten percent of your assets in Crypto that's stats on on the high end. Would I would suggest most people give him the volatility and given the significant wrist. But I'm in Bitcoin because I think it's it's the world's most amazing asymmetric bet in other words. Of course you could lose one hundred percent of your bat but you know what other opportunities do. Most people have to get a Tan acts or twenty x one hundred x like you have the opportunity of doing with Bitcoin one hundred percent and I think a lot of us here probably listening you know maybe went a little overboard on that ten percent allocation uh-huh missing zero. Yeah and I get some people or twenty or thirty percent. Yoed all depends. I think where you are or in life. Yeah I've got three kids. I've got a lot of college paid for so you can't afford a ninety nine percent drawdown aids. Learn about not being able to go to college but I really thought big always going to be a thing to be like the worst father in America. I love it loo- Lou tell us a little bit more about this. A symmetry that you're talking about what is an asymmetric bet mean and are there any other examples in history. Look you know I think we all see. I was an equity analyst on Wall Street and one of the first lessons that I learned when I got there in nineteen ninety four was oh my God. The market is really efficient. And that's why in traditional finance. You what we've seen gene is a growth of ATS which enable people to get very diversified portfolios at very low cost and that has been the smartest way way for ninety nine point nine percent of investors to play the investing game whether it's inequities real estate or bonds is through. ETF's through minimizing the minds in the cost in getting diversified portfolio. But myself you know as an equity analyst my job was was to give investors. Good ideas yes and I really felt that if I came up with one really good idea where I saw something that other people didn't see if that happened once a year. That was a really good year. If I sign as metric bet in other words I saw that I thought that the upside was yoked significantly greater than the downside You know in you know given the risks involved also and so kind of my first asymmetric bet that I saw was American line. I was the first analyst large Investment Bank to pick up coverage of America Online in Nineteen Ninety six. And that's all right exactly and that you know that had over the subsequent for ears you know more than one hundred x On that it doesn't come along very often I think. Did you see something that other people don't because markets it's a really efficient. You know so now I feel like I come up with a good idea once every three or four years and so I my hope is is that creek. Does the last good idea that. Actually I'm going to execute on because I think this is the biggest thing in the history of humanity and I have absolutely no interest in moving over its any or sunny optics Holy Crap. I mean there's just so much to unpack in that that lasts two minutes. Where do I want to start? I guess the first question. I'll I'll just unpack pack. I WANNA talk about efficient versus inefficient markets. And I want to also talk about what it was that you saw in. AOL that made you so bullish and see. If there's anything anything similar any you know fly Hallmarks that are similar in a crypto. But I also WanNa talk about you know why you think Cryptos the biggest first thing in the world so there's three things there but let's just start with inefficient verse. Efficient markets unpack that for us. Cher look at the truth is is your information is your more available today been ever and your investment in these companies is based on the information so everybody has the same information. It's a question of what they do with it

Bitcoin Cryptos Lou Kerner Wall Street Journal America Israel Equity Analyst Goldman Founders Syndicate Kenya Cher AOL Michael Milkin Fly Hallmarks Nineteen Ninety Portfolio Science Professor Mike
Bitcoins Consolidation Continues

The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

05:21 min | 10 months ago

Bitcoins Consolidation Continues

"Get everybody welcome to try equipped Craig speaking well yeah talk about what a great little bit happened a little bit little bit a little bit of course we say also getting bit of bashing at the minute not all not all of course sir but many are taking bit of fumble backwards at the moment was saying some some downturns kicking back into play which is fine because it's just about knowing where to look for your opportunities and for the moment we really focus will I'm really focused on looking against the US day good margin opportunities available wants to USDA Suits may take two boxes on right now bitcoin looking he's up so files and closed up just yet because that will happen just a little while but the the level of bounced off as it as intesting twice snap is of significance to me you say it was the old lows thereabouts of two thousand and also of the pullbacks if you recall when we ran up fourteen thousand ish we did pull back to alot of non thousand four and of course we do know it went lower than that but that was the point at which we did really true selves into bit more downward momentum on that weekly hauling front now we're finding some support around that level have tested across two days now the first thing the twenty seventh of course today the twenty knots while today in Australia's thirtieth but you get what point the twenty ninth will of tested that lows well we do have a bullish candle that in currently two thousand four hundred fifty two dollars it's actually up two point four six percent so looking quite good there as far as green goes WANNA stay with us throughout the day the midterm times racial me all that much on Bitcoin to theorem definitely a painting a very different picture there of course it's theorem now pushing on two hundred ninety two dollars it's up point three five percent today and getting reading on on those low a timeframe talking about four out of the two hours worn out so and so forth some NAS looking trends up they could convergence moving averages of fanning of course looking for boosters and cradles look down less timeframe throughout to dive trading charities on AOL dolls and forty one cents consolidating around just below three dollars sixty really not a great deal happened off the push to the quickly last Friday but it is holding it rondos highs and I'm I'm just waiting to see what it does next we're GONNA move heart will a halt we do if we do move higher than it will kicks Trenton and will look a lot better for Mavi now three dollars and forty one cents up three points six two percent still aluminum don't want syllabus very little dog looking at six point six six cents very must numbers up three point three percent right now except a guy in another one of those in a consolidation Ryan drought now hovering around thirty cent mocks struggling to re- Mike above thirty one and push on if it was to do that it'll be more than happy to look for opportunities to try it it's up two point six four percents thirty cents right now lot sixty in fourteen cents again another one consoled with bitter resistance of ahead sixty two it nonsense caller ID three dollars around that region sixty say sixty one dollars Sixty what is the bloody number Mabel case sixty around sixty one sixty two bitter resistance through they're studying exactly exact level but we sort of looking around sixty one sixty two bitter resistance through that I wanna say push on before really look to take any traits he wants to solicit comeback much of saying showing up there on theory at the moment with a NAS trend kicking in as a six dollars and fourteen cents on at three point eight nine percent bitcoin cash one of the top performers in the top ten today as few tease therefore you nostrand there on the four hours I look at this law opposite up on voting charities from myself and some of the garden goes within the community this just Monday gone the paternity whether took up to what you did obviously the other day I think USA die before there was a little Bush Channel Four hours well but currently twenty wasn't seventy two cents many that have taken a little boost of the time went out on Mach v would be well beyond one to one wrought NASA profitable try to three point nine percent trump will the big winner for the day as trump two point two cents of eleven point one four percent just rocking on charging pretty heavily to the upside Breaking into a nice up trend Derek Dine on the daily and also the weekly now starting together a little momentum it's been a long time coming for Tron let's see how long it lasts Kadhafi four point three cents up two points four seven percent right now and again looking a little flat I names to move I was consolidating range much the same as many of the other markets in the top ten of the Mon falling on the very consolidation holding around that one city with those all resistance now acting is a little bit as a poet sitting at one hundred forty two dollars three percent right now so throughout the day guys we're going to wait and see what could see how these Ma closes and act accordingly

Craig Three Dollars Three Percent Two Thousand Four Hundred Fift Two Hundred Ninety Two Dollars One Hundred Forty Two Dollars Eight Nine Percent Four Seven Percent Three Five Percent Sixty One Dollars Four Six Percent One Four Percent Six Two Percent Nine Percent Six Dollars Four Hours Two Hours Two Days
BITCOIN BOOM! Was That China Knocking?

The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

07:14 min | 10 months ago

BITCOIN BOOM! Was That China Knocking?

"Xena massive massive move most of you probably well aware of it I've seen three days to die full percent up the Friday it ended up if fraud up sixteen point four five percent arguably off the back of the the news China seems to be embracing crypto assets blockchain and Hopefully things cost big on the missile this Saturday really hot a guy and we ended up undeclared a six point eight two percent but at one stage and a wealthy claud was ninety two hundred but that was twelve hundred dollars lower than the high of that candle we did Max out at ten thousand four hundred eighty nine now currently as I said before four point three percent it's nine thousand six hundred sixty three US day look really it's it's one of those looking really awesome looking really nasty going out as far as anything else goes housing there on the data that was some strong divergence on that loss bright law it did one thing that's on the high timeframes was definitely clearly then I'm certainly not suggesting that a cold this movie will try to this because I did not I there's nothing the trading wise would call it this is as simple as on the nobody could a quote this move with anything other than luck or in Saudi for my absolute inside insider trading but I have been wrongful Doug we'll be wrong a guy in as it stands right now bitcoin because it's just moves so you know so radically is really great deal there for me at the minute the trend coming to play better on the four US going to move to the tune we we did see a northbound one thousand two by the way with two stunning to try and do something the one hour well there is a trend that now there is a trend there little bullish candle there with nine minutes to go until it closes now nominates from now which is what I'm actually recording this will actually be for me the second of a ten sorry a non am in the morning here in pseudo name so yeah not a great deal on Bitcoin as it stands skip through the records and talk about theory and well it do also had a very strong performance on Friday closing up twelve point eight nine percent a down day on Saturday night full so what a great deal but it did sort of hinted was trying to break two hundred filed once guy and filed a around that region twice as receives at one eighty six and forty up three point three a one percent right now on a guy naught really that attractive mate for the way that I'll try trends AOL Agai still performance on the fraud sixteen point seven three percent not three dollars thirty three cents currently it's up six percents and not a bad move to die there on the old else mad dog and a little bit of a trend Loyd shop shot look we did have update on the Friday six point five nine percent then we will whipped gyn down two point two seven on Saturday and today we're at three point John was sitting at six point four cents diner remains a very ugly little jot their exile pay well look I mean there's one thing I can't study about X. does seem to be another level over resistance in there on the thirty cent mark it his fawning a bit of having a bit of a hard time getting through in a did before a minute if you recall back in four sorry wrong I'm looking at the daily if you recall back Ellen is that was four out that way thirty cents is another great deal on a four hour on the dial level to get through is really around thirty three cents it's a bit of an ugly to be fair the fraud is a big move was eight the biggest on the Saturday down point flat and again today where up point nine on twenty nine point seven cents a lot going while had obviously taken advance that move on Friday with the the fraud I can't closing up fourteen point eight nine percent everything was sort of lagging bitcoin. bitcoin definitely the dawn performer across the the markets on that Friday session actually woke up to its Saturday morning but it was a Friday. US session that really sort of kicked in US and Europe Lachlan Sixty dollars flat to right now on the nose fof went to nine percent and have argued moved a guy it's bit over the shopping bitcoin cash I'll look very strong rejection of that ought to I ninety one that I've been talking about quite some time you know we saw twenty one point four percent I think bitcoin cash was the largest move at a lot bitcoin was there show bitcoin cash definitely a following up the Sorry bitcoin cash I believe it was the biggest mover with Bitcoin just behind it quite sure what up it have a very strong moving to die out three point two four percent at two hundred and sixty dollars and forty four cents Bonnet is a little well known as much as the assistant alleged Moore I guess so's Ten percent I love that only so a ten percent on the Friday then we went into Saturday eight point nine percent it did really well on the on the fraud I fifteen percent today up thirteen percent so far of the couples guy really really strong looking job there Arafat a basically they just want to pull back in just waiting for those trends to reestablish himself before we get to into the mix Cada two cents up three point fives six also it was ten percent on the night on Friday the Nautilus Movement since then to Buffet Bitcoin S. V. Lemay moving quite well for walnut apple Buckingham hoping to see a little bullish candle that did not get one and from the nine point one five saint twenty five percent full wohlfarth percent and today at one point four percent as a matter of fact pulled back into Tokyo through I'm saying here since it pulled back in its most radim pullback another we've seen a sixty seven rise in bitcoin cash why the it's just moved so right now from me to you I am looking at this market and just waiting for that clarity there is some transient that will be keeping an eye on what he's well what we have saying is some big moves may look at Nair Nair is eighteen percent today and nine percent yesterday I don't know what that's off the back Oh this is a guy bitcoins even with bitcoin strong performance near has outpaced its odds about big patient waiting for the opportunities to arrive Tanaz pullbacks coming in now when we look at the rockets so those pullbacks represent some good opportunities and say you have a great guys and those viewing Sydney get get your spot with very soon ended about which is fast approaching Boffa now

United States Fraud Nair Nair Europe Boffa Lemay Arafat Moore Tokyo Sydney Nine Percent Eight Nine Percent Four Percent Ten Percent Twelve Hundred Dollars Seven Three Percent Twenty Five Percent Eight Two Percent Five Nine Percent Four Five Percent
Open your cold calls with personalization - Jason Bay

Daily Sales Tips

04:34 min | 10 months ago

Open your cold calls with personalization - Jason Bay

"I'm your host Scott Ingram today Jason Bay from blissful prospecting is back with his regular weekly prospecting tip here's parents house making cold calls with one of our clients earlier this week in the work for one of the largest shearer 'cause we're we're training them on this right now and the energy a pretty good job of it already but there are some things that came up in the call that we've been working on that that'd be really good to share you're making cold calls and for whatever reason people are getting angry or they might not be interested or you you might just be looking for you might be doing this really well on just looking for a different way of approaching this so I wanted to share a tactic this working really well for them and it's opening up with personalization so hopefully you're already doing research on prospects and you have a reason for reaching out but oftentimes here is that people don't really mention what that reason is and soon enough in the call in get the prospect talking about that in a way that's going to engage them and get them more receptive to meeting with you later so the way that I like to open up cold calls in a lot of this is supported from Gong. AOL is you know. Hey this is Jason Bay with blissful prospecting how have you been in you look the prospect talk that line how have you been lot of evidence in data around that like I said I'll link to the Gong article so you can see more about opening minds but I love that one you get them talking in the personal typically say good you know what's up how can I help you or they might ask you how you're doing in either case you're going to have a really short dialogue there and then you WanNa go straight to the point the reason for my call is in this is where you want to actually answer the personalization so I'll give you a couple of weeks apples here so in the commercial real estate example a lot of times what we're seeing their when they're calling into what's referred to as multi market account with multiple locations we're looking for triggers that might indicate that they're expanding or mergers and acquisitions might be another trigger that they might need some help from a broker Susan Hey the reason for my call is I noticed that you guys are closing down a few of your locations and you mentioned in one of your shareholder us that you're focused on consolidating those locations right now so I opened up with something personal to that prospect and that's going to grab their attention right you're the second thing you WanNa do have engaging question that you can ask and this could be as simple as so how's the consolidation coming along so far hey are you guys having any challenges because sometimes what I hear when consolidating is people deal with this type of challenge is that something that you guys are running up against right now or something that's top of mind for you so personalization have your reason for the call have that personalization and I had another episode about this on daily sales tips that you should check out but make sure that personalization is connected to how you might build to help them and then you need to ask engage in question so I'm going to give you one more example so let's say I'm cold calling for prospecting services which is what we saw prospecting services training that sort of thing you hey tom near the reason for my call all is I noticed that you guys are hiring Sdr's right now and it looks like you guys have added three str's in the last three or four months and I was wondering how do you guys typically handle you know prospecting between str's in as I know that for some companies they want their as prospecting US curious how how does a lot of their own prospecting sometimes they don't etc in asking them a question related to that to get them talking so make sure when you're doing your call calls out that personalization open up with something that actually shows you did your research and then ask engage in question that will get them talking about it if you appreciate Jason's tip six after you've connected with Jason be sure to come back tomorrow for another great sales tip thanks for listening

Jason Bay Scott Ingram Shearer AOL Four Months
"aol" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

04:52 min | 1 year ago

"aol" Discussed on TechStuff

"And by that, I mean oath so right now, it looks a little grim in the short term for people who work at both Verizon is offering up a voluntary separation program. That's a nice way of saying we need we need some of you guys to leave. We need a lot of you guys to leave and we're offering up a package if you take this package, you're going to get some compensation, you're gonna get some severance pay, and we don't have to have the pain of going through a list, and deciding who we're going to lay off so this is to try and take as many of those people out of the decision making process of hoodoo layoff as possible. But if they don't meet the goal for the number of people who depart they will start laying off employees the estimate right now is that the company expects to shed ten thousand four hundred employees total. This is Oliver is not necessarily just from oath by June two thousand nineteen as for oath specifically. And that filing Verizon said that the company quote has experienced increased competitive and market pressures throughout two thousand eighteen that resulted in lower than expected revenues and earnings. These pressures are expected to continue and have resulted in a loss of market positioning to our competitors in the digital advertising business into quote. So in other words, what sort of saying is, hey, those guys who were in charge earlier, you know, not us. But those other guys who used to lead the company they thought we were going to do way better than what we actually are doing right now. Now, but they weren't able to an -ticipant the market conditions or how well our competitors. We're going to do. But we, you know, the new guys who are in charge. Now, we have to deal with the mess that they left, and we also understand it's going to be really tough over the next few years. That's essentially what the filing says. And it's a warning this that says don't expect us to turn this around overnight. So what is going to happen next for oath or specifically to ALL? That's something of an open question as a record this episode. And maybe by the time you hear it. It will have been answered it may be that Verizon will decide to spin off the company after all because Vesper doesn't really seem all that interested in developing a media company, it's not likely to go away because the companies still does generate revenue it's not like, it's hemorrhaging money left. And right, and it's just not the transformative property that. Verizon was hoping it would be when it made the acquisition. Which again, I think you could argue convincingly would be the full history of AOL Behrens, by the way has an article that cites Wells Fargo analyst, Jennifer Fritz, and she wrote that quote, the hype of oath has been over for some time while we believed in the white board concept of oath, offering a new digital advertiser of choice beyond Google and Facebook, we think this has been an uphill fight for Verizon without a significant amount of scale and content ownership end quote, and that's the story of AOL so far from a startup in the nineteen eighties. The provided a bulletin board like service to Commodore sixty four users all the way up to a cog in an enormous multibillion dollar global corporate machine that's giving off a little smoke at the moment. The upcoming departures and layoffs will likely mean things will continue to change. For folks over at AOL. But hopefully, those who are working in the content side will continue to have gainful employment as someone who creates stuff for the internet podcasts, the occasional article. I feel a lot of empathy for people who work at other companies that go through these big changes, I've gone through changes like that multiple times myself, I've been very fortunate so far, but you can't take that for granted those things can really shake things up, and it's a huge impact on the lives of real people. So I hope it turns out for the best for everybody concern that is the conclusion of the AOL story so far America on line probably has several years left in its history. Sure. Hope it does hope it doesn't just go away. So I'll probably have to do an update a follow up episode at some point in the future. But this was a really fascinating story to look into very complicated from a business. Perspective, but interesting and connected to so many other companies whether directly through mergers and acquisitions or through competition, if you guys have any suggestions for future episodes of tech stuff..

"aol" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:31 min | 1 year ago

"aol" Discussed on TechStuff

"Better in quote, AOL had also changed in another way, it changed from corporation into a limited liability company. Now, they get into the differences between an LLC and a corporation in the United States is more than a little beyond the scope of tech stuff. But it mostly has to do with how profits and losses are handled. And it also has to do a lot with how accompany is taxed so we're not going to dive into all that. I'm sure most of you don't really care. Honestly, it gets pretty dull pretty fast, but the following year AOL made another big change in moved its headquarters which had been in Dulles Virginia ever since the founding of the company now it was going to move to New York City. It also laid off about two thousand employees or about forty percent of its. Entire workforce. This move was largely to refocus AOL on its advertising business as the dial upside continued to dwindle, though is still generating revenue at that point. This was two thousand seven and and just for reference two thousand seven also when apple introduced the iphone. So the iphone comes out people are still using dial up modems enough for ails division to be profitable. That's not the last humble talk about dial up though, anyway, ails new headquarters were closer to Time Warner's H Q, and it was also much closer to the advertising world in general the advertising world in the United States is almost entirely based out of New York City. So this was putting AOL close to where the advertising businesses thrived AOL also would change CEO's Jonathan Miller who had been leading the company up to that point was replaced by a guy named Randy Falco AOL made some acquisitions many. Of which did not turn out. So well, so for example in two thousand eight A O L acquired a social networking site called Bibo. It's not that well known in the United States, but it was the second largest social network in the UK after Facebook back in two thousand eight Bibo could boast twenty two million unique visitors and they spent an average time of forty minutes a day on the service, which sounds like a pretty attractive bargain. You can go to an advertiser and say I can guarantee you the millions of people are going to look at this for forty minutes every day, and you're going to be able to sell a lot of ads so Ayla would.

"aol" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"aol" Discussed on TechStuff

"After the dot com crash. However that value dropped to five billion, according to some accounts. Although honestly, most accounts say the value was closer to twenty billion the whether it's five or twenty both of which are enormous numbers. Get don't get me wrong billion as allot that's such a huge drop from two hundred billion by two thousand five the number. According to some sources had climbed a little bit. It was moving in the right direction. Both still. Will a fraction of what AOL had been prior to the merger and the time of the merger. AOL had the higher market capitalization between the two companies, but Time Warner was making way more revenue. So you can look at this as indicative of the whole dot com problem in the first place yet these internet based companies that were valued much much greater than what they could actually pay off in. They their value was greater than they're worth. And that was really the issue that led to the dot com bubble bursting in the first place, the culture clash never settled down between the two companies. They weren't able to find a good equilibrium. The AOL executives felt their traditional media counterparts. Just didn't get how business on the internet worked. They were probably right. But the Time Warner executives saw AOL as wasteful and filled to the brim with hubris. Accompany just was convinced that the way it did things was the right way. And that it was building a business on a product that was clearly on the way out that being dial up service than the Time Warner executives were kinda, right? No one was holy in the wrong hair. Other than the fact that this partnership was holy in a wrong. In fact, by two thousand three just a few years after this merger AOL Time Warner began to drop the AOL part from its name became to just call itself. Time Warner again, keep in mind AOL was the company that technically made the acquisition. It's technically the company that bought Time Warner. But now the collective entity was casually ignoring the online part of its identity in two thousand five AOL and Tele pictures productions a division from Warner Brothers would create TMZ. And if you're not aware of. What that is. Consider yourself fortunate. It's a tabloid news website, that's mainly focused on following celebrities around and publishing everything it can about the celebrities and has been one of the more successful properties to come out of the AL and Time Warner days. So I'm pretty snarky about the whole thing. I don't really like TMZ and the way they do business. However, I cannot deny that it's been a money maker. It has been very successful. Whether I like it or not. So I mean, you know, they they're the ones who became really rich on it. So what do I know and two thousand six America Online officially changed its name to ALL CEO. John Miller said that the reason for this change was that getting America Online would bit that had been the old mission of the company to get America Online. So that's why it called himself America Online. But he said the company did that we've done. On that already. We achieved our goal. So this new name indicates the quote expanded mission to make everyone's online experience.

"aol" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

03:11 min | 1 year ago

"aol" Discussed on TechStuff

"Com. Bubble bursting and be pretty much on track for what about to say. But essentially, you had an intense era of few years in which investors were speculating wildly on the performance of various internet connected businesses. Many of those businesses flush with cash from investors realize that they didn't know how to make any money they failed to become profitable. Some of them failed to even develop a coherent business plan companies achieved a market value that didn't reflect their real value. And eventually there was a reckoning the house of cards grew too heavy, and it crumbled as investors lost confidence that they would ever see long term returns. And they began to try and retrieve their investments in pull out of the market. This led to an overall economic recession and AOL Time Warner was hit just like everyone else, then they lost a whole lot of value because of it in the wake of that economic stumble AOL had to write off forty five point five billion dollars in the fourth quarter of two thousand and two and that led to the loss of another forty four point nine billion dollars in all it was a nearly ninety nine billion dollar loss. When the dust had settled Steve case stepped down as chairman of the board, though, he remained a member of the board of directors. Ted Turner who had founded Turner Broadcasting resigned as vice chairman of the board one big development that people at AOL and Time Warner perhaps should have realized before talking about a merger was the. General trend toward broadband service. Because ALL was a dial up service. You would connect your phone to a modem and your modem connected to your computer, and you would actually dial up to connect to AOL servers. Well, broadband was slowly gaining traction. And this would allow an always on connection. You wouldn't have to dial up. You just would turn on your computer. And then away you go like most technologies. However, it was really expensive when it debuted. In fact, prohibitively expensive for most people, and it was also very limited in its accessibility. Not very many people had access to it. But as years went by and more companies invested in building out the infrastructure. The accessibility improved prices began to come down the number of households in the United States with broadband connections jumped fifty percent from two thousand to two thousand one that is it increased by fifty percent. That's great growth, but it doesn't necessarily tell you anything about numbers because if you have four customers in two thousand and six customers in two thousand one that's an increase of fifty percent. But by two thousand. Three the FCC estimated that just under forty percent of American households were subscribed to broadband services and ails main business was quickly changing..

AOL Time Warner Ted Turner Turner Broadcasting FCC vice chairman United States chairman Steve fifty percent ninety nine billion dollar five billion dollars nine billion dollars forty percent
"aol" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"aol" Discussed on TechStuff

"But one designed by a leader in the space for some people halo meant the internet. That was what they thought of it some people called AOL internet for dummies. But a lot of people just thought AOL, that's how you get on the internet. So on the surface, all of the seemed incredibly attractive other companies were worried that this merger was going to mean, there is going to be a new giant media company and soon it was going to become a monopoly, and it would either run you out of business or it was going to gobble. Oh, you up and acquire you. That's something that love folks are saying right now about Disney not to mention some other pretty big companies like AT and T, but this all came from a high level conceptual mindset when it came to actually bringing the two major companies together things fell apart pretty quickly. The corporate cultures were drastically different. Time Warner executives saw AOL executives as being impetuous, brash and arrogant, AOL executives viewed their Time Warner counterparts as being stuffy and conservative and risk averse to the point of complacency and this mismatch in perspectives meant there were very few instances of people actually working together across company lines. They were frequently feeling like they were at cross purposes working against each other making things even worse was the general economy now as I said the deal. Happened before the dot com, bubble burst. But then that bubble did burst. And I've talked about the dot com. Bubble so many times, and I'm sure some of you probably could pause the podcast right now and give an overview in my voice about the dot.

AOL Time Warner Disney AT
"aol" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

03:58 min | 1 year ago

"aol" Discussed on TechStuff

"So your family always comes back to a well lit home. And one of the wonderful things about Caserta is that it's not like other smart lighting systems. You might think you have to replace all the light bulbs in your house. And that's not the case Caserta by lutron makes regular bulbs smart by replacing the switch not the bulb. And here's why that's great. The average home has about forty five light bulbs, but only about twenty switches, so it's not nearly so much work. And it's not as expensive either. All you need is a screwdriver and about fifteen minutes. Now, I've done this in my house. I've replaced a switch. It was way easier than I even -ticipant it'd and before I knew it. I had the smart light. System working in my house. So get smart lighting, the smart way with Caserta by lutron searched for Caserta, that's C A S E A Caserta by lutron. Welcome home to peace of mind. In November nineteen ninety eight AOL announced it was buying Netscape Communications corporation, which was the company that created the Netscape Navigator web browser. Netscape Navigator is a fascinating story all on its own and I'll have to do a full birth to death episode on it in the future. But here's some highpoints market-driven who while it college had worked on an early web browser called NC SA mosaic saw the potential and a web browser for the average person. He partnered with Jim Clark of Silicon Graphics to start a new company ultimately called Netscape Communications corporation and bring this vision to life. The first version of this browser was called mosaic, but after some threats of legal unpleasantness, they would change it to Netscape Navigator. Now this all started in nineteen ninety four by nineteen ninety five it had become the dominant web. Browser largely because there wasn't very much competition. If I'm being totally honest Netscape became a publicly traded company in nineteen ninety five and had a company valuation of almost three billion dollars of very early startup unicorn by ninety nineteen Ninety-six things were different because Microsoft started to really go after the web browser market with its own web browser Internet Explorer, then there's all the different stuff about Microsoft, incorporating, Internet, Explorer into windows, and and then also downplaying the ability to use other browsers on windows based machines, we won't get into all that. But in ninety eight Netscape announced it would release the source code that the company had used to build Netscape communicator, which was a suite of programs beyond just the web browser. This. Intern would become the action that would bring Mozilla into being and Mozilla would have inch. Produce the fire FOX web browser who by the time AOL announced intention of acquiring Netscape, Internet Explorer had already caught up and taken the lead in the web browser market share. But it wasn't like Netscape was down for the count. It had been the dominant player. It was now number two. There was every reason to think the company could come back with a new version of its browser and went back some folks, so go back and forth between Netscape and Internet Explorer. So it was definitely still an attractive company when AOL made its proposal which was for four point two billion dollars a princely sum. This deal would end up being a not so good one for either party, though, it's not the very bad deal that I referred to in the episode title. Anyone who has been through a merger or an acquisition knows? There's always an adjustment as different departments hash things out cultures attempt..

Netscape Communications corpor Caserta AOL lutron Jim Clark Microsoft Silicon Graphics Intern Mozilla three billion dollars two billion dollars fifteen minutes
"aol" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

03:13 min | 1 year ago

"aol" Discussed on TechStuff

"And then got wildly popular now might as well stick with aimed for right now before getting back to AOL at large ale would go onto by miraculous, which operated the icy cute chat app. Aim would power apples. I I chat app, although that would change in later versions of idiot and Microsoft in an effort to take some of the steam out of AOL's engine built a version of MSN messenger. That could communicate with aim users. So you could use MSN messenger and send chats to people who are using aim, and they can talk back to you. This actually made the aim team, really? Angry because it meant that people would be able to communicate with aim users without actually downloading aim themselves. And so began a back and forth war in which AOL would block Microsoft's chat app and Microsoft would engineer new version of MSN messenger. That would get around this block, and that happened more than twenty times back and forth until the AL team sent a threat to Microsoft. They essentially said if you insist on making the MS N messenger app compatible with aim we will use that connection to infect your servers. With malware the threat convinced Microsoft back down also. Yikes. That's like some sort of nerd gangster stuff right there. This is a nice computer database. He gut he it'd be a real shame of someone. I don't know infected with viruses. Apologize for the terrible. Accent aim always existed a little outside of ALL because it was a standalone app that wasn't in the walled garden of the AOL experience. It was seen by AOL executives as being a bit risky over on the AOL side, the company could curate the customer experience the stuff that they would see before they would connect to the internet at large was completely under the control of the company. So they could censor it. They can make sure that there was no objectionable material showing up in front of people. Right. They would just make sure that it was all company approved content, but aim was outside of this garden, and you couldn't control what other users might say or share and kept in adding features like file sharing voice support stuff. Like that. Many of them would be copied into later, tools like Skype, but over time and began to lose influence other tools were. Coming up. Some would allow users to communicate through multiple chat services using a single client. Some were connected to the blossoming social networking sites. And that was where LA the chat was moving to aim became less relevant over the years starting in two thousand and two AOL began to scale back the aim team this happened each year from two thousand to two thousand five then in two thousand twelve the only team members who were kept on were support staff who just made sure that the service wasn't going to collapse on it self by then aim had less than one percent of the market share of customers.

AOL Microsoft AL Skype engineer one percent
"aol" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"aol" Discussed on TechStuff

"And so it was user overload that caused the problem if that's the case, it's a great problem to have because it's better to have to scramble to meet demand than to have to hustle to get enough customers to scrape by you want the problem of having more demand than you have supply Kinsey had stepped down in nineteen ninety five in ninety six Mark Saraf. The other co founder would resign. His position of senior vice president with the company and leave to go do other stuff which meant that out of the three co founders only Steve case remained, although to be fair Kinsey was on the board of directors for a little bit in nineteen Ninety-seven bolstered by grown. Customer base and a solid performance in the stock market AOL began to stretch out a bit it made a move on one of its major competitors. A company that had been around much longer than a oil had it moved to acquire. Compuserve. The two companies had been competing fiercely over customers for years, sometimes one would offer special deals to lure people away from the other service than the other service would do the same and it went back and forth year over year over year between the two companies ael L had the larger number of customers by far by nineteen Ninety-Eight, which is when this acquisition would become final AOL hat around eleven million subscribers and CompuServe was closer to two and a half million. The acquisition was a little bit on the long and winding side. In other words, it got complicated. So let's explain because it's one of those fascinating corporate maneuvers that as a. A person who loves tech and has a history in liberal arts education. This was new to me so before the acquisition. Compuserve was part of ancient are block. The the tax preparation company agent are block purchased. Compuserve back in nineteen eighty for like twenty million dollars by nineteen Ninety-seven agent. Our block was going through some major changes at the executive level. They were having real issues, which is a fascinating story in itself. And I can't really tell it on tech stuff because it doesn't really tie into tech. But maybe I'll tell it on the brink one day because I think it's a fascinating story. Anyway, they were going through some stuff, it got complicated Facebook style. And so the board of directors for h R Block decided one of the things the company needed to do in order to streamline stuff was divest itself of CompuServe. ALL expressed interest right away saying we would very much like to take that off your hands, and we'll make an offer and they offered to purchase the company with shares of AOL stock, but the board rejected this offer. They didn't feel that AOL stock was valuable enough for this to make sense, they prefer to either have stocks that were more stable more established. I guess is a good way of putting it than AOL or they wanted to do it in cash Ehlo do it at cash, but then a third company came into the picture. The third company was WorldCom, which is another company. I'm going to have to cover at some future point WorldCom had an offer for both agent are block and ALL WorldCom offered to by CompuServe from HR in exchange. Worldcom would give up some of its stock that stock was seen as being more stable. Title and more valuable than AOL stock and agent are thought will we can turn that around and sell it right away and get the money we want. So the age NAR block board agreed to that term. And CompuServe was sold to WorldCom for one point two billion dollars worth of WorldCom shares which h and R Block then sold the very next day after this exchange between world combination are WorldCom sold part of CompuServe to ALL specifically, it's sold. The information services part of CompuServe, and it retained CompuServe's network services business because that's the business that WorldCom is in is in network technologies. In addition ALL sold to WorldCom its own advanced network.

Compuserve h R Block AOL WorldCom Kinsey senior vice president Mark Saraf co founder Facebook NAR Steve ael L executive twenty million dollars two billion dollars one day
"aol" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

03:42 min | 1 year ago

"aol" Discussed on TechStuff

"But in thirty one states, it's still legal to discriminate against LGBT Americans. Simply because of who they are get the facts at beyond I do dot org. Now, the internet as a thing that the general public could readily access has been around for nearly thirty years, but before that it was a network that only a relatively small number of people knew about let alone had access to if you were on the internet before let's say nine hundred ninety you were likely a college student and most likely if you're a college student on the internet, you were probably enrolled in at least one computer science class and employees at a research facility might have access to the internet people in the military had access to the internet. They also had access to mill net the military specific network that is built on the same architecture. So there were a few ways that you might have access to the internet, but just a few. It was just it was not readily accessible to the average person. Then you had these online service providers go beyond their own internal networks to connect. To the network of networks. The reaction was not overwhelmingly positive on for the people who are already on the internet. That is veterans online were greeted by a flood of new users who had no inkling of how things would work on the internet. They hadn't been part of the culture that had been forming. They didn't know the lingo there were noobs in other words, and the veterans weren't necessarily kind to the noobs they resented this. Flood of the uninformed who are way worse than the annual introduction of college. Freshman those were bad enough. These people were even worse there was a bit of an online culture war. But then again, while I call this a culture war, you have to remember at most this affected may be a million and a half two million people AOL didn't even have two hundred thousand subscribers yet. So most of the mainstream world had not dipped to toe in the internet and viewed the whole thing as a big fuss with computer nerds. And I guess it mostly was. But a oh well was trying to expand beyond that narrow niche of computer enthusiasts. They were trying to encourage adoption of this. And do it the company took on a new marketing strategy that became about as famous as the you've got mail line AOL began to produce CD's compact, discs that could install the AOL interface onto a computer, then they began to send those CD's out. They put them in magazines, and they would mail them directly to home addresses. And it got a little out of hand anyone who owned a computer and some people who didn't begin to accumulate collections of AOL compact discs. There were jokes about using them as Christmas decorations or coasters or frisbees. They were everywhere the strategy was pervasive. It was annoying, and it was affective in nineteen ninety-five Jim Kimsey retired as CEO he. Stayed on board as the chairman of the board for AOL for a couple more years. Steve case became the news CEO he had proven his worth numerous times by positioning the company's services in a way that appealed to the end user one of the big differentiator is in the AL service compared to competitors like prodigy and CompuServe is that AOL's focus was on the ability to create communities online that tied back to that book. I talked about earlier the one that inspired case when he was in.

AOL Steve case Jim Kimsey CEO chairman CompuServe AL thirty years mill
"aol" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"aol" Discussed on TechStuff

"Around nineteen eighty nine the company launched its first instant messaging service a precursor to what would become AOL instant messenger or aim. I'll talk about aim more later on in this series of episodes. One other super important moment happened around nineteen eighty nine according to the official AOL history. That's when the you've got mail alert debuted. So if you've ever heard that phrase, it comes from ael L, and specifically comes from nineteen eighty nine the phrase would become icon IQ in the early days of the internet. It became a bit of a cultural Meam folks would mimic the notification or they would use it as a punchline to a joke later on when people had smartphones that could actually play soundbites that would become some people's message. Hurts system you've got mail. The man whose voice says you've got mail for AOL is Elwood Edwards. Now Edwards is wife. Who was a customer service Representative for quantum computer services had overheard. Steve case say he really wished that. They could have a voice component to the online service interfaces that the company had something to differentiate their service from other products. So she came home, and she told her husband Elwood about this and Elwood was a voice over a performer as well. As a broadcaster. He had a history in this kind of thing. So he according to the story went into his living room and got a cassette player, which was a thing back in those days and a cassette tape and he recorded himself saying several phrases, including welcome, and you've got mail and lots of others, and they send it off to Steve case. And he got the gig. He's obviously done lots of other work. Like, I said he's had a long history in broadcasting. But Steve case liked it. He said this is the tone the technique we want then they went with it. So the phrase would become intrinsically linked with AOL services in those days. It was famous enough to become the title of a romantic comedy film in nineteen ninety eight starring Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan AOL. Got a lot of mileage out of those phrases as Elwood in two thousand sixteen he popped up in online culture after a woman named brandy Barker uploaded, a video of Elwood cheerfully reprising his famous line. He was driving her around because Elwood had sort of retired from broadcasting, but was working part time as an Uber driver in Ohio. That's actually a sweet little video. If you look it up, and that's pretty much everywhere. Online by nineteen ninety one the leadership of quantum computer services felt that the company. Needed a rebranding to better reflect what it did what its products were. So Steve case held a contest internally to rename the company and employs got to vote on the various nominees and the name that won out over all the others was America Online and so quantum services. Quantum computer services ditched its name for AOL that happened in nineteen Ninety-one. Now AOL was not the first online service provider as I said, the first of those came out more or less in nineteen seventy nine these dates are also kind of fuzzy because it really depends upon when you would consider the beginning of the service. There was some limited services in nineteen seventy eight when you could call into computers after a certain time because the computers during the day would be used for one purpose. But in the evening, they could when they would otherwise be idle they could be put to use for this kind of stuff. Seventy nine was really when things were starting to take. Effect and one of those early services was CompuServe one of these days, I'm going to have to do a full episode just about CompuServe. Another one was called the source..

Elwood Edwards AOL Steve case CompuServe customer service Representativ ael L Tom Hanks Meam brandy Barker official Ohio America
"aol" Discussed on This Is Success

This Is Success

04:05 min | 1 year ago

"aol" Discussed on This Is Success

"So the even though the startup was a failure, the, you know, the some of the relationships I forged there and some of the insights we be gleaned their ended up helping in terms of the creation of an arc online. When we started AOL nineteen, five, only three percent of people are online and their online an hour a week. And so it was the concept. The reality is people weren't online. Most people didn't think anybody would want to bother getting on my like, why would somebody go the trouble buying a personal computer so they can like type message on a keyboard somebody when you know they pick up the phone, call somebody, I get why that's not gonna ever work and that skepticism was there for more than a decade. If finally idea the internet, you know, kinda took up and thankfully at that point AOL as well positioned and kind of got a got America Online at our peak about half of all the internet traffic, the United States went through through a well, but for a decade. Most people didn't believe I have that similar sense that deja-vu sounds while I'm talking about the rise arrest. I recognize a lot of people are skeptical, but we hope to prove them wrong. We will prove them wrong and the and maybe there's some part of my personality that would have you know when people say it can't be done. That's sort of the challenge and okay. Well, we'll see about that head of AOL when you're at a quantum computer services. This was your first tech company that you're helping build up. You're saying how that didn't work out. Well, you were working with apple, but there was a lot of bumps along the way. Just looking at that experience. What did it teach you ahead of AOL. How did it prepare you for building a company that became huge? Well, the early days of we started what's now known as AOL well in nineteen eighty five. Initially, the name was quantum computer. Services and the initial strategy, and it was true for the first several years was essentially to partner with personal computer manufacturers to create custom, almost private label online services for each of them. So that really was our strategy. We didn't weren't able to raise much capital. I think our initial venture capital raise with about one million dollars at the time. There is a company called prodigy backed by IBM and Sears, and they committed one billion dollars to launch prodigy. So are one million dollars was not going to, you know, beat the prodigy, one billion dollars. So rather than try to compete head to head, we decided to kind of have this strategy of partnerships. And so for the first several years, that was how we built the the company was on the back of these these partnerships. And so they actually worked quite well and took us from this start up to actually being a real company. But one of the key partnerships was with apple with licensed their brand name to create this apple Inc service and. Not long after launching it, they decided they didn't really like the idea of kind of having some other company used their brand. They had licensed their brand anybody else before. I'm not sure they have since. So it's frustrating and and kind of scary because you know, we, we thought that was going to be a big part of our growth for the next few years. But it was clear that apple is firm about that. And so we negotiated kind of settlement to go our separate ways. And since we couldn't call it apple Inc anymore. We said, okay, we need to call it something and you know, little internal contest and it ended up being America Online was the the winning brands. So the challenges of that partnership with apple and kind of let us to have to kind of relaunch as America Online. And then over time, you know, that service really gotten traction and we ended up, you know, kind of changing the company name and you know a couple of years later taken the company public. So you know the lesson was those partnerships were critically important to get us going. We would not have been successful without them, but. There was a point where we kind of had kind of stand their own two feet and move away from being so reliant on these core partnerships..

AOL apple apple Inc America United States partner IBM Sears one billion dollars one million dollars three percent two feet
"aol" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"aol" Discussed on Acquired

"So basically aol everything valuable about that company is completely an illusion and wall street notices and so it it's announced what is it january two thousand by december of two thousand one jerry levin steps down the ehlo people are still thinking that they're in charge at this point so they wanna take over the ceo ship of aol the control of aol this up specifically and actually that's where bob pittman really was the guy that thought he was going to take it because he was feeling like steve case would step down at some point but no as we know it went to dick parsons and so bob pittman is out by july of two thousand two steve case finally leaves in may of two thousand three september 18th 2003 time warner officially drops aol from its name that the combined company was called aoltime warner officially but just three years later aol time warner basically wants to pretend like aol on it and at this point they still on the asset like they're they're not saying in all in one fell swoop organise spin it out liked it is still on the company it's just not doing anything well you as we always hear those numbers now and again about however millions of people are still paying every month for aol dial up i mean it's all yeah i i've i've actually got the number i as of rising bid in may 2015 there's still making six hundred and six point five million dollars in dial up revenue i looked up some it really actually hasn't shrunk much today so they're really actually still maintaining that well you know there's other there's other assets in their member they bought netscape only too little company called netscape i mean the so i you know every there's a reason why kerris which was book is called there's a pony in here somewhere it's.

aol bob pittman warner aoltime warner jerry levin ceo steve dick parsons netscape five million dollars three years
"aol" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"aol" Discussed on Acquired

"But but like literally outta who's no pun intended who they are truly practical things about culture clashes like if in one of the books like sports illustrated just refuses to play ball like we're not going to give our content to you were running our own in fact with sports illustrated famously never really gave much to the web anyway or think of there's a story about like warner studios after the merger refuses to let a awhile take over the harry potter website and the online promotion further the harry potter movies are just getting going right so that's why werner studios is the is so in aol says them okay let's take this over werner studio says no right and then the thing that aol wanted the most like to save their skin was air wells or i'm sorry time warner's cable division time warner had roadrunner famously which is another thing like they do they couldn't even get warner to give them licensed them the roadrunner cartoon that's that's the infighting that is at timer but so when when aol says okay listen let's let's brand air well into your your your expanding cable internet service time warner cable says get bent right so even though there the acquiring company essentially the the entrenched powerbrokers at time warner just tells these guys to screw off and basically weights them out until the the disaster of the merger becomes evident and get kicked out what went and if you think about like the the power dynamics generated by the the revenue like i think a oh well total revenue in 2000 right before the merger was like nine point five billion her somewhere in that neighborhood and and you know time warner had a much more narrow price to earnings ratio where they you know of that what we're they were they valued at one hundred fifty million or something there billionaire yeah harass our eight hundred sixty billion like they had real material revenues such that that had to be like a a three acts or something not like you know ridiculous multiple like aol.

warner studios werner studios aol warner roadrunner warner cable harry potter
"aol" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"aol" Discussed on Acquired

"So listen these are crazy times these are fat times for aol again i want to bring up this idea of culture and aol being scrappers and doing whatever it takes to stay alive so why do they stop when all of a sudden there and like in the cat birds seat they seem to be the next this of of this new internet economy and they're bad pitman's army of dealmakers you know basically basically dr what is essentially the thing that really makes wall street go nuts so we're we're going to get into this again later but everyone thinks that the alewa it will went away because people stopped doing dial up or paying for dial up and they move to broadband and things like that but the thing that we'll see actually has the deal sorta collapse and aol stock price collapse and things like that is the fact that what may their stock appreciate so much was that they had this insane growth in advertising and that's where the money was coming from that's where the actual cash flow is coming from sure it's great to have in the background this recurring revenue of the you know the subscription revenue but that's not what was actually moving the needle in terms of why wall street loves them yep it was all of these all of these deals they were doing with all these dotcom startups that we're doing them all of their money exactly well interestingly enough to transition here because they're doing all these deals with these dotcom companies they have sort of their ears to the ground and they can start to see when you know the money starts to dry up these see money starts to dry up ipo start to go bust they're the ones that no before anybody else that listen this bubble might be bursting.

aol pitman cash flow the deal
"aol" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"aol" Discussed on Acquired

"So again we're going back to the 80s it's not till the early nineties when they cut a tie themselves to microsoft and windows that they sort of leap to the head of the pact there's a whole pack here there's compuserve there's genie there's prodigy there's all these an and compuserve as on compuserve it's my dad was a beta tester for compuserve and for aol so he's got free accounts and i remember being on compuserve and thinking it was better but i my understanding is that it was like only sort of four the super internet savvy nerds and aol was much better reaching the massmarket does that does that feel like sort of why aol one their 100 percent oil had the derogatory or pejorative name of training wheels for the internet but they actually embrace that and it makes sense i mean i've said on the show like you know a lot of people's first email was was a oh well in a time when you you didn't have email unless you're at a college or or at work or something like that but also a oil train people how to live online like they gave you a screen name and you went into the chat rooms and you did thirty sexchat and things like that and uh you could create an online identity like and and and this is what we should talk about what ails business was you know they eventually basically made their money by allowing people onto the web but they were also trying to cure eight the web and create this online experience that would like handheld handhold people into it.

windows compuserve aol microsoft 100 percent