35 Burst results for "AMI"

Ami Ayalon Hasn’t Given Up on the Two-State Solution

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

01:27 min | 4 months ago

Ami Ayalon Hasn’t Given Up on the Two-State Solution

"I mean i alone. Born in tiberius in nineteen forty five three years before israel was founded and raised on a kibbutz spent most of his military career with the israeli navy's commando unit shot at thirteen eventually becoming its commanding officer. He served in the six day. War the yom kippur war and on many other operations. I alone is one of only forty soldiers to have been awarded the medal of valor. Israel's highest decoration for battlefield gallantry one during a raid on an egyptian radar station in the gulf of suez in one thousand nine hundred sixty nine later in his career. Ireland was the admiral commanding israel's navy and from nineteen ninety-six to two thousand director of the shin bet. Israel's internal intelligence service. He had a subsequent stint in politics and in two thousand seven neely became leader of israel's labor party as i alone demonstrates in remarkable new memoir. Come manifesto he has grown over. That journey progressively less interested in waging war. Much more so in making peace. His book friendly fire how israel became its own. Worst enemy is a hard headed argument of ireland's hard won understanding that for israel. Peace with palestine is not merely a morally righteous aspiration but i national security imperative existential importance.

Israel Israeli Navy Tiberius Gulf Of Suez Neely Navy Ireland Labor Party Palestine
A.J. Green keeps future with Bengals up in the air: 'Who knows what is going to happen?'

Mo Egger

02:06 min | 4 months ago

A.J. Green keeps future with Bengals up in the air: 'Who knows what is going to happen?'

"Green had a decent game yesterday He after the game was Noncommittal about his future is going to help him with that. Aj thank you. i love you. You're going to be thirty three years old next year. See it's not here not here. I mean this is. This is not something that's franchise should have to wrestle with. I do think you referenced atkins before. I do think one of the most interesting off season questions is do they move on from a guy who played a whopping seven snaps yesterday and they are roughly thirty million dollars to over the next two years. Do they move on tough. How do you not you have to start moving on from old bed players. You're your goal for the next. Three games should be to figure out who you on this roster that you can go with. It's not no atkins gino watkins. It's not going to be jay green next year them. We just we just let go of back in two thousand fifteen. They were good because for years. It seems like that's driven. The strategy gives them rewards player but andrew. Whitworth give your young lineman chance. Give some linebackers chanson and go from that. You have to figure out what you have. At some capacity because of all the whole we just mentioned in the last segment with the new england patriots cling to jeans seconds to about the current state of their team which is not great but would they cling to gino atkins. Because it used to be good a long time ago no or because. They felt like they owed him something with the pittsburgh. Steelers no with the baltimore ravens with lynn. The san francisco forty nine know what. Zack taylor's old teams. Move on move on from expense. Ami did it last year underperforming players. The dolphins were oh and seven and tanking moved on. Yes people what are they taking doing this publicly. Okay there now. Competing there in the playoff hunt. They went toe to toe with the chiefs. Like they're in a better position. I think there's a place in the nfl for jay green. I do on like a two year deal green bay or something. I don't know that there's a place in the nfl for gino acts

Jay Green Atkins Gino Watkins Atkins Gino Atkins Whitworth Green Zack Taylor New England Patriots Andrew Baltimore Ravens Steelers Pittsburgh Lynn AMI San Francisco Dolphins Chiefs NFL Green Bay
"ami" Discussed on Horror Fictional and True Stories

Horror Fictional and True Stories

05:49 min | 4 months ago

"ami" Discussed on Horror Fictional and True Stories

"I september all the vegetation was fast crumbling to a grayish powder and name feared that the trees would die before the poison was out of the soil. His wife now had spells of terrific screening and he and the boys were in a constant state of nervous tension shunned people now and when school opened the boys did not go but it was ami on one of his rare visits who i realized that the wellwater was no longer good that had an evil taste that was not exactly feted nor exactly salty and ami advised his friend dig another well on higher ground us till the soil was good again name however ignored the warning for. He had by that time become callous to strange and unpleasant things. He and the boys continued to use the tainted supply drinking it listlessly mechanically as they ate their meagre and ill cooked meals and did their thankless monotonous chores. Through the aimless days there was something of stolid resignation about them all as if they walked half in another world between lines of nameless guards to a certain in familiar doom. That is went.

ami
"ami" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

B&H Photography Podcast

03:50 min | 5 months ago

"ami" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

"I mean These two good. And that's why i spend ten years on one story. I think you cannot parachute into places and try to understand what's happening. You need to go back. You need to tell the story either in your backyard or be able to spend significant amounts of time in place to really understand what's happening because things change from day to day from year to year you need. I think that her in history perspective and you brought up a really interesting point. This is so funny it might prince for nature sale. There's pictures of polar bears. Guess what nobody's buying the pictures a polar bears why it depresses people. Wow that's interesting interesting. Yeah yeah and you know in order to spend the time that you you want to spend on these stories it takes money it takes funding and and i noticed that you know you're somebody who's still like i said at this stage in your career. Applying for grants is looking for funding. Is this something that you spend a lot of time doing. And can you talk about the the value of of applying for grants and getting your workout. There been submitting your photos for contests in these ideas. Absolutely i mean. Journalism is a different place than it was when i began and it wasn't in the healthiest state when i began either but i think everybody knows that if you want to do deep rich storytelling that takes years. There is no publication on the planet that can afford.

"ami" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

B&H Photography Podcast

04:06 min | 5 months ago

"ami" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

"Tourism is what has funded major conservation projects around the world and it protects habitats restores habitats and creates awareness and when it crashed so did so much of the much-needed protection for animals in these ecosystems contrary to popular belief. These empty parks are not really a good thing for wildlife because not only do tourists fund conservation. They also help to keep poachers away. And so i was hearing from my friends and colleagues around the world about how bad it is and realized that you know i. I i have the privilege of knowing all these amazing people. I call them up and asked him if they would donate a prenton and they did and so that's what prince for nature is a recognized. A lot of the images are on the site and a. We're proud to say that Some of the photographs taken pike Guests of the podcast. But there's some really great work on there and if you're interested in a obtaining some truly powerful photographs that you'd want to have on your wall at wall supporting really really good 'cause I think it's a really really terrific Idea of terrific way of doing it by the way all of the information is will be on the show notes for For this particular episode. So if you jogging around looking for things that it'll all be a on our site when this podcast goes live so the're not an emmy conservation international. Imagine you've worked with a lot of organizations and there's a lot of great groups out there. There are a lot of great groups out there. And i chose them because i have been working with them in seeing the work on the ground. They started for example. Teti elephants sanctuary. They helped get that off the ground. Which is the first indigenous owned in run elephant sanctuary in all of africa. I i like them because so much of their funding goes directly into grassroots organizations. So they work with partners that they know are doing great work and i love the idea of funding indigenous organizations And it's just it also reaches organizations all around the world in a time. We desperately need to be funding conservation and are some of the efforts. Are they anti-poaching efforts. What other organizations where the money ultimately gets into the hands of the people that are on the ground. What are they doing with ya. For example i mean techy was a great one that was you know an organization that started it was samburu community that started a sanctuary for orphaned elephants and its wholly owned and run by the community itself and so conservation. International gave them the funding to build the infrastructure. And get off the ground so they they got that institution often running in the beginning and they do that around the world they also do a lot of habitat restorations so for example mangrove forest are the lungs of our of our planet. They are such you know. We talk about forests but mangroves. Are you know some of the most important for us than they do. Mangrove habitat restoration and protection. And i mean. I could go on and on i would say. Check out their website dive into some of the work that they're doing and the other thing i love is that it's really every country. Director in the people on the ground are indigenous organizations people from those countries and so much of the funding for example. It doesn't go into this huge dominant The money goes right. Back into those core initiatives..

Director africa
"ami" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

B&H Photography Podcast

03:05 min | 5 months ago

"ami" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

"Amy may be one of the world's best known photographers and his embarrassing. The script as that might be if it brings attention to the conservation initiative. She's going to share with us today. Perhaps we can give it a green light. Just let it slide this once. Amy is a national geographic contract photographer. A five time world press photo award winner a nikon ambassador a founding member of ripple effects imaging. And if that isn't enough one of her photos was voted the most important photo of the decade by national geographic. Reader's quoting her website. Any has lived in mud huts in war zones contracted malaria and on the pantsuit keeping true to her belief in the importance of living the story. Welcome to the show. Amy hi allen. And john so much. That was such a wonderful introduction now before we get started. I one question. I'm just curious about something. The house you woke up in this morning where is it. What's it made of. What are you wearing an animal sued and generally speaking how you feeling these days. Okay i for most people question. I actually in montana. It snowy outside of i am not in a in a Mud structure right now and I m headed to to go to kenya pretty soon and i'll be working. Maybe working out of the tent very soon which i love before we jump into a story about You conservation efforts and and and your upcoming trip you organize. They're a really wonderful image sale to benefit conservation international Can you tell us about the prince for nature sale. Yes the prince for. Nature is a initiatives with eighty nine of some the best photographers in the world. Many of them are my colleagues at national geographic. Really well known people some I also made an effort to find. People that are not traditionally represented very well and we are offering prince that collectors Mazing for collectors to start getting amazing images that frankly some of them go for thousands in galleries and their two hundred fifty dollars. All the prophets are going go to conservation international. And i can talk a little bit about the reason for doing this You know basically. The pandemic has really had a bad impact on wildlife on poaching in asian and the beginning of the pandemic. We were hearing all these wonderful heartwarming stories about wildlife getting this much needed break from humans and that they were thriving in this era of lockdowns. But unfortunately that is not really true..

Amy kenya nikon founding member montana john Mazing
Early Mammals Had Social Lives, Too

60-Second Science

02:10 min | 5 months ago

Early Mammals Had Social Lives, Too

"Six million years ago a group of small mammals huddled in a borough in. What's now montana. They were good diggers most likely furry and petite. They could sit comfortably in the palm of your hand. I mean if you saw them running around today you probably think it looks like a small rodent of some sort like a chipmunk or or a a mouse or or something like that lucas. Weaver is a mammal paleobiologist at the university of washington. These little creatures didn't belong to any of the three main mammal groups on the planet today. Which are the placental. Mammals like us monitoring like the platypus and marsupials like koalas and kangaroos. Instead they belong to another now. Extinct group called the multi to berkowitz their teeth. Is what really distinguishes them from. From any other group of mammals they have these really bizarre molars with these multiple bumps on on the teeth which is where they get their name. Multi typically it just means many bumps. weaver in his colleagues have studied the fossilized skulls and skeletons of these animals dug up in montana. And they've given him a name. Philippe amis prime. Mavis friendly or neighborly mouse. The details are in the journal. Nature ecology and lucien. Weaver says drought or climate. Change may have killed the animals though. It's hard to be sure. But the critters were fossilized together in ways that suggest they sought out each other's company. That's a big deal because it's commonly thought that social behavior didn't arise in mammals until after the death of the dinosaurs. Ten million years after these smokers hung out together the narrative for decades his been that mammals that were living during the dinosaurs were mostly solitary rat like creatures that were kind of scuttling the night under the foot of dinosaurs. In so the fact that we're finding these multi berkeley mammals totally unrelated ancient group mammals. That's apparently exhibiting social behavior means that this was probably not uncommon among these early mesozoic mammals. And it kind of changes. The narrative of sociology is somehow unique to placental mammals. Even today social behavior is relatively rare among mammals but these findings suggest the need for company in some mammalian species is an ancient

Weaver Montana Philippe Amis University Of Washington Berkowitz Lucas Lucien United States
Democrats are now unlikely to win a majority in the Senate: Here's where things stand

All Things Considered

03:28 min | 5 months ago

Democrats are now unlikely to win a majority in the Senate: Here's where things stand

"Republicans are enjoying a much better election than anticipated. Republicans are now poised to maintain their majority in the Senate. I just received a very gracious call from Sara Gideon conceding the raise voice of Republican Senator Susan Collins, speaking earlier today in Maine, a state that Democrats had considered a must win to have a chance at flipping the Senate. No. In the House Republicans are expected to pick up seats shrinking the Democrats majority down to single digits for more on this NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis is here. Hey there, Sue what went wrong, so to speak for Democrats? Yeah, I mean, it's been a complete reversal of fortune for Republicans down the ballot. There had been this widespread confidence that Democrats were going to take over the Senate that they could gain as many as six or seven seats. And that Democrats were poised to grow their majority in the House by as many as 10 to 20 seats. Obviously, not if that happened. I think the one thing everyone is pointing to right now is just how wrong the Poles were. I think in that main Senate race that's a great example. The Democrats Sara Gideon, she led in public polls all year long and yet still fell far behind in the race. I talked to election analyst Sean Trendy this morning, and he told me that polling simply did not account for Trump's support that a significant number of Trump voters just were never accounted for. Those are the exact people that when you hear a phone call in the person says Hi, I'm from the New York Times. Would you take it all? Just go click. I think it is that straightforward. I also talked to Democratic Congressman Ami Bera of California today, and he said that the polling was way off from where it was in the 2018 midterms. And that's when Democrats won. He basically told me he just thinks Democrats couldn't account for the effect that Trump has when he himself is on the ballot. While it looks like Republicans will hold their majority in the Senate, Not all races have been called. Can you tell us what still outstanding? Yeah, There's still five races that haven't been called 47 have been called for Democrats 48 for Republicans won were watching really closely Is Michigan. There's a Democratic incumbent there. Gary Peters. He's running narrowly behind a Republican John James. Obviously, what could be a pickup opportunity for Republicans. North Carolina remains really tight, but incumbent Republican Senator Tom Tillis is leading. You know, that was always seen as a state that was critical to the majority. So if Republicans hold it, I think that's one of the reasons why they seem to feel pretty secure. Right now. Alaska hasn't been called, but I don't really see any reason there to think it's going to be a Democratic pick up and Last one's Georgia. There's two Senate races there. One of them is going to go to a January runoff, and it's quite possible. The other one where it's held by incumbent Republican David per two, might be able to hold it off and win it out, right. Given that there are some races that are going to be uncertain, at least for the next few days does that What does that mean for the Senate majority? It does, and you know, depending on how Georgia goes, it could take quite some time. North Carolina in particular, could be tight and could be subject to court challenge. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell spoke to that reality earlier today in Kentucky. You can anticipate in close elections, Both sides will be lawyered up and we'll end up in court. It's happened over and over and over again. Nothing unusual, and I do want to see her. I think McConnell has a point, and it's worth focusing on that. I think a lot of people are really nervous about what's gonna be happening with Balan challenges. It's really not uncommon, especially in Senate races to go through court challenges. Before they're certified. It happens almost every election year. That's NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis. Thank you. You're welcome.

Sara Gideon Senate Senator Susan Collins Sean Trendy Congressman Ami Bera Susan Davis Democrats NPR House Senator Tom Tillis Maine Gary Peters Donald Trump David Per John James The New York Times North Carolina Georgia California
Thinking Outside the Box to Solve Todays Challenges  Squircle  Francis Cholle - burst 10

A New Direction

05:38 min | 5 months ago

Thinking Outside the Box to Solve Todays Challenges Squircle Francis Cholle - burst 10

"Know, when you go to school at four or five 6 in our age they they will teach you the alphabet. They will teach you numbers and and then you're being evaluated on your ability to use those letters and language and and and Thursday and I'll memorize things and deliver them in an orderly manner that can be noted and evaluated. So everything is put into an evaluation wage. It's actually not rejecting to consideration any form of creativity and more importantly they don't even tell you that those are tools for you succeed in a society that general not in large majority will use those tools and and but there's a unique person behind those tools and never forget the unique person and I'm really the most important part is not the tool is the art for the two of the Arts isn't with the tool to press formal apartment and and but that's not really what's developed and fortunately what's developed is the Perfection of our use of the tools. So now off, you know, you've identified with those tools those tools are Made to produce some results. So can you can read you can actually read and and and and measure those results and and you lose bit by bit your used by with your your your ability naturally that naturally create naturally invent cuz that's what we are. We are born natural adapters in natural creators. There's the way you know, when you drive off you went in an environment that's forever changing a skeleton mask and all people want to do, you know driverless cars. It's very difficult to mirror or reproduce our ability as humans to take in all this information any given moment and make sense of it and adapt to it in real time. Okay. So that's who we are. That's we are but we don't trust this. We don't come from long experience becomes some fear. Yeah, you know, you know here's I think this is why also in chapter three you talk about Square vs. Circle A controversial relationship you talk about that school, you know, we the square organizes everything in terms of opposites is what you discuss and and you know, I think it's because we want things to be binary right? We want it to be 100 to be black or white. We just not very comfortable in the gray, right? I think I think that's his kind of what you're kind of that you kind of get at and I think also you talk about what you talk about is that we like to think of everything as either rational or irrational but there's another Choice isn't there absolutely so so again, you know, we've developed an amazing school science and enabled us to do so many things. I mean like, you know, who's not happy to be able to have a hip replacement or to have their child with an x-ray or see what I mean? Like, you know, it's like it's it's amazing job. It's it's it's it's it's incredible and we always so much but every scientist knows that you know science is not there to produce certainty is there to produce knowledge knowledge. Then you have the responsibility to something with you know, it's immoral and it's not, you know responsible for what you do with atomic energy, whether you want to create a bomb or you want to create a nuclear plant that's going to create energy cheaper and cleaner. You know, that's that's supposedly that's your that's your choice. That's not a choice of the science is a scientist is there to produce knowledge and then what we've done we move from page to scientism. We may need a we we give it Faith because it's so practical not over to make a choice, you know, well science tell you this is the way to do it. All right, so I'll do it. I'll follow it takes away a ton. Ami of choice takes away my responsibility of choice in the choice I make so so we drifted away and education is really based on this and there's nothing wrong with the fact that we have to log. And signs of you see nothing but we should never forget that ultimately. This is my choice and my responsibility not alone in relationship with others obviously religious Society. So here the boundaries and and the constraints but but we have a telling me I didn't even know that's what you were saying with emotions. So maybe give you a simple example. So two images that really capture the whole thing. So long life is filled with colors that combine endlessly and create and less divorces. So nothing in life in nature for instance, you know can be said to be other black or white. Everything is in the gray Zone. And when you think of it even like in whites, you know, you know, why does this have a word calories and like is just absence of Light which denies any color? Okay. So apart from black and white. I have a world of things, you know, anything else World things. So when you apply logic true not true. This is red notice is not red know the red you like to write you see the red you don't lie to it. I don't see you know bout this is it is completely subjective. So once you put this into a binary it's as if you are looking at life in black and white you take away the colors and now you organize everything from wage like to White There's No Gray Zone as you were saying and then there's no nuances fabulous. Those are computers one and zero and we know what computers have done for us right now in interfacing together. Through computers in two different parts of the country and East Coast and West Coast. So it's fabulous. It's incredible

East Coast West Coast
"ami" Discussed on The Mindful Minute

The Mindful Minute

02:21 min | 6 months ago

"ami" Discussed on The Mindful Minute

"Into tone. When you're ready drawing your palms together in front of your heart bowing your chin down. Taking a moment to Simply honor the cycle that you are in in this particular Moment In Time. Feeling both the practice of listening and the practice and valuing that cycle when you're ready rub your palms together rub until you felt some heat and some friction between those comms waking the energy up and when you're ready, you'll cut those warm Palms right over your eyes. Just feeling the heat from your palms transfer through eyelids through skin muscle bone right into the midbrain there. Enlivening awake Ami and with your hands still over your eyes. You might just blink your eyes open letting a bit of light it. And then releasing the hands down as you're ready. I'm.

Ami
Atlanta - ICE Almost Deported Immigrant Woman Who Says She Got Unwanted Surgery While Detained

Morning Edition

03:48 min | 7 months ago

Atlanta - ICE Almost Deported Immigrant Woman Who Says She Got Unwanted Surgery While Detained

"Week from immigrant women who say they were subjected to unwanted medical procedures while detained at an immigration and customs enforcement facility in Georgia. Some women say they underwent his direct Amis or other surgeries that left them sterile. Members of Congress are demanding a quick investigation and in one case, lawmakers say ice has already tried to deport a key witness. NPR's Joel Rose has more Pauline Benham was nearly deported. Yesterday, Immigration and Customs Enforcement put her on a plane back to Cameroon, a country she left when she was two years old. She was on the tarmac when members of Congress say they intervened. It felt like ice was trying to rush through her deportation. I can't say that for certain, but all of this is extremely troubling. Representative Pramila Gioia Paul is a Democrat from Washington State and a member of the House Judiciary Committee. She wants been in the U. S so that you can tell her story to investigators. Venom is one of a growing number of immigrant women who say they were subjected to gynecological procedures without consent. While they were held at the Irwin County Detention Center in Georgia. The first allegations came to light in a whistle blower complaint this week from a nurse at the facility. Since then, lawyers for other women have come forward with similar allegations. Jaipal says the total is now at least 17. This feels particularly agree just because it is obviously Invasive reproductive surgery. And so for every woman in particular across America, this sends chills up our spine. More than 170. Members of Congress have signed a letter calling for an investigation by the homeland Security inspector general. Ice confirmed that Pauline Venom is still in the country and denied any link between her allegations and her scheduled deportation. Spokesman says she was pulled off the plane because of a paperwork snafu with the Cameroonian government, not because of congressional intervention. In a statement. I says that all female detainees received routine gynecological care, and that quote a medical procedure like a hysterectomy would never be performed unquote without informed consent. Bingham's lawyer says Otherwise. When she woke up from the surgery, the doctor informed her that a portion of her fallopian tube was removed. One win is Bingham's lawyer at the nonprofit Georgia Latino Alliance for Human Rights. She says, been, um, sought treatment for in irregular menstrual cycle and thought she was getting a routine procedure. Of course. Pauline was very upset and sort of appalled that this had happened without her consent. Win says the long term medical implications are not clear, but the procedure could prevent been him from conceiving a child detention itself takes so much away. I'm a person's life and then for her to have gone through this experience while she was an immigration detention, just rob sir of so much more than her time, wind says been, um complained to the staff at the detention center, but those complaints went nowhere. Irwin is operated by a for profit company LaSalle Corrections, which did not respond to a request for comment. Elizabeth Meth urn is a lawyer who has represented immigrants held at Erwin and other detention centers in Georgia, she says complaints about medical care often fall on deaf ears. They consistently Ignore complaints they consistently act like any complaint is just histrionics. It's ripe for exploitation, right because there's not proper oversight. There's not A proper like Level of humanity. Katherine says lawyers have been raising concerns about medical conditions for years. They're relieved that the public is finally paying attention, even if it took shocking allegations like these to make it happen. Joel Rose.

Pauline Benham Georgia Congress Bingham Irwin County Detention Center WIN Joel Rose Immigration And Customs Enforc ICE Amis Pramila Gioia Paul Pauline Venom Pauline NPR Cameroon Georgia Latino Alliance For Hu Cameroonian Government Homeland Security Representative
ICE Just Tried to Deport Immigrant Woman Who Says She Got Unwanted Surgery While Detained

Morning Edition

03:49 min | 7 months ago

ICE Just Tried to Deport Immigrant Woman Who Says She Got Unwanted Surgery While Detained

"Have come to light this week from immigrant women who say they were subjected to unwanted medical procedures while detained at an immigration and customs enforcement facility in Georgia. Some women say they underwent his direct Amis or other surgeries that left them sterile. Members of Congress are demanding a quick investigation and in one case, lawmakers say ice has already tried to deport a key witness. NPR's Joel Rose has more Pauline Venom was nearly deported. Yesterday, Immigration and Customs Enforcement put her on a plane back to Cameroon country she left when she was two years old. She was on the tarmac when members of Congress say they intervened. It felt like ice was trying to rush through her deportation. I can't say that for certain, but all of this is extremely troubling. Representative Pramila Gioia Paul is a Democrat from Washington State and a member of the House Judiciary Committee. She wants been in the U. S so that you can tell her story to investigators. Venom is one of a growing number of immigrant women who say they were subjected to gynecological procedures without consent while they were held at the Irwin County Detention Center in Georgia. The first allegations came to light in a whistle blower complaint this week from a nurse at the facility. Since then, lawyers for other women have come forward with similar allegations, Jaipal says the total is now at least 17. This feels particularly agree just because it is obviously Invasive reproductive surgery, and so far every woman in particular across America, this sends chills up our spine. More than 170. Members of Congress have signed a letter calling for an investigation by the Homeland Security inspector general. Ice confirmed that Pauline Venom is still in the country and denied any link between her allegations and her scheduled deportation. Spokesman says she was pulled off the plane because of a paperwork snafu with the Cameroonian government, not because of congressional intervention. In a statement. I says that all female detainees received routine gynecological care and that quote a medical procedure like a history. Ectomy would never be performed unquote without informed consent. The venoms lawyer says Otherwise. When she woke up from the surgery, the doctor informed her that a portion of her fallopian tube was removed. One win is Bingham's lawyer at the nonprofit Georgia Latino Alliance for Human Rights, she says been, um sought treatment for in irregular menstrual cycle and thought she was getting a routine procedure. Of course, Pauline was very upset and sort of appalled that this had happened without her consent. Wind says the long term medical implications are not clear. But the procedure could prevent venom from conceiving a child detention itself takes so much away from a person's life. And then for her to have gone through this experience while she was an immigration detention. Just rob serve so much more than her time, Wind says Been, UM complained to the staff at the detention center, but those complaints went nowhere. Irwin is operated by a for profit company LaSalle Corrections, which did not respond to a request for comment. Elizabeth Meth urn is a lawyer who has represented immigrants held at Erwin and other detention centers in Georgia, she says complaints about medical care often fall on deaf ears. They consistently Ignore complaints they consistently act like any complaint is just histrionics. It's ripe for exploitation, right because there's not proper oversight. There's not A proper like Level of humanity. Katherine says lawyers have been raising concerns about medical conditions for years. They're relieved that the public is finally paying attention, even if it took shocking allegations like these to make it happen. Joel Rose. NPR news

Pauline Venom Georgia Congress Joel Rose Irwin County Detention Center Immigration And Customs Enforc ICE Wind Amis NPR Georgia Latino Alliance For Hu Pramila Gioia Paul Cameroon Cameroonian Government Homeland Security Representative America Jaipal
Speech Processing for Disease - Dr Ami Moyal, President, Afeka Tel Aviv College of Engineering

The Voice Tech Podcast

03:29 min | 7 months ago

Speech Processing for Disease - Dr Ami Moyal, President, Afeka Tel Aviv College of Engineering

"Center for Language Processing Quick Example was founded by eleven years ago after I spent fifteen years in the high tech industry as a research engineer vice-president technology, and CEO. Since then the centre has grown to be the largest research. Sentiment is bound helpless on Applied Research Field With project completed for the defense industry high companies, the medical field and more. Most recently, the language processing has been researching the use of speech processing, not sufficient diligence algorithms for providing a quicken, readily available three diagnostic assessment of Covid, nineteen infection we belden need for human intervention. When it comes to a rapidly spreading virus such as covid nineteen with millions of potential carriers Goud the global population. It is essential die identified like carry-ons virus at the early stages confection in order to private as testing efforts and break the chain of mission while it's great to hear there's just so much going on in Israel in the in the research failed, and specifically around language processing, you guys are really applying it to one of the most worthy and needed causes at the moment, the pre diagnosis of covid nineteen. Completely, understand the need to prioritize testing efforts. Tests are in short supply so you really do have to get to the right people i. I'm rendered. There was some talk around whether it was possible to use voice for the diagnosis of Kavita. This is a couple of months ago. Remember I'm on the on the what's that groups and things? I'm part of people were skeptical that it was actually possible. So tell us. Is it actually possible to use voice files, voice recording speech even coughs and non? Verbal. nonverbal recordings of of a human voice to be able to diagnose covid nineteen. That is precisely what our current research is into. After consulting with physicians specializing oratory disease and ear nose and throat, as well as with doctors conflict within coronavirus patients, we learned that among the earliest symptoms. So covid nineteen. Vocal the. And throat infection. These affect human localization patterns. We are modeling samples of speech coughing and breathing from both symptomatic and Azima the night to carry us to compare with models taken from healthy subjects. AUTOMO-. We are also modeling vocalisations subject the tested negative for covid nineteen yet are exhibiting similar symptoms shot such as those infected by the common flu. DC will a loaded the commodity who differentiate between someone who is likely a carrier and someone? Well. That makes perfect sense I mean obviously someone who is infected and is showing symptoms is going to sound different to someone who is isn't so I completely understand how you can train these machine learning models to recognize the difference I'm fascinated by the ability to be able to distinguish between different diseases though because I would imagine the you know if you have one type of disease or another, the reaction of your body would largely be the same the produce flam in the lungs which would come up in a fatal throw in different ways I'll be really really interested to know what the difference is. In how that sounds depending on the on which disease that you have

Research Engineer Vice-Preside Throat Infection DC Israel CEO
Connecting to a Building Automation System using the BACnet Protocol

The Sprinkler Nerd Show

06:16 min | 8 months ago

Connecting to a Building Automation System using the BACnet Protocol

"Todd Hey man welcome to the sprinkler nerds show. Glad to have you today. Thank you good to be here. Yeah absolutely man that it's been little while. been wanting to have you on because you and I always have fun kind of bullshitting on the back into baseline about different types of technology and we have the I should say I have the luxury of spending time with you as relates to building automation and controls integration some looking forward to this conversation today, and before we jump into all that I kind of wanted to. Set the stage with with you and maybe learn a little bit about your background and how you found your way into the irrigation industry. Right. Well. I guess I. We had year Gatien on the farm growing up. So I learned a lot about moving hand line and all the other stuff that goes along with. with with dealing with irradiation there and then With the university and got eggington airing degree. So continued on with You know the agricultural aspect of my education and ended up connecting with baseline as director of sales was our neighbor. For Awhile. And so after he moved in and we've got no, we started talk more about. What the what we all did for a living and talk about baseline and near Gatien fees. We ended up for. That of building a bit of a working relationship there and I got involved with a company through him. So okay. So before coming to baseline. full-time you're working in the AG engineering side of things. Well, I was doing engineering. I ended up when I graduated it was The job market wasn't very strong and so the offer I got was from utility. Company. So I ended up going to work for a power company doing. More electrical engineering automation engineering. Down And So I did that for quite a while and then Iman partner baseline initially and. Work in. Technology application really is I think are the best lady despite my role whether it's internally within the company Director of Right. So when you're doing work for the power company see this is good I didn't even know some of this. This is awesome. engineering can mean all kinds of things mechanical and electrical and. What exactly where you're doing for the electrical company. Well. I was doing project work primarily, and so we were building new plants in the beginning and then my focus was on the automation side. So we started doing large control system upgrades and replacements. So the last big project had at our company was control system replacement that one of their big woods, the coal fired plant at that time and about twenty five, hundred megawatt plant, and or different independent systems that we integrated into one big system. You know very, very large scale stuff It was good job with a good project lots of different things to do and coordination and I kind of oversaw the implementation of the role that I had. We did the design. Do. We went out for bids and pick vander in then provided vendor support in the vendor we picked with actually inbox borough mass I got spent some time back there. s sounds wicked. Good. It was interesting. It was it was it was a big challenge and there were a lot of personnel changes that went the place during the project is the company that made the equipment got sold as partway through the job, and so all kinds of logistical things to consider. But that the end of the day the plant came online on schedule and stayed running. So that would really measure. It sounds much more complicated than twenty, four volt soul noise on and off. Well there was we used forty eight volts so. But. It's all about coordination and all about programming and testing and making sure that when. Excuse that when you tell something to do something doesn't doesn't at the right time in the right. Way and. Like what we're doing now with the irradiation stuff, it's just instead of controlling boilers and turbines and things like that. It's. It's more. Cool. So let's see before we get into the again the topic of conversation what exactly is your role at baseline? What do you do on a day-to-day basis? Well, you know I do all kinds of different things I think the best kind of the best way to capture technology application. So I do it it infrastructure support for both internally baseline and I knew that for customers as well. program application. So we have a bunch of different programs US within the company to manage our systems and our business processes and accounting and all that sort of stuff. So I support those systems and. Customer side you know we have our our our standalone servers and back net manager and so again, application it's about. What's the customer looking to Do what the? Solutions Are they looking to. And then how do we do that and so technically within baseline I'm under the IT. Umbrella. But I do I and support. Little little bit engineering once in a while software type stuff and then But a lot of my work is customer facing. Stuff that's you know that's where the Value Amis where I can generate. The most value is when you're helping customers solve their issues no optimize the use of their resources and integrate their systems so that they can they can basically manage their sites or their organizations however ABROA- their management those in a way that they're. Else, them basically all these operational things going to go into the background.

Ag Engineering Todd Gatien Director Of Sales Iman United States Director Vander Abroa Partner
Trump opposes extra funds for U.S. Postal Service to aid with mail-in voting

Pat Walsh

00:27 sec | 8 months ago

Trump opposes extra funds for U.S. Postal Service to aid with mail-in voting

"Congressman Ami Bera says the United States Postal Service must be funded so it could continue to operate at full capacity. Vera, advocating for the U. S. Senate to pass the Heroes Act, which includes additional Corona virus relief aid, as well as postal service, an election funding President Trump recently revealed in an interview he's blocking more Postal service funding to prevent increased voting by mail. The president has also repeatedly claimed voting by mail will lead a massive election fraud.

United States Postal Service Congressman Ami Bera President Trump U. S. Senate Vera Donald Trump Fraud
Getting Ready for the 2020 Emmys

Monocle 24: The Globalist

07:19 min | 9 months ago

Getting Ready for the 2020 Emmys

"The Television Academy has just unveiled the nominees for this year's edition of the Emmy Woods Nichols Fernando Augusta per checker and colossal rebelo went through the list and brought us the highlights. Let's have a listen. Pelada. Lovely to have you here. Let's talk about the AMI's but first of all, I mean, you have quite an experience with the amas right while I was very lucky last year while working out of our Los Angeles Bureau to attend the ceremony last for the seventy first. Edition of the Emmy Awards it is amazing. It really is a celebration of all things television not only of course, you're able to see the ceremony yourself and how it all unfolds that the Microsoft Theater in downtown Los Angeles, you get to sit right next to some of your favorite stars as they celebrate you know a year worth of work you get to watch as some of them lose some of them when at last year was quite. Special because it was of course, the last year that game of thrones was nominated the end of the saga of game of thrones, which was, of course, a really big deal and one thing that I really liked about that was also how they marked the series that were coming to an end last year by bringing all the cast in the production team that was attending the ceremony on stage and kind of acknowledging any TV show that's on. Air for. A few years it is a bit sad one. You know the last time modern family was also the last. So it yeah, it is. It is quite an experience. I mean we are still a few months to go until this year's edition. Hopefully, we'll be able to have it in person by then by September the television academy still hasn't exactly unveiled the plans for that. But yeah, it just feels as much as it is A. Celebration of television it feels very different to watch it in person than on. TV. Sets and if he's going to be a special year because I mean we've been watching lots of television during lockdown effing and one of the things don't you grieve me. Colada that I like about the Emmys they are. You know what they are actually fairly diverse compared to the film awards and that just shows TV can be actually quite progressive away. Absolutely I think. The nominations this year as well. Reflects that diversity is well and yeah it does show how TV has been able to catch up with only momentum that has been happening in Hollywood about asking for change when it comes to diversity. But even if you look at the shows that are nominated or even just a shows that we're watching now they are reflection of different stories that are a reflection of different themes it's not as standard I would. Say, for example, with the Oscars and I think that's what makes it quite an interesting and exciting. Well, let's talk about some of the favorites I did like sheets Greek being nominated for comedy series of things surprise it started as a very little Canadian series but then apparently people saying that my win actually because the critics love it oh, it is a fantastic show I definitely has been one of the ones I've been watching this year and I was very happy to see it getting nominated for the outstanding Comedy Series Award another one on that category that it was really happy to see their it's the kaminsky methods. This is a Netflix show and yes, it is very lovely with Michael. Douglas starring in it and it is very funny as well and it was so nice to see you know it. They're in the category as well and I just I was very happy I. Think. As we were saying the nominations this year do justice to the TV. We've been watching I mean drama succession I know we're both big fans and you know Brian Cox and Jeremy Strong both be nominated for best actor in a drama series very well deserved extremely well deserved and it is, of course, we're talking here about a big categories. As if you go down the list, there are more awards being given to all the shows we've been mentioning. Not Awards, nominations I mean. But yes, I was very, very happy to see succession I think personally, it has been one of my favorite shows over the last few years I can't remember being dad excited about a show in succession was already nominated for Fiore's last year. I. Know that Nicholas Brutal do who composed the sound score for at won an emmy last year. For. For the score, he composed for succession that would be nice to see it how it's catching momentum and that fans quite disappointed that due to coronavirus sat filming restrictions. The third series did not come out this year as planned but this is a recognition of TV done very very well, there's been other recognitions for example, the morning show had quite a few nominations. And again, it was a show that it was not like loved the beginning by tics but I think people kind of were said, you know what actually was a good series especially the last episode of series. So another one I'm very happy also have very significant for apple as well as the morning show was you know the show that apple try to use as? To make its mark as someone that could compete with the network giants and streaming giants as well. So not only is a very good sign for the a seeing Jennifer Aniston Steve Carell nominated but also to see apple when they've been investing into the right series hiring great actors, great writers, Great Producers, and that it actually pays off and Collado. So what if Jimmy Kimmel? This time I mean, as you rightly said, we don't know how ceremony is going to be, but you know what bt awards they did try and they did like a special ceremony. Names might have to do that because it's happening on the twentieth September. That's very the as the television academy has said that the creative emmys, which you know the creative emmy is usually happen a few days before the Primetime Emmys and they've already said that those are happening on an online platform a few days before didn't haven't clarified yet for the AMI's themselves. We still don't know exactly what are the plans now? What is interesting about Jimmy, Kimmel here hosting I think it's his third time hosting is that he is nominated as well. His show Jimmy came alive is on the outstanding variety talk series, and there's always very endearing one. You know one of the host sometimes even people introducing the award end up being nominated. So yeah, I'd be curious to see exactly how that's going to pay out I don't know. was there any surprise nomination here on this list for you? Fernando as F- in the morning show was A bit of a surprise for me and also in the drama category I mean, we saw men hurriedly having quite a lot of nominations itself Jeremy Pope for his role in Hollywood for a best actor on limited series or movie because Lotte I think competition program should go again to Rupo's drag race. Oh Yeah. His love rapport figured they will he would win again just shows how you know when Ru Paul's drag race started. It was a very Niche not known at the public, and now they've been doing this for over a decade now, and there's just shows how you know there is an appetite for a show like that that it is mainstream, there's no way you can't say that anymore and is so empowering it is, of course, one of my personal favorites as well. It was really nice last year to be there when they won and to see Europol come on stage with a lot of the. Of the show as well and some of the judges when we look at that category I'm partial to and I would love to see them winning again on that category.

Television Academy Jimmy Kimmel Emmy AMI Fernando Augusta Hollywood Apple Emmy Woods Nichols Los Angeles Bureau Los Angeles Ru Paul Microsoft Amas Netflix Jeremy Pope Kaminsky Nicholas Brutal Europol Fiore Douglas
Assisting the Professional Photo Assistant

This Week in Photo

06:51 min | 9 months ago

Assisting the Professional Photo Assistant

"Jesse welcome to the show man. How's it going? Unanimous really excited. Excited to you're looking at your website is we were talking before I started recording. We're talking a little bit about some. Stuff and I brought your website up on the screen. Your work is fantastic man I've I've got lots of questions I? Know we're going to target this. We're GONNA. Talk a little bit about the social distance to photography all that, but I want to go off the rails and talk about your work as well because it's. Cool. All saw the man I'm here. I'm here to answer questions. I love it I love it, so give it give us the Jesse. ditmars sort of the origin story. You know what brought you into this crazy world of photography? And what what? What's the gravity that keeps you in orbit around it? Loaded question right. That's a long. We have. To keep us sure. Yeah exactly. I. Mean I've. I don't remember going. I've always. I've always been into arden and music and we're going to barnes and noble. Go to the book section of Shark from section, dislike pulling open some of these books by. Any LIEBOWITZ avenue iron earning Penn. Nigel Perry in the beginning was a huge. He has some great photo books and just being enamored with all the faces in. Just. The idea that I had a book in front of me that I knew was of people who are famous, and I had no idea how it was compiled by one person or purpose I just thought the images were selling interesting and I had to spend gravitating towards photography at that time of my life, my early teens and I. Just was the moment where. The rest of my life figuring that out How how do I do this thing? and that was that was really the springboard in. It's all been one kind of pretty much straight path since then to here I ended up. Working for a lot of those people for for any Liebowitz soon, the best photographers in the world is there assistance and that's how I learned to. How and Every step along the way man from college into interning into assisting into shooting and a struggle between us ASEAN shooting, and in the beginning of my career. It's all has been A. Reinforcement of kiss is something that I love to do so. That's the origin story, and now I'm here. It's been about about five years six years since I started being a fulltime freelance, photographer and I'm still still loving it. You know I get to meet the coolest people and I get to photograph people that are really accomplished end really are changing world in. Highly influential ways in the ability to stand in front of then, and and have a couple of minutes of their time, and really kind of be able to put that experience and transforming into art is deputy I do it. I love that man. What a great answer and you! You hit it right on the head. A lot of people say that the the. One of the the benefits of being a photographer is the camera and a lot of ways access your passport into situations that ordinarily wouldn't have any access to or access to people you know at the same time, which is which is really cool. I'm one of the. There's a million things to talk to you about so I'm going to try to I'm GONNA try to keep it focused. But you mentioned any Liebowitz we here. We are name all the time you know mostly in the contract fully. Yeah mostly in the context of accomplished photographer kind of the gold standard for you know if you get up to the Anti Lebron Woods level. Now you're real photography. Well, pass your science your Rockstar at that point. So how is it? How is it working for somebody with that much talent? That you know what? What does the day in the life? Look like for an assistant. That's assisting for someone like Ami. Well there's different levels right of. Sutri, for someone like anti. She has her full-time people who are on salary or their day in and day out, and then she has any number level of prevents assistance that are coming in on a needed basis in all the way down through interns who are also there for a short period of time, but day in and day out, and so it depends on where you are in. That tree is a freelance assistant I got to Canada's coming in come out of a couple of shoots and. You know for me. It was A. It was a fantastic experience. I think that. I was the best photo system I was going to be by the time I got to work with Anne which was very good for me, because I was one of six assistance on on set, and I was the. Fourth or third on the hierarchy, so I was getting asked do stuff that was not super complicated like setting up stands like setting up lights. Things that were very easy to me because I had done them thousands of times before so I was able to do that job very well without putting a ton of my brain power into a per. Se So I was able to at the time. Really kind of visualize taken everything that was happening on set. An. That was a that was awesome for me. I really enjoyed my experience You know I think it's different. It's different. Bene- first assistant as well as not to any and I. Set of experience because experiences because there's so much more. Weight on your shoulders and so much more responsibility on your shoulders to your part of the team on a day to day. Basis on, and you learn a ton doing matt to. I mean if I ever was the for going to become the first assistant Liebowitz. I probably would still be there now. I would be here so I would have a different path. so I'm really happy with what I ended up doing. There I ended up learning so much. I learned what it takes to. Have the quality that she has and the quantity of output that she has which is unrivalled in industry. I mean people. People have their qualms about her work on some people love it. Some people dislike it. I, consistently say no one else in the world is putting out the cover of vogue. The cut the cover of Vanity Fair and a Nike campaign all in a three week period it just she's the only person that can do it on because of the because of the infrastructure that she's built, and that was the biggest thing. I walked away with I I when I stopped to six Randy I said to myself right then and there. I'm not any LIEBOWITZ right now, but I'm GONNA I'M GONNA make my operation. Move as if I were and it might it might be only a tenth of the size, but I'm going to operate using the same structures and the same kind of

Liebowitz Randy I Jesse Asean Jesse. Ditmars Nike Nigel Perry Vanity Fair Lebron Woods Canada Barnes Sutri Bene Anne Matt
"ami" Discussed on Ctrl Alt Delete

Ctrl Alt Delete

05:31 min | 10 months ago

"ami" Discussed on Ctrl Alt Delete

"Yes, I've got to admit when I first read it read the first Chapter I was so relieved to hear that you and Ami now to aren't perfect and the. Issues because I don't know whether it's my story projecting onto you to obviously through the podcast but I yeah, I did kind of hold. You guys off as like this friendship. That was just you know you never had any problems and it was really I. Feel Bad saying that it was nice to read that you do. I think that it is you know not not every version of this book began that way you know. We really wrote it pretty chronologically, and the truth is that you know for many years in the beginning of our friendship, it was quote unquote. Perfect in the sense of we weren't fighting, or we didn't feel any strife with each other. I think that now with the benefit. Of Hindsight, we can see that there were a lot of things we weren't talking about in that phase. And you know that's one reason why we wanted to start at A. A point of difficulty, so that readers when they were reading those early chapters, where things are pretty much great with our friendship could be looking for the cracks a little bit in the way that we were not in real time and sure. Maybe there are some long term close friendships where they never have a fight. They never 'cause each other any pain, but I think we really just wanted to normalize the fact that every intimate relationship. Yes, even if it's a friendship is probably going to contain some difficulty as you try to figure each other out. A hundred percent because I guess when reading the book, it was interesting, because yes, it's friendship, but really a friendship and a big friendship all is is a relationship, and any relationship takes work. You know people say before you get married. You're not going to be happily ever after. Running into the sunset like it's going to be continuous work and I guess that is proof three podcasts that you've been doing it for so long and..

Ami
Former Atlanta officer charged with murder of Rayshard Brooks

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

01:18 min | 10 months ago

Former Atlanta officer charged with murder of Rayshard Brooks

"Funeral services will be held today for ray shard Brooks in the black man shot in the back by police earlier this month in Atlanta A. B. C. Steve since ami is in Atlanta his killing here on June twelfth in the parking lot of a Wendy's restaurant at the hands of Atlanta police has divided the city and helped fuel the national movement demanding police reforms earlier access point if you it began as a DIY when Brooks refused to be put in hand cuffs and ran off with one of the officers tasers former officer Garrett Ralph is seen shooting him in the back Ross list of charges include felony murder officer Devin Bronson and posted bail and is fighting an aggravated assault charge a witness says he saw one of the officers trying to help Brooks as he was dying and shared video with ABC news the officer who he says he saw helping is wrong we can tell that one officer was really concerned about about racial racial R. R. while while the the other other officer officer was was analyzing analyzing the the situation situation in in statements statements both both officers officers say say their their actions actions were were appropriate appropriate all all of of this this has has been demoralizing for Atlanta police upon hearing that was scheduled for former officer Ralph has been postponed he's being held without bond it was originally scheduled at the same time the family here was holding a funeral for their son

Ray Shard Brooks C. Steve Atlanta Garrett Ralph Devin Bronson Officer Ross Murder Assault ABC R. R.
Explorers & Contenders: Annie Oakley

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:03 min | 1 year ago

Explorers & Contenders: Annie Oakley

"Annie. Oakley was born phoebe and Moses on August thirteenth eighteen sixty in Dark County Ohio when Anne was sits. Her Father Jacob died from pneumonia and his mother. Susan wise soon remarried but her second husband died suddenly two with eight children and very little income. Anne's family was sent to the county's poor farm. These institutions predated federal safety nets like Medicare and social security residents often dealt with miserable living conditions while battling the cultural stigma of needing help and he was placed with local families where she would work in exchange for room and board. She started hunting at eight years old from the start and he was a gifted shot selling her game to local restaurants to help support her family. At fifteen annie's hunting skills paid off the mortgage on her mother's farm that same year she traveled to Cincinnati to compete in a shooting competition with Frank e. Butler Butler was a traveling marksman who made bets with local communities that he could beat anyone in a sharp shooting match. Anne made all twenty five shots. Butler missed the final one. The two started courting and married soon after eighteen seventy six and he was sixteen years. Old Butler continued butlers tour of the country with Anne acting as his assistant despite her skills and he was responsible mostly for holding up items for Butler to shoot. All of that changed our. May I eighteen? Eighty two when Butler's partner fell ill anne filled in on stage and from then on and he was officially part of the act after touring for a year with the sells brothers circus. Anne and Butler joined Buffalo. Bill's wild west show. It was Anne who had been given the name little. Shir shot by LAKOTA. Sioux leader sitting bull really rose to fame. Butler eventually chose to serve as her stage assistant and manager even by today's standards any stunt were jaw-dropping. She would shoot glass balls and coins out of the air and cigarettes out of her husband's mouth her show often opened with her skipping onstage lifting her rifle and in one shot snuffing out the flame of let candle. Anne and Butler remained with Buffalo. Bill's show for sixteen years. The tour took them all around the world. They performed for Queen. Victoria's golden jubilee in England and travelled through Spain Italy and France. Every time she stepped on stage and he proved that women were more than capable of using firearms challenging the disciplines. Masculine reputation. She publicly encouraged women to learn how to use a pistol and to carry it in their purses arguing. Self defense was empowering in nineteen one after returning to the United States and Butler were in a train crash. Any injured her back and stopped touring two years later in nineteen. Oh three it was reported in Chicago that Anne had been arrested for stealing a man's trousers and selling them for cocaine. Despite the story being entirely false the woman arrested had used the fake name any Oakley News outlets ran with it. Anne sued every paper that ran the false accusations over seven years. She won fifty four or fifty five cases in one thousand nine hundred seventeen. The United States entered World War. One and he wrote to the secretary of war. Henry L Stimson offering to fund raiser regiment of female volunteers to fight. She also offered to help. Teach soldiers how to accurately shoot. Neither offer was accepted in nineteen twenty two any began preparing to tour again but a car accident delayed her plans after a year of recovery anti finally returned to the stage soon though any fell sick and in one thousand nine hundred eighty five. She moved back to Ohio to be closer to her family. Annie Oakley died on November Third Nineteen Twenty Six. She was sixty six years old. Her husband Frank. E Butler died three weeks later the two had been married for fifty years in nineteen forty six a fictionalized version of Annie and Butler's love story debuted on Broadway as the Irving Berlin musical. Annie get your Gun Ami thing you can do. I can do better. I could do anything better than you. Yes I can yes I can to this day. The show is still regularly performed by theaters around the

Butler Butler Anne Annie Bill Annie. Oakley Frank E United States Jacob Susan Wise Buffalo Medicare Pneumonia Oakley News Dark County Ohio Moses Cincinnati Shir Sioux Henry L Stimson
"ami" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

04:08 min | 1 year ago

"ami" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Here show join online by ami Horowitz you produce star directed in the highly reviewed theatrical feature film you and me he also is a a video journalist and he has put together a bunch of different videos over the course of time really featured on the program one of his videos in the last few days video he did in New York City he's walking around asking people in New York to make a deal would they be willing to make a deal with they have the country suffer a longer more severe crisis demand that president trump would definitely lose the election a lot of them said it was a hard decision and many of them suggested that chore more pandemic just so long as trump loses it I'm for me thanks for joining the show always a pleasure Ben how are you I do pretty well so you you you never have a shortage of material for a man on the street interviews and and this one is no exception static only went to the streets of New York the nearly barren streets of New York to ask people if they'd be willing to watch more people die said trump would lose are unfortunate I guess the best word I can use but look this is not to be clear these are leftists these are not sort of a typical hello she Democrats right it's sort of self selecting group when you go to the East Village of New York but having said that it was very disheartening where the majority of people that I spoke with the majority of people would rather have a wall more severe coronavirus and specifically with more debt yeah more deaths there we would have otherwise and and their answers were yeah I will I will take that you know when I push them further away said well how many deaths will it take for you to change your position a million deaths now two million deaths no in fact a lot of them said there is no number of deaths they would be willing to accept if it meant changing the ministration for the next election and and it and it really does I think speak about the psyche of the left throughout history right and if you the list is always cared more about philosophy and politics the humanity it's it's what led to twenty percent of Cambodia being killed by the camera route or or twenty million people killed by letters dollar fifty million by mouth he didn't really care about their people about humanity they cared about their doctrinaire philosophy and while I'm not comparing these people obviously to those dictators it does speak to a certain philosophical undergirding you kind of expose with this video you know I'm a DJ how serious you think these people when you're talking to them because it's possible that either they are drawing your they're exaggerating for effect it has seriously she takes sentiments like that but I don't know okay I want a clear this is not the this is not everyone but just why was age sixty with my character about sixty percent majority I would say they were and the fund is intended although maybe when poor taste they were definitely Cyrix I think these people are this notion of trump derangement syndrome and whether it exists or not clearly shows that it does exist and I think the speech thank frankly my guess is if I didn't have a camera there I had was just a position I ask more people off camera I would have gotten a higher and they knew they were being shown this is going to be out there now the people answered in the affirmative they would take this this devil's bargain for more deaths long coronavirus for new president I think they were I think they are very scary I think if they if if they had the kind of telling of where the last stand so on me I was here on the ground in New York City what's the situation like today on the ground in New York City governor Cuomo has said that things seem to have flattened out a bit obviously the deaths are still very high in your state I used to sing a lot of depth there but but have things mitigated all in New York City no not really I I it's it's I don't know what like L. A. R. yeah I've been there since this really began but it it's it's become sort of a very eerie city where the streets are are pretty barren and in fact you know I will guide you to the bloody with the Communist Party realize I'll be wearing in bread lines which is what's happening now.

ami Horowitz
Build Your Resilience During Covid19

FlashCast By PDB, With Phil Di Bella

08:26 min | 1 year ago

Build Your Resilience During Covid19

"Today Going to tackle the topic of resilience obviously given current circumstances. And what's happening around the world? This is something that everybody needs to adopt him. Something we really need to talk about some someone talk about resilience how you can cut with with stress and become more resilient and a little bit more about you know the control you know and dump especially children. I might even touch on you. Know the whole concept of children in resilience for them because that's their important also. We need to make sure that people are being resilient but let me stop boy much resilience is simply about you know making sure that no matter how many hits somebody takes whether it be personal professional family that We keep going. We get backed up dust off and keep going. You know that to me is the very one vision of resilience is that we build the toughest skin and you know when certain things hurt us. Damage US will give us a setback that we're able to dust ourselves off learned from the situation and move forward and be a lot stronger. And of course Secombe Sanchez. Change everybody's resources a different everybody's responsibilities at different said he doesn't go In speak parole. And what I want to touch on his a bit of a framework on how we can actually build You cope with stress and become more resilient Sunday. So let me start with saying that the way off and the best to cut the stress and become resilient and see what's going on with the whole corona virus. It's time you discovered discussing this and number one is always better. Chewed develop the right attitude. That's going to be Attitude Is Everything. Gratitude IS ABOUT MONTHS. Hit at shoot is about frame of mind at it shoot. Is The lens that you're going to choose to look at the situation? We need to have the right attitude. If we don't start with the right attitude then nothing else is going to matter. It won't matter. It doesn't matter what your buddies doing doesn't matter what you plan to do. And what the strategy is if you don't have the right months if you don't have the right attitude than the rest is not going to work for you So it really is key to get the next is you need to have an internal form of control and this will be different for different people. You need to have a go to form of control that you know. Some people are talkers. Some people are listeners. Some people like to write things down. Some people like to acting at whatever it is. It doesn't matter. You need to have an internal form of control a Goto something that helps you control something that helps you the pause button when you're feeling that stressful that situation happens to you. We all need that. Only that Internal Form of control. So it's very important again. Some will be reading some. We'll be music some boxing some sports. Some we'll be seeing silence. Meditation doesn't matter. This is the time that we really need to know ass oems and really understand what works for us. What is internal form of Control that works for us? Number three is rally. Good people around you the The benefits of amazing people people that lift you up to give you energy not people that tell you. You need people to tell you what you prepared to hear what you need to. He asked not just blow. Smoke up your in. You need people that are not going to tell you that we write may cheese ride. Everything's great now. You need the support or engineering. You need that network. Some people talk about the five most influential people around. Do some talk about the two. Most favorite people supportive. It doesn't matter it's different for different people but everybody needs that support. Everyone needs people around them to help them. Choice of how many and who they are but they do need to be people that will help you and lift your spirits. That really do need to be those people and then he staging obviously the people that you need to put a random people that need to know you. They need to be you know on a shares similar values that need to be on the signed wavelength that need to obviously Gel and and Share a lot in common with you but because you don't want people that I don't have the same values or don't share things in common to support mechanism. You need people around you. That know your story your history know who you are as a person know what makes you happy. Sad Mad. Angry excited this of support. You need around you when you're actually needing to cope with stress and be more resilient because the last thing you need is people that are going to add to the stress. Well people that are GONNA on one hundred questions when they know that to be questioned so important time that the right people around you in support and saying you know use and then I had to the stress but rather help you become resilience number. Four is always about having a good laugh. You know you've got to keep a sense of humor now again whether that's watching a funny video which ing movie you need. Something cooks going to make you laugh. Laughter is is a good cue for many things. Laughing is good for body. It's good for the mind and it really has you know. Has Its upsides that provincial research laughing is important and so you need to maintain some form of sense of humor and again that might be part of the people around you. That might be the tools you might have Iran and might be a form of control. But you do need to have some sort of sense of Hannah. I always adopt attitude that this too shall pass. We're going through a tunnel. Some tunnels the longest tunnels shorter. Coming at the other side of town will happen. And it's no different with the corona virus right near where we're going through a tunnel and nobody's immune to this but we'll come out the other end of the tunnel it will happen and you need to be prepared What's happening of course right now? It's hard to keep a sense of humor but it's an easy need to make sure it happens and and just putting a small device. It's very hard to be angry when you're smiling laughing and give it a go so even in the worship Collins try. It's pretty hard the other day I went and got my flu shot. And I'm not a fan of NATO's hype and the nurse said to me. Put a small if I put the needle in because it'll take away must've pine and she was right. I didn't even feel the needle going in honestly rather small Emma Face. She moved the needle and earning. You should finish because I heard the needle popping into the little kenniston because obviously I can't stand there and watch him but smile. Hixon through that tough tough situation. Just put a smile in your face. And what have we got to lose a great way to cope with stress and be more? Isn't it in the last month? Amis getting in touch with the spiritual side Very big fan of being part of your spiritual side often go to church. I have strong faith. I also follow. Things took the dispenser I did believe in spiritual guides. I do an open to all sorts of spirituality. An pick and choose what works or doesn't work or sit with me based on my values and my name but everybody needs to be in touch with the spiritual side. Mama shape or form and spiritual doesn't need to be Catholocism or or Buddhism or whatever it is spiritual is to have a fight of some sort and whether that's fight in whatever it is you choose the important that you have a fight than the fight means that you believe and the moment you have faith in you believe that your spiritual side so people are getting touch so in some rain develop the run attitude develop an internal form of control rally the rock supporter. And You keep your sense of humor and get in touch with your spiritual side. These are the things that I believe. Helped me cope with stress and be quite resilience? Who HELP YOU as I've been saying nobody's immune to the current situation. This too shall pass. What we should be doing. Now is obviously the most important things that we need to keep shelter and food necessities and then we should also be planning on what happens when we come back. We'll be planning to commit the other side so you can hit the ground running. When there's some sort of normality restored to an extent you've been listening to fill Dibella and this is flash crossbar. Pd Bay stay safe. Stay smiling as best you can and care and community is the key to get us all through the current virus and make sure we are isolating from people and not spreading germs. See on the other side till next on the best you can

United States Secombe Sanchez Pd Bay Dibella Emma Face FLU GEL Hixon Hannah Iran Nato Amis Collins Rock
Harnessing the Power of Stem Cells with Christopher Kennedy, President at Elixell Therapeutics

Outcomes Rocket

11:56 min | 1 year ago

Harnessing the Power of Stem Cells with Christopher Kennedy, President at Elixell Therapeutics

"I WANNA welcome Christopher and Chris if you can Say Hi and fill in any other blanks of the intro. That may be. I may have missed that. You want to educate the listeners. Great thank you for hosting this morning and I and I look forward to a really good discussion. Yes so exciting. Time for us here in Kansas City as you mentioned Our offices actually at the Bio Science and Technology Center that's Housed on Kansas University Medical Center campus here in Kansas City. Kansas so this area is essentially set up perfectly for collaborative organization like ourselves. We're really trying to pull in best in class. Researchers best in class practices when it comes to the laboratories themselves the clinical work excited or and so we feel like. We're kind of in a hub here in Kansas City. Even though sometimes we don't think of the midwest of being a hub of innovation. Things are changing here in Kansas City. So I'm excited to represent the the eulex style therapeutic specifically but in the greater community as well. Well I think it's awesome and Christopher the work that is happening outside of those traditionally thought of focal centers like Francisco or Boston or where a lot of the effort seem to be happening. There's more happening in in the flyover states and being in Chicago. Lot happening here. That maybe doesn't always hit the radar so. I'm glad you're plugging in the word for your neck of the Woods Casey. So what exactly inspires your work in healthcare. Yeah so just before we move onto that question saw just kind of highlight what you just mentioned there Interestingly enough we have thirteen patents and our Ip actually comes from the Towers Institute which is based here in Kansas City. And before I moved to the area I also was not as aware of the great technologies that have come out of this particular geography but the Stars Institute for for listeners. That aren't familiar with. It is a global research institute. It's a six hundred thousand square foot facility here in Kansas City. And this is one of the first license out license technologies. That has come out of there. That eulex therapeutics has the privilege of working on. But Yeah it's to your point as well. I mean I grew up in the Chicago area. Also another great hub of innovation and ironically on this project that I'm working with there's actually a Chicago footprint as well as a Kansas City footprint. So yeah more than ever my wave in the Midwest flag so love it represents you get to your question about what inspires healthcare. I I find it interesting when I think of your title so outcomes rocket my career has been really focused on patient outcomes and I I love the term. I know that it's probably becoming more and more use potentially over using some regards now on the healthcare circle but I love it because it really aligns with a scoreboard right like a performance scoreboard where we at and where we going and he looks. Therapeutics was constructed on the premise of we can go further when it comes to stem cells particularly the advanced themselves sciences and when. I say themselves from our perspective. I'm talking about poetics. Themselves with adult stem cells versus the embryonic stem cells. That are in the media today so H. SC's are the focus for us because there is so much potential around the therapeutic side of what can be in the future in a lot of our umbilical cord banks throughout not just the US but worldwide and so- outcomes are clearly are focused. Here's walls. We feel that we can utilize a new technologies to really impact the patient at the bedside here in the near future. Yeah that's interesting and appreciate the differentiation there. Christopher what would you say? The business is doing specifically to add value to the healthcare ecosystem. Help US diving deeper and understand what the value prop is. Yeah and I think. This is a benefit to watching a company in twenty twenty to be frank right that we've been able to capitalize maximize the opportunities that exist. Now you mentioned earlier on the intro. Some of the work that I had done the telemedicine virtual care space and never. Is that more important in. Today's I think clinical time but also when it comes to clinical research so we're global organization and we have ties to Asia Europe. And then of course here in the US but our researchers are really in a full term of collaborative research together. And so we've cut down. I think a lot of the time. Line that traditionally this taken to get all the parties set up and ready to go when I come. You know for clinical work for example or just on a project in general and working with academic institutions large research institutions like the University of Chicago or Kansas University of Kansas and being able to transition Ip out and then get the research up and running is really been something that we focused on early on and successfully. I feel that we are implementing that and the proof point of that right. The outcome of what I just mentioned would be our scientific advisory board so traditionally in my experience. The Scientific Advisory Board for Big Pharma Small Pharma Biotech Med device and all of those spaces is very critical in the direction organization. Takes but just on our scientific advisory board. We've got six globally world-renowned research academic type Individuals who I think in years past without the you know. The advent of some of our current technologies would have taken a lot longer to get together and working on the same project so institutions like Penn. Yeah we have University of Chicago Ball University of Indiana researchers from University of Kansas. That I mentioned earlier Stars Institute all sitting on our advisory board and it allows for us to cut down the time it takes potentially to have a novel concept or an idea in them tested on the laboratory taxi tested in our early clinical phase. To See if it's viable or not and then to get feedback from a global perspective from the SAB. The Scientific Advisory Board has been instrumental. So the right now. We know the to pass. The Ron have the best chance to reach their outcome at the end for patients. Love it so if you think about what makes what you and the company does different and better than what available today. What is it so let's talk about the technology rising when to that ASPECT OF HSE STEM CELL? Topic is big. And there's essentially what I feel some sort of a race going on for getting technology into the marketplace that allows us to really recognize all of the stem cell opportunities within Belco cords themselves. Right so just says as a layman that I was entering into this project really understanding of the D. N. A. M. R. N. A. Aspect of of how life is working and uncovering the researchers that we have the privilege to interact with on our team published a really important and I would definitely classify this as a breakthrough paper and this was specific to and cell research the suppression of success a reader. Which is the White Dwarf to that? We're focused on under these. This category of an fix a reader and six say reader modulators essentially an expression of of Mres right so when we talk about DNA and the communication channels within cells. There's a communication that happens that really specific to stem cell fate determination. And what we've done is uncovered that with whites. Hdf to Professor Lynne. Hanley in Schwann. He both uncovered the fact that when you knock out whites. Hdf to all of the sudden we start to see a really successful stem cell expansion so one becomes two to become a three and so on and so forth and this stem cell expansion allows us to take potential biblical cord banks that are out there today and really go head into the challenge of having limited cells that are available and these banks. So you have all these blood cord banks that are out there. But the issue is both uncovering the actual cells themselves. So how many cells are stored right within the blood cord and then getting them so that we can have more of them essentially and what we're learning now on what's going on in our lab is how do we use this white T H D of. Two knockout or blocking mechanism to then help those cells. We already have in a bank expand and they'd be more therapeutically viable for diseases. Let's talk about oncology. For example where one of our first pipeline products is currently underway. Also from an orthopedic application when you think about cartilage regeneration so stem cells and set them themselves allow us to have the potential to really impact in a really large number of different disease states. And I think we're on the cutting edge of being able to recognize how powerful discoveries like this can be and that's our big differentiation. Salt as you know and my stays being a part of an early stage biotech. We pivot often. So we're we're starting right now. We've already moved a few places to the left or to the right to get to our early clinical work but that's our differentiation. Today is definitely the publication that kind of expresses what we're doing under why Tgif to interesting and so appreciate you you're honing in on that Whitey HD F two and it's basically this isn't my specialty but it's a protein right that basically encodes a gene and potentially is responsible for some of the diseases. Were seeing cancer will. What we know is. The setback forced themselves their piece today. Is it's hard to get the volume of a number of cells and into the correct location. Potentially do their job. And because of that that limitation. It's almost a self limitation of pure numbers. Race is on to find out well. How do we unlock the potential for those souls that we currently have banked become more and so when you block white t? Hdf to their allows in a particularly in the actual article that was published by Lynne. Hanley and Sean. He led the more than tenfold increase and the bench. So big you're looking and then when you look at measuring evidence no you can't no it is a From a scientific terminology standpoint. It's an say reader. But there's a modulation aspect of that right because these in Marin as when you essentially modify or work with the actual Ima- reader than the the results can happen like we're seeing in this clinical work. Now we still have more more work to do on this front right. And so that's where research is currently going on and the human element of things but in the animal models It's really impressive. And so where we sit today were versus where we'll sit even twelve. Eighteen months from now is exciting and every day. We're looking at Trends right and so I feel like you know again back to our term outcomes. That's the common language between layman like ourselves. That aren't biochemist right or molecular biologist and for us to hang in conversations with our backgrounds on more the business side of healthcare we all can agree upon is. What are the outcomes that we're looking for in the clinical work in what our objectives are overall? And so we've done that. I think successfully Here in the early stages to kind of keep us on track and also we've been very very fortunate to sit on University of Kansas medical centers. Campus where we are working with. It's called Ami if you're here locally but it's Institute for Advancing Medical Innovation at Ku and this group is essentially a gold standard for what we've been talking about in this call so so far and that is taking best in class practices and taking a true collaborative approach to getting something that was discovered in a laboratory getting through clinical trial work. And then. Really getting out to patient bedside. Where it's driving these outcomes so I think that's been refreshing for me to see not just like the theory of how do you launch a biotech company but then to actually being a place where these resources already set up and it's really helping our

Kansas City Christopher Chicago United States Kansas Advisory Board Scientific Advisory Board Stars Institute Bio Science And Technology Cen Kansas University Medical Cent University Of Kansas Medical C Professor Lynne Kansas University Of Kansas Hanley Midwest University Of Kansas
Bitcoin Battles $10,000

The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

05:57 min | 1 year ago

Bitcoin Battles $10,000

"Active weekend and we still still tinkering around pretty cables right now. So let's talk about that. Let's discuss the elephant in the room that everybody is saying is very aware of and ten thousand so bitcoin over the weekend I actually found a long. I am long becoming stalking this position. For quite some time and The candle in the crowd on the two-day shot. I'm very happy to belong here. of the day with. I'M GONNA make a profit or not or ought I do know that my promo ability success is reasonably high bicester my trading records. But you never want to win is gonNA come. You don't know if it's destroyed all the next tried. You know that is if you flip the coin a hundred times in this guy to be a stretch re probably gonNA flip and land on towels five times and arrive at the probability of coming back to it being even author. Honda tosses is very very hot necessarily my trading okay. I'm I'm flipping the coin. I'm following the same strategies and structures every single time. I take that try Dr. No which tried is going to kill. The PIG will eno is that. I've got the probabilities in Moi. Five up now right now. That tries looking really really nauseous. But this definitely the hurdle of ten thousand you got to get through that region. I think that if we can get through that area I think we might actually have a little bit of potential upside mentioned. Carry through and the reason that I signed. This is because the has been a little bit of a battle up there at ten thousand. We saw yesterday in the evening. We pushed out through ten thousand in the Kennel. Started to get a bit wacky. Some big candle went straight out three. We wouldn't wish got into it and then back down a couple of hundred all's on a couple of hundred neely a couple of hundred dollars relatively quickly so we went back up there again to die. We pushed through ten thousand. We actually met a high of more than ten thousand and thirty six dollars before guiding a got scuttled other. Speak to now at nine thousand nine hundred and twenty eight point four tool percent today okay today so we are. We are having taught little hustle with ten thousand. If we can get through we good because we'll have cleared out the sales if not then there is potential further down. Saw what could also be an option is a consolidation now because the daily is not telling me enough. It's the Tuta I've taken my tried on. I really liked the look of his trend. Thus far we did pull back on the weekly can which was lost. Wicked closed point three percent. Up of the interesting thing is that we went down as low as nine thousand three hundred thirteen dollars before closing at nine nine. Seven one so felli good shift. We went into that cradles. Very close that cradles off the candle closet is a bullish candalyn. If we ingest I will get about ten thousand and then get above the high of last week's candle ten thousand three hundred thirty one. They've got the break of another. Hi sorry not a high sil- drug and then we break the high of another weekly candle that stocks we saw. We want small as we push on to new highs there the bitcoin just sitting there waiting seeing goes on. It's pretty slow at the minutes. Precipitous slow indeed. Now therapy has been my best tried for a little while. Buffet It's of move my stop up again after having guilt long way did I get long long. background to twenty three. My stops out to fifty six and I only had a two to twenty three to seven days seeks to stop very good trade. They locked in more profit highway currently sitting rotten out point two two percent and You know the weekly here gain loss. Cantwell's bullish close up six point. Two two percent in has just gone ripping streit outside. I be surprised at all to see except I saw a theory. Pull back a little bit this week. If the rest of the market does take a break because it has been a pretty still around were to seventy four seven point two five of a percent except as awesome. The kids their twenty eight cents. Were Dan point five percent. Little breakout happened yesterday. What say we just saw always? That's all it's doing. This does not a great deal more to decide really about Tom. About Excel pay. Bitcoin cash half a percent as I speak to you right now at full of five spot three five that is Willa. It's taken a long and again To Canada push the outside this another opportunity. Potentially if anyone out there trading those br sorry trading cradles base to ninety six and nineteen dollars down to three percent very solid way still locked coin do pull bucking that cradles to really nice move there. As a matter of fact the next tweet is preceding. That was eight point nine. Five percent move. It's at seventy eight dollars and seventy six cents. Currently down one point six percent on this day Eos perp. Masha talk of their deep pool but quite hard about south at three fifty. Roughly ran three fifty quite well. Our photos and thirty six point three percent. Bon Ami childhood really do like to look up here The bonnets contract on the two-day ripping the bonnets contract on the two against Bitcoin also ripping really good. It's at one percent right now. Twenty three dollars and thirteen cents. Kadota another pool back into the cried ozone over the weekend. The two day were six point. One percents We're looking good. They're really nice. Looking trend until break stamped low ally. There's nothing really to worry about for me. Just holding on and seeing what goes on the therion classics down one percent right now. Pretty Ivory agree pretty ugly looking shot. If on honest with you guys a little bit of consolidation starting to form around bat just show up at the ten dollar marks actually now that implies on what actually just throw that a more watch list to keep an eye on that nine dollars and sixty eight cents. Ten Percent Tron. Is Dan Warren? Half percent up two point one cents as well to round out that top ten.

Dan Warren Stalking Honda PIG Neely ENO Cantwell Streit Bon Ami Willa Canada TOM
Ripening Your Cervix for Labor

Kathy Fray's MotherWise Podcasts

06:02 min | 1 year ago

Ripening Your Cervix for Labor

"Everybody it's can for here from otherwise and welcome welcome to another. We've been up podcast this little many women that we talk about tonight. The topic is all bat. How to help help your Subic's become really soft and ripe really dilating when you go into Labor? Sorry look these. His secrets have been used for thousands of years. meaning that midwives since don't time have been helping women with with elections in potions and things to help a woman's civics Dada tight. Civic says that opening of the word so we knew it pregnant you. You'LL SUV as long and feminine. It sort of feels like the tip of your eyes and by the time that it's soft and ripe in really to actually type into during Labor it soft and stretchy it feels like Hewlett ups so their prices is These are some Products out there that you can get now. I'm not here. I'm formally endorsing them because I'm not an actor pet so what I'm doing. His is passing you on some hemp and types from my experience over years and years of being on the coalface in the front line and and seeing how they do positively A woman's selects. So you still need to do your own highway and find out. Your things are make sure that you're we're happy and speak with your local naturopathic medical hubris tiny I pay acupuncturist subtract. I would. He's tight to necessarily talk about metro pathy to a medical doctor and least trained nature faker. Otherwise you're asking them their opinion on something donate surely his full training on are kite so these basically areas of your things that you can do that ripen a civics and in things that you can do when you hit thank civics that can maitre you to go into actual like that. So I'm GonNa go into these old. I love deep a lot of Deepak If we and my mother wise and a super great my masterclass and this is part of my senior vice. Ix per game where people pay a weekly or monthly subscription to get access to my huge online two-night library twenty seven. Plus all of my full length with Anna's NAUSEAM podcast End Our weekly live. Check where we can. I can answer any particular questions. Sorry it's another thing that you might WanNa think about during and hand. I'll put the link on a coming on the bottom of this so you can check it out if you wish okay so anyway. It's just one through these quickly and you can knock some of these up yourself office without so fiercely. Nature's sunshine is a brain that produce product code find W which stands for five weeks And you take it in the last five weeks if you'll pregnancy it's full of HIPSTER figures for a long long long long long time. Lots of European hips primarily a really wonderful to help ripen a Subic's and you take it from its cold five W. because he's take the last five weeks and said it's from city five weeks and so get some new product and these also they Emeka Mak- six fifty six cold evening primrose oil and that comes in thousand milligram capsules and you can take that early early and finally sorry. I'm always great to be taking in those last few weeks outside really from fifty seven weeks on what's with that and you can puck a little hole in them and When you go to bed shoved went up to the very Beckham? Have you ever China. Which is where you'll save excess and Lee your suv kind of drown and evening primrose oil night because it as his a a natural sort of Defeat of helping to ripen the accent the actual kind of goes out. Typically when you go for way in the morning yes yes I think he's a really good things to be during now seeks as good to help them to ripen a civics at because it contains male ejaculate it contains prostaglandins and then the other things that are really good a your reflexologist et hymie apathy particularly con- Afam and Somme Amis So what tiny open. Faith I sort of team to have shortened names which people know about said it's one called that spouts a U. L. and another one that spout. Say I M ICEE and those can be great little tinctures to be taking swell and again it would be good to be speaking to your own. Naturopathy homeopath a pat. Trust refixed holiday season in. Look the one thing I would say is do everything. You WanNa get obsessed with ripening your civics because the ripe it the civics x the shorter the lighter and the shosha Elijah the crooked the in the quicker the much lower chance that you're going to need a heaping keeping labels of paint Al Jazeera epidurals which have dramatic high risk factors into the into the base. So tonight that the more normal waking thanks then the least chance your baby is going to habit traumatic with dramatic vice. I'm delivery by agency agency Caesarian or Megyn space. I'm volunteers so forceps which the common common outcome of

Subic Elijah Hewlett China Al Jazeera Deepak M Icee Anna Beckham Emeka Mak
"ami" Discussed on Photography Radio

Photography Radio

11:51 min | 1 year ago

"ami" Discussed on Photography Radio

"Tagging groupie images easy to share these folders privately and advance manse stats and absolutely no ads. When browsing so that is the positive of flaker but as a photo sharing social media platform like instagram instagram? While I think it needs a lot of work but there is potential. I think that flicker has an identity problem. And they need to tackle that first before looking for new subscribers to the platform. Now it'd be a shame if flicker were to disappear both no clear direction or goal other than to increase revenue without adding value to existing or potential subscribers. This platform may become a has been now full disclosure Ami pro user. Her and I am a paying subscriber and user flicker for the past six years. So I personally don't want to see this pop from disappear but again will allow the market forces is.

Ami
"ami" Discussed on CritterCast

CritterCast

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"ami" Discussed on CritterCast

"Wait in in your brain yeah. I think that's still very fast. Yes especially to swim that fast right going to work through the water thirteen hundred pounds yes. That's a lot a lot to maneuver yeah so the other. The subspecies live in all sorts of different lagoons younes estuaries and rivers. They live in eastern mexico down the central american coasts across south america the greater antilles and the islands of of the caribbean all the places all the places so here's some like the basic background factual information for the most part they're pretty in general mammals like into how do they have babies. They have like most mammals have babies live birth yep yep and very similar to wales the the babies are born underwater the moms have to pop them up into the air so that they can breathe yeah <hes> they have babies about every two two and a half to five years the moms are basically the sole caretaker yeah so and like other aquatic mammals. They have blowholes yes. Yes i have no idea oh no ono looking at your pictures. Look at the photos you have prepared weight because dolphins wales. They all have blowholes. It would make sense. Oh no don't what okay so. They have more like hippos. They have to lift their their nostrils above the water. Well that seems stupid. Though because hippos like are you. Do you think i guess i guess. Hippos are ma'am. Yes you just like i think of them more. I don't know why i always will because they don't live their entire life and water right right now. I don't have legs they can't they're not walking around like nope and they can. They could do a walrus thing for a little bit. They need to gather the water they could. I don't think they'd well they could breathe could look like trying to do the worm at a wedding. Is this the thing that it has video documentation child even better before everybody had videophones. Thank god yes yeah. I would have so many more moments poor kids who are alive as children now. All those moments addressed your privacy yup so here's i wanted to get straight into the juicy bits okay so i just did some research on the lake. The weird weird weird back east manatees. Do the weird stuff well yeah. I think the weird stuff all right so they're water dwellers. There is now but they weren't always they have evolved from animals that wandered land. I mean like amphibians vivians. No like big giant mammals. Oh okay yeah like whales. Whales evolved from land wales so yeah and then when they started out i mean all life started out in the water yet and they got out of the we'll see. That's an i'm back in. That's what i was thinking of the thing i always think of this series of nature documentaries that i watched in seventh grade with raise raise hansen's life science class we we spent a lot of time watching movies. I think that's why i like that class so much. That was what we also learned about snails best thing ever where they do just do like c._g._i. Re-creations of like what dinosaurs would have looked like on earth with the first mammals look like where you really feel like you're watching a nature your documentary except definitely there were no cameras and so i always think there's like a pretty graphic sex scene of like whoa little frog leg like like little amphibian but like legged creatures that i walked.

wales hansen mexico america thirteen hundred pounds five years
"ami" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"ami" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"The fire department is on the way if you're traveling on bart good news there no problems to report looking to buy a car online shopping can be confusing not anymore withdrew price from truecar now you can know the exact price that you'll pay for the car that you want and see what other people paid for two when you're ready to buy a new car or used car visit truecar to enjoy a more confident car buying experience if you missed anything this morning go to our website k. f. o. dot com and get our morning show blog or podcast and of course the our puppy from puppy love and now you'll love rush limbaugh has been a long time I'm since I've seen that much compressed. Collective hatred and anger, in one place on the one St. I can't remember. It was just pouring out my gigantic one hundred fifteen inch monitor the hatred AMI anger coming out of debate number two. The democrat party last. Homer. Tony, south Florida. Friday. God, those people mad. Trump is just. Creating more havoc than he even knows in this party. Anyway, folks, here we are at the end of yet. Another busy broadcast week. It's open line Friday and I said yesterday. Things that you think need to be talked about an art being data. Call and bring it up a question or comment feel free. Eight hundred two eight two two eight eight two..

ami
"ami" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

MYfm 104.3

14:10 min | 2 years ago

"ami" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

"The barbecue solid color. Table covers are just five for five dollars and half. Steam pens are on sale for just fifty cents party like you mean it with amazing savings? Party city. Oh, it's on restrictions apply. See store for details. Four three on with Mario Lopez nine o'clock Thursday night, Mario Lopez here. Let's keep the music going for you right now. KABC Los Angeles won four three. Ooh. Ooh. Are you happy? Is this? Good. Long. An hearty band so hard. Good. Longing. That fear. Three. I just wanna stay son wear. Find. Sometimes these peace in sons, peace of mind. Sometimes. About. Big and much. That's easy to say we have a list of people that we would take for them. For everybody. Through metaphorically. Religiously. Even. Winning. Question. Much. Thinking. Thinking thinking. Avenue thinking. Avenue thinking. I've been thinking. Thinking. Three. Fam-. Little. Screaming. Thank you. With you pay. You'll pay. Aging. Nice. Someone. Children. Compose kiss. Those. Shogo code. Me. Crazy. People. Plus Angeles win over three. Easy, just how you take tag. Shooting. You trouble from the kids. Bowman. Open. What should? Sure. But you want to say. Back in. When you back away. That's just what you. Face breaks out my car. Trash. What should? But you won't sue the say. But. Sure, we'll do the say. Mara lopez. Keeping the music going for you in about to David Keck ner in here. Larry Chan kind anchorman, AMI Todd Packer in the office. And now a much more serious role in his new movie all creatures here below back. David Dave ten..

ami
"ami" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

MYfm 104.3

10:20 min | 2 years ago

"ami" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

"This conversation named companies. So what do you say this pay? Away. Dead. Can be without. Single stay with me. Because ever so much wrong going. No. More music more variety. Yup. Two now. Nobody. Right now. Ami? Three. Found. Sweet. I never knew someone weighed in full. Just kids when we. Not known. I will. Me. And. Be. Do you? So when you. Whispered. Anyone? Says mateen's. Sunday. Kevin. Secret. Kevin. Feel kid who is so. I know. Tonight. Four three nine thirty five nine thirty five or six shots. Win your way to six flags. Magic bound not just any night. It's our my private night at the park where into the park, and we feel with all my winners. P many. So you know, what that means translates into short lines? It's a right all of the awesome superhero world class coasters like that, man. The ride with Vange superman ride all that stuff. You got the run of the park for a night, basically. Okay. Next shot nine thirty five right here on my fan. Hey with me. Dragons coming up some policy. I okay. This is good Sam Smith Norman again to the stranger. Sorry, little selfish. Like that song..

ami
"ami" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

02:51 min | 2 years ago

"ami" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Also yesterday called on the Democrats to work with Republicans to dress broken asylum laws quickly. Now, they will ignore him unless he does something to get their attention like stop or heavily tax the remittances sent from us to the country south of the border. But the the president urged Democrats the Republicans to address the US asylum laws quickly the latest push from the president or refocus on immigration after each retina last week to shut her the southern border Trump suggested Sunday night. That his administration could take action. If may call and congress do not prevent further illegal border crossings. Ami's considering appointing as czar to oversee the immigration agenda and as a cherry on top. How about this? The president said that US the US sense. This is meaningless without the citizenship question. Democrats do not want the citizenship question on the census Democrats say that's not what we're look. We're not counting numbers citizens. We're counting a number of bodies weaken Termine how much welfare that we need to give them we're not. We're not worried about counting citizens, but Trump is adamant that the citizenship, quite can you believe the Democrats going to the mat over that? Why can they don't want the citizenship because they don't want to things they don't want the legals hiding and returning to the shadows to avoid being counted? And they don't want the actual number of non-citizens related to illegal immigrants immigration counted. They don't want that. That number to ever be known because if it is if it were ever known how many illegal immigrants are in this country. It would shock people and rally them. So the Democrats don't want any part of that Trump is insistent on it. Love this word loophole loophole in the asylum loopholes. It's like it's like somebody writes a law, and then purposely puts in a way to break it. That's the way loopholes like tax loopholes or second amendment gun law. Loop loophole loopholes. They're just ways around law. Everybody's creative. But loopholes give the idea that there's something not right there that needs to be shut down. What needs to be fixed as asylum law? Not the loopholes. I don't wanna I don't wanna spend a lot of time arguing semantics, I mean, people think Lou loopholes or something. And if that's what it takes to communicate to them fine. I'll say it we need to get rid of the loopholes..

Trump president US congress Ami Lou
"ami" Discussed on Wash FM 97.1

Wash FM 97.1

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"ami" Discussed on Wash FM 97.1

"She just wants to be. Before she go. Notice. No, see. She praises AMI's praised the sculpted by sculptor. Sheet all see. This guy. People within the is confined. Maybe we made a blast. See? Zohreh? But. has to.

AMI
"ami" Discussed on The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"ami" Discussed on The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

"The delivered to each customer individually at the appropriate time there's no more sort of global sales that drive the entire marketing counter they're still of course our global sales but it's not the be all end all it's now much more about one to one marketing instead of one too many so what's next possession ami's that anything else that you can share with us today yeah i mean i think that gdp are thing has really cast a bright light on customer data which is good for us because we treat it like gold and all our customers do as well so that's good for us and the other thing is i kind of mentioned earlier it's it's really escalated the conversation it's elevated the conversation to the really top of the house level where this isn't sort of a marketing thing so how can we market better that's clearly a part in it but it's how can we deliver customer service better when someone calls if you really wanna tag is them ask them their name and to restate their problem three or four times as you transfer them about the organization right that's like the classic red bow red flag in front of a bull thing so at the c d p that customer service agent that has nothing to do with marketing can see who's on the other line what they've purchased what their historical exchange has been with the brand and based off of that they can handle the situation intelligently to their satisfaction into the customer satisfaction so that has nothing to do with marketing saying with frontline store operations if someone comes up to the register scans of personalized one to one coupon i can see who that person is what they've bought historically on on the basis of that i can do everything from his pedestrian his greet them differently to make product recommendations in real time to suggest that they come for follow up visit at a point down the line so it really is elevated customer data out of the sole domain of marketing and really broadened the scope across the organization now you've talked to like today up how many many problems that bunked businesses are struggling with.

ami
"ami" Discussed on We Can Talk About

We Can Talk About

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"ami" Discussed on We Can Talk About

"Okay the metro has been a huge pet project for him i think and goes can i count on your support for measure ami handed me a bag of minium ems bribing me with these then i ask them how to vote for i think it was prop sixty seven the pharma drug pricing to match the veteran's affair and he was actually against it and had a very nuanced he goes well just gonna shift costumer else so it's like a false measure we address it in different way yeah i bet he was like wow this guy actually knows a second impressed showing again like a photo op and then like a concerned citizen estimate real question because at the end okay shake your hand now they can take a picture l shaking bring him up because eight martinez was talking to him i think they were actually talking about the new mattress firm that's going to go in in preparation for the olympics and amer tina's was dancing around like what's in the future for you next and he goes because i heard that you were recently in iowa and then he just went uhhuh right and there was like silence and silence on the radio always feels so deafening and i was like what is and then they quickly moved onto something else and i was like what was that about and then i was like oh wait a minute that's the if you can win an iowa you can win anywhere so i i mean they're definitely everyone keeps saying he's gonna run.

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"ami" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

KHNR 690AM

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"ami" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

"Thank you so much now several callers said that i mispronounced the name of the trail over which the florida bridge would span had it not collapsed it's called tammy ami in thank you so much for for that we're talking about hillary's in my opinion pretty insulting comments about why white women did not vote for her gina is in houston texas jeanne you're on the larry elder show thank you so much for calling leery first of all i just want to say i love your show and i listened to you on the way home every night they may white i was gonna say i guess i guess your i guess your husband or your boyfriend tells you to listen to me right yes of course i think i told my husband about you i see anyway i just wanna say that you know i do identify with the republican party but i made that choice on my own and that is because of you know what's going on with healthcare with immigration with the economic policies you know so many things like that and i just really disagreed with everything hillary had to say and not only that i really do think she's potentially a criminal and so that might be another reason why she didn't get my those but what do you think i also think that she potentially a criminal i don't think any going to happen to her but i think certainly something should have happened to her you know the the server and lying about it in destroying all those emails they're were under subpoena i mean come on exactly anyway i think it was just crazy what she said but you know it's it's not helping her with the party and she can say what she wants well david thank you very much for that i appreciate it arlen is in silicon valley california on you're on the larry elder show are you larry.

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