35 Burst results for "AJC"

"ajc" Discussed on People of the Pod

People of the Pod

06:10 min | 2 weeks ago

"ajc" Discussed on People of the Pod

"Now it's time for our closing segment about table talk and joining us Chabad table. This week is Naomi Ravic, the newly appointed program associate AJC's young. Leadership. Department often called the best department at AJC. Now when you're talking with your family at your table this weekend, what are you going to be talking about Anke you. For having me back for about table talk it is such a pleasure. My family has been talking about Jewish unity this whole week and our own forms of interaction -ality. So I expect our spot table will be no different coming from an interracial family these conversations that being black and Jewish have always been a part of the discourse of my life, but I'm really excited to see that agency and the national. Urban. League are taking these incredible steps to not only acknowledge the history of these two communities working together. But also talk about the intersection of what it means to be a part of both for me. I've never felt that being black and Jewish is an obstacle. I do oftentimes feel caught between two different planes of being both black and Jewish, and I've definitely had the experience of feeling other by one community or the other. The feeling of being other it isn't necessarily one of exclusion rather of being highlighted for your differences. I've never felt this is a challenge for me to overcome more. So another part of identity that I have to reconcile with the world around me like anything else. My mom and I have been discussing our own unique perspectives as a black Jew and myself as by Racial Ju- of a different generation we've been talking a lot about our similar experiences as are many different ones and I've been reflecting on how fortunate I feel that you've made so many strides in the last forty or so years. unity week has come at such an opportune time considering everything that's going on in the world recently from the protests rounding racial quality in this country and the rising anti-semitism to a black woman being nominated two major party ticket for the first time in American history. As Dr Jani said on the program earlier this week about the experience of Jews of Color in America. I believe that we're at a crucial jumping off point but that the work will truly be done when we no longer have to identify as Jews of color when we can walk into any Jewish based unjustly. Jewish. I've never been prouder to be Jewish woman of Color and I'm so thankful that AJC has taken this week to highlight these stories. I'm looking forward to the day when I can just be who I am without having to myself. But for now I'm proud to see kids who grew up like I. Did of the opportunity to see their stories shared on a platform like AJC is in the National Urban Leagues I'm optimistic that the work is in stopping with s week and that this movement is only just reigniting. Thanks. You heard a bit about this program already in Naomi's beautiful Chabad table talk but this week AJC featured three Jews who are black in one of our black Jewish unity week programs in partnership with the National Urban League. Rabbi Sandra Lawson, the associate chaplain for Jewish life at North Carolina's Ilan University Tiffany Harris the chief program officer for the International Jewish community, Building Organization Moisture House and Dr. John Eaves, the former chairman of the county commission in Atlanta's Fulton County and a member of AJC Atlanta's regional office board joined conversation with Dove. WELKER AJC is director of black Jewish relations to discuss their experiences being both black and Jewish. When AJC I worked with the National Urban League to conceive of black Jewish unity week, there was a risk of reinforcing an erroneous binary of putting a slash between the words black an Jewish of implying that it's only possible to be one or the other to be black or Jewish we knew we had to avoid that because we know that there are too many Jews who are black who are members in our communities who are leaders in our community like Rabbi Sandra and Tiffany and John and I might add like Naomi. Ignoring those Jews is not only an affront to them, but it robs the broader Jewish community of the full breadth of our diversity depending on your definition and how you count somewhere between five percent and fifteen percent of the American Jewish community are people of Color. It is critical that we see those Jews that we engage those Jews in our organizations and that we work to ensure that our community fully embraces those Jews in all that we do. Judaism puts a high value on welcoming the stranger because we ourselves were strangers in the land of Egypt, if that's the case with strangers, think how much higher the value is. Welcoming all of our Jewish brothers and sisters regardless of the color of their skin. If you haven't thought much about this before or even if you have I, hope that you will head to AJC. Dot. Org To watch the recording of that remarkable conversation I hope that you'll discuss this imperative to welcome all Jews at your table. I know I will at mine show botulism Shabazz's alone. You can subscribe to people of the pod on itunes Google play or spotify, or learn more at AJC dot org slash people of the pie the views and opinions of our guests don't necessarily reflect the positions of AJC, we'd love to hear your views and opinions or your questions. You can reach us at people of the pod at E. J. C. Dot born if you like this podcast, be sure to rate it and writer review to help more listeners find us. Thank you for listening this episode is brought to you. By AJC. Our producer is condo. Our system producer is a Tarlac Rats and our sound engineer is t k broaddrick tune in next week for another episode of people of the Pot..

AJC American Jewish community National Urban League International Jewish community Naomi Ravic Anke producer Rabbi Sandra Lawson E. J. C. Dot Dr Jani Tarlac Google Dot botulism Shabazz Dr. John Eaves Egypt America Atlanta Tiffany Harris director
"ajc" Discussed on People of the Pod

People of the Pod

14:03 min | 2 weeks ago

"ajc" Discussed on People of the Pod

"Was declared the year of tolerance and they have extended that tolerance promotion which translates into tolerance inaptly frankly from the Arabic, it's really more description than tolerance itself. It really conveys more mutual respect and welcoming but that has been the spirit that has been directed really from the top down but absorbed by the society in so many ways that there is an ex patriot Jewish community in the UAE becoming. Jewish communities from really all not not Jewish. But is GONNA be religious communities, religious factions from every possible branch it every faith practicing in that country. But. We try to do a twenty years ago when we first went to the UAE and what we have continued to do over those years in smaller and larger group visits and sometimes single visits by myself has been to explain the Jewish people to civil society leaders. Government officials learned from them, their concerns about the region hear from them, their aspirations for. A more stable secure regional architecture explore the possibility of developing a relationship with the sole middle. East democracy. That actually also is a country that has different faiths respects, diversity celebrates diversity, and that is Israel. And that also has strategic concerns that are common to the. UAE. At other countries other Sunni Arab countries in the Gulf a by the way I should point out that HEC has been elsewhere in the Gulf going back even further back to. Nineteen ninety four was our first visit to the Gulf. It was developing these relationships developing friendships, opening doors, disabuse people of various misconceptions they might have they might have been taught about the Jewish people introducing a narrative about Israel that was contrary to the narrative that was widely available in the media and in school curricula but that was consistent with the way we saw the region and the way many in the world see the region and the possibilities of a very different political and cultural context. Than was kind of enforced over. So many decades I've seen estimates that there are as many as a thousand Jews today in the I'm not sure if that's a little high little low suffice to say, there were not a thousand Jews in the twenty years ago. So you are very much a trailblazer at the time it wasn't your first kind of foray into the Arab world, but were you nervous to be a Jewish person heading to to the Emirates in in two thousand? No not the least Yes, you're right There was a very tiny Jewish community when we were there twenty years ago maybe it was just the two of us who were visiting the time. Although that's not really accurate because of course, there have been Jewish engineers and lawyers and doctors and other experts professionals who have come into work in the energy companies there and consulting companies, various kinds and other businesses well, of course but there was not what you would describe as a Jewish community there. Individual Jews that changed for many years when hse would visit, we would host a Chabad dinner and service in a banquet a small. Banquet. Room. In a in a hotel that we would occupy and we would invite those Jews we knew were there to come and be with us on a Friday evening and we would continue this ritual year after year and the group would meet other people other Jews in the UAE and Dubai mostly. But a little bit in Abu Dhabi as well and and other Emirates, and they would gather together convened by AJC a until about. Five six years ago maybe it goes back seven years when the community had grown enough the network had expanded enough that people were meeting in a villa and were conducting services, Atalante Friday evening, but on Saturday as well, and gradually that sort of villa operation grew and became very substantial, Jewish, enterprise in in the UAE and then really just in the last two years I think it. Really wasn't the fall of two, thousand, eighteen. So almost two years when there was the first public declaration in the local media that there was a Jewish community until that time people had been very quiet as they would gather at the villa on a Saturday, they would be careful about how they arrive. They wouldn't come in a bus they would come individually in cars there was no. Sign outside the villa that said that it was a Jewish center of any kind. But that change two years ago, and now there is a robust community it's not large. I. Don't think it's a thousand people but it certainly in the hundreds and they have organized the Jewish Council of the Emirates there is a chief rabbi of the Jewish community of the emerets Rabbi Yehuda SORTA. who was the nyu Hill L. Rabbi in New, York, but because nyu as a campus in Abu Dhabi his frequently and Abu Dhabi as well and he has been adopted by the community as their chief rabbi and we have regular Friday zoom Coupla about services that I and others in AJC have been invited to participate and sometimes speak in the services David Harris spoken I've spoken. David Rosen our colleague in Jerusalem. Or International, director of into religious affairs. So Agency is very fully embedded in this community and supportive of admiring of this community we will continue to work with as we make our plans to establish an ongoing permanent presence in the U. E. which we just announced obiekwu. I've heard from countless middle, east experts over the years has been that the Israeli Palestinian conflict represents a kind of glass ceiling on the potential for Israel's relationship with the Gulf states. Now, in the span of less than a month, we've seen Israel in the UAE announce and proceed along the path toward full peace and normalization between the two countries and proudly Zionist Jewish organization AJC opening an office in the Emirates. What should we make of that Maxim today that there's this kind of limit to how far Israel's relationship with the Arab nations can go? The reality is that Israel has had quite relations with many Arab states even with this formal declaration by the Arab League and enforced from time to time in various Sarab summits that there would be no normalization of relations with Israel despite that official stance, there have been unofficial contacts and quite extensive unofficial contacts at the intelligence level security level. But also with businesses there have been many Israeli business relationships that have developed with folks in the Gulf in North Africa over decades and their products and services that the go back and forth, which is exciting a now, it can be really built on in a much more. Open and sustained and I think mutually satisfying way what we've started seeing just in the last couple of years especially I think maybe I would trace some of this to the October two thousand, eighteen visit of Prime Minister Netanyahu to Amman was graded by the then Sultanate of Oman not having a diplomatic relationship with Israel but having invited the prime minister of Israel to come and meet with the Sultan. From that point and there were other events that occurred in that same several months of two. Israeli. Ministers going to the two one two Attila Communications Conference want to sport international sporting event. Of course, in the summer of two, thousand and nineteen. You had the Buffoni hosting of the peace to prosperity onference over the course of months multiple declarations by influential Arab leaders to the effect that They understood the decades with pretending that Israel doesn't exist hasn't helped the Palestinians that if we are trying to advance Palestinian statehood a two state solution to the Israeli Palestinian conflict what we've been doing for decades hasn't really done that there haven't been serious negotiations since the Oslo accords nothing has moved forward since nineteen ninety-three how can we continue to insist on doing something that is obviously not working? Let's try different path and frankly AJC for centuries has been encouraging different path. We've been saying to foreign ministers and heads of state and various other officials and business people if you want to help. The Palestinians. You'll do a better job if you are talking to the Israelis if you're encouraging them to move forward if you are looking over the shoulders of negotiators and tried to push things in a direction that makes for you and make sense for your Palestinian cousins. So some of this is, of course, common threats, the common threat from extremism common threat posed by an aggressive Iran these are concerns that Israelis and Gulf Arabs have naturally but it's more than that. It's the opportunities that could exist that could be exploited by a real relationship with Israel and over the table relationship with Israel. Now comes the news that. Is is opening an office in the UAE. It'll be our thirteen overseas post. What kind of work will that office do is going to be focused solely on the E. or also work with other countries in the Gulf to try to deepen our relationships there. We started working on plans to open an office in the UAE well, before this announcement when one of the objectives at the end of the line was the establishment of diplomatic relations now that that has accelerated and is moving forward so quickly, and in fact I think the finishing touches are being put on an agreement between Israel and the way we will develop other aspects of agenda that we'd been laying out over the last year that has to do with the with interfaith relations AJC already for several years, but involved in in efforts in the UAE to deepen Muslim, Christian Jewish relations and in fact, as you know. The has announced plans in the next couple of years to build what they're calling an air brake family house, which will be a synagogue, a church, and a mosque on a complex in Abu Dhabi, that will also have educational programming exhibit space. We hope to be able to do more to to contribute to to to that planning as well into participate in some of the programs that will take place. So interfaith is one aspect of it. We will be there we will be able to engage in these discussions with higher committee in the that is dealing with these issues we. Would like to be able to use a base of the US to reach out to others in the Arab world. This will be AJC's first office in the Arab world we have maintained relations with North African and Gulf in live on countries for many years by flying in as often as possible and meeting with officials when they come to the United States and be with their embassies and their diplomats supposed around the US. But this'll be much more satisfying, much more direct to have the ability in a few hours to be another Arab capital, the possibility exists that AJC could serve as A. An introducer, a connector, a networker for business people, and also civil society organizations in Israel and in the United States and in the Arab World I think we'll be quite busy. We don't expect to have a staff of fifty people in the UAE we'll start small as we have in other places and we will have friends and we will deepen those friendships and we'll also be able to set up some exchange programs. I. Hope between the US and Emirati officials and student leaders and others and introducing more and more of our people. Our concerns are aspirations to this dynamic culture in the Gulf. I'm just before we close I want to throw a critique at you that I've heard a friend of mine who's a journalist with the Jewish publication through a critique me over the weekend and I've seen this echoed a few other times on twitter as well. In addition to the words enhancing the well-being of the Jewish people and Israel. AJC's mission statement also includes the words advancing democratic values around the world. It's very obvious to everyone how an AJC office in the Emirates relates to the former the part about the well of Jews and Israel but how will our first office based in a non democratic country wreck in with the part of our mission statement talks about democratic values? That's an interesting question Steffi on a complicated one. Over. The many years at AJC has been operating internationally have been exercising our diplomacy in many different countries at many different settings. multi-laterally, and bilaterally, we have encountered governments that have political systems that we don't find necessarily a surly compatible with American constitutional principles. We have nevertheless found ways to advance our interests and Arkansas and our communities a term. Aspirations by dealing with specific issues that are at the top of our agenda listening to the folks we are talking to, but not necessarily feeling compelled to agree with every aspect of how that country operates. We hope that through time and through modeling of our principles and our behavior, we can perhaps have some long term influence in countries. Where we might share some concerns and some values, but not all we are not going the world to change every society. We are there to protect the interests of the Jewish people and to advance normal relations with and respect for Israel and widen the protection for minorities universally and respect for human rights universally. But we will steer our way through this challenging environment. In every country we operate in as we have learned to do through more than a century of diplomatic activity it may be challenging from time to time, but I will tell you that in a country like the which celebrates tolerance which has expressed a desire for close relations with the Middle East's sold democracy. which aspires to an even closer deeper relationship with the United States. We have a lot to work with and we are looking forward to working with our friends in the UAE. The opening of this office is a very exciting step for our organization Jason and one for which you are do tremendous Kudos. So congratulations on the step in. Thank you so much for joining us here on.

UAE Israel AJC Gulf Emirates United States Abu Dhabi Jewish Council Arab League Middle East David Rosen Rabbi Yehuda Dubai Iran Jerusalem twitter
Celebrating #BlackJewishUnity Week with the National Urban League

People of the Pod

21:28 min | 3 weeks ago

Celebrating #BlackJewishUnity Week with the National Urban League

"Next week, two of the world's foremost human relations organizations the National Urban League and J. C. will unite against surging levels of Anti Semitism and racism to declare black Jewish unity week. Together, we will strengthen ties between our nations black and Jewish communities and combat all forms of hate. To discuss the importance of this event and to talk about the challenges of fighting racism I'm joined now by Clint Oda, the National Urban League Senior Vice President for Policy Advocacy and the Executive Director of the Urban League's Washington Bureau Clint, thank you so much for joining us. It's a pleasure to be with you. Now this special week, this black Jewish unity week is not happening in vacuum. It's happening because of rising antisemitism and racism in this country my listeners here plenty about antisemitism. So I just wanted to start by asking you this. It's been a Helluva summer. How are you? I would describe myself as weathered a little bit. We've been going through this quite some time this summer at least the notoriety of these police incidents are is much higher than it has been in the past. So we're we're hanging in there. We don't have a choice. Because this work is so important. And it really does reinvigorate me to see that we've got allies in this fight and we've always had allies in this fight but to see them step up in the way that they have his really reinvigorated me and I'm very excited to keep the fight going. I'm sure that our listeners are familiar with the name, the Urban League because it is etched into the annals of history of this country and anyone who knows anything about the civil rights movement will know the names of the Urban League of the ACP Snick we can go deeper also start really getting to the deep cuts. Tell us a little bit about. What the Urban League has been up to lately and what you've been up to especially over the summer in the wake of the George Floyd killing and other events in recent months while we're one, hundred, ten year old civil rights and Economic Empowerment Organization and we have been working on I'd like to say ending systemic racism for the past one. Hundred Years. we've been doing that through our programs such as making. Housing more Ford audible teaching people how to purchase homes how to stay in homes. We've been helping people to get work meaningful work they can sustain them and their families. We've been working the traditional voting rights area and civil rights area for the entirety of our existence but social justice is taken on a real importance in our work right now as as well as doing all this work in the midst of a pandemic So that's so interesting what you say about systemic racism and then specifically citing home-buying and things like that. You didn't mention education, but I think there's a pretty robust education. Portfolio at the National Urban League as well. Absolutely I think if you look at AJC's goals and National Urban League goals, you'll see mirror images of each other. That's been the real cool thing about this that this partnership and all of these things that people are talking about and I'll show my millennial miss. All of the things that people are are posting on instagram talking about explaining what systemic racism is and why you know wealth divides between black and white communities are so important and underpin. So many elements of of racial injustice today all of those things are things that the National Urban League is. Working on absolutely and I can't say that when I started about a year and a half ago I spent the previous ten years working in the United States Senate including four vice presidential nominee Senator Kamala Harris. I believe crazy how these things happen working for her and the agenda that she pursued is so consistent with the work that I'm doing today. One of the first things we did when we walked into the place is lead a resolution condemning hate antisemitism anti racism xenophobia homophobia. It's as important to her as it was to me and so coming here was just a natural extension of that but. As I was saying just the Times in which we live are so unique and perilous parallels between the early nineteen sixties which I'm sure we'll talk more about and today are really really compelling. It's almost like we're back in the sixties again, I want to go there right now because this week is going to be all about black Jewish. Relations and the story of black Jewish relations is not a new odd. We might be writing a new chapter, but there's a whole book that comes before us here. So what's one element clint of the Black Jewish relationship that has meant a lot to you personally. I would probably say the religious and spiritual aspect of the relationship. Growing up as a as a young kid in the deep South. There were a lot of Jewish people around although they were president. We didn't know it I grew up Protestant Christian and a great story is on Sundays. We were always able to use the parking lot of the temple across the street and it used to just puzzled me is to how generous the temple folks could be. Given that they must have services on Sunday to. Eat of the temple was empty or they were just being generous over time and as I moved out of south, then went to law school and live here on the East Coast I. got a much greater appreciation, not only for the religion. My Wife, for instance, used to teach at a Jewish day camp in new Rochelle New York but just meeting. So many friends of the Jewish faith drawing those connections between my own faith and their own and. Also learning the rich history of black Jewish communities especially in the era of civil rights as a lawyer was a big fan is that really don't have you could come up with a Thurgood Marshall and no understanding of the work at the end of Lacey P., Legal Defense Fund was complete without understanding the role that Jack Greenberg played and lots of other Jewish folks in philanthropy in spirituality and pursue the nonviolence movement just a wonderful partnership over the years. As a religious person myself that resonates with me a lot as it happens our listeners probably talk about this before for college I went to a joint program between Columbia University and the Jewish illogical seminary and actually not migration at the graduation of the class ahead of me which attended representative John Lewis spoke, and of course, John Lewis all of our listeners will remember passed away this summer I think he actually was an ordain ministered and he told a story that I'm sure you've heard before because I've heard until it multiple times of preaching to his chickens in Troy. Alabama and that had a certain resonance in this audience of basically all Jews including some we're going on into the rabbit. Those ties between our communities where were not everyone is a person of faith but certainly, there is deep faith and religious history kind of threaded throughout our communities I think those are really really powerful things to focus on. And I hope over time you take a look at surveys of religion in the country in other pugh has done some study in this area religion is trending down a little bit. Don't always necessarily consider themselves religious if you look at community surveys and so it's really important to reinvigorate this relationship and put it on a firm spiritual pudding in Judeo Christian tradition is so rich in the African American community and there's just so much there to really build on. I'm really looking forward to getting that history more prominently understood and remembered in our communities. So when we're talking about black Jewish unity right and we're talking about building black Jewish unity they're really two levels to it, and this is something that we talk about with a lot of our advocacy work. At AJC, there's the grassroots and there's the grass tops right. I want to ask you about both. Let's start with the grass tops right at the high profile level at the celebrity role model level, the politician level what do you think? Needs to happen there to demonstrate the Jewish people and black people should work together and are stronger together. The grass tops may be one of the more important roles in unity and understanding. We are a celebrity driven culture for better or for worse and ideas have a lot more resonance and a lot more acceptance when someone that you know and admire to saying the same thing. So grass tops to that extent are the key in moving opinion. Notions like reparations notions like black lives matter notions like social justice have mood and pretty quickly I think because athletes because celebrity on television and other artists have been saying the same thing and in a short period of time we've seen. Opinions shift in this country not just age not just religion not just race, but everything seems to be moving in the right direction from a popular standpoint. The grass roots which we're going to talk about next is where you really determine how sustainable this movement is. Right. Yeah. So tell us about that I mean in our neighborhoods and our schools in our churches, our synagogues mosques, how can we strengthen those relations? Sure. I've seen a lot of encouraging evidence that we can do this at grassroots level. This is a very human. Very, empathetic movement when we're talking about grassroots, we've seen some of these grassroots efforts come up in. Pittsburgh for instance and New Jersey. And in Brooklyn where when horrible acts of hate murder violence take place the communities come together and they usually come together I with religion. It's the pastors it's the churchgoers. It's the temple goers that really give me some hope that we aren't just a moment, but that we're in a movement. So I think in many ways, the church and the faith community are are in central piece of grassroots. That's kind of what I'm seeing sort of on the ground right now I think black Jewish unity week can drive those grassroots even deeper because understanding the tragedy of the moment is not nearly as important as understanding these deep historical ties right in our faith and our families and what we want from each other in shared history sometimes things that aren't so great sometimes shared history of oppression. Lutely, and for our listeners WHO WANNA learn more about black Jewish unity week, they should go to AJC, dot org, slash black, Jewish unity, or text black Jewish unity all one word to five to eight, eight nine not to keep hitting the faith note here you know we're we're a pretty secular organization in JC but I love what you said about the houses of worship I live on the upper west side of Manhattan which is this incredible. Kind of Jewish bastion historic whatever and if you go twenty blocks down for me in twenty blocks up for me, you probably are GonNa pass by twenty synagogues total and we're also steps away, I mean. We're a mile two miles away from Harlem and the two neighborhoods are very different and that's something that's worth exploring as well. Why that is how that happened etcetera, the strengths and the challenges of both communities, but I was in synagogue on. Chabad after the shooting in Muncie and Lo and behold there in the front row, was a a delegation from church in Harlem that wanted to come in and to be there and to show solidarity, and they got up and spoke after services, and then fast forward to this summer were all obviously in lockdown. But the rabbi of the synagogue made kind of Zoom appearance at that churches services after the killing of George Floyd talk about solidarity with. The black community in the wake of the killings of and Taylor George Floyd and so many of the challenges of injustice that are being faced right now and I think you're right that the grassroots level it. So often does start in those kinds of houses of worship, our religious leaders reaching out one to the other in something that you said, really struck me about the proximity of Latte community and Jewish community in relatively small plot of land. As a policy Wonk I'm sure you appreciate this but either just for the benefit of your listening audience, blacks and Jews were both subject to the same kinds of redlining restrictions in many ways throughout much of the United States where banks would identify areas and they would say this is a desirable area in this is a less desirable area, and so you know Jewish and black families were often circumscribed by these lending lines that still have an ongoing lingering vestige today. If you look at housing segregation patterns certainly in the African. American community they are just as bad as they were in the nineteen sixties things like bike homeownership, which is at a low point especially because pandemic in or closures any fictions Is Worse than it was in the late nineteen sixties. So some of these things we were still wrestling with they seem twins dental, but they're not incidental at all. But again, it's this proximity you know that gives me hope and hope that even outside of crisis, we can expand and strengthen these relationships crises great reasons to get together but it's the more sustainable relationships happened over time outside of the crisis built on shared values and shared interests. So once again, this Jewish unity week has the potential to to be a real game changer. Well, so talk A. Little bit more about that. What do you hope is going to come out of this week if you believe that the basis of a better relationships and greater understanding comes from exposure than my hope is that we can use this week to focus on our rich history on our shared cultural values and to help understand things that we may not understand about each other but to be able to come together in a safe place and talk about those things, this has been tried in lots of different ways you know with lots of different impetus over the years. But in this country, as you know until you can make a sort of a holiday of it until hallmark starts to sell. It really difficult to have something that is stained and that you can go back to know every year. and. So that's the thing that excites me the most I know how excited I was to leave the south. And to meet people of different faiths including the Jewish faith and and get to know them get to count them among in my close friends. I would like that for everyone and so that when issues come up in our communities as we saw in Brooklyn I think earlier this year there was a really terrible assault in Brooklyn by a woman African American woman and if we had a built in long standing. Unbreakable trust between our communities. We can weather the storms we can come together and mutual condemnation, mutual understanding and mutual healing. It's not enough just to condemn something, but it's more important. I think to learn from it and make sure that it doesn't happen doesn't happen again and then five years hence, we can be sending each other black Jewish unity. We cards produced by hallmark absolutely creating whole new language in a around. It, it could be it could be urban slang and Yiddish expressions that. Unless you're in the know you don't you don't know. I'm hopeful hallmark if you're listening. Might be onto something big year. We'll see we'll see what's things we can pull their. I want to close by asking you for a few tips for our listeners actually the few months ago we had an amazing friend of AJC on the podcast named Eric. Ward. The Executive Director of the Western states center. We were talking about racism and I asked him what he thought as a professional opponent of racism and as a black man, what he thought American Jews should be doing to fight racism. His answer was pretty surprising to me actually because he said the best way for us to fight racism was to fight antisemitism since in his work he's bound that white supremacist racism is always based on a foundation of Antisemitism. So I I'm just interested in your reaction to that I, I think I'm citing him basically correctly I'm interested in your assessment of. That and second I want to give you a chance to answer the question from square one. Also, you know what would you like to see Clinton? What would you like to see American Jews doing proactively now to be effective allies in the fight against racism and I WANNA go back to Eric's point. Let me see if I can make this one I. I've only recently come to understand the difference between anti-racism. An anti-discrimination has a lawyer I've grown up understanding that if you want to fix racism, you have to attack it as a matter of non-discrimination don't discriminate against people in hiring don't discriminate against kids in school, and sometimes that anti-discrimination is in the form of color blindness. So whatever the remedy is, it can't be race specific right because the constitution doesn't allow such a thing but let's let's just come up with big broad sweeping solutions that african-americans might incidentally benefit from. You know by virtue of maybe being lower middle income people, we're going to come up with solutions that will work for everybody including African Americans. I've now come to understand that that's just not cutting. It goes great disparities that you talk about the at the beginning their persistent for a reason it's like trying to perform surgery with your eyes close, but you may be able to route around and feel where the patient is but your ability to be precise with a scalpel. And and fix the problem identified at problems impossible. If you don't open your eyes that has been the character of how we approach race in this country for decades. I've now come to understand and have really been encouraging others to join me in. This is becoming an anti-racist. It saying I may not have owned slaves I may have never committed an act of racism or discrimination. Even if that's true. You have to personally get involved to fix these problems. It's not enough to say, well, you know we have laws to address those issues. Laws had been very inexact and very unhelpful. In many ways you've got to get in there, roll up your sleeves and say, okay, is lack of capital in the black community a problem I need to figure out how to get more capital into black communities are educational disparities problem. Okay. I need to figure out how do we improve schools whether it's funding whether it's through pedagogy whatever we need to do, but we need to come up with solutions that actually help. Like people. And not just. Continue to perpetuate these gaps in Hustle meeting well in educational opportunities and health and civic engagement. That's my biggest message to the community, the An anti races. Just. As you know, we should all be fighting against anti-semitism. It's not enough to turn your back and say, well, you know they're not talking about, knee they are talking about you. And it's when we get to the point where those protests and in the halls of Congress where we're trying to make change we see people who look like you see people who would like me and seek people or Asian and and people who are all different walks of life saying we are here because we care and black lives matter and we've got to change the way this country works. I want to dive in and ask a million more questions and and talk so much more about where you just this conversation we are unfortunately out of time. So I hope that this will be an effective way to wet our listeners appetites for the week ahead, I should just add that in addition to his impressive titles at the National Urban. League clint wears another half. It's one of my favorite. Hats it's the hat organizational podcast host and Clinton is one of the hosts of for the movement the National Urban League podcast which people should check out and especially check out for this next episode where my colleague Dan Elbaum will be a guest on the show. We will link to the podcast in our show notes, Clinton let me just say once more. Thank you so much for joining us this week. She said thank you for letting me be here.

National Urban League AJC George Floyd Bureau Clint Brooklyn Clinton Executive Director Clint Oda Instagram Washington United States Senate Harlem National Urban Senator Kamala Harris J. C. John Lewis African American Community Pittsburgh
Republican Jewish Coalition official makes the Jewish case for the Republican party

People of the Pod

05:42 min | Last month

Republican Jewish Coalition official makes the Jewish case for the Republican party

"As the Republican National Convention dominated the news this week I sat down with Matt Brooks the Executive Director of the Republican Jewish coalition to hear him make the Jewish case for the Republican. Party. Just a reminder AJC is a five. Oh, one C. Three, not for profit organization that neither endorses nor opposes candidates for Elective Office Matt. Thank you so much for joining US Saffy. It's great to be with you. Thanks for having me AJC held a series of virtual programs last week at the Democratic National Convention and we're doing the same this week alongside the RNC you spoke at. An Age RNC program yesterday and you guaranteed the Donald Trump will win a larger percentage of Jewish vote in two thousand twenty than he did in two thousand sixteen. What makes you so confident of that first of all, my understanding of the politics of the Jewish community I've been doing this job for thirty years. So I think I have a very good feel for the Jewish community. But then the most important reason is to look at the record of this president There is no question that he has been without a doubt, the most pro Israel president ever in history. That's not coming just from Matt Brooks, but it's coming from people like the prime, minister of Israel has said as much in the Oval Office in meeting with them. So there's a reason why fifty six percent of the Israelis who were polled in a recent poll would like to see president trump reelected and only sixteen percent. WanNa see Joe Biden reelected because they understand that this president is absolutely transformed the US's relationship beyond that Steph. Touch on domestic issues I think people in the Jewish community are deeply concerned about what's happening in our big cities whether it's Portland Seattle New, York, the lawlessness, the rioting, the efforts by the left wing progressives in the Democratic Party who want to defend the police. I. Think People in the Jewish community understand that president trump giving his incredible track record. Pre covid is the best person to revitalize our economy postcode and also recreate and bring back all the jobs that were lost as a result of this pandemic. So I think there's a wide range. Of issues that both foreign and domestic that to me give me great confidence to have my back moment point into the stands and guarantee that this president will do better among Jewish voters and twenty twenty than he did in two thousand sixteen was the Yankee Fan I. Appreciate any reference to Babe Ruth let me just follow up on that though you pivoted and spoke about domestic issues at the end, which obviously are very important. You started out with Israel though I'm curious does the RJ see any kind of polling or anything like that indicates that the? Percentage of American Jews do vote based on. Israel. My sense is generally not at top issue for American Jews. So we do have extensive polling and we're very data driven in our messaging and how we look at the races you know, I think your point is well taken but you know elections and campaigns about mosaics. It's about putting pieces of the puzzle together. It's not just one issue. There is definitely a segment of the Jewish community that does care about Israel we're going to appeal to them. There's definitely a segment of the Jewish community that appealed issues. Like school choice we're going to appeal to them. There's definitely segments of the Jewish community the care about the issue of defunding the police and having law and order in our streets in protecting us against anti-semitism. So we're GONNA have various messages targeted to various constituencies within the Jewish community. Our community as you well know is not monolithic. So to say that there is one issue that's gonNA drive the Jewish vote would be a mistake but I think we have enough experience and expertise in this arena to make sure that we're serving up the right messages. One issue that you just mentioned Matt is is Antisemitism Joe. Biden actually laid the cornerstone of his campaign on President Trump's comments after the unite the right rally in Charlottesville in his video announcing his candidacy, and then again last week when he accepted the nomination, vice president. Biden cited the president's very fine people on both sides comment at which he saw as excusing anti Semitism he cited those comments as motivating him to get into the race to beat the president. How would you want Jewish voters to think about those comments? Well, I, mean, that's going to be part of our task and we've had several events both with Nikki Haley Mark Levin with Senator Ted Cruz just this last Sunday night you know in which we've talked about that there is a mythology that has taken hold by the Democrats to try and create a false narrative that the president Or somehow tried to give support to white nationalist. If anybody takes a step back reads the entire transcript and admittedly I wish he had been clearer and less awkward in his original remarks when we put out a statement to that effect. But if you read a few sentences before and a few sentences after very fine people on both sides, it's very clear that the president strongly condemns White Nationalist Neo Nazis, and you know it is absolutely unambiguous also to some of his other speeches in actions you go back and look right after the tree of life synagogue tragedy he gave a speech that day to the future farmers of America No. President no president go back and take a look at the record, and you'll agree if you read the opening speech, no president has ever condemned anti-semitism and planted a flag about us and our strong commitment to fight anti-semitism wherever it raises its ugly head, and then obviously you look at what the president did it on his executive order to help protect students on college campuses who have been the victims of anti-semitism and I will tell you time and time. Again, this president has by action demonstrated his commitment, not only to condemn white. Nationalist Neo. Nazis. But also to stand up and take strong stands against the rising antisemitism in this country.

President Trump Israel Donald Trump Matt Brooks Joe Biden Vice President United States RNC Executive Director Democratic Party Babe Ruth Portland Oval Office America Steph Nikki Haley Mark Levin Life Synagogue Senator Ted Cruz
The American Jewish Community and the 2020 US Election

People of the Pod

09:44 min | Last month

The American Jewish Community and the 2020 US Election

"Soifer previously served as national security adviser for Senator Comma Harris now, the Democratic nominee for vice president and Joe Biden's running mate. She joins us now to talk about the role. Jewish. Voters play and how she believes. Democrats addressed. Jewish. Priorities please keep in mind. AJC. Is a five. Oh One C. Three not profit organization AJC neither supports nor opposes candidates for elective office and with that disclaimer Haley welcome thank you so much for having me. So let's start with the basics and Kinda, the horse race aspect of this how much of the American voting population identifies as Jewish? So the Jewish community in terms of the American population is about two percent, but we're actually about three percent of the electorate and we'd play an outsized role in. NHS for three reasons, we voted higher rates. On average Jewish Americans vote at a higher rate than. By about fifteen percents we also where we live correlates with wear our votes tend to matter even more we tend to live in swing states and a third reason which I'm sure we'll get into is that we overwhelmingly support Democrats in our view as Jewish Democrat organization that is especially or in terms of the outsize impact we have. So Haley Bernie Sanders in his speech on Monday addressed the many Democrats who really wanted him to be the nominee and many of them were Jewish are Jewish many of them have us on Israel, that don't jibe with the very pro Israel aspects of the party, platform. It really sounded like Bernie was calling on Democrats to unify despite their differences and I'm curious how the Party and its leadership have prevented Israel from becoming a wedge issue. Joe Biden has done an exceptional job in unifying the party around these critically important issues, including Israel and the platform that's been adopted at this convention exemplifies what is overwhelming democratic support for the US Israel relationship. Ebeidi s support a full funding for military. And Support of the STOORIKHEL alliance, it's the view of the majority of members of Congress that is the democratic mainstream media. So you emphasize what a majority of Democrats you certainly we've had concerns over the years about Ilan Omar had to leave. Is that kind of who you're thinking about when you say a majority of Democrats feel this way I should have said an over overwhelming majority you mentioned. Two. Members, of Congress, we currently between the House and the Senate head of over two hundred and seventy. So between those two members of Congress who we agree do not share our views on Israel and we've spoken out against them going back to before they were even elected. But between the two of them to over two seventy, we're talking about less than one percent of the Democratic members of Congress. They are very outspoken though they have expressed views with which we disagree and we've made that clear and that's why we're not supporting their re election and we don't share their views but luckily, their views are not shared by our party either look at the platform I mean the platform is the views of our candidate and the views of our Party and the platform could not be more clear in. Its support of Israel, what I the states to watch in this upcoming election and in which of those states could the Jewish vote really make a difference. When we look in elections, we always look at the last election as a baseline and we know that had Donald Trump not one Florida and either Michigan or Pennsylvania. He would not be president today and in those three states Florida Michigan and Pennsylvania. The Jewish vote alone could made up those margins. So when we looked to twenty twenty in this election, we are looking at the Jewish vote in those critically important states, my home state of Michigan Donald. Trump won by just ten, thousand, seven, hundred, and four votes. That margin could be overcome by the Jewish student population of Michigan in Michigan state a low. We are looking at the Jewish vote in those three critically important states but also states like Arizona and Colorado and Georgia, which in addition to being presidential swing states are going to be critically important in terms of the control of the Senate. Are you saying that the Jews in those swing states voted Republican or didn't vote at all did shoes in those swing states voted we know that Jewish voters do turn out and in twenty sixteen, it was no different than in previous elections choose turned out. But. We also know bat they turned out in support of Hillary. Clinton at about seventy two percents. If you look at the two thousand eighteen midterms Jewish voters supported Democrats at seventy nine percents. So we saw an increase, we believe that in twenty twenty, those numbers can continue to go up in terms of Jewish support for Democrats. So now we'll talk with your Republican counterpart on next week's episode. But from your vantage point, you said that most Jews identify with the Democratic Party why is that? So, choose have historically for decades defied overwhelmingly with the Democrats, the values that Jews hold dear tend to be those aligned with the policies supported by Democrats. So when it comes to domestic policies such as access to affordable healthcare and education ED and gun safety and ensuring that we are country welcoming the stranger and not enacting cruel and discriminatory policies toward immigrants and refugees. These are all key issues driving the Jewish vote. On those issues and more, that's where Jewish voters align with Democrats when it comes to foreign policy is well, we know that support of Israel is an issue that is important of course to Jewish voters and Mrs. Issue Where Democrats to our squarely aligned with the priority of Jewish voters, which is the support of the strong US Israel relationship, and in this election, we have a new issue. So all of those things have been constance. New issue in this election that is impacting the Jewish, vote in Support of Democrats and that is our rising insecurity as a community. We have seen an unprecedented rise in anti-semitic attacks targeting our community including the horrific attacks in Pittsburgh and Powei we know that seventy three percent of Jews feel less secure than they did years ago and over half of US blame. Donald Trump for that and that's because we've seen him embolden anti-semites white nationalist just last night he tweeted out support for an extremist group Hugh a non that has peddled conspiracy theories still on these issues especially when it comes to the security of our community. There's a clear choice in this election and Jewish especially do not believe that Donald Trump has the best interest of our community in mind he has Jewish family members. He's certainly been friendly to Israel is strengthened that relationship. So how does that square? There's no question. He has Jewish family members. He's also married and he's done said many misogynistic things. So that alone does not qualify him as what I would consider to be someone who's been particularly good for the Jewish community I look at the numbers and I look at the unprecedented rise in white nationalist propaganda or anti Semitic attack and the words that. Come out of his mouth better clear signs to anti-semites to racist to bigots that he is their ally whether it is identifying anti-semites white nationalist marching Charlottesville as very fine people or calling the extremists that marched in Michigan with swastikas very good people that was earlier this year or hiring someone recently, Sebastian Gorka who is affiliated with the Nazi party in Hungary? When it comes to Israel. Donald Trump. Has Been Long on symbolism and short on substance. Yes. He moved the US embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, and we recognize that Jerusalem is, of course, the capital of Israel. But the substance matters and when you look at the record of Joe Biden who with President Obama finalized unprecedented historic thirty eight. DOLLAR AGREEMENT WITH ISRAEL PROVIDING FOR AID for the next ten years, and you look at the security issues that Israel faces. Actually Donald. Trump has not been that great for Israel.

Israel Donald Trump Joe Biden Michigan Party United States Haley Bernie Sanders Congress Senate Democratic Party NHS Soifer Vice President Senator Comma Harris Ilan Omar Stoorikhel Jerusalem Hillary Florida President Trump
Atlanta Track Club: AJC Peachtree Road Race will only be run virtually

Atlanta's Morning News

00:57 sec | Last month

Atlanta Track Club: AJC Peachtree Road Race will only be run virtually

"Victim to Corona virus governing best piece Bill Chi actual reporting live A J. C Peachtree Road Race will not be running person. Yes, God, that's right. A difficult decision for race director Rich can on disappointing Andi make the announcement with mixed emotion. The race, which is 1/4 of July, tradition, had already been moved to Thanksgiving because of the pandemic by the Atlanta track Club announces this morning, the race will be run. Virtually instead cannot telling Atlanta's morning news moments ago. There's no way to have a race with thousands of runners safely. Recent weeks as we've seen the spread of the virus continue in the spike, go unabated. We recognize That our best chance to deliver that authentic piece experiences to plan you have the best possible virtual one. For For those those those who who who are are are registered. registered. registered. You You You will will will still still still get get get a a a T T T shirt shirt shirt and and and race race race bib bib bib with with with your your your number. number. number. Registration Registration Registration will will will reopen reopen reopen for for for the the the virtual virtual virtual race race race on on on August August August 31st 31st 31st live live live at at at the the the breaking breaking breaking news news news desk. Bill

Race Director Bill Chi Atlanta Atlanta Track Club Andi Rich
"ajc" Discussed on People of the Pod

People of the Pod

01:58 min | 3 months ago

"ajc" Discussed on People of the Pod

"More. Jewish safety and success in the United States is bound up with that of other minorities, including our brothers and sisters in the black community. Just five years after its founding, AJC had already taken up the cause of racial justice pushing New York state bar discrimination on the basis of race in public accommodation in nineteen eleven. As Reverend Martin Luther King. Junior would point out when accepting EJ American liberties medallion in nineteen, sixty five. That was a time when quote, few men dared to speak out about racial injustice, but the successful passage of that New York bill in nineteen thirteen lead, many other states to follow suit slowly too slowly paving the way for the landmark advances of the nineteen sixties this June eighteenth when AJC joins our black brothers and sisters and celebrating this June, eighteenth is no less festival of freedom than the Jewish festival of Passover, but it also demands introspection no less than the Jewish holiday of Europe. Poor what? Must we each do to root out the racism that exists in our country and our states and cities in our own communities in our homes in our own souls? How can our synagogues organizations be forces for good in this fight? How can we the allies to our black partners? How can we ensure that our? Jewish spaces are as welcoming to black Jews as they are two white ones, these and more are the questions that we must grapple with, and what better place to start than at archambault tables, June eighteenth provides a welcome opportunity to reflect on my favorite lines from what has been termed the black national him. Lift every voice and sing. Sing a song full of the faith that the dark past has taught us saying song full of hope that the president has brought us. Through faith that we will persevere, and with hope that a brighter day is dawning, and with a song on our lips. Let us rejoice.

AJC New York United States Martin Luther King president Europe
"ajc" Discussed on People of the Pod

People of the Pod

05:18 min | 3 months ago

"ajc" Discussed on People of the Pod

"It is a time honored AJC tradition to feature civil yet forceful debates at the AJC Global Forum each year. We weren't going to give that up. Just because we are meeting virtually without further ado here is AJC director of communications. Avi Mayor to introduce our great to be on the future of the West Bank. The West Bank is in many respects. The Jewish heartland known in Hebrew as Some alone or today and Samaria. It is where Jewish kings reigned Jewish prophets preached, and it is today home to some four hundred and fifty thousand Israelis it is also home to an estimated two point seven million Palestinians many of whom have lived there for generations and none of whom have ever had a sovereign state to call their own. The question of what to do with the West Bank has vexed Israeli decision makers since this all came into possession of the territory during the nineteen sixty seven six day war now the Israeli government appears to be considering. Considering the unilateral extension of Israeli sovereignty, two parts of the West Bank a move fiercely opposed by Palestinians who claim the territory for a future Palestinian state? Where should Israel go from here with us to debate this pressing question today are two distinguished guests and friends of AJC member of Chris admit ally, of Israel's Labor Party, who was previously a prominent journalist and commentator, an ambassador gold, a veteran Israeli diplomat, including as permanent representative to the United Nations and current president of the Jerusalem Center for public. Affairs welcome to you both. Let's get started member of. Your opening statement, please. The state of Israel has existed unfortunately twice as long with the Palestinian Israeli conflict at this form twice as long as it has without. So to a large extent, it doesn't know itself without this contract. But we need to go back to the forming of the state of Israel and ask ourselves. What is design is dream what has designed vision, and I think it is very clear. It is a state for the Jewish people, a democratic state, or all the Jewish people now in order to have that we need to have a border which separates us from the two seven million Palestinians live in West Bend. If possible a border of peace, which.

West Bank AJC Israel Israeli government West Bend Samaria Avi Mayor director of communications Labor Party United Nations Jerusalem Center representative president Chris
"ajc" Discussed on People of the Pod

People of the Pod

05:48 min | 3 months ago

"ajc" Discussed on People of the Pod

"And I saw a concourse full hundreds and hundreds of Americans, singing songs and chanting and patriotic slogans, and that was one of the most beautiful things I saw that evening was a circle of Orthodox Jews with key pause on and sits US hanging out. Celebrating in Glee over Muslims coming into our country. I get chills now when I think about the beauty of these people who lived there values I believe fundamentally that before you tell me about your religion, show it to me and how you treat other people. I still remember them linking arms dancing like I was at a Jewish wedding. That's how much joy they found in strangers in greeting strangers because they were once strangers in a strange land. So there will always be darkness. There was always be bigotry. I. Don't think we ever think that we've snuffed it out. We must remain always vigilant, but what will define the character of this country what will define the Jewish people in the black people who are interwoven into the fabric of America? What will define is how we respond to that darkness. Weeks ago, we had the privilege of speaking with the Black Secretary of the Smithsonian Money Bunch. We asked him this question. Might look you instead. What inequality here's an incredibly accomplished respected senator who worked hard in one election after election. To some you are. Right on a bunch bunches proof Barack. Obama is proof that there are no longer boundaries or issues of access in America. What you stated that. Well Look I. Don't Know Folks WanNa Point to me as somehow to relieve us of the burden to deal with the enduring racial challenges of our country, and my experiences alone show me that we can do so much better when I got to the United. States Senate I was shocked, it was the least diverse place I ever worked. And the and Brian shots a great senator, Jewish senator, and I went to Chuck Schumer Great Senator also happen to be Jewish, and three of US said we gotta do something about this and we decided. To have every Democratic senator have to publish their diversity statistics well guess what's happened since is since then you've seen a lot more people of color hire. and which is important to me, because this body is making laws and places like the Judiciary Committee that disproportionately seem to impact black and Brown people. And so I think that anybody who wants to say that somehow we're in a post. Racial Society needs to look at the data and look at the evidence from the criminal justice system to environmental injustice to our economy to our healthcare system and see that when you control for other factors, that race is still very dominant influence in what kind of healthcare you'll get what?.

senator Senator America Obama US Senate Chuck Schumer Racial Society Judiciary Committee Secretary Brian
"ajc" Discussed on People of the Pod

People of the Pod

03:30 min | 3 months ago

"ajc" Discussed on People of the Pod

"Jersey served two terms as mayor of Newark before he became the longest serving Black Democrat currently in the Senate last year he addressed AJC Global Forum video as a twenty twenty presidential candidate on Wednesday, he sat down for a conversation with my colleague Julia Raymond Ajc's Deputy Director of policy and diplomatic affairs to share his thoughts on the fight for racial equality in the United States, and how the Jewish community can be effective allies. Here is a portion of that conversation. It is my great pleasure to introduce a leader in the fight for American civil. Rights and Racial Justice Senator. Cory Booker of New Jersey senator. Thank you so much for being with us today. Good to be with you, thank you, of course you've been on the ground floor of many recent bills to address racism from finally making lynching federal crime to the Justice Policing Act two, a bill to remove confederate statues from the capital. Recognizing that it has taken us four hundred years to get to this point in the much progress needs to be made. Can you help us understand? Is We prioritize advocacy? What's the hierarchy of knee in your appeal? Well first of all I. Just want to say thank you. Aj has been extraordinary champion for justice. You live so many of the highest ideals of Judaism. This idea that if I'm not for myself, who will be for me if I am only for myself. What am I if not now? And I think the thread that ties together all of the issues that I know you to your core justice equality in end to racism, anti-semitism bigotry of any kind I think a lot of this work on the bills that you mentioned have to deal with getting people's consciousness raised. We've become too comfortable with injustice in this country, if a criminal justice system that is way out of whack with the rest of humanity, we are the mass incarceration nation, incarcerating often the most vulnerable people into our prisons and jails people that need health care the need addiction treatment folks that are often in criminalized just for being poor and the challenges is most. Most of us just aren't aware of the injustices. What we see now across this country with people protesting in the streets, all fifty states, thousands of cities is that it's a wonderful thing that you see such diverse groups of folks who are confronting the injustices of our times, and so if there's an area for AJC to in terms of prioritizing, it's just that awareness where people need to be maladjusted to injustice again and need to recognize the are invested in the outcomes and to do nothing is complicity that mixed legislation passing a lot easier and a lot quicker a win. They're more Americans. Who Voices are demanding that we create real change. You? Make it sound sort of common sense, but sometimes the most common sense efforts ended up being really difficult I feel that way I have a very frustrating day as we're trying to get gearing going around the justice and policing issue, and I have to remind myself when I feel on days like this frustrated, or if like banging my head against implacable walls of resistance now. Now I have to remind myself that how long it took to pass civil rights legislation voting rights legislation, but people didn't give up and as we say the names of Brianna Taylor George Floyd let's just say their name, but remember the conviction of people who face the same wretchedness or worse Emmett till yet still found a way like Mamie..

Aj AJC Julia Raymond Ajc Cory Booker Senate Newark United States Senator Deputy Director of policy Jersey New Jersey senator Brianna Taylor George Floyd Mamie Emmett
"ajc" Discussed on People of the Pod

People of the Pod

03:18 min | 3 months ago

"ajc" Discussed on People of the Pod

"Have seen in the Middle East in recent years, and you're alluding to that and the US has played an important role in you personally played an important role in this changes new thinking about Israel's place in the region while your government has always been clear about support for the Arab peace initiative and the creation of independent Palestinian state. There have been visits to the UAE by Israeli government ministers. What's the way forward to realizing that vision and what obstacles if any lie on the way? Fundamentally is can I have a political disagreement with Israel, but at the same time try and bridge other areas. I think I can't and I think this is fundamentally where we are today, we are for example facing hoover, nineteen challenge, and if I am able working with the UN and working with a through the with Israel, to try and bring support to the Palestinians very fragile health service A- Tetra How does that really affect my physician? Reserve the issues of the day such as for example, the proposed annexation I think sixty seventy years. Our relationship has shown that the. Breakup of the relationship between Israeli out of countries has increased animosity and built in my opinion is huge and Gulf. That could have been much easier to bridge in my opinion, so clearly the need today is. Out of consensus that basically looks at the solution as a two state solution, Hartselle. Do you A. also wants to see continual stadium is reading. The. Is clearly against any annexation as being used by the is later. Having said that that is the political now. Do I have to really look at all of the. And make them basically. Almost sort of static because of the political me, and I think we've tried that over many years as a group of Arab, countries and I. Don't think it has really led to what we want the bringing stability to that each. This is enlightening on fascinating and really encouraging on. Thank you for addressing the AJC Global Forum. And for your thoughtful, your candid observations and more than anything for the refreshing outlook that you and is Hynix Abella and the entire leadership of the consistently bring to the challenges, confronting the Middle East and the challenges confronting all of us who are dedicated to peace and progress in your region in conclusion I. WanNa, thank you I wanNA thank the UC and I. Want to show you that ideally you will continue on its path of moderation on its back of our specialty and on it's also leaching very successful and forward looking country in each. Academic Argyle. Senator Cory Booker of new..

Israel Middle East Senator Cory Booker UAE Hartselle AJC Global Forum UN Hynix Abella US Gulf
"ajc" Discussed on People of the Pod

People of the Pod

05:30 min | 3 months ago

"ajc" Discussed on People of the Pod

"This week thousands of global Jewish advocates were supposed to have been in Berlin for the AJC Global Forum. Unfortunately, the pandemic had other plans, but we weren't just going to cancel our critical conference, so we took the global forum virtual all week. Thousands of people from around the world have been tuning in on AJC DOT ORG to watch high level addresses, intimate conversations and fierce debates over the future of Israel, America in Europe over the course of. Of this episode, we're going to bring you. Parts of those conversations Dr Anwar. Gosh is the United Arab Emirates Minister of State for Foreign Affairs this week. He joined the J. C. Virtual. Global Forum for conversation with his friend and our chief policy officer Jason Isaacson in doing so he became the highest level official from an Arab country without relations with Israel to publicly address an American Jewish audience. Let's listen in to some of that conversation now. I want to begin by thanking the distinguish minister, not only for taking the time to share his insights with AJC and our many thousands of guests on this virtual platform, but for the multiple times that he and his colleagues in the leadership of the UAE have met with AJC over the twenty plus years that we have been regularly traveling to his country in pursuit of regional peace and cooperation and understanding or meeting with government officials when they have visited the united. States Dr Guard Gosh. It's very good to see you again. Thank you, Jason. Thank you I'd like. Like to begin by thanking you for boosting need today and <hes> I that this would be opportunity for a frank and constructive discussion, which is much needed I want closer to take the opportunity to thank ag see for what has been quite remarkable bridge to the ridge. There has been an octave work that was done to numerous visits to all the countries of ragent, all the countries of the Gulf and I think this sort of visiting and understanding the food of Fiji sees. Look over this city has been quite busted sounded, so thank you very much for that. Thank you very much. His remarks Dr Garg. The has a proud tradition of philanthropy including major charitable dishes here in the United States. How has your country contributed to the global fight against Akron bars pandemic, and what is your assessment of international cooperation in this fight generally closer to home, please talk about public health cooperation across the Middle East. How successful has it been? How can it be improved going forward? What specific role has the UAE played and I note by the way that the has twice in recent weeks, Asakusa and medical aid to the Palestinians by Israel feel free to discuss that as As well. I would actually agree with lock analysts who have said that our national responses have been more important than what I recall regional responses or googlers, every country, really as sort of look into its own and thermal situation, and this raises a lot of issues rarely about global cooperation, regional cooperation on issues such as the CAL now. If you look really adept policy, it's interesting, because in my opinion, we have come with a very I would say organized which nationally which is allowed us to actually and pry and help others and Binat relations originally and. We I think done something very successfully. Separate. Elliptical from the humanity so here for example we have no relationship with is ran, but at the same time we have recognized that this isn't Adia that we need to cooperate together because it is one that edges human beings finally from the religious affiliations at. Let's look at the long term effects of the pandemic on. The long lockdown of the widespread in deep economic disruptions, the effect that they will have on regional stability and security. Not every country in the region has the kind of resources that the UAE. Does you throw in the recent plunge in oil prices on the crisis across the region really is amplified. Are you forecasting a regional power relationship restructuring a potential conflict between states, says spike and out-migration, perhaps from the Gulf states. Where do you see a softer landing after the pandemic? I would say that things will change and things will stay the scene. To suppose that fundamental issues that we have not been able to tackle for forty and fifty and sixty s will suddenly change overnight I think is expecting too much unfortunately, but at the same time I think that we need to try and work at the edges of. So clearly I think we need to avoid rhetoric that leads plus colletion. We need to avoid confrontation because everybody will be affected the dubs. Demographics guns. Economy and so on so

AJC Global Forum Israel AJC United Arab Emirates Minister Jason Isaacson Dr Anwar Stephie Cogan Berlin J. C. Virtual Dr Guard Fiji UAE Europe officer America
Highlights from the First-Ever AJC Virtual Global Forum

People of the Pod

05:30 min | 3 months ago

Highlights from the First-Ever AJC Virtual Global Forum

"This week thousands of global Jewish advocates were supposed to have been in Berlin for the AJC Global Forum. Unfortunately, the pandemic had other plans, but we weren't just going to cancel our critical conference, so we took the global forum virtual all week. Thousands of people from around the world have been tuning in on AJC DOT ORG to watch high level addresses, intimate conversations and fierce debates over the future of Israel, America in Europe over the course of. Of this episode, we're going to bring you. Parts of those conversations Dr Anwar. Gosh is the United Arab Emirates Minister of State for Foreign Affairs this week. He joined the J. C. Virtual. Global Forum for conversation with his friend and our chief policy officer Jason Isaacson in doing so he became the highest level official from an Arab country without relations with Israel to publicly address an American Jewish audience. Let's listen in to some of that conversation now. I want to begin by thanking the distinguish minister, not only for taking the time to share his insights with AJC and our many thousands of guests on this virtual platform, but for the multiple times that he and his colleagues in the leadership of the UAE have met with AJC over the twenty plus years that we have been regularly traveling to his country in pursuit of regional peace and cooperation and understanding or meeting with government officials when they have visited the united. States Dr Guard Gosh. It's very good to see you again. Thank you, Jason. Thank you I'd like. Like to begin by thanking you for boosting need today and I that this would be opportunity for a frank and constructive discussion, which is much needed I want closer to take the opportunity to thank ag see for what has been quite remarkable bridge to the ridge. There has been an octave work that was done to numerous visits to all the countries of ragent, all the countries of the Gulf and I think this sort of visiting and understanding the food of Fiji sees. Look over this city has been quite busted sounded, so thank you very much for that. Thank you very much. His remarks Dr Garg. The has a proud tradition of philanthropy including major charitable dishes here in the United States. How has your country contributed to the global fight against Akron bars pandemic, and what is your assessment of international cooperation in this fight generally closer to home, please talk about public health cooperation across the Middle East. How successful has it been? How can it be improved going forward? What specific role has the UAE played and I note by the way that the has twice in recent weeks, Asakusa and medical aid to the Palestinians by Israel feel free to discuss that as As well. I would actually agree with lock analysts who have said that our national responses have been more important than what I recall regional responses or googlers, every country, really as sort of look into its own and thermal situation, and this raises a lot of issues rarely about global cooperation, regional cooperation on issues such as the CAL now. If you look really adept policy, it's interesting, because in my opinion, we have come with a very I would say organized which nationally which is allowed us to actually and pry and help others and Binat relations originally and. We I think done something very successfully. Separate. Elliptical from the humanity so here for example we have no relationship with is ran, but at the same time we have recognized that this isn't Adia that we need to cooperate together because it is one that edges human beings finally from the religious affiliations at. Let's look at the long term effects of the pandemic on. The long lockdown of the widespread in deep economic disruptions, the effect that they will have on regional stability and security. Not every country in the region has the kind of resources that the UAE. Does you throw in the recent plunge in oil prices on the crisis across the region really is amplified. Are you forecasting a regional power relationship restructuring a potential conflict between states, says spike and out-migration, perhaps from the Gulf states. Where do you see a softer landing after the pandemic? I would say that things will change and things will stay the scene. To suppose that fundamental issues that we have not been able to tackle for forty and fifty and sixty s will suddenly change overnight I think is expecting too much unfortunately, but at the same time I think that we need to try and work at the edges of. So clearly I think we need to avoid rhetoric that leads plus colletion. We need to avoid confrontation because everybody will be affected the dubs. Demographics guns. Economy and so on so

Ajc Global Forum UAE Israel Jason Isaacson AJC United Arab Emirates Minister Dr Anwar United States Berlin Dr Garg Dr Guard Gulf J. C. Virtual CAL Europe Middle East Fiji America Binat Akron
"ajc" Discussed on People of the Pod

People of the Pod

02:22 min | 3 months ago

"ajc" Discussed on People of the Pod

"Each week we take you beyond the headlines and help you understand what it all means for Israel, and the Jewish people I'm Stephie Cogan and I'm on Uber Sheer men. This week thousands of global Jewish advocates were supposed to have been in Berlin for the AJC Global Forum. Unfortunately, the pandemic had other plans, but we weren't just going to cancel our critical conference, so we took the global forum virtual all week. Thousands of people from around the world have been tuning in on AJC DOT ORG to watch high level addresses, intimate conversations and fierce debates over the future of Israel, America in Europe over the course of. Of this episode, we're going to bring you. Parts of those conversations Dr Anwar. Gosh is the United Arab Emirates Minister of State for Foreign Affairs this week. He joined the J. C. Virtual. Global Forum for conversation with his friend and our chief policy officer Jason Isaacson in doing so he became the highest level official from an Arab country without relations with Israel to publicly address an American Jewish audience. Let's listen in to some of that conversation now. I want to begin by thanking the distinguish minister, not only for taking the time to share his insights with AJC and our many thousands of guests on this virtual platform, but for the multiple times that he and his colleagues in the leadership of the UAE have met with AJC over the twenty plus years that we have been regularly traveling to his country in pursuit of regional peace and cooperation and understanding or meeting with government officials when they have visited the united. States Dr Guard Gosh. It's very good to see you again. Thank you, Jason. Thank you I'd like. Like to begin by thanking you for boosting need today and I that this would be opportunity for a frank and constructive discussion, which is much needed I want closer to take the opportunity to thank ag see for what has been quite remarkable bridge to the ridge. There has been an octave work that was done to numerous visits to all the countries of ragent, all the countries of the Gulf and I think this sort of visiting and understanding the food of Fiji sees..

AJC Global Forum Israel AJC United Arab Emirates Minister Jason Isaacson Dr Anwar Stephie Cogan Berlin J. C. Virtual Dr Guard Fiji UAE Europe officer America
"ajc" Discussed on People of the Pod

People of the Pod

02:01 min | 3 months ago

"ajc" Discussed on People of the Pod

"It's always one of my favorite, not just because we bring to brilliant people who have different points of view on important issues, also because I think it represents AJC at its best I mean if you think about it, we live in a world which is increasingly silo D-. Intellectually politically silo GONNA. Look for debates. People go look for reinforcement of their own ideas, so they choose their t beat channels. They choose their websites. They choose their newspapers. Newspapers to such a large degree based on their desire to find kind of security and comfort in that space, whatever their viewpoint is, what AJC say wait a second folks. We're not going in that direction. There are a lot of complex issues out there that don't have simple answers. You may say they do, but in reality they don't, so we have rebates. One of the debates is on free and hate speech. Are there limits and one side of the? By very distinguished legal scholar, some very well known to the public will be. There should be no limits. The answer to hate speech is not the banning of hate. Speech is more speech and couches speech, so that'd be one break debate. The second debate were in twenty twenty Presidential election underway we have top emissaries of both the Biden trump campaigns who will be debating foreign policy national security? Though the democratic way or the Republican way. You can be sure the be a very joy, say energetic debate and the third debate we have slated is a two views of the West Bank. As everyone knows. This has been a long standing question Israel with different views on what the future of the West Bank will to look like I it's coming into focus again. Because of the trump peace plan and we have two prominent Israelis will be debating what the future of the West Bank to. To look like wants to be decided unilaterally to be decided east negotiations if they can take.

AJC West Bank Israel Biden
A Conversation with Mayor Eric Garcetti and Mayor Betsy Price

People of the Pod

05:06 min | 4 months ago

A Conversation with Mayor Eric Garcetti and Mayor Betsy Price

"This week. Ajc hosted the mayor of Los Angeles. Eric Garcetti and the mayor of Fort Worth Betsy price for a conversation about their leadership on the front lines of the COVID nineteen crisis fighting antisemitism in their cities and what it was like for them to travel to Israel with AJC THOUGH. Garcetti is a Democrat and price or Republican. They agree on so much and are able to talk productively through their disagreements. I think the conversation will help you feel better about America and I know that it did for me. You can sign up to watch this and other. Ajc's zoom programming all part of our advocacy anywhere series by going to AJC dot org slash advocacy anywhere. Now all had the microphone over to my colleague Melanie Maron. Pell who moderated the discussion. Thank you so much above mayor price than mayor. Garcetti for joining us today. It's so nice to see you both here and looking well first of all just really grateful that you're giving us some of your time today. We know how incredibly busy both of you are. And what the life of a mayor must be like. We can only imagine right now so if you can. Let's begin by just a little bit. About how the. Covid nineteen crisis has impacted your cities and Betsy. Why don't you kick us off? Sure thank you for having us. It's great to see everybody Melanie. It's great to see you. After traveling with Y'all we had a great time and go back in a heartbeat learned an incredible amount and mayor Garcetti. It's always fun to be on panels with you. He and I've done a of panels has dealt with this. We've been fortunate for city our size. We're about nine hundred thousand people. A very young city I average age is thirty one and yet we have a big population of quotes. Also and buried reverse demographics. Were thirty five percent. Y thirty six percent Latino in about nineteen percent African American. But we've been very lucky. Our numbers have not been near as high as some of the other Texas cities. We're very spread out city not allow public transportation. And when you're recruit MRS sometimes I walked at density will in this case the lack of density has really helped us. We've got about twenty seven hundred confirmed cases and as of yesterday about eighty eight deaths in the city The economic impact. I'm sure we're going to get into that later. But the economic impact on the city the loss of sales tax probably the downgrading of some property tax is GonNa hit. The city's budget were about one. What four billion dollar budget and we estimate this year alone will be about seventy million or more live managed our budget beard whale where very conservative especially responsible. So we're going to get through this but long-term. This is three to five year hit for cities on their budget particularly on tourism sign and for small businesses. Thank you and mayor. Garcetti but good to see Melanie Ameriprise. Always great to see you as well Awesome to be with. Ajc in all of you. Thank you for making the time to. I represented a small little city Global crossroads it's a place which we have folks who literally originate from every country in the world speak every language were added at diversity in that sense of belonging that we all have but it's also one in which we hold from that value to of come together very proud Los Angeles ca dense urban setting in the metropolitan area is the densest in the United States. But we've seen probably about a twentieth impact of what we saw New York City. We went very early into taking strong actions but that said we still had for state so we have a high number of cases relative to the middle of the pack of America. But we've done extensive testing so we'll under fifty thousand cases about two thousand deaths. But we've also were the first big city in America to offer universal testing with or without symptoms in thirty eight testing centers. We just opened up the Loyd testing center in America yesterday Dodger Stadium to six thousand tests day. And we're very proud. I think mayor price would agree. Mayors suddenly had to become health experts in usually. It's the state of the. That's in charge of that county's often have executives but sometimes don't so they set up to do extraordinary work but not necessarily always to make quick decisions or to stand up in crises. So we've had a state of emergency here Certainly use those powers to be able to stand up testing help expand capacities in our hospitals. Our numbers have stabilized and certainly adequate. Mayor Price received a devastating impact on states and cities in our budgets. Were also very fiscally conservative We haven't had bombed downgrading in this. We have the largest reserve fund in our history at said were Facing huge cuts just our basic services. So I hope that Washington continue to look at our local state governments key parts of our economy and helping stand up the site to defeat. And I'm interested to hear what this assistance would mean to you and your cities and what would be impact. What sorts of pets are you facing? I know you've already described the

Eric Garcetti New York City Mayor Price AJC Los Angeles America Melanie Maron Covid Fort Worth Melanie Ameriprise Melanie Betsy Pell Washington Israel Texas Dodger Stadium United States
Changing U.S. Political Landscape

People of the Pod

05:41 min | 4 months ago

Changing U.S. Political Landscape

"I moderate conversation between Bhatia under Sargon the opinion editor of the forward. And Seth Mandell the executive editor of The Washington Examiner magazine. The program was called the changing. Us political landscape. And what's at stake for American Jews? We are pleased to bring you some of that program now yesterday. Ajc's National Leadership Council received an exclusive briefing from Dr Land Schlieffer the CEO Regeneration Pharmaceuticals and toward the end of the call. He made the points. I hope I'm not misrepresenting. You Hear Lynn. He made the point. That PART OF WHY? America hasn't been a world leader in responding to the corona virus crisis. Far From It is because our political polarization has had almost a paralysing effect on the ability of government to address the primary and secondary issues coming from the pandemic put differently in a certain sense. Our political divide is literally making us so just to lay some groundwork I want to start by asking each of you. How did we get here? How is it that the country that dominated the last century now seems at times like it could tear itself apart by? Let's begin with you. I have a bit of a polarization. Scott's back Anna now what I mean by that is I think that when you look around at our nation more generally this polarization in fact that is so clear to us on. Twitter is so clear in Congress and in the Senate and so clear in the media actually really evaporates as soon as you get out of these sort of centers of chattering class. Political classes is just to say that the tragedy of the polarization in our nation's elites is so much greater because it truly is leaving you know our nation behind it does. We are actually much less polarized. As a nation we have ever been in our history. Polling shows that as a nation we have never been more united than we are over. The major issues at this nation was founded on and so it's deeply tragic to see them at in the media and in political classes. We are others throats really failing to represent the people that we are supposed to be representing set to you kind of agree with that formulation you WanNa take a stab at the original question or you also disagree with my premise here. I think that body is basically right. I think the problem is that there's a perception of partisanship but that perception of partisanship actually has a real effect on what's happening in what goes on and and the formation of policy and things like that you have leaders in alternative media in. Party affiliated party associated media that make a lot of noise that noise that gets picked up by the rest of us in the mainstream media and we sort of broadcast it out and it makes it look and sound like there's a real divide here but in reality on the important thing which is compliance. That divide wasn't really there. It was just an argument. We were having in public. But that's what a democracy is. We were having the argument in public. And the lockdown side. The restrictions were winning the argument and both sides more or less complied with the ramifications of that. So in some ways I do really think it's healthier than it looks but I worry that if we're formulating policy and we're having these national conversations based on the perception of division than the reality matters less than it should so we need to somehow find a way to have the leaders in Congress in media those who set the national debate reflect the same level of division or lack thereof as the general public. Were talking about the vanishing center whether it's actually vanishing kind of out in the districts or it's only vanishing maybe in the halls of Congress to set last point right that might matter more or still matter even if the back home kind of get along but if we're talking about the vanishing center the Center makes me think of consensus issues Fighting Antisemitism and supporting Israel both used to be consensus issues and I think that in some ways they're both disappearing maybe the consensus support for Israel is disappearing a little more obviously than the consensus support for fighting antisemitism. But I think you'd both agree that people are trying to instrumentalise the fight against anti-semitism in a way. That's that's really unhelpful. So Seth we'll start with you. Why are consensus issues like this disappearing the issue that I always return to as something that looks better than the American Jewish Committee is response by? Comparison is what happened with Jeremy Corbyn in the UK and on the eve of the election there was a poll that eighty seven percent of British. Jews considered him antisemitic. And I just remember thinking that that's close as a consensus as I can ever remember. I mean I think the reverse was when maybe eight Ludo mayor it had like a five percent approval rating or something. You had ninety. Five percent of Israelis agreeing wasn't a very happy moment at any time you have countries Jews almost ninety percent agreeing on something that's Unity. That's a form of office and it also means that the political ramifications were not what was important. I had people telling me. Hey look. I'm a lifelong Labour member. I'm not leaving the party but I. I am canvassing for bars.

Congress Seth Mandell Bhatia United States Israel National Leadership Council Twitter Executive Editor Editor Jeremy Corbyn Ceo Regeneration Pharmaceutica The Washington Examiner America American Jewish Committee Lynn Dr Land Schlieffer Labour Scott
John C. Yang's Journey to Asian American Justice

$6.99 Per Pound

04:34 min | 5 months ago

John C. Yang's Journey to Asian American Justice

"Please welcome John Thanks. Show thank you so much for being here and talking with US and chatting with US. I have to say we were all looking at your bio and resume and it pretty much belongs to an Asian mother's dream. It's very very intimidating. You are irrational lawyer. You worked under Obama. The president the only president that parents probably know about you. Yourself are president of insert prestigious Asian American organization. Here you have so many accomplishments so on the surface it's again quite intimidating but I'm sure it wasn't You know rainbows and it wasn't an easy path to getting to where you are. Sure to. A lot of hard work and determination just reading the articles that you were involved in your son of immigrants who experience a lot of the same challenges that may be somewhere listeners or people who are represented country also experience. So could you walk us through your personal journey and how you got to? Ajc sure we have to do. I thank you very much for having me on the show. It's a pleasure to be here and you're right. It's interesting because a one level if you look at my quotable resume I'm not a doctor so I don't have that going for the Asia gene so to speak but I've been very privileged to have a lot of professional successes but one thing that I don't have on my bio but that I actually do talk about bit is the fact that I was undocumented immigrants so my background is very much like all of our background with respect to being coming from an immigrant family and at one point when we were growing up. I was still a child volley out of status. My parents came here on a work visa and that work visa expired and they had to make the decision of whether to go back to China or stay in the United States until by I always reflect back on the courage that my parents had in decided to stay here because at that time I was nine years old my brother might have been ten years old and they knew that for us to go back to China when we had raised here made no and so that does carry with me in terms of the work that I do now and always remembering. Why won't do the work that I do? Not As amazing. Um I mean you just like I I you know I went out. I came into this country. You know I didn't have paperwork for myself either and through various hardships Many years going to the social security office in a winter time to renew social security and get a new a worker's permit like a family was able to get a green card before My parents my brother and I had to go to college. So we were able to benefit from student aid but So I totally understand like the struggles of The uncertainty that you kind of have to go through to being essentially a second class citizen in a country. So that's you know I applaud you for that But with that said like you know I'm assuming like the sense of Being an other in a country and really a persevering through all of that kind of drew you into working at a legal realm but is there anything else that kind of like Made you want to work in Asian American justice. Well it started because I grew up in the mid west and what I grew up in the Midwest at that time there were few Asian Americans literally account a my hand. The number of asian-americans in my graduating class graduated class of five hundred. Sixty some kids and that always stuck with me and let's let's be real right growing up. I had my fair number of occasions where salute will call me. Chink or someone would call me a racial slur and when your kid you don't really know how to deal with it you you you get into fights arguments at always lived with me and then obviously the immigration experienced lives with me and so when. I was thinking about what I wanted to do. A idea of a legal background not necessarily becoming a lawyer but just having illegal background seemed to make sense because it felt like it would open up opportunities and to allow me to help others. I know that sounds grand but it did go through my mind as a find a way to help

President Trump United States John China Midwest Asia
"ajc" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

01:33 min | 6 months ago

"ajc" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"Field trip Friday this morning a Garda spokesman telling the AJC it's a way to keep families connected and teachers from going crazy each attraction will post interactive materials online for the sure weather wise today sunny with a high near seventy three tonight mostly clear with a low around fifty if you could stay at home please do and stay connected hi Maria Boynton for news and talk thirteen eighty W. A. okay now let's check the roadway thinking about life insurance what if you could make one free phone call and learn your best price from nearly a dozen highly rated price competitive companies well that's exactly what happens when you call select quote life for example George is forty he was getting sky high quotes from other companies because he takes meds to control his blood pressure but when I shopped around I found him a ten year five hundred thousand dollar policy for under twenty five dollars a month I'm select quote agent Dan sabino and believe me if select quote isn't shopping for your life insurance you're probably paying too much for your free quote call eight hundred seven zero four twenty three thirty that's eight hundred seven zero four twenty three thirty eight hundred seven zero four twenty three thirty or go to select quote dot com since nineteen eighty five we shop you save get full details on the example policy it's local dot com slash commercials are price can vary depending on your health insurance company the fact not available in all states.

AJC Maria Boynton George Dan sabino Garda
'Viral: Anti-Semitism in Four Mutations': A Close-Up on Hatred

People of the Pod

13:03 min | 7 months ago

'Viral: Anti-Semitism in Four Mutations': A Close-Up on Hatred

"In an unhealthy society? That has problems. They say who did this to us? And the Jews are always candidate. That's columnist George will who's featured in a new documentary on anti-semitism out in theaters across the country on Friday with us in the studio to discuss that film is its creator. Andrew Goldberg in two thousand nine. Andrew focused his lens on the resurgence of Anti Jewish hatred around the world and in mainstream media but after the two thousand sixteen election and the CHARLOTTESVILLE rally where protesters proclaimed the Jews will not replace us. Goldberg felt compelled to return to the topic for an even deeper exploration in viral for mutations of anti-semitism Goldberg travels through four countries. The United States Great Britain France and Hungary to speak firsthand with victims witnesses anti-semites an high profile figures including bill. Clinton Tony Blair Deborah Lipstadt and AJC Europe director. Simone Rodin Benkin in Pittsburgh. He examined the far right ideas that led to the attack on the tree of life synagogue in Hungary he looks at the Anti Immigration. Anti George Soros anti-jewish propaganda promoted by the government and in the UK. He explores the pain caused by the Anti Zionist messages from the UK's Labor Party the film also explores the repeated violence against Jews in France carried out by Islamists Andrew. Welcome glad to be here. Thank you so thank you for making this documentary and I'm curious. Can you kind of take our audience back to the original conception of it and how it evolved over time since I believe some events actually transpired in the making of the documentary will shortly after the election? We noticed there was sort of an uptick in anti Semitic incidents around the country. There were series a bomb threats which we know turned out to be bogus but those caught. Everyone's attention and suddenly everyone was noticing things and shortly after that a lot of tombstones were desecrated several different cemeteries and then the sort of global eyeballs started to notice these things talk about them more in the press and online and we immediately thought we should make a film about antisemitism and we didn't know what it would look like or what it would be. I think our initial thoughts were that would be about the United States but as we did more and more research and we knew this was a global issue. We knew it was happening in other countries. But as you unpack these things you realize that. There's an urgency to a lot of these stories and so we decided to really expanded and to look at four different situations. Those would be the far right in the United States. The far left in England in Hungary where the prime minister has launched a massive PR campaign against a Jewish philanthropist and in France where Islamist have been killing Jews in various terror attacks and other violent attacks against Jews to the tune of what unofficial numbers seemed to be more than three thousand a year. Now you've been making documentaries and doing journalism for twenty years As have I and I was a religion reporter for fifteen years in Chicago and I will tell you when I came here. I was stunned by just how much people hate. Jews. And I'm curious you I. I mentioned this to a former colleague at the Tribune recently and his response. He's in his eighties. He said we'll of course you grew up at a different time You know it's no surprise to me but yeah of course you didn't realize I'm just curious if this was a real shock to your system as you were doing the reporting the idea that Jews are hated was never foreign to me. I mean keep in mind. I'm fifty one and so I grew up where the Holocaust was not that far off. I mean I was raised in the seventies so I guess it was still thirty years old but it was not as it is now sixty plus years old where the next generation of people don't even know it was there Growing UP IN CHICAGO BEING JEWISH WAS It was not something to be celebrated at least among my friends and among my peers. I was made fun of for it a few times. It wasn't I didn't grow up in the midst of it but the Holocaust was connected to us in a way that it was very very real and so for that reason I understood that Jews were absolutely despised and I started making films in my first film that had anything to do with Jewish subjects was around two thousand and two or so and you know it was about Eastern European Jewish life before the war. So we're talking about you. Know all black and white footage of shuttles of Warsaw of what we might call the Yiddish world and that whole world is utterly destroyed in Eastern Europe and in Europe and in Russia and that made it pretty easy to see and in doing that film I started to learn about it. I automate fillmore at antisemitism in the media in the Middle East at one point and you realize that it is it is widespread. There's Anti Semitism where there are Jews. There's antisemitism where there are not Jews. There's Anti Semitism among people who are friends with Jews so my awareness of this has grown so in other words you entered into this project knowing there was a history of this but you had never seen it kind of in the current context as well. I had not seen it the way I see it now. I when I made a film in two thousand seven on antisemitism in the in the in the arab-islamic world per particularly North Africa and the Middle East I didn't focus that much on Europe and the US at the time antisemitism in the US was a very minor issue compared to what it is now. I don't want to say it was minor because there were plenty of people experiencing antisemitism but we didn't have it to the magnitude and we didn't have the Internet the way we do now but I knew that it was alive and well in the Middle East and that was surprising to see just how deep it is just how woven into the fabric of conversation and media it is. I was interviewing some kids in Egypt on the street and I said to them what are Jews they said User Satan Jews are evil. Juice should die. I said what if a Jewish kid was walking right here across the street and got hit by a car. They said we would call an ambulance. These two ideas existed right next to each other. And that's what's so interesting. One is in the abstract one is in the day to day Would you say that abstract versus day day is what's also infecting Western Europe United States? This wave of anti-semitism that we're seeing or is it. Is it very different? I think they crossover so for example. In Hungary there's virtually no violence against Jews In Hungary a survey showed that forty percent. Forty two percent of Hungarians held at least one or more anti Semitic views. Does that mean that? The people by larger anti-semites probably not but it means that the numbers are higher. Those numbers were higher than they were anywhere else in Europe or give or take a country. How many countries are there in Europe? A lot right so but there's no violence against Jews physical violence. That's what I mean physical violence against Jews but those lines do tend to cross over at points and so the fear is that it can translate these nationalist movement so in Hungary just to give some context the government has launched a huge campaign against George. Soros it's on Mute right now. It's not running right now but it ran not too long ago during the European Union elections. It came back up again. I asked one of the spokespeople of Hungary will come back and he told me that it would come back in a very consistent way so the whole idea that the Hungarian government has put forth. Is that this Jewish billionaire. George Soros is out to flood the nation with Muslim immigrants and since Muslim immigrants in the eyes of the Hungarian government are bad. You the Hungarian citizen the White Christian Hungarian citizen are in danger. And you're in danger because of a Jew. So here's these people are all worked up about a Jew who actually isn't doing anything like this but yet at the same time they're not vandalizing. All the Jewish shops are not beating Jews. And what have you? Although there's I've heard some rumblings that a little of that has happened so we'll have to see but I'm no expert on the data right. Well I think that's the argument. I mean argument. Deborah Lipstadt makes in the film. For example it starts with words it starts with comments and then does eventually escalate. That's the danger of not addressing it nipping in the bud. When you see. I think that's here right so I think that in America we've seen rage on the Internet translate into violence than I think you know the hatred in Hungary is really a government media campaign which took place on TV on the radio on the Internet. But also on billboards outside it was like an all encompassing life. You would drive down the street and you'd be bombarded with it here This antisemitism isn't billboards. I mean there's we'd see them occasionally but it's all on the Internet and people get the Internet sort of like you and your computer. You Lock yourself in this little space and then you start to get worked up and you start to hate and so we see that. Not all but many of these. Violent attacks in the United States are people who sort of incubated these ideas on the Internet. You raise a good point billboards in Hungary that was the been the vehicle of communication there for that. Soros campaign but I'm curious what about social media. What about the comments in violence on social media is it just as rampant in places like Hungary as it is here we'll so the makeup and the nature of the of the campaign in Hungary? We didn't break down so I don't know what percentage of it certainly on social media and not only was it on social media is a place where people can share about it right so in addition to whatever the government put on social media because the government had all these different forms they had radio they had. Tv They billboards aid magazines. It's social media mailings mailing mailing which is in the film How much of their media mix was the Internet? I don't know but if you're a person with anti Semitic views you can't do anything with billboard but some people did right hateful messages on billboards with magic markers in pain. They actually vandalize them. But by and large the billboards are you don't interact with them in the billboard. Don't post against back and forth a TV commercial. You don't respond to that. The Internet is where everybody took their hatred in their dislike of George Soros and they brought it to the Internet. And I think that's a place where you would see a lot more of this. Anti Jewish rhetoric the Internet is where it becomes the People's action not the government right. You have obsession in the film that talks about the brief history of blaming Jews. And you talk about the films that you've done in the past and the history of this but one critique of the film that I've read is that doesn't include enough historical context now I hear this critique all the time as a journalist you only have so much space or time right to address the whole of a situation but I'm curious what your thoughts are on whether to include more history or trajectory. The history of antisemitism is extremely complex. It grows out of misinterpretations if that's a word of people misinterpreted biblical scripture. It's changed and it's more throughout the centuries throughout Europe. If you WANNA talk about how it's been a part of the story of Christianity knew very thorny and complicated history which takes a long time to get in and out of now take that for a minute and think about. We have limited shelf space in our movie. I always say to people in movies not a casserole but take that from it in a notice that in the film we have that history. We have extensive history of the civil rights movement in the United States with history of the entire Orban's campaign and where that came from in Hungary in Oregon was we talk all about a migration and the history of colonialism in France as to give the backbone of that in England we talk about the Labor Party going all the way back to two thousand and eight. What we don't do is this deep analysis of Christian history but my response is also this. If I make a film about racism in about how African Americans are being shot in the street by police. Do I need to tell you? The history of why blacks are disliked by racists in this country. If I talk about misogyny do I need to tell you? The history of why people are misogynists to me and the same goes for LGBTQ. Americans no one's asking why. Why do I need to get into the fact of why Trans People are being murdered? Right now are being beaten up. I don't need to analyze that. Well that too comes from the Bible. Right hatred of homophobia grows right out of scripture. But I don't need to give that analysis so it's a it. We talk about double standards and antisemitism and I don't want to say this is anti Semitism but it's almost a reflex that people feel like anything has to do with Jews. With antisemitism with Israel has to be held to some type of second order of scrutiny and I found that a little bit frustrating. There've been some debates on college campuses about whether or not Jewish students who are pro. Israel can join feminist marches. Lgbtq right marches. You other causes. They feel excluded from those causes because of their Zionist positions and so. That's where intersection. -ality has come up a lot in conversations here is how do you address that exclusion? Even though it's very different causes communities have gotten together and there has not been room for the Jewish issue of antisemitism has four complicated reasons not been welcome into that crew. Because many in this left is idea. Do not like how they don't like what's going on with the Arab Israeli conflict let's not even parse the Israeli conflict. Unfortunate part of this. Is that a Jewish students who have nothing to do with Israel who are oblivious to Israel are still being singled out now. It's very dangerous to to assume. Length phrases like colleges are a battleground. We visited colleges as we spoke to a lot of students. It's a very complicated and mixed bag. But there's no doubt that on some college campuses and we don't have hard data on how or where or what we have a lot of anecdotes. We have a lot of very upset parents. We have a lot of very upset students. But what that actually translates into numbers. We don't know what we do know. Is that Jewish? Students are being asked to somehow be called to task for what Israel is said to be

Hungary United States George Soros Europe Government Semitism France Andrew Goldberg Middle East Chicago Israel Labor Party UK Simone Rodin Benkin Tribune Pittsburgh England Ajc Europe
French Antisemitism Survey, 75 Years After Auschwitz

People of the Pod

09:13 min | 8 months ago

French Antisemitism Survey, 75 Years After Auschwitz

"Week. AJC's Paris office released a new survey measuring Jewish rush and non-jewish opinions about antisemitism across France. Joining us now. To unpack the survey findings is Simone Rodin Benz Akin the paris-based Chris based director of AJC Europe Simone. What's fascinating and even groundbreaking I think about this survey that? AJC Paris just conducted -ducted is that we asked the questions of both Jews and non-jews about their thoughts and feelings around antisemitism and so now that we have the results. We can actually compare the way French. Jews think about antisemitism from the way French non-jews do so let's start off with the ways in which their thoughts are the same. What are the areas where French Jews and French non-jews are kind of similarly concerned or on the same page about the sources of or? We are worried in the same way about antisemitism so first of all I would say that The one thing that I think Jews and non-jews share is the understanding standing that anti-semitism has really sort of become a problem in. Finally I mean for friends. Jews of course it's more than a problem it's reality it's something that they have to deal with and we can go further into what that actually means and and to what extent Jews are actually affected by antisemitic But what is clearly seen. Is that French people in general have really understood that anti-semitist becoming problem and that they experienced even in their daily lives one out of five French people So not graduates has heard someone is in his entourage Say something bad about Jews for example so it's basically it means that you know one out of five. French French person was not Jewish. Can Be anywhere in front has heard something bad about juice so this is good the antisemitic ya'll has really become a reality. Both for Jews and non-jews What I think to have separate the Jews anonymous? Of course they experience and this is very clear is that Jews and not Jews simply. You don't have the same live in France at the same concerns The same daily lives are the same the same perception of security a threat the way they perceive their family and they then they way that they behave and I guess one way that we're seeing that manifest ask. Is this kind of startling top line result. which is that? Nearly three quarters of the French public and seventy two percent of juice of seventy three percent percent of French people at large and seventy two percent of French Jews consider antisemitism a problem that affects all of French society which she's really a startling number. I guess it's actually a positive number to see that so many French people at large are concerned about the problem. Is that right yes. I think that's absolutely right right. And I think that's sort of Out of the rather sobering aspect of the servicing. This is really the part that gives us a little bit of hope. Let's not forget that anti-semitism has been the problem in France for nearly twenty years The numbers have proved that people have been killed in France. People get a daily assaulted in in the street in their homes and in front of synagogues and schools and so to see that French people in general now understand that. Ah anti-semitism is not just a problem for you know. The nearly one percent of the population fronts meaning Jews but at that they they have come to understand that it is an attack against fringe value. That it's an attack against bronzes very identity and democracy. I think it's a positive sign for many many years Jews in France have felt very loaning. There was a clear feeling of solitude. I personally remember with the number of demonstration of walks where we were very much known. We would walk in the streets after the merger of Ilan Halimi. By the way for yesterday we commemorated his fourteen th year when he was abducted and ultimately than killed twenty eight days later but I remember that after he was killed we were a couple of you know few hundred. Maybe a thousand in the streets than we were. Basically you know ninety nine point nine percent so now understand that French people in their entirety very largely seventy three percent understand that anti-semitism concern learned over the front. And the very hard to France is very important not to move away from the kind of uplifting elements of this too but there aren't that many uplifting uplifting elements so we might have exhausted that line of questioning I wanted to also ask Simone. Where are the places in the results? In which Jewish opinion and French opinion at large differs. Often we'll see that. Jews are concerned about different sources of antisemitism from the way that non-jews kind of think about I anti Semitism to make the direct analogy here in America. We often see politicians from one party or the other or public figures associated with either the left or or the right kind of saying you know of course Anti Semitism is important. And that's why everyone should agree with my kind of predetermined political outlook on the world. Because because you know that also they would say holds the answer to antisemitism which is pretty cynical. So I'm wondering did we uncover kind of the same thing in France with the survey well I. It's interesting so three sources were cited four One is one is the far left one is the far right and then we also asked about sort of general the age old anti Semitic prejudice. But that's focused on the first three Islam. As far less enfor writes on Islam. Both relatively agree. There is a ten percent nine percent difference but dude and don't use agree reduce By forty five percents see that Islamism is the first source of anti-semites whose place it ED. Thirty six percent and the extreme-right also they share a relatively same view on it where they differ immensely is on the way they perceive the far left and the far left anti-semitism and their dues. French do see that it is by thirty percents a source of anti-semitism and on the fringe people in general only nine percents. And I think this has partly not something to do with the fact that a French to have experienced have understood for a very long time that this anti-semitism affect them mm-hmm that it's not the traditional anti-semitism that can be easily identified with swastikas with Neo Nazis. But they knew that this sort of untie. Zionist obsession has easily become something else and has easily become anti-semitism. And I think unfortunately I need the rest of society as such has not yet come to understand it even bill. I still have hope that this will becoming Surveys are released east every day in every country all around the world and and even around Anti Semitism there have been a number of surveys. That have come out in recent months. Has this one made any any kind of particular splash in France. Yeah I think we can easily say that we brought out yesterday and it was on the front page of the biggest. You could most read most widely read newspaper in France and it was on the front page front page said to Jews of fronts are worried our Fred And there were another two pages in there and basically For the past forty eight one a forty eight hours despite everything l.. What's going on in the world? Basically D- Top story anti-semitism has tended on twitter. They have been. I can't even count them anymore. The number of articles. ooh That's been invited on all sorts of shows etc to talk about it Because again I think it comes at a time when there is growing understanding signing of the fact. That anti-semitism is a symptom over bigger problem that we have seen a lot of violence we have seen a lot of radicalization shen with Islamist radicalization but also in the political spectrum. And I think people have come to understand that you know. If we don't tackle so the problem of anti-semitism the cancer will only spread than it will only affect the rest of society more. So I think it's at East. My interpretation and that is one of the reasons why has received such widespread coverage and discussion and conversation also in the political

France Simone Rodin Paris Ilan Halimi Director Twitter America
Future of the Labour Party, ICC Investigation, Black-Jewish Relations

People of the Pod

11:35 min | 9 months ago

Future of the Labour Party, ICC Investigation, Black-Jewish Relations

"Liam whore is the Europe editor for moment magazine. It has been covering Labor's antisemitism awesome scandal since two thousand fifteen. He joins us now to help us understand. What's next for that party for British Jews and for the United Kingdom Liam? Thank you so much for joining us. I thank you for inviting me for the most part analysts are chalking up. Labour's defeat to having the wrong message on Brexit but there is is no doubt that Jeremy Corbyn. The Labour leader was historically unpopular. And no doubt that a part of that unpopularity was due to the anti eighty. Semitism that he let grow in the party. Are there grumblings on the far left that Jews are responsible for his defeat. And that's something that British Jews are worrying about. I think what we've seen since the election is people on the far left at Labor constituency meetings and online researching the British Jewish Institutions. Such as the Board of Deputies or indeed the chief rabbi Were in fact stories or conservatives I should say and innocent intervening in the election on their side. That's what he wanted to the things that the board of Deputies hope that the future Labour leader will expunge from the and that is one reason why they've come forward with the ten pledges in recent days. You mentioned the list of ten pledges that the Board of Deputies the kind of umbrella Ella Organisation for British Jews that the Board of Deputies released just a couple of days ago they basically say that these are the ten things or perhaps the first ten things the Labor Party needs to adopt needs to do in order to heal its relationship with the Jewish community. And we don't need to go through them one by one but broadly what are these ten pledges calling calling for. Well as you say broadly the first thing is that Outstanding Cases Anti Semitism in the Party needs to be resolved and the discipline under reprocessed to have to be made independent again and sh- interference from the leadership team sort of around. Jeremy Corbyn in this process must come to an end thereafter. What's I think? What's important folder? The board is to reestablish a working relationship with the leader of your party after all when a function is to be a conduit between the panoply of organizations they represent and and the government Foreign bodies and so forth and finally just add that one of the things they want to see done is that the full I h Ra the definition of Anti Semitism. With all of these examples applauses will be introduced and used in disciplinary cases within the party. That was a major eric. Eric disputes within the party last year or earlier this year. And that's one of the things I want to get done here at. AJC We're very proud of having been a part of authoring during the era definition but for our listeners who aren't familiar with the definition and why it's so important. Can you just say a word about that. Well because of dispute within the party I should say making making more specific is that People on the far left of the party were concerned that this definition would prevent them from Criticizing sizing Israel or Israeli policy. Which of course? He's not well. The definition does he's indicate ways in which rhetoric concerning Israel Israel can tip over into antisemitism I believe for example if people would say that the actions of the Israeli government towards what's the Palestinians in some way resemble the actions of Not Towards Jews in Europe in the nineteen forties So really they had nothing to worry about. But this is all tied to a much larger augmented. It was rambling on throughout the entirety of Jeremy Comex leadership of the Liberal Party concerning anti Israel rhetoric break and wearing that becomes at. You haven't ISM or for example. If someone challenging British Jews were to somehow hold them accountable for the actions actions of the Israeli government. I think that would also be seen as anti Semitic under the IRA definition which is really important. Considering the way that often we've seen across Europe and perhaps in Britain specifically people tried to do that. Try to discredit jus. I think there's a slur that has cropped up in the UK. Zayas people who you you know. They're interested in defaming and demeaning. They don't really have any way to do it except to try to tie them to Israel so I think it's important that the Labor Party adopts the definition in order to make very clear to its constituents that that kind of thing is anti Semitic well quite an in recent days we have an example of that which is that There's no sort of I would say online activists By the name of Rachel cousins. Who goes by the alias? Rachel Swindon who has a following of tens of thousands of people on twitter. It's unclear whether she is or is not in fact a member of the party but she's nonetheless very close to the sort of cold and leadership and in response to the boards pledges. She tweeted that as I previously said that the board was essentially a conservative organization and also came out with is her own or Or perhaps found only list of pledges for the board which more or less argue that the board had to come out and condemn Israeli military action. In the West Bank thank or condemn what she calls the ethnic cleansing of Palestinian communities in in the West Bank in other words as you said holding British Jews accountable for the actions. uh-huh office ready government. which if they at the very least a dangerous road to go down and she somebody who has previous four in this regard having tweeted about the rothschilds and the so-called influence in the past so the point of this is to say that changing the Leo Party is only the first step? They won't be root and branch Tusk to erotic antisemitism from the Ponti it is always interesting to see how those people who take part in what is called the new antisemitism this kind of attacking Jews shoes on the basis of what Israel does how at the end of the day they are also just old antisemites in the way that she brings up Rothschild conspiracies and things like that. I wanted to ask you about one of the pledgers. In particular number eight is entitled engagement with the Jewish community to be made via its main representative groups and then in explains Labor must engage with the Jewish community Levi its main representative groups not through fringe organizations and individuals. That sounds like it's referencing. Something like there's some history there. Can you tell us a little bit about that. Sure I mean I mean Jeremy Corbyn is somebody who was throughout the time he was leader of the party. Never very much interested in the views and concerns all mainstream British Jewish ortganizations. He has historically been in most of the time that he was leader. Always much more comfortable with what the board calls fringe organizations for example He wasn't much interested in The Jewish Labor movement which is sort of the mainstream Organiz ation all Jews in Labor Party or affiliated with the party rather Jewish Voice Labor whose membership I think could fit into a phone box. I mean if you look at their rallies and meetings the the next in the Guardian newspaper. It's always the same ten fifteen twenty people who assigning these latches At the same time At one of the times when the relationship between Jerry in British Jewish groups was was at his lowest he attended a Saito organized by a group called choose. Who are legitimate tendency in the Jewish community and represent people who have felt themselves felt this affiliated pushed away from the mainstream left-wing clock but they themselves I'm sure would say the reps and also a a very small number of people also Jeremy's also been affiliated with sort of anti-zionist ultra Orthodox people who live in his community but he did not have a working relationship with the board he did not have a working relationship with the chief rabbi in so far as I know and not that he had a working relationship with with the Jewish Leadership Council? which sort of is a you might say a rival organization to the Board of Deputies also a representative group so this point eight? This engagement group is really about the board wanting to reestablish Atlantic communication and a working relationship with the party which is sort of one of the sort of raison. d'etre foil for the board. It sells I'm going to move on in just a moment. Kind of forward-looking questions but there is one more retrospective effective thing that I'm curious about. which is what are we to make of people who are real friends of the Jews or certainly seem to be who campaigned for Labor in this last election? I'm thinking of people for example like London. Mayor Sadeq Khan who has said all the right things about anti Semitism done many of the things about about antisemitism but nevertheless tried to make Jeremy Corbyn the next prime minister should we hold that against him. I case if someone likes to Econ we should not hold that against against him and I think I think you know people who reunite kind of position which is to say supposedly oh party but not supposed to Jeremy Corbyn were very torn because the reality is the British electoral system that much like the Americans. There's it ends up becoming a two-party system Elections to the House Elsa parliament more or less function like elections to the House representatives. There are six hundred fifty constituencies. Each insurance becomes its own kind of to race and in many any of them the racist between Labour and the Conservatives and so sort of I would say anti anti Semitic Labor supporters found themselves in a very Korea unenvious position of having to decide. Do I vote for the Conservatives and put into power party that I oppose my entire adult life likely. ooh Aw do I grit my teeth and vote for the Labor Party on the basis that I am somehow voting for the Party and voting for the candidate in my constituency. But somehow not Jeremy Corbyn and I you know I as a journalist. I love about the free in this regard. So I don't have to make such compromises but I nonetheless feel for people who know people like I said Connor or you could answer this people like just flips. Who is now a candidate for leadership who it's not about Anti Semitism in the pause About the kind of compromises. They had to make that time. So no we we. We shouldn't hold I bet against As you intimate in about a month the voting will begin to elect a new leader of Labor this kind of an interesting quirk for our American listeners. The voting voting will actually stay open for more than a month through the beginning of April and people can vote. I guess anytime in that span. Who are the names that we need to know who are likely Lee to win the election and are any of them going to be you know kind of on their own? The answer to Labour's antisemitism problem tackling the antisemitism crisis is not as simple as for lack of a better way of putting removing the head from the snake Having Jeremy Corbyn leader suddenly a good thing because the cost was it the crisis could not be it's solution But in terms of who will become the next leader There this prison time probably two main candidates on the one hand you have Rebecca Long Bailey who is perceived to be the continuity Corbin candidate the date.

Party Jeremy Corbyn Labor Party Labor Israel Board Of Deputies Europe Liberal Party Israeli Government British Jewish Institutions Leo Party Semitism Moment Magazine Representative United Kingdom Israel Israel Liam Brexit Jewish Leadership Council Jewish Voice Labor
Sesame Street to launch Arabic-language show for refugee children to help them deal with trauma

People of the Pod

03:03 min | 11 months ago

Sesame Street to launch Arabic-language show for refugee children to help them deal with trauma

"When you're talking with your family and friends at your table this weekend. What are you GONNA be talking? Yeah well I have a three year old daughter and a five year old son and so we will be talking a lot about sesame street this week which celebrated its golden anniversary anniversary. Did you watch this mystery as a kid I did. Yeah Jessica what about you absolutely. And who are your favorite characters. I was always partial to Mr snuffle up this big bird's imaginary best friend and go what about you. I did love big bird a lot. And Ernie and Bert really really were probably my favorites. Though actually wonderful and I was dismayed to find out recently watching it with my children that Mr Smith Aleph guess is no longer I quote unquote quote figment of big birds imagination. Everyone sees him. It was very disappointing to the ranks of the real monsters. Wow that's like saying the tooth fairy doesn't exist well. My favorite character was kermit the frog especially his portrayal of TV news reporter which should come as no surprise But I might soon have a new favorite character and his name is John. John has been introduced to children will be introduced to children in Syrian refugee camps as has one of them he is the Star of Alan Simpson or welcome sesame an Arabic language version of sesame street that has been co produced by sesame workshop and the the International Rescue Committee it teaches letters and numbers. Yes but it also teaches emotional coping measures for the millions. Yes millions of children who have been traumatically they displaced from their homes and may remain displaced for decades especially as countries like the United States. Continue to cut the number of refugees at allows in twelve million Elian refugees. Twelve million six million of them are children and those are the stats get this only two percent of humanitarian aid for education in For refugees two percent and so once again sesame street has come to the rescue just as it did in the late nineteen sixty s when it first debuted John his friend Bosma and Friendly Goat Maza debut in twenty countries across the Middle East in February twenty twenty via satellite dishes in the refugee camps. And from time to time there will be guest appearances by Cookie Monster Grover and elmo. I have to say cookie monster was one of my favorites as well. The project is funded with a one hundred million dollar grant from the Macarthur Foundation and the grant also covers direct services to the families whose children have never been outside the camps and therefore they don't know fundamentals that we take for granted such as imagination or basic information like fish. Come from the sea while the focus will be more on emotional tools these fundamentals annals will also be covered as well and I really do applaud sesame workshop for taking this project on and I say. AJC is also exploring new ways to reach out to The era world in the Arabic language. And we'll be hearing more about that in the months to come but this project in particular is just really fascinating to me. And that's what we'll be talking about at our Table

John Mr Smith Ernie Macarthur Foundation United States Jessica International Rescue Committee Reporter Middle East Alan Simpson Bert Two Percent One Hundred Million Dollar Three Year Five Year
This Weekend Marks One Year After Pittsburgh Synagogue Attack

People of the Pod

12:25 min | 1 year ago

This Weekend Marks One Year After Pittsburgh Synagogue Attack

"This weekend marks the one year anniversary of the shooting at the tree of life car Gatien in Pittsburgh it's also the second annual show up for Chabad on the weekend right after the shooting we at J. C. encouraged Jews and our allies around the world to go to synagogue and show up for shut it became the largest demonstration of solidarity with the Jewish people in world history this year as we mark the tracks nick anniversary we hope you'll show up for Chabad again on this weekend October Twenty Fifth and twenty sixth head to AJC dot org slash show up for Chabad to learn more Manja who did you chat with this week Avi Mayor the Managing Director of Global Communications for AJC who spearheaded an unprecedented survey of American Jewish you too about anti-semitism how about you for my interview I really zoomed in on Pittsburgh and spoke with Jeff Finkelstein the president and CEO of the Jewish Federation in Pittsburgh so let's dive right in and hear those conversations now Sunday October twenty seventh will mark exactly one year since the deadly shooting at Pittsburgh is tree of Life Congregation we spoke with Jeff Finkelstein President and CEO of the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh to get a sense of how Pittsburgh is doing one year out jeff thank you so much for joining us thanks for asking me to do this now we're almost exactly one year out from the attack that Jews US All across America felt in our own way but the victims were in Pittsburgh so I should start by asking how is the Jewish community in Pittsburgh doing so I think you're actually starting with the right question the answer's complicated and complex because when we talk about the community were all victims and there are different levels of victims obviously the families who lost loved ones the people who were injured those who are in the synagogue but escaped and saw the shooter people in the parking lot the Jewish community of Squirrel Hill the general community of Scroll Hill the Jewish community of Greater Pittsburgh Etcetera and so there were all these rungs and I think if you ask representatives of each of them on different days you'll get a different an answer So the real answer in one word is it depends you just reminded me of the poem that you might be familiar with called the order of the bomb by you who to buy it's a famous poem by famous Israeli poet and it's too long to read into the record here maybe we'll link to it in the notes but in it he basically talks about the concentric circles of you know he's speaking of course about a bombing in Israel but he says the diameter of the bomb mhm was thirty centimeters but the range of the people who had hit and the people who were affected by that and the people who cared about that further and further ends by saying and I won't even mention the Howl of orphans that reaches up to the throne of God and beyond making a circle with no end and no god which is perhaps deeper than either is intended to go there but you're certainly right to point out that the attack took place in one location but it was felt everywhere it definitely has ripple effects by the way e yes I was my professor at the Hebrew University when I was there for my junior year and I actually don't remember studying that home but I'm sure I did at one point uh now going to have to go back and re read it you know and I can speak personally there were days where I feel more than others as we approach the one year marker and I'm looking at some of the drafts of videos that are going to be used I ended up in tears and and other your time's I'm fine when the attack happened in Powei that retraumatize people in the community including people like may so I just think they're good days is there a bad days and I'll end this part just by saying that one of the blessings in my professional work has been getting to know especially the victims families who were closest to the incident they are truly remarkable wonderful strong inspiring people that's that's that's beautiful a year ago so when this happened Pittsburgh became a mechanism for antisemitism in America right it became a kind of shorthand when many people today say Pittsburgh they don't mean the city on the allegheny river they mean the place where an anti Semite attacked a synagogue and that for you it's home right it's where you raised your kids it's where you work and perhaps not only where you go to work but it's the community that you really help to Lee it has it been jarring disconnect between the city people talk about in the one that you live in it's actually interesting I just I wrote a piece and I haven't done anything with it yet it on this topic specifically because I really might even be anger that I feel when people referred do what happened here as Pittsburgh they say we have to remember Pittsburgh Yeah and when I what I want them to know about Pittsburgh is that this is an incredible unique Jewish community this is a place that's growing with close to fifty thousand Jews today that's getting younger with millennials going into our city because of the increase in eds and meds higher education medical work and high tech in general and it is is and I always state this without actually ever researching it but it never stops me it is the last major urban center Jewish community in North America outside of New York every other Jewish comed- that I know of the major community has moved out of the city itself we are still saying entered in the city of Pittsburgh with the diversity of the Jewish community there it is an incredible place and that's when it comes to the Jewish communities what Pittsburgh it should mean and when it comes to being just a city this is the city that built America it had the third most fortune five hundred companies in America after New York and Chicago for a number of years it literally built America with its steel and those are the things that people need to remember about Pittsburgh this week AJC released the findings of a new survey of American Jews feelings about antisemitism and in the survey we found that a quarter of American Jews say that they avoid certain aces events or situation out of concern for their safety as Jews forty-seven percent report that Jewish institutions with which they are affiliated have been targeted by antisemitic threats graffiti or attacks and more than half of American Jews report having police and or private guards posted outside of their institutions. What has the hardening of Jewish communal spaces look like in Pittsburgh so just to take it back prior talks over twenty seventh year and a half before we hired a Jewish community security director at the Federation to start looking at that and his work save lives on Tober Twenty-seventh we we know that from people who survived in twenty four hours after the shooting took place we convened all of our Jewish institutions for briefing with our security director FBI police local politicians and talked about what was going on in the community and we at the federation made the Vision we hired armed guards throughout the Jewish community for the next four weeks we paid for it and the whole idea was to build resilience we didn't want people so scared of coming into our Jewish institutions forty eight hours after the shooting the largest Jewish preschool which is located at JC and Squirrel Hill all but one family showed up that's what we were aiming for and yes facilities have been physically hardened and there are addition thousands of new personnel for security at many of them as well someone asked me about this earlier today and you know has it has on an impact on people my own synagogue I was just there for Simpler Toronto Media Sarit I know the armed guard the people who come a lot we know oh that guard he is not Jewish he wishes you Chabad Shalom on Chabad and hugs them on the holiday it's not jarring it's comforting actually for most people I think and he's almost a member of the community and it's really it's been beautiful I think that's the way a lot of the institutions have tried to deal with the addition of security personnel now the tree of life congregation where the shooting took place last year issued a statement just last week too it's it's New Vision for the synagogue building a new mission for that institution can you tell us more about that before I answer the question I wanted just makes are we make one point that it was the tree of life building where the attack took place and that building house three congregation right tree of life New Light Endorse Hadasha and I I know you know that Steffi but I wanna make sure your listeners know that it's really important that people realize that so they've been talking about this for several months now with different parties that might be interested in co locating and collaborating on the site there's just been one initial meeting with the group I know that because we at the federation help convene that first meeting and there are a lot of details to be worked out think the congregation tree of life itself the owner of the building has been very public especially Rabbi Myers and there president that they are committed to re opening on that site in some way what it looks like exactly I think we'll take some time but the idea that Jewish life will be can you on that corner in Squirrel Hill I think is definitely is key to their thinking I just WanNa close by asking You Jeff how are you going to be spending the day I'm sure you're going to be on call and and working throughout the what will you be doing to commemorate next week so the day has been planned there's been a group that's been meeting from about the third week after the shooting they've been meeting every Thursday and that group is convened by actually part of the federal government with representatives of the three impacted congregations it's the Jewish Federation are Jewish community center or Jewish family and community service this is another local nonprofit called the Center for victims and a couple of official representatives of the victims families themselves and they have put together the framework of what will be happening that day my federation team is the one that's actually done the heavy lifting to make it all happen and that's what I'll be participating in starting at eleven am we have volunteer activities we have slots for slightly over eight hundred people as of today we're well over seven hundred are already filled in the ideas that we're going to make the world a better place in the name of those lives we lost very traditional Jewish way to do it at two o'clock the next traditional Jewish way to remember those who have lost will be tower study and I I think we're approaching four hundred people now registered for that with lots of different teachers representing all the different streams of Judaism which is I think the way we function in Pittsburgh working together and then at five o'clock will be a large community gathering to be run about an hour or so and most of that again centered around those we lost everything that's happening that day is victim centered and trauma informed because it's the local incident in Pittsburgh whereas the rest of the country that are doing things for them it's not their neighborhood per se and so that's how I'll be spent in my day is going to each of these things and being with our community well jeff our thoughts will be with you as you do that thank you so much for joining us on people at the todd thanks EFI

Pittsburgh Gatien One Year Forty-Seven Percent Thirty Centimeters Forty Eight Hours Twenty Four Hours Twenty Fifth Four Weeks
UN confronts anti-Semitism as a human rights problem with historic report

People of the Pod

13:01 min | 1 year ago

UN confronts anti-Semitism as a human rights problem with historic report

"Shaheed is the United Nations special rapid tour on freedom of religion in or belief last month he released a historic report to the UN General Assembly the first UN report of its kind to be wholly dedicated to Anti Semitism Doctor Shaheed is a consummate diplomat of former foreign minister of the Maldives and a lifelong human rights crusader he joins us now in studio to discuss his momentous report often thanks so much for taking the time to sit down with us before presenting a AJC's Jacob Blaustein Institute for Human Rights Later Today SA- pleasure to be here thank you let me now this is the first ever UN human rights report dedicated solely to Anti Semitism if I understand correctly you were appointed Special Rapporteur on free religion or belief and then you got to pick your topic so why did you pick antisemitism well you know when I began my work on this mandate three years ago I observed how disengaged engaged the UN was with the topic of Antisemitism we hadn't actually served energy at all and sometime I was observing oh how violent way attacks on the Jewish it's disproportionately high in terms of numbers and in the time I noticed this scene of huge optic in antisemitic incidents head crimes really is long overdue report just before we go any further we should probably help people understand a little what about what's in the report so can you share with us two or three of the of the top level findings of of your of your work well the first thing of course for me to dance right that that my mandate on freedom of belief should address this subject and I make a case for that than I look at the of my work because important to know how the report now look at the different forms in which antisemitism manifest itself in the past and today because it's evolving and changing phenomenon and then I looked chart trends what in terms of the incidents and the violent incidents as well that I look at the online dimension which is quite significant forum as as so to speak in terms of how manifested that look at St responses there's good practice that also bad practices then finally of course I make recommendations ends of the report is focused on the important to define antisemitism as a way to understand what the phenomenon is there for the the definition by the Hell costumers alliance is given a full coverage in the report along with concerns I'm have risen about it but I offer clear guidelines on how and burn it might be used to document and to raise awareness it Anti Semitism my other recommendations of course include are calling upon states to ensure they have proper laws in place to to address antisemitism to support victims if such a crimes and to use education as a very important tool to address this phenomenon and of course for the UN to play in a high they will and boy justice issue at at a global level you mentioned the International Holocaust remembrance alliances working definition of antisemitism this is a first from the UN ED recommend by your report for all states to adopt that definition what are the merits of that particular definition which AJC is proud to have helped author well what is important is that we should know what we're talking about what this definition does is give us titans on winter sport enter Semitism is not comprehensive because some aspects that the tunnel covered bite but nice talking point and also gives examples of when it might be anti Semitic so what I'm saying is the purpose of this definition was to monitor and to some indicate crimes and incidents and then it's a very good tool to raise awareness about when this happens but it's also going to be used as a non nego what I'm saying is if you use as a non legal educational rule to monitor document and respond krantz is a very useful tool and therefore states must ensure they use this for this in this in this fashion to make sure that they're prepared to understand and a splinter antisemitic hate crimes right as as an American organization J. C. where concerned at times when the report is used for kind of enforcement action ends because hate speeches is problematic but it's also problematic from the American perspective to cut down on on someone's freedom of expression so the working definition can sometimes CBS toe the line on some of those issues is that what you meant about the non legal educational perspective indeed I think which understand that expression is vital even to deal with antisemitism so whenever someone tries to censor speech one it's very careful that the lines are drawn not standards and that's time that is inciting violence discrimination and hostage against the else where that line is not crossed then of course we should use other means you must have caused denounced antisemitism and all that forms of recall I call on government leaders to respond to US such incidents by denouncing them but they want to criminalize speech than they should have very high threshold which follows international standards are on ensuring that they're on the criminal his speech that is inciting violence and discrimination against indio communities Jewish leaders have spoken to my mind convincingly about the what a in which Israel is kind of scene today as the Jew among the nation's right that a lot of the kind of mutating shifting anti Semitic perspectives that were anti Semitic Canard's tropes et cetera that were projected onto Jews in the nineteenth and first half of the twentieth century is are now projected onto Israel so Israel has become kind of a prime target for underlying anti Semitism cloaked in this kind of thin veil of political discourse that's something that the working definition helps to tackle I suspect I know your answer to this question but I'll ask that molest can criticism of Israel Anti Semitism well I think one has care for the new the definition by the customer so that alliance there said that example list which includes demonizing Israel can be antisemitic but tomato context assessment because context husband and they're very clear criticizing Israel like you would any other democratic state does not concern Semitism so there is enough scope in the definition to ensure that that both the use of Israel critism two separate entity trump's is defined as well as ensuring that these limits to criticize his actions as a government actor Ofman your report documents rising anti Semitic violence and hate speech around the world and identifies it as a threat to Jews but not only a threat to Jews is quote unquote toxic to democratic societies we talk a lot here at AJC about what we see as the three primary sources of antisemitism the far right the her laughed and certain radical segments of the Muslim community does that blueprint fit your findings yes I do point out that antisemitism comes in a variety of forms and almost all across the spectrum of politics society to the jets and other groups in society and and I give examples of how these two different perspectives are presented and What I of what I'm offering is a human rights based approach to this subject because such wide phenomenon and I point out that antisemitism is essentially about Jews it it is as a manifestation of dysfunctioning facilities it's about almost everybody else how the becomes in a four big have become intolerant how how how we are big attorney Harvey Racist so it's up it's a global phenomenon it causes everybody and you're right to point talk as a note that the into music sentiment and discordant messages coming from the far left there is a far right into the crimes pop up Edward quite frequently and also radical Muslims to do this and of course beyond this hate crimes are as widespread antisemitic prejudice across all societies and I note that in Muslim societies in some examples the days widespread prejudice amongst call those among students I know textbook switch convey antisemitic content as I do you got some political parties which period as champions of the left often when national altea national bodies like the UN talk about antisemitism they pair it with Islamaphobia Or with other forms of discrimination right you just talked about some hard left folks who define themselves constitutionally as anti-racism yet as we've seen with some of those examples some of those people who think of themselves as anti-racism Crusade others are in fact themselves occasionally perpetuating antisemitism so the result is that these bodies that will talk about antisemitism and Islam phobia or antisemitism and racism they very rarely have the opportunity to speak specifically about Antisemitism and in the meantime I'm as you note hatred of Jews and violent attacks on Jews have kept going up so why is it important to tackle anti Semitism as its own problem and not only as anti Semitism and first of all I think we should look intolerance in all its forms because they really a single phenomenon but antisemitism as you just said you know Z. oldest hatred and is often the canary in the coal mine of Autumn's of hatred has in the past see into that how how does it came communities I think the important thing is to look at something as widespread as antisemitism as something that's enough concerned too many communities of time as a good starting point to address offers hatred but beyond that every hatred requires a specified focus on its specificities we need to look at everything in a broad general framework but each each form of hatred requires a focus on its specificity so antisemitism given given it's it's it's you know Bite spread occurrence is almost endemic everywhere requires an urgent attention also because we have neglected and like I said I'm very concerned deeply concerned about the very violent forms in which these manifested often in societies which have very strongly role of traditions become into a week from the Pittsburgh one ear of week from Pittsburgh attack and six months later we had the poet attack in the phone and then just last week in Holland and Germany and throughout you find very violent forms off attacks on Jewish communities I think we have to focus on this subject and get to the bottom of it and find recipes and I would argue that if we can address antisemitism effectively than behind the tool to other forms of hatred as well You know I think we here at AJC certainly agree with that you know it's it's very important to us to fight all types of hatred and bigotry and at the same time we know that there is a time when it's entirely appropriate to speak about just antisemitism or just anti black racism I Islam phobia without kind of dragging other things into it as you mentioned ofmeat before we close I have to ask one question about the UN because a lot of our listeners American Jews in general are deeply skeptical of the United Nations now I know the UN does a lot consists of a lot there are a lot of different arms and bodies in committees and figures and special tours like yourself that fall under the UN umbrella but this is an organization that Jews are deeply suspicious of why the Jews today beat glad to see this report your report on antisemitism coming from an organization that they are so suspicious of well I'm not saying that we Ford is out I think he's a good starting point my attempt is to start working on this subject to let the UN also start focusing on this I call for a joined-up approach by different Duran bodies on this subject that many working on this UNESCO U. N. scientific educational body has just late last year a policy guide organization in dealing with any in schools the following up with another look this year on pedagogical aspects of pending antisemitism classrooms today you in bodies being on this I think it's important that the global reach of the UN is used to address this issue I think we should find ways to work together to address this issue I was going back to earlier point while I agree with you that we should all focus on specific elements of each type of a hatred what should avoid is what I call victim competition off that happening as well and I'm not saying it's happening here but we can all work together to address all forms of intolerance and if we are doing well on one we would necessarily between invasion others as well I certainly agree with you there I think our philosophy at AJC has long been that you know specifically in America but really around the world as well our patchwork of communities and societies can work to uplift one another rather than focusing on on who's been holding each other down op and thank you so much for taking the time to ns for your diligent work on this report for all the great work that I know is yet to come thank you it's been a pleasure to be on Avocado thank you

United Nations Un General Assembly Doctor Shaheed UN Three Years Six Months
Two dead in German synagogue attack on Yom Kippur

People of the Pod

11:20 min | 1 year ago

Two dead in German synagogue attack on Yom Kippur

"Remco lean who's acting director of AJC Berlin joins us now from Berlin to discuss the anti Semitic attack on Yom Kippur afternoon against the synagogue in Hallo- Germany. REMCO thank you so much for joining us of course thank you renew now tell us what happened this week in Hallo- saw yesterday at around noon we got the first thoughts that was his shooting in which is a rather small city in the eastern part of Germany and immediately I messages we received so you know they were talking about there was a shooting at the synagogue on near the synagogue it wasn't like really clear from the beginning but you know if you hours in you know that AH story developed became pure and Kira that this terrorist tried to attack synagogue in other and it wasn't able doing that so he couldn't enter synagogue and because he wasn't like really sophisticated but sadly enough he was able to kill two random people in Holler and so that's like the short version of what happened yesterday it's interesting because when he didn't succeed to get into the synagogue thank God he shot someone if I understand correctly you shot someone on the street and then he drove to a Kebab restaurant which is kind of almost a a symbol of immigration and shot someone there you know it kind of speaks to the ways in which Jews and immigrants and Muslims uh-huh are kind of all targeted in certain situations by the same people of course yes but I guess I I really need to stress that I mean he obviously streamed his terror attack in the Internet and of course he's a racist and of course he hates Muslims but that's what I've learned from people who have seen the video and the livestream you put on the Internet and he immediately starts all this video denying the Holocaust and saying that behind all ills in society the Jews so you know it's main target and his main goal was to kill Jews from that's synogogue and you know after he failed of course he just passed by a Kebab shop and so again I haven't seen the video just you know I can only tell from you know whatever it in the news because I really don't need to see this bet she more or less really okay then you know I'd take the shop and so people there but again like you've gotta logical driven by hatred for Jews and Jews were his main targets and so I guess we really need to stress yeah we saw something similar last year in the shooting in Pittsburgh at the synagogue in Pittsburgh here in the US where the shooter was apparently driven of course by his hatred of Jews but specifically it was the fact that the synagogue had hosted like a a welcoming refugees event and he saw that as you know this kind of very classic Anti Semitic idea of the Jew as puppet master wielding all of the elements of society that you know he has a part of the so-called master race thinks of as savory so his way of pushing back against immigration was he basically felt that he was going to the source which to him was the Jews of course I mean the plays a problem you know guy who was an anti Semite very likely to be a racist and is very likely to hate Muslims so that all goes hand in hand but again like you was mainly driven by his tantric for his anti Semitism and so we ah we we just have to keep in mind and I mean again like you know these people that are always racist at the same time and I mean he he already in this video again I haven't seen it but just altruism some transcripts he also said like that you know feminism is the driving force behind declining birth rates investments ladies and you know that opened the gate you know for the refugees and you know by the Jews or letting all this migrant so of course you know there's always part of the apology of like people like him what did you think Remco of the response across Germany yesterday what happened both governmental and civil society Eddie and is it the right response so in terms of governmental responses security was a short up around Germany and this is still the case and all states as far as I know and we'll keep it this way for the foreseeable future and in terms of civil society Heidi I mean we had a few gatherings I mean we had to here in Berlin with a few hundred at these there were other gatherings and other cities and I attended the gathering here in Berlin and thankfully the chancellor showed up and express solidarity with the Jewish community but still I mean you know Berlin in the city ah like three and a half million people and you know three hundred people showing up that much I also have to stress that we had a case on Friday today I mean you know this week was very busy they could guy tried to enter to negotiate in Berlin with a knife and and AL sheltered slurs Israel so nobody wants their you know to so they're sort of a you know in this case so it's very sad that obviously people have to die people you know come out and shoulder so verity with the Jewish community I'm glad that you bring that up Remco because in just the past seven days there have been they've actually been to anti Semitic attacks or really attempted attacks in Germany of course the shooting and hollow which made international headlines but also this attempt to bring into a synagogue in central Berlin on Chabad by someone who if I understand correctly it was a Syrian refugee screaming Allah who are men the F. Israel he wasn't quite so polite as I was you know it really highlights for people the fact that anti Semitism is not something that only comes from the far right and it's not something that only comes from radicalized Muslims but it comes from both of those sources also comes from the far left do you think that in Germany there's an awareness in an appreciation for all the different sources of Anti Semitism today unfortunately not because as already right they said you know we have anti-semitism on the right that we have seen today although we are their Muslim anti-semitism which it's Friday here in Berlin we have the coming anti-semitism just thinking what PDF's and all this anti Zionism but we have also an anti Semitism mainstream society so it's coming I'm from all corners and you know people are very good at you know always like picking v. anti-semites their own ideology meeting like you know the Nafta's always pointing to the right the Conservatives always pointing to the left and I don't have the feeling that there's a deep understanding of how fundamental problem is that it's been political dishes are outlooks and this is a problem that we have like an all corners of society and not just in just one on one of my friends put out on twitter that a friend of his WHO's a rabbi in Hamburg Germany that he had requested police protection for Yom Kippur Synagogue and was re accused the police actually told him that they didn't understand why the synagogue would need protection do you think that this is a turning point is this going to be a seminal lament in Germany's understanding of the resurgence of antisemitism. Do we think that in the future police will recognize that Jews need to be protected I can only also but nowhere in talking about security you can say that we are talking about the bigger cities in Germany prank for Berlin Munich The the security is already good thought you know when you go to Jewish communities and spawners cities I mean as we've seen yesterday and you know there was not even police officer in front of this and I walk on poor and this is something that is just simply unacceptable and I've been in today and I would can you to be tomorrow and contact with authorities and officials and stressed that you know this right knowledge like the most important thing that you know security not the most important right on that every community every community every Jewish institution has to have proper protection in Germany and not only right in our you know the next three weeks but permanently because what happened yesterday can happen again and that you know a Jewish community doesn't have depiction is unacceptable and it's acceptable that's security and you know the life of Jews in Germany depend on you know how thicker doors because you know people didn't die yesterday in the synagogue you know thankfully didn't happen because the doors to the terrorist wasn't able to enter the synagogue and gave up for and again like right now the most important thing is that security is tightened in every community and for every Jewish institution in Germany so that's one thing you know what are we specific clearly looking for Germany to do and really we can broaden this to to all of Europe what needs to happen now to ensure that Ju- stay safe for all we have to recognize the problem very very cuny and we have to understand the problem we have to understand the problem is in you know we find this problem in every corner of society the leftist the right Muslim in the mainstream we have to address it properly we have to make sure that this is after we've tested and analyze that there action taken and that you know civil society supported in their efforts to counter anti-semitism and you know there are a lot of great civil society league groups that we as AJC in Berlin work with and doing an awesome job and what they're doing and you know they have to have the proper funding because this is nuts something that the state can just do so we need the support here and the civil society and yeah so that would be like the two immediate steps and certainly I mean just talking about Germany I mean we've talked about the case on Friday where this guy was tried to end I mean he was released Kathy even twenty four hours after that he tried to enter this and our goal with a knife and this is also not acceptable and there's also something you know the the politicians have to look into to see you know where we can tighten the law and that these people are at a guy like the guy on Friday you know it's not released it almost immediately and because they said there were no grounds on holding him which is you know he obviously tried to murder juice so that's not a reason to hold somebody in custody you know what is well Remco we're glad to have you on the job we know that there is much more work to be done thank you so much for updating us on this tragic an important development

Remco Ajc Berlin Hallo- Germany Berlin Acting Director Twenty Four Hours Three Weeks Seven Days
Georgia Department of Education Awards Literacy Grants to 38 School Districts

Glenn Beck

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

Georgia Department of Education Awards Literacy Grants to 38 School Districts

"Sent Georgia officials say they've won a major crash aimed at improving literacy in public schools governor Brian camp announced the nearly one hundred eighty million dollar award from the US department of education on Thursday the AJC reports they comprehensive literacy state development grand builds on prior federal grant money center Georgia the state got more than sixty one million dollars in two thousand sixteen which was distributed to nearly forty school districts the paper says after getting the money some local district sought literacy scores rise after they bought more reading focus textbooks and curriculum materials for younger

Brian Camp AJC Georgia United States One Hundred Eighty Million Dol Sixty One Million Dollars
Big drone on campus: UPS gets U.S. government okay for drone airline

This Morning with Gordon Deal

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

Big drone on campus: UPS gets U.S. government okay for drone airline

"We're one step closer to potentially seeing big brown deliveries ballet flying drones Matt Maclear has more Atlanta based you PS is the first company to win government approval for a so called drone airline the FAA approved air carrier and operator certification for the U. P. S. flight forward program the company wants to drone delivery service earlier this year on some hospital campuses and with this new approval UPS says it plans to expand it to other hospitals across the country Georgia is also reportedly in the running for flight forwards headquarters and control center but according to the AJC it'll have to compete with other states and it will likely be years

Matt Maclear Atlanta FAA Georgia AJC
"ajc" Discussed on People of the Pod

People of the Pod

09:49 min | 1 year ago

"ajc" Discussed on People of the Pod

"Dr Kirk Graham is the director of the Harry. S Truman Presidential Library in Independence Missouri next year will be seventy five years since Truman succeeded. FDR's president and an anticipation of that anniversary sorry the Truman Library has undertaken a major renovation. Kurt join me in studio last week for a wide ranging and fascinating conversation on the importance of history. Sorry the founding of the State of Israel and Truman's legacy today Kurt. Thank you so much joining us great to be here. I WANNA start with kind of a Meta question from that thirty thousand in foot view before even dive into Truman. Why is it important to study history well. I mean if you think about where we've been that gives us. A good sense of is it provides context for where we are so I think the main reason to study history is to get context for your own time but also to expand your your experience we all lead fairly limited lives and I think you go back in the past and meet characters in the past for the same reason you take a plate of cookies and go meet your neighbors because that that expands your horizons expand your experience. It introduces you to people who don't think an act and talk and look like you do and I think that's always very beneficial. There's an interesting kind of debate. The in the community of historians think about or maybe a debate in the general public about whether history repeats itself your typical historian would say no but you can still learn something thing from history about maybe not learn about the future but as long as we know the lessons of history it can inform the way we address the future. Where where do you fall out. I think yeah I mean I think that people who who are fearful that somehow we're not learning the lessons of history. We're doomed to repeat some catastrophic decision. The fact of the matter is the context. The circumstances are always different so you you can't go back and say well see we learned this from World War. Two or we learned I mean honestly one of the reasons that Vietnam went the way it did is because we were applying the lessons of World War Two and it was a very different kind of engagement and so I I is obviously very worthwhile to study history to know ourselves better and to have a broader experience because it just makes us better the decision makers in general but the idea that we can go back and figure out what you know what Abraham Lincoln do in this situation well you know I mean you know people. Ask that all the time. What would the founders under. Do you know around this. You know global warming or something well. That was the furthest thing from their mind. They wouldn't have even known where to start with that question so we need to be bold enough to make our own decisions and not try to pass it off on other people who you know grab a quote and taken out of context and say we'll see here's what Emerson would have done or here's what Jefferson would have done well yeah. Maybe I'm picturing someone explaining leaning twitter to Abraham Yeah. I'm not sure how that would and trying to explain it. Not only one hundred forty characters Kurt your. AJC AJC story starts in two thousand eighteen at the AJC global forum in Jerusalem when you spoke on our main stage and you said quote you believe there's no better place in the United United States to tell the story of the founding of Israel than the Truman Library for our listeners who don't know that part of history. Can you tell us about Truman's role in the rebirth of modern Israel well. It is just to pick up on that on that statement. I appreciate you starting there. Because there is no other place there is no other museum. There is no other think tank. There is no other sort of university department or unit that is pursuing this important question and the thing that is important to me is that Harry Truman literally changed the map of the world. The fact that this farmer from Missouri became president it says a lot about a lot of things but it does have an impact on the world far beyond just farmers in Missouri so certainly his decision and desire hire to recognize Israel immediately upon its declaration and to have been concerned about that problem to have been concerned about the Holocaust about the DP camp. Some of this had been playing him for years. This was not oh he got three memos and you know sort of weighed this in in an afternoon decided what to do this decision which was momentous. Mantis was years in the making and and it speaks to the heart not just a crisis in the world and what needed to be done it speaks to WHO Harry Truman was he always was concerned about people who are being abused or or taking advantage of some ways I mean his civil rights. Legacy speaks to that he was ahead of his time in terms of an I don't know maybe that's not even the right phrase ahead of his time. He was concerned about others. It was a very basic principle whole there's a humanity to that. There's there's a reality that that Truman just always went back to kind of moral core when he made those kinds of decisions. I'm glad you mentioned that and Holocaust there. If I recall correctly Truman spoke at a rally in either New York or Chicago in Chicago. It was called. I'd like Rally for our Doom Jewish brothers in Europe something like that right to demand rescue the doom Jews I believe was the phrase and this was where where was this was in nineteen forty three when he was still in the US Senate yeah so he was a little known political figure at that time I mean he was getting known and being known for the Truman Committee which he went around the country in a crisis that we have on display at the museum the traveled No no first class jet travel in those days so he went from place to place and he was investigating fraud and abuse in government contracts around military installations and that kind of thing so so that was kind of what he was known for him he was getting known a a sort of a a guy that really knew how to find waste and fraud and the budget and whatnot but the idea that he was this voice for the underdog that he was this great humanitarian this champion the rights of other people even though those of us who look back on his career well of course I mean this was this was this was this was growing all along but the fact of the matter is that speech in Chicago was was a turning point for the rest of the world to hear from him with with that kind of clarity and this is a young senator with ambition establishing a foreign policy credential or this is just someone who feels called to speak out against injustice in the world. Oh I think it's I think but I think it's more the latter. I mean I really don't. I don't know that Truman at that time. I think that you know not only was he not necessarily trying to carve out his exact thing. You know we're we're used to the United States Senate Senate today being a place where as soon as people get there they start thinking about how they get on the ticket and what they do to position themselves for that next bump Truman was a senator senator. He was very hesitant to become vice president he wanted to stay in the Senate. you spoke a little bit about what the founding of if Israel would have meant to Truman and certainly what it meant for the world. Can you just back up a little bit and tell us the story you know my understanding is that kind of all of his advisors here in the states. All of his official advisors were saying you pump the brakes right so what happens in. May Nineteen forty eight well you know it is an interesting moment and it is not a moment that would be the easy to predict. I mean if you didn't know how the story turned out and somebody said okay. Here's all the data points leading up to this decision. How do you think it's going to go. I don't think you can clearly guess us what is going to happen because I think the decision was rooted. Not In policy not in the particulars was rooted in character and it was rooted in this deeper kind of humanity yeah the story was was that Truman with these DP camps and we had the Harrison report. He had all these things telling him look things are not good in Europe. These people are displaced in many cases. Don't have homes to go back to so this idea of a of a partition plan of the following through on the Balfour Declaration. which was you know? World War One product which basically basically promised the Jews a homeland and Truman just felt that that's something that should be honored but you're right. I mean he had to go against his own State Department. Many of his I mean including General Marshall who was very close friend mentor advisor someone he respected probably more than anybody else at the time he also had a to grapple with an ally the British who were were not wanting to take people from Europe allow them to land in in and with a called Palestine because they didn't you know the problems at that would create from their perspective but Truman valued and follow that partition plan that idea of sort of what we would call today a two-state solution didn't go that way obviously but but nevertheless it was something that he felt was important so when when the country was going to be declared this this new nation was going to be sort of birthed if you will he was right there within literally within hours of that declaration the United States recognized the new state of Israel. There's this famous story of high invites men who would go on to be the first president of Israel was in D. C. and the Jews in mandatory Palestine the Jewish community designers community unity in America kind of thought that the best chance for US recognition I think would be vitamins sat down with Truman and there's a fellow named Eddie Jacobson who kind of facilitates dates this right right the so Jacobsen is a as a World War Two buddy of Truman's they ran the commissary together and then after the war they went into business together in in Kansas City and that's the you've heard the failed haberdashery clothing store that went out the because the economy was bad they couldn't make a go of it but he Jacobsen Simpson Jacobson of course with Jewish and they were very close friends which when you go back into that time thinking about a southern Baptist an Jew being close enough friends to to actually go into business together you know I it speaks a lot about about Truman. I think even even then but they went into business and you know when that business failed. Truman's mom was the KKK supporter or something they were there. These overcoming some family history overcoming civil rights legacy the same..

Harry Truman Truman Presidential Library Israel Truman Truman Committee United States president Kurt Europe Missouri Senate Abraham Lincoln FDR Dr Kirk Graham AJC World War One senator State Department
"ajc" Discussed on People of the Pod

People of the Pod

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"ajc" Discussed on People of the Pod

"Past yet doesn't mean it's not there even claims that Israel will extend sovereignty over West Bank Jewish Settlements Irma Tom. That's fundamentally makes a two-state solution impossible If that happens again the political divide will be seriously aggravated and any attempt to suggest. It's not all all that compelling. Frankly I think is pure politics. That's the first thing I would say secondly I would say. Is that this this sort of thing I I know you've been working with with the leaders for tomorrow program that young people I mean they're a little bit younger than than your cohort but young people in general born say after nine hundred sixty seven they've known the reality -ality occupation what I think oftentimes I feel they forget about is what might be called the true miracle of Israel. I only miracle in a supernatural sense. I do mean the return of the Jews. The sovereignty in statehood after two thousand years of statelessness is one of the greatest success stories of Jewish history certainly as the success story of modern Jewish history that needs to be celebrated in other words are narratives should not be about I can't go to the Kotel or my Jewishness not recognize those problems but the larger narrative. Tiv- is that of the miracle of creating a Jewish state the third thing I would say is really to go back internally and talk about ourselves and that is one critical reason jason for the chasm is the reality of simulation in American Jewish life. The more distant you are from Jewish matters will just going to be from Israel so in that respect blaming Israel for the chasm is a one-sided indictment. The real charge needs to be two sided that Israel's done some things that American Jews have enormous problems with again. I wouldn't apologize for that. I wouldn't try to suggest that's not real what I would also say though is that American Jews have drifted away because the power of relation has taken a significant toll on Jewish identification here in the United States well Steve. There are few people who have the kind of expertise that you do about American Judaism and Israel to aspirations so thank you so much much for joining us today to share a bit of that expertise rated. Thanks.

Israel West Bank Jewish Settlements Irma Tom Tiv United States jason two thousand years
"ajc" Discussed on People of the Pod

People of the Pod

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"ajc" Discussed on People of the Pod

"Put out a candidate responses contest various questions related to foreign policy and one of those questions was do you support a two-state solution to the Israeli Palestinian conflict and while they you manifestly those were asked by cf are said that they do in fact supporters Tuesday pollution they go into a lot of Buea interesting detail about you know what is the relationship between the Israelis and the Palestinians what is the US role. Are we allowed to be a broker are we currently is perceived as an honest broker. there are a lot of really touchy details. that can't be parts out by a bird dogging kind of question asked while somebody's trying to take a Selfie and I think that it it behooves the Jewish community read wired whatever side of the spectrum you're on to not allow this issue to be AH minimized to the point of a conversation around a selfie right we need to have bigger longer more intense conversation about these issues news and and I don't think if not now is allowing for those conversations to happen or enabling the Jewish community to have the by doing this sort of bird dog tactic check one thing that many people have noted over the first couple rounds of debates is that there really hasn't been much of a focus on on foreign policy in the vein vein of those council on Foreign Relations questions that you said what are the questions that we would like to hear posed and the foreign policy questions that we would like to hear posed in the next debate in in September This is a great question. I think that this will happen. I don't WanNa make it sound like I'm pinning this on on certainly not the candidates but not even the media because the debate the largely are a response to what the nation wants to hear but even more specifically we're the debates are located and what that particular constituency wants to hear right so we started in. Miami and it was a Telemundo broadcast as well well of course there was gonNA be a lot of conversation about immigration migration etc in this most recent round within Michigan's of course. We're talking talking about healthcare manufacturing the workforce issues around race so I think that we will get there. I don't think it's even someone say assigned signed that the foreign policy issues aren't first and foremost of importance or on the minds of these candidates eventually at their although we people say that it's it's interesting that multiple candidates these sort of used the phrase our house is on fire dig on on the current administration but also sort of saying there's so many pressing issues within our borders on the domestic front that you know these these have to kind of come first but in terms of the questions that AJC ask I think we have to first and foremost start with questions about the US's role in the world world period question about you know what is principled American global leadership mean what's the US role when it comes to the when when the European Union NATO international treaties an obligation the protection and promotion of Human Rights sort sort of that big picture question of what is America's role before we can even get down into into the other issues right because we're GonNa talk about what what America's role with regards Israel or what's America's role with regards to combating antisemitism where worldwide or even the most clear example what can be America's role in negotiations with Iran post withdrawal from the joint comprehensive ends a plan of action it has to start with where is America now. Are we reading. Are we taking a backseat. What should our leadership will look like. What's the role of Dr Allies which of all the multilateral institution well. Julie will certainly be watching this as the months tick by we get closer and closer to actual votes being cast and caucuses being held in the Democratic primary. Thank you so much for walking us through the state of play today. It's my pleasure Asia.

America US Dr Allies Buea Telemundo Miami Julie Michigan European Union NATO Iran Israel
"ajc" Discussed on People of the Pod

People of the Pod

14:27 min | 1 year ago

"ajc" Discussed on People of the Pod

"The weeds headlines and what they all mean for Israel and the Jewish people. I'm your host Seffi Cogan in addition to being a longtime friend of AJC see Andy's Amanita is the Chicago based Executive Director of the Hellenic American Leadership Council and thank you so much for joining us. Hey great to be here. I think the first first thing that many American Jews think about when they hear about Greeks and Jews probably a pie or some other Jewish fraternity or worse. Maybe maybe the Hanukkah story or something like that but actually they're strong ties between the Hellenic American community and the American Jewish community ties that you've been instrumental in strengthening. What's the background there. Well you know prior to me too. I mean I I'm very proud of our partnership with AJC and what we've done but we do stand on the the shoulders of giants and you know sometimes. It's it's easy to forget where we came from. It wasn't too long ago was certainly in my lifetime to Greece and Israel were not that close and in nineteen eighties. He didn't enjoy full diplomatic relations and so you know you're Chicago. Oh crowd will love this. Maybe the rest of you but the whole Greek Jewish relationship been even at the state level has ties in Chicago 'cause. AJC's then president president maynard listener and the lay leader who we affectionately called the Patriarch of the Greek Community Andrew Athens endeavored decided together they were going to get Israel in Greece to upgrade to full diplomatic relations now tying it to today the then prime minister who is the father of the recently elected Prime Minister so Curios Mitsotakis his father Constantine Mitsotakis was elected prime minister and and AJC with their partners into Greek American community undertook to get this full diplomatic upgrade done any any got done so I I would say that's kind of the origin story so just this week actually we saw some of the fruits of that burgeoning relationship the inaugural east Mediterranean Energy the summit kicked off in Greece senior leaders from Greece and Cyprus from Israel the US from other countries met to discuss significant energy cooperation Grecian why are these kinds of US backed partnerships in the region significant well because the East Med. I tell the people that swear civilizations. We know it started you know another. Greek Jewish tie Winston Churchill's famous quote that no two cities counted for humanity the way Jerusalem and Athens and and the US you know for Americans. Let's remember we have a navy today. A Marine Corps right because of piracy in the Mediterranean Right Retina the Marine Corps theme from the halls of Montezuma to the Shorjah Tripoli and they met in Tripoli Libya naturally the landlocked city in Greece. We face some of the greatest threats right. you know the Arab uprisings at turn into who in Islam like winter Syria Hamas and Hezbollah presence and Islamic state at presences on the Mediterranean Libya s still a mess Turkey has become a revanchist a state. The one piece of good news in the last ten years is the spirit of cooperation that really started with Israel Greece and Cyprus and now has expanded and I it wasn't inaugural this week actually inaugural wasn't February in Cairo the East Smith Gas Forum but it's something that AJC and how have been working on from the establishment of the Congressional Hellenic Israel Alliance Caucus where we said we got to help help create a regional infrastructure that just like the European Union started because of an energy source and still trying that that natural gas and renewables by the way can play a similar role and when you sit there and see Egypt and Greece and and Cyprus and Israel and Jordan and Italy and the Palestinians all sitting down working on joint communiques now you have the French ambassador under saying we want to be part of this. I we're GONNA frontlines a history here. It's really an amazing thing to think about you know the sky's the limit with a project like that right yeah the Mediterranean right by definition right the word in Greek means the middle C. or middle of the earth right. It's been a great connector her and at a time where people argue that nationalism or tribalism is the most important or the most powerful force in the world they have people connected to have the EU connected with the Levant to have Eastern Orthodoxy in Western Orthodoxy tied directly in working cooperatively with with Judaism and Islam and to be connected especially because of law the C. issues these are borders right and you look at the Mediterranean in you know that it's Israel's only friendly border truly friendly border is its it's border. It's it's exclusive economic zone with touching exclusive economic zone of Cyprus and this is not a theoretical issue you know people may may forget this but when Moore she came to power for sing he said he was going to do is cut off our energy. to Israel and immediately Israel Greece recent Cyprus came to a deal to lay the world's longest emerged power cable that you early Asia interconnector which which took another step forward again the last couple of weeks and this is one that one will make sure Israel's never cut off from electricity because it's going to connect Israel directly right to Europe's `electricity grin but it's also a two way if Israel produces excess electricity it can help power Europe which then makes yes Europe more energy independent from countries like Russia right so what's going on here is going to change geopolitics a moment ago you mentioned the Congressional Hellenic Israel Alliance or or Chia which your organization and mine helped to get off the ground Chia am and specifically. I think Congressman Ted had Deutch who longtime listeners of AJC passport will remember as an engaging guest she is urging the passage of legislation in Congress to provide formal US support for the burgeoning alliance between or among rather Israel Cyprus and Greece I'll just add that if people are interested in earning more or or supporting that they can head to AJC DOT Org Slash Eastern Med to write to their representatives and ask them to sign on while people are are navigating over to that link Andy. I I understand why the relationship is important for Israel and I understand why it's important for Greece and Cyprus and by extension. I understand why it's important for me and why it's important for you andy but why is it important important for America because the U S you know what we've learned and especially with the forever wars the US can't be everywhere and the US does not avenue endless supply of blood and treasure and at the same time the US can't withdraw from the world we see every place a US withdraws from becomes. It's more dangerous so the US needs reliable allies reliable strategic partners unfortunately in this region Indus region for a long time there was an and the region being eastern Mediterranean there was kind of a dual pillar that the US could rely on Israel and the US could rely on Turkey Turkey has proven to be not reliable and in fact doesn't even work with the other pillar Israel while anymore so if we are going to have an arc of stability in what has become a sea of instability basing a new US or a re conceived US strategy on the three democracies in the region and this is only a value this is one of those rare moments where your values and your interests can work quite well. Greece host the southern most NATO base Sabet right which is a hard asset that is incredibly important and it happens to be the only military base equidistant from the eastern front against the Islamic state and a western front ends directly across from the Sinai Desert. We know Cyprus a host three percent of Cyprus as a result of the decolonization. I has remained sovereign British bases so they are very important military installations installations and Cyprus the French and the Germans conduct operations against the Islamic state or against Assad from Cyprus and you look at it. It's like a permanent from an aircraft carrier in the middle of the sea so besides value reasons they're hard reasons intelligence sharing maritime Cyprus and Greece two of the most prominent merchant marines not only in the region book into world are part of anti piracy and anti proliferation initiatives which which allow us to make sure weapons to terrorists weapons of mass destruction are not they're not being transported by CS and finally they're very important because if we're gonNA do stuff from whether it's designating Hezbollah's terrorist group enforcing sanctions ends against rogue states and terrorist states. We need people who are. GonNa lead to charge in Brussels in Greece and Cyprus have been doing that a few weeks ago you you travel to Greece with AJC CEO David Harris while they're David met with the newly elected Prime Minister Qiriako Smith's Otoka's who you mentioned before I say newly elected but I'm I'm not sure that quite does it justice within the first twenty four hours after Prime Minister Talk is assumed office that he and David Matt back in twenty eighteen gene when you were with us in Jerusalem the JC Global Forum Prime Minister Mitsuo Takas who then was the leader of the New Democracy party but not yet prime minister addressed our Global Forum Forum and he promised to strengthen his country's already robust ties with Israel fast forward now to just this weekend the Greek foreign minister WHO's only been in office. I guess for about about Gen three weeks was in Israel and he met with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu Foreign Minister Israel Katz President Reuven Rivlin Do you expect prime instruments with us to keep this promise to you. See someone who's who's really going to strengthen these ties with Israel serious way absolutely first of all they're strong in historical ties even from the meat so donkeys family like I said it was his father upgraded to full diplomatic relations. Prime Minister Show me today keys people forget he was in the previous the New Democracy government he was a minister with then prime minister some Ross another very strong friend of Israel's and of the Jaycees and the upgrade that we're seeing right now that we're enjoying is rooted in that government went to so he has the policy background. He has a personal tie and right before he came to global forum actually just days before war he was the first meeting from Athens to Jerusalem delegation that AGC access and how leadership twenty thirty km so there's there's a constant line of communication several of his ministers Foreign Minister Dan Diaz served as Defense Minister in some Saas government minister of Health Galea's. is a longtime friend of AJC has spoken at joint hockey event spoke ended ended the Chia Conference. there are a host of officials in this government who have been pro. Israel pro American Jewish but at the very top of it the prime minister. I think we're looking as someone who's hit the ground running on day. One very impressive start committee said I don't need a break. He's told his parliament and his party forget about August. Recess gave a detailed plan every ministry a six month plan he said I don't WanNa breakout Hawaii one hundred days. I want results immediately which is very critical because we are looking at a time in the region that it's even more unstable you know the s four hundred purchased by Turkey Turkey deciding. We're not gonNA let Israel in Greece and Cyprus Egypt. Go along and set the rules on on energy so I think having him ready to go. He means it. I I expect very good things especially because does being pro Israel right now and pro. US is a matter of bipartisan consensus this series government which series are means actually literally the Party of the radical left anything but in terms of that geopolitical orientation are very good friends of Israel very good friends of the EU very good friends of the US I think we have a moment in time which is unique in Greece at you have the two major parties and everybody everybody else is kind of a minor but if you look at the breakdown of the parliament when you look at the top three parties the control well over eighty percent of the seats and they are all on this consensus in terms of geopolitics may be on a specific issue changes but we are not going to go back anytime soon the days in Greece that you thought one parties in their pro-western another parties in they may be you know anti Zionists or anti NATO or that's not we. We are in a very good spot. Uh where we can use these years to launch an even better relationship and in the last election we actually saw golden dawn the Neo Nazi party voted out how Harlem Element out completely out completely out not only out of the parliament but they also have no longer having their political base having other essential problems they were..

Israel Greece AJC US prime minister Cyprus Israel Cyprus Congressional Hellenic Israel Congressional Hellenic Israel Chicago Israel Katz President Reuven R Prime Minister Benjamin Netany Mediterranean Prime Minister Qiriako Smith Andy European Union Turkey Turkey
"ajc" Discussed on People of the Pod

People of the Pod

11:36 min | 1 year ago

"ajc" Discussed on People of the Pod

"We'll chat with experts from around the world to help you better understand the weeds headlines and what they all mean for Israel and the Jewish people. I'm your host Sethi Cogan last month. An off-duty Israeli police officer shot right and killed Solomon Teke an Ethiopian Israeli teenager. The exact circumstances are still unclear but Solomon's death has roiled the Ethiopian Israeli community and Israeli society as a whole. We're joined today by Pnina Agan Yahoo. Panini came to Israel at a young age from Ethiopia and today works as a leading agent of social change in Israel as the interfaces and synergy director in the strategic strategic planning unit of the Jewish Agency for Israel. You know thank you so much for joining us. You're welcome what do we know about the events that led to the death S. Sullivan Teke so it's a big confusing at the moment you have this demoniac from both sides the telling different stories some people from the Cuban community will say that the police officer there was there is trying to hide some. It's just the money though some that that can actually put him down to gel and out of hand. There was something that I personally even heard that they after which you can hear them anymore. They're not exist and there is a really I don't know how to express it but there is no sh in an affiliate instead of the community that they're not making the right. justic police not really looking in all the criteria on all the testimony all the voices and they basically Siklie easier for them to take the policeman side but if we want to look you know at the sucked at the moment the fact is that the policeman was in that area of playground where there was four or five teams that was playing together sitting outside and he was there not a with uniform not on duty with his wife and kids and he stayed that he sold them yelling in one kid or even be Makita and he came to help this boy and he asked him what you're doing and his group of teams told him not to intimate to this agreement. It's not as business that didn't know his policemen and the policeman said police many took out his tag and then the fact that start being different from different sides so their side said that day thought and throw a stone to because they're concerned about their life and and that he pulled the gun a dramatically and shut out and he will say that there were throwing many stones on him and he was in risk of his life and he was protecting them seven. That's why he was shooting The gun now. No one really knows exactly what happened until today and I think part of it is also because not everyone is telling the full picture of it the full story and this is another layer to what the community is expressed in regard into police profiling the discrimination by the police in Israel and and what form has that community expression taken have there been protests they were purchased then of course and I feel this process was much different from the previous wanted to know if you follow one in two thousand fifteen and the one a couple of months ago six months ago there was another case of teen was shot by a policeman man this time at the protest was much more intense and organized by the youth by the younger generation not even my generation and we did generation you know the board anythere but we came here in early age and the community the entire purchase through the what's up group. It's what's accepted. Stuck the texts applications rather everyone use it not through the media and the way they did it. It's was with known leadership on the field that you didn't have any leaders to negotiate with him in the protest to talk to him. If you're police or the you know the the press or the media it's it was all around the youth and through the what's up group by themselves and they didn't communicate what they want what fighting for the only message that they were trying to pass. Is that the society here to meet the wake up there is a police profiling and something has to be done in to this policy of how the police look at as black teams in Israel and for me by the way someone that's been in many parts of the fast it was very different because the voice here it was a different voice of of a different generation in our community but also because it's get to the point that they are very very depressed and they lost their trust lost their trusting any institution and they don't feel they can trust anyone. Even there friends that are not and I said that's the terrible thing about it. I mean it's terrible. Of course it's terrible and it's the heart and Painful Dad Assembly lost her son but I think it's also terrible and painful that there is a huge group of the generation I was born in Israel and they see them Israelis I now they see themselves if European I and they feel they you know are out of a outside of the entire society here and I'm motivated to do other things they feel. They no one care about them. There's almost like a reverse versus immolation going on where at the very beginning when the Ethiopian Elliott Israel I took place it. Was You know these are Jews. There should be welcomed. It's great that Ethiopians ends are here and now there's kind of a sorting almost like either Ethiopians are moving themselves or the rest of Israeli society moving theo. Pin's kind of outside of the mainstream. Is that what you're saying I'm saying that's the Phil that's notion now. Among the young generation I can tell daddy through my generation me and my peers and my friends we communicate a lot also through the what's up group. We all feel that you know in some cases we need to negotiate but growing communicate that with the with the answer narration tell them that you know it does astill our land we came here to stay here to be part of the society to be part of this country and we can just give up now and deaf guy you know because because of the year we need to fight back and see how we can fight ignorance in Israel or or racism and can action and our side of now way to other institution the to Shin or policymakers to take action for us but instead of is I feel there's a lot of anger and a lot of pain which is okay and and to have among the utes and that's why it's also become so violent protests. They've been there six hours outside. I was there in the first two hours and the participant tel-aviv it was very quiet very relaxed a protest this book beautifully the people for you know the a young generation spoke beautifully about what the care what's butter. Dan What's Magnum anger what's offended them and then I feel the anger was you know must must stronger than what other feelings madore out there and you had teens than you. It's all over the country protesting and and and stopping there the roads in Israel and did something didn't happen. I think the last time something like this happened was in the seventy s you know with the Moroccan community eighteen is well the same feeling with Ashkenazi Jews in Israel. I think our listeners are somewhat familiar with the basics of Ethiopia you know two large large waves mostly in the nineteen eighties nineteen ninety s today there around one hundred forty thousand Ethiopian Jews in Israel so what does that experience look like more broadly as they're Aaron. Economic gap is their social gap. You know what broadly speaking as the inexperience in Israel in my opinion during the successive side of the community unity and there's also the challenge there's still many challenges and they'll say that the challenges today as I see them is oh point five challenges that I say one of them is the skin color which is out there and I think we not there enough to speak about it to talk about it or even educated about it. I feel like today today. Dan Generation here doesn't do much embracing and skin color is part of their identity and which is okay and no one took about it too much but it's out out there and it's still a barrier because many times in Israel as the minority you may find yourself as the person that is standing ending Fourtou and documenting even though you haven't done anything regarding to that so even a kid born in Israel and is actually supposed to be an Israeli. We know what that will give an example with the young Jews in America if a young Jew in walking compass and there is movement there someone that boy guys Israel or Jewish people and he doesn't WanNa be field with that. It can take off the keep are you can take Ju- star and no one can't relate him to this community right we don't have this his privilege skin color if you know it child Bernese ballet and he wanted himself Israeli and only Israel and this is his choice of identity and he will do everything through the you know the DNA of the typical Israeli still people are gonNA look at him. I began and it's a challenge and it's something that we don't talk about at all in education system or Mongo Steph into society the second challenge in my opinion that related this it's that many sometimes institution Israel unfortunately and even individuals will cr self will see us and consider acids or limb new immigrant and again again for kids born is well that born to educate parents like me that already integrated to the society and live here to be considered Orla automatically even though you you not newborn pro up here. It's it's not only offended but it's put you in a in a very low side of the group. You're related to so especially in school system for example. If the principal the school have a special program for a new immigrant and you're gonNA pull out a kid and kid only because he looked at the appeal not because he's a new immigrant something wrong happening here. the third challenge is that our Judaism is still questionable in some sectors of the society some sectors in the society will never marry their kids with our kids because they do not think still that we Jewish or Jewish enough which is something that also relevant to other you know no and part the Jewish war if it's conservative very from and into Russian community in Israel the still forces something that we struggle a lot with because because it's a story or something that we can with us from the moment we arrived to Israel that was part of the conversation when they brought us that was part of the conversation when proper a Steph declare that we lost drew and we part of the Jewish people and still you will believe as a person that went through that for the last thirty five years..

Israel Solomon Teke officer Ethiopia Sethi Cogan Yahoo Jewish Agency S. Sullivan Teke Dan What Makita Dan Generation Mongo Steph America Panini Ju principal director Orla utes Aaron
Tex McIver murder trial costs 'way outside the norm'

Mark Arum

00:32 sec | 2 years ago

Tex McIver murder trial costs 'way outside the norm'

"The way down to University Avenue northbound delays the speed limit rises little tapping the brakes around the Grady curb we'll check trouble and, Coweta county next on ESPN The final price tag is in for the text macgyver murder trial proof so expensive, it was a major factor in a budget overrun so severe the DA's office has suspended hiring. Of some attorneys, and staff a million dollar overrun the AJC reports are typical murder conviction cost. The DA's office five thousand dollars to convict McIvor of murdering his wife it costs. Five, hundred and seventy eight.

Aretha Franklin Detroit Murder DA Coweta County WSB AJC Cobb County Espn Mcivor Mike Duggan Harris Ross Chris Pennsylvania Thousand Two Hundred Fifty Fiv Five Thousand Dollars Million Dollar
"ajc" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

103.5 KISS FM

02:52 min | 2 years ago

"ajc" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

"To the music and backed up for it in angie on one of the revived kiss fm opinion kennedy site jacqueline pistons though at dawn his friends i always gone is gone on the again the guide are losing a game on day so we don't we make it so we got so i told him that the musical reward the way but he was me in the kitchen another lebanese is leave them resume the genesee genesee ajc get the best some me the battle nina flagdraped that aspirations made the same sad eyes nandasena sakes for us did you campaign made this dry and law and the old i saying valley fabius me again then measures reach got a girlie god thorny eisner but the security leader one down that i never did a chance to make him on the keep elina of a little thin where i live dingell it added zulu limits all know unbelievable so gil both guy had things to do what i always think about a lebanese levels eminence zuhdi jasser caesars eat healthy beaded the bending the battle nina thrives ray already made the same they say 'yes made the same sakes paris but you can't blame me bush ryan i know i am the alliance saying capital valley thanks mainly logan them i three the then hm friday come on in terms of faith the gray john brennan did you campaign made this dry in law the lion saying after valley thanks me again then line three yeah hmm casey in beyond say soldier field august tempt chest right now announced by us it.

jacqueline pistons eisner elina dingell paris john brennan casey kennedy genesee genesee ajc