38 Burst results for "AIRBNB"

Fresh update on "airbnb" discussed on Bloomberg Intelligence

Bloomberg Intelligence

00:59 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "airbnb" discussed on Bloomberg Intelligence

"Super wants to be down is on retail Alfie Commerce 80 Plus service might actually end up benefiting Netflix in the research and data on 2000 companies and 130 industry. Return is the key story for the U. S banks. Telcos naturally are moving into content distribution. I think it's a good move Bloomberg Intelligence with Alex Steel and Paul Sweeney on Bloomberg Radio. Over the next hour. We will dig inside the big business stories impacting Wall Street and the global markets each and every week we provide in depth research and data on some of the 2000 companies and 130 industries are analyst cover worldwide. Today. We're going to take a look at vaccine distribution hurdles there a lot of them plus the heavy truck outlook for 2021, But we want to begin with Airbnb. His I P o to help us walk through its leverage potential versus its peers and what kind of pop we might see. We want to welcome Bloomberg intelligence, senior industry analyst Man Deep saying. Mandy Love talking to you. Why would Airbnb go public in the middle of a coronavirus role? So I think one of the things they're trying to prove is their business model is stress test it now with, you know, travel, getting decimated by corner virus and Pretty much you know, people having to reconsider their travel plans for the near comedian Trump. The company is still able to, you know, manage this business environment and really, you know, do it much better than peers like Expedia. So our sense is look, the metrics don't look that great right now. The top line potential doesn't look that great and the near to medium trump, but this is still a very large market. People are not going to stop traveling and you know it will come back and hear being devoted direct traffic. Really has a long runway. It's a category leader in alternative accommodation. Yes, they will get hit by. You know the ship from urban to suburbs, but at the same time, they are the largest player and it comes through those limited accommodations and that Shows up in all the metrics we came across in this one so many deep. We know that the travel business whether it's the airlines were the hotel's again have been just decimated Airlines, you know still well, well below kind of 2019 levels. Give us a sense of how Airbnb is. Business has been Impacted by the pandemic. Yeah, so one of the things that stood out to us is here Being these third quarter bookings is down 18%. And when you compare that to let's say the large hotel chain Marriott higher Chilton for them, the bookings are down almost 60 to 70%. Now, how did the Airbnb do that? It's because They have a lot of inventory for domestic travel. So we think they're being these business model is much more diversified than you know the larger T A's or the large hotel chain simply because People will look for, you know, safe travel options there. They contracted social distancing at the same time. You know, it's close by to where they live. And Airbnb has done particularly veil on that front tried to cover it. They were getting about 50% off their booking internationally. Now they're getting just 20%. But still, they have bean able to, you know, show pretty decent booking on Dat is a functional channel people. Choosing to travel domestically so If that's the case, then this Airbnb not get is much of a recovery. Pop like the hotels would once we get a vaccine. So in terms off the metrics, yes. The, uh, you know, the base is a lot lower for the large hotel change. Once there's a vaccine, and you will see higher growth rates. But in terms of the long term potential is the NBA has exporter to both urban rentals. International vacation domestic travel. So I think the steel that they have been able to gather over the last 10 years. It's a functional how well they have created this new segment within travel alternative accommodations. As well as they've been able to, you know, get more exposure to wear. The traditional hotels used to have all their booking. So our view is it will participate in the recovery. Although the growth rates may not be as pronounced as you're gonna see for the hotels, you know, which will be around 80 to 90% next year. Once there is a vaccine so many taught us about the hosts. The people that opened up their doors to travelers has as that declined, and I'm not sure I'd want Strangers coming in and out of my house during a pandemic. Yeah. So I mean, there is a deceleration and you know the kind of pace at which they are new host as well as you know, the rate at which they and these guests who use their being the other platform, but you look at some of their cohort numbers. So here be indeed close retention rates. Improved over time to the extent that you know, they have almost 100% retention in year three and poor if the host stays with them. Same thing with, you know, guess the retention rate improves over time. Now that Ping That is not seen with the other duties like Expedia and booking which rely ah lot on paid searches. You know, they spend about 4 to $5 billion on Google every year just to get traffic and there isn't a lot of repeat traffic for the larger teachings in case off their baby. That's different things. Get a lot of repeat traffic and they have very high retention among hosts because they cater to this younger demographic 18 to 35 years old and you know those customers. And hosts among them All right, Mandy, thanks a lot man Deep, saying Limburg intelligence senior industry analyst coming up on the program promising news on the covert 19 Vaccine Development front. What up getting it out. You're listening to Bloomberg Intelligence on Bloomberg Radio, providing in depth research and data on 2000 companies in 130 Industries..

Airbnb Bloomberg Intelligence Analyst Bloomberg Radio Expedia Mandy Love Man Deep Netflix Alfie Commerce Alex Steel NBA Google Paul Sweeney
React Native at Airbnb with Gabriel Peal

Software Engineering Daily

03:17 min | 4 d ago

React Native at Airbnb with Gabriel Peal

"So do you have any advice for people regarding react native so who should use react native. Who should not use react native. Or i don't mean to make you prescriptive. Maybe you just want to talk about specific strategic decisions but can you help people vet this technology. Yes so this is the golden question. Should i use reacting overnight. And i refuse to give specific. You should use your acne over. You shouldn't but this is what i would say. First of all doing reactnative does not preclude you from ever having to do native android or iowa's so there will unless you hire people who explicitly how to do that. Just be aware that if you do native you will need to jump into andrew s fairly frequently depending on what you're doing and the second one is that when reactnative works it is amazing like i saw we had a couple of teams that had really good experiences with reactive and the productivity and the speed with which they are able to move was like simply off the charts like between hot module reloading which actually works. Reliably you right line of code and shows up on android and ios in like one or two seconds. I think that's really incredible. But would you wind up with. Is these what. I call land mines so everything is going swimmingly. Well and then you hit a little landmine. So i'll give you an example of one We had one instance where sometimes on certain phones even in particular. The pixel was particularly notable for this randomly. We didn't feel like we had made any significant changes. We one out of ten times or so already. Screens would render white. They would never render. And we didn't know what everything seemed. Fine it was initialising. It was hitting the java script but it just simply wouldn't show up on the screen and we're pulling our hair out trying to reproduce reliably figure out what is going on and after i would say a solid week of multiple engineers going heads down trying to figure out what was going on. We discovered that we had removed the initialisation of fresco so frisco is react natives image lending library load images from a network airbnb we glide which is basically. It's a similar library but instead of using theirs we've always used glide and so we just wrapped the image tag in reactnative with our own image view but the reactive library has fresco out of the box and so we we had that included. All we did was removed. Initialisation of that and randomly caused uncertain funds some screens to never under native to this day. We have no idea what the connection was but it spent multiple engineers officer had to spend like an entire week trying to figure out how to make this work again. he's it was released blocker in screens. Were simply not rendering. So this is this is really really bad other issues like the keyboard thing that i mentioned. I think you're like oh. It's just a simple form and you made you. You write the components of the four men like an hour and then you spend two weeks trying to make it. Scroll above the keyboard so things like that are really really difficult for us because it makes it really hard to forecast how long things take or you. End up giving up Even though it's technically possible to make do you want. The amount of effort is to to figure out how to solve. Landmine is not worth the investment.

Andrew S Iowa Frisco
Fresh update on "airbnb" discussed on Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

00:26 sec | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "airbnb" discussed on Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

"A little under the 0.5% gain was forecast by economists. Looking for PM eyes from China later that are likely to come in and 51.5 and would be better than the 51.4 the month before, and Taiwan raised its forecast for growth this year. As a very, very strong demand for technology products helped fuel the economy. Also a positive note Airbnb and door dash are planning to release higher than expected valuation ranges. Whether I pose but then on the other side, Jack Moss and group looks unlikely, according to people we know and who are familiar with this that they may not even get the AIPO done next year, Dolly in one of 403 Any cake is up 2/10 of 1% and looking at the Cosby and sold down about 2/10 of 1%. That's check of markets news with it back.

Jack Moss Cosby Taiwan Dolly China Airbnb
Building Products with Keith Pitt of Buildkite

Developer Tea

06:14 min | 6 d ago

Building Products with Keith Pitt of Buildkite

"If you were to evaluate the landscape and let's say you. Let's say bill didn't exist today and you were to look at the available tooling out there and maybe find that there are some other self hosted kinds of things and would that have deterred you you know. Just kind of trying to rewind back if you had found something kind of filled that that need for you would you have gone and built something yourself or was that really the the critical kind of crux of the matter. That didn't exist yet and you wanted to. I think if i'd found what i was looking for the time i probably built it I just felt compelled for this thing to exist because my problem. The problem wasn't solved. If someone had sold to. Or any for me. I would have been great. I would have been very very happy and over the moon 'cause i'm way more about the problem being solved in solving the problem myself And so yeah. I think that if if the tool head existent of her would have used it already. But it didn't so i just felt like the need to build it so that's the story it it it was this. This need that you had and you were able to recognize that you're able to see clearly can of what you wanted to do. You saw the other competing or not even competing but can of the pieces of the puzzle. The different pieces of the puzzle One did one thing you liked another did another thing you liked but they didn't you know none of them did everything that you needed them to do. It wasn't necessarily. I'm going to put words in your mouth wasn't necessarily because it was a novel idea was because it was a mix of multiple ideas that had already been executed on just not together. Would that would that. Is that true. Yes that's right. I wasn't i took the best of both worlds sir Felicitous that may not know much about cic d- There are two different sort of flavors of cic d. The flesh flava is the self hosted option. And that's you run the tests yourself on sevens that you control and then you run the plane yourself as well And that's going to be done in in if you have a distributed team where the needs to access the tool from harm A lot of these tools aren't really that great of being run on open internet so a lot of sort of kept within. Vpn's or hidden inside offices that's the self hosted option. The other option is the hoisted cic de tolls Your circles you travis's and and those tools you handle that. Will you occurred to them and they manage the orchestration plane and the running tests yourself. The problem with that is twofold but the host options are two major problems. The first problem is you have to you. Have to handle a all of your employees if you want to do continuous deployment which i'm a big fan of Yet the beautifully keys to potty which for some organizations is inaugur the second problem is those tools ernie go so fast if you go to their pricing page. We'll see the slider that earning goes so far out of the rut and you can integrate lost without there. Being a big sign that says contact us to go foster And i didn't want any of those. I didn't accept the cons of the hosted option. It didn't accept the cons of the self hosted option. And so i was thinking to myself. Surely there is some middle ground And so i sort of set out to kind of cherry. Pick the best of both worlds sort of crepe credit mashup of what i thought would be the perfect tool and that's kind of how do was born and i wanted. I wanted to zero in on this idea. Because i think it's important to recognize especially for engineers who are kind of thinking. Oh i have this idea. And it doesn't exist but people can do it themselves if they go and you know mix x and y these two existing things out there A lot of these ideas that tend to be A kind of remixes of multiple other ideas together or you know taking one thing. The best of both worlds like you said. The new product is multiplicative in value. rather than additive. Right in other words somebody could probably go and run. You know two different things to get this same values but when you put them together. It changes the landscape. It's not the same thing is just running those two things back to back. It's changing Kind of the fundamental shape of that product in so it's important to recognize that because critic most critically i think a lot of people who are thinking about starting a business or they're you know they're they're thinking. Hey you know. I'm i'm might do the side thing. I might build a product on the side. I think a lot of them are thinking. Oh i have to come up with a truly new completely novel idea. or outs. Nobody's going to want it right. There can't be at shadow of this idea on the market. Otherwise you know it's it's already saturated every ideas already taken. And i have to come up with something totally new for to be successful and it couldn't be further from the truth. Yeah that's exactly right. There's no such really. there's no such thing as a new idea I think south park said it really. Well they have this episode of the simpsons already did it and there's a recurring joke where they have these themes or plots within the episode. But simpson's already done that particular plot. It's the same product as well. If you look at the big ones rubio burs taxis But they sort of took it and did a mash up and made it better airbnb. Her tells But they've taken it mashed up and made something new. See i city. I didn't invent the i. C d i didn't invent it at all. I just took the best of a bunch of really good ideas and put them together to create something new a new product. And i think that's kind of what a lotta the tools these days. I just improvements of existing ideas.

Travis Foster South Park Simpson Rubio
Fresh update on "airbnb" discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC Programming

Talk 1260 KTRC Programming

00:52 min | 10 hrs ago

Fresh update on "airbnb" discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC Programming

"Clear. And welcome back to all things. Real estate. This is Tom Simon. Owner of West Gate Properties. I have Steve Riemann, owner of Santa Fe title. And Lynn crop, Nick of the principal partner of cryptic and speeds had toe Had another engagement. She had to sign off. But we're happy to have her whenever we can get her, and I'd like to introduce you to Vince Marciano, the owner of a TV insurance. In business since I don't know what 2000 and nine at least 20 years of risk management experience. Events and we're very grateful to have your expertise this afternoon on all things real estate. Welcome to show. Thank you. Thank you very much for having me, Tom. I understand. You know each other or you've Broken. It's hard to not know each other. Santa Fe is a small town and we're all in different aspects of the same business Real estate Condominium association's H a ways Vince, What have you got to share with us afternoon? What's that? It isn't that fun that we live in a network And in a town where we were all friends, we all work together. You kind of have to And so you learn to learn to get along with everybody and have some fun and and in doing it, and Vince's Vince, I hardly ever see you, but I do know your fun guy and you like to do Good business in in a good way with a good sense of humor at the same time, so I'm glad you were able to join us today. Thank you for having me. And when he's not here, he's fly fishing or I don't know where you are. Hunter vents. Yes, but primarily fishing. So we have Ah, okay. Whole family full of fishermen. Remember that. Remember meeting your son and Giving him some fly tying equipment. I hope he's still using it and making great flies. Absolutely. It's It's extremely credible, consummating time. Yeah. You know those flies convicts pensive. So Vince were during the break. We were talking about some of the challenges of Getting insurance for Condominium Association's Steve Freeman handles the title insurance. But you handle the condominium master policies and policies for H away liability directors and officers, so I'm sure with our listeners some of the challenges that you've experienced along those lines. Sure so. One of the biggest challenges we experience are on these Unique condominiums, which may not be complete. We have a high percentage of rentals, and they're certain Tonto differentiate between long term and short term being Airbnb NPR Vo On with those types of associations. What we find is that the direct writing insurance carriers like travelers Philadelphia Liberty They don't ensure those properties because the risks are much higher. What their forces us to do. Is go to an excess and surplus lines option. What's provides coverage? Hasn't provided, as is broadly as with direct writers, and it's often far more expensive. So it's a It's a large burden for the association, Tonto oor and pass along. Through all of the unit hunkers. So it's always one of those where we have Tonto. Identify Current construction details, occupancy details on the front end And then manage it from year to year because as management of the association improves and the number of rentals decreases We can find ways to save the association money by bringing them back into the direct writing insurance market. That's the part you general liability side. Are you saying that vacation Reynolds get counted? Against him Association because it's considered a rental. Absolutely posted second only so Yep. So, so most of the direct writing carriers, which are your best coverages and chief, it's premiums. Typically have a percentage limit at 25%. Of all units that are rented. And of that. Each of them have a different definition on what is considered a rental. Some say it must be at least a six months. Lease. Some say might must be 12 month, please. But when you start getting into these one day to day rental options. Within the Airbnb in V R. B o space. Based here clear they don't want to have anything to do with it or If they been in the account for long enough. They'll assume. Additional risk because they know that it's been well managed. There haven't been losses to one and so forth, but what we're seeing is it It's really difficult to find insurance for those associations with rentals greater than 25%. Always been more tuned in to what the mortgage companies. Concern themselves, which which is a rental pull of more than 50%. And they don't count the vacation rentals as Rentals. They count them a second homes. So it's interesting to me to find that the insurance a zoo, another Central road blocked obtaining Um, well to obtaining insurance master insurance policy for those associations. And the reason for your son. And the reason for it is they made the determination in risk management and risk tolerance. That those rental units that are short term lesson six months whether the day to day or week to week Are the equivalent of a hotel. So there isn't as much pride in ownership. Care to take care of the property when occupying the space. So the risk of something happening, whether it be fire accident increases significantly, so it changes it from the residential condominium risk. Two more of a hybrid risk that includes The hotel element, and there really isn't an insurance product right now that correctly balances those to risk. Specially when the units of rentals.

Vince Marciano Santa Fe Tom Simon Airbnb Condominium Association West Gate Properties Steve Riemann Lynn Crop Steve Freeman Principal Reynolds Nick Partner Philadelphia
Uber, Lyft and the sharing economy

Future Tense

09:45 min | Last week

Uber, Lyft and the sharing economy

"What used to be referred to as the sharing economy. Let's quickly remind ourselves what sharing actually means if i give you a ride in my car and don't expect anything in return that's sharing if however aguirre rod in my car and you have to pay for the privilege. Well that's cold commerce and that's why when we talk about uber and deliver ruined task. Grab it and even airbnb. These days we now refer to them as gig economy companies. Juliet shore has been researching. Why the sharing ideal ended up as a form of anti regulation capitalism. Her new book is called after the gig. How the sharing economy got hijacked and how to win it back. So the sharing economy launched in the midst of the so-called great recession of two thousand eight nine and it emerged with a series of could've wonderful promises about all the good things it was going to bring an call that the idealist discourse so it promised it was going to give people a whole new way to work without a boss if people independence and flexibility autonomy that it was going to provide income for struggling middle class people and that it was inclusive because it was so easy to join these platforms and it would reduce discrimination and help low income people. It also promised that it was going to create social ties connections. These were what we call appeared appear person to person exchanges. Somebody in their car. Someone who needs a ride someone with a room. Someone who needs a place to stay and that those exchanges would yield truly personal intimate relationships and then finally it claimed that it was going to reduce carbon footprints. Because airbnb would make it. So we didn't have to build hotels and ridesharing would make it so people didn't have to own their own cars anymore so it was a pretty hefty set of claims and sort of idealistic hopes which we heard from ordinary users. And of course from the platforms themselves as well as the many consultants who were touting the benefits of this new way to run an economy. What does it suggest that flexibility is really the only regional virtue of the sharing economy that still touted by the big gig companies today when whenever they come under attack for their methods and actions. Well flexibility is still at least in principle a key part of gig work in the sense that people can choose to go on the app and go off at any time. They can work as many as few hours as they want in practice. What we do find though. Is that for people who are trying to make a full time. Living on these apps they lose almost all the flexibility they lose a great deal of it. Because there's not enough work too many people chasing too little work so they have to pretty much stay on the apps. Whenever there's any work to be had we know that very quickly. The sharing economy co opted by silicon valley venture capitalists. But we're those original ideals. Plausible could have worked. I think some of them weren't some of them weren't so the environmental idea really warrant for much of the sharing economy. That's because the two biggest sectors which are lodging and transportation are both really carbon intensive activities travel and you know both long distance travel and local travel and these sharing platforms made these services available much more cheaply which meant that more people were gonna use them. So more people getting into private cars as a result of ride hailing because there was so much less costly than taxis. Many more people travelling as a result of the fact that airbnb offered cheaper accommodation so environmental claims weren't laws above the social. Claims are a little bit more mixed. We do find people on airbnb if they're staying with someone who's present in the home rather than renting out a whole place. They are making social ties there. Few sharing platforms like blah blah car in europe which is long distance ridesharing where connecting with someone is really relevant but as far as the claims for the labor side of things economic claims. I think they were feasible. Wall if you had a decent business model and you didn't let too many people on the platform but second the companies started out with pretty decent compensation for the workers in the early days people were pretty happy with many of these platforms but over time because the companies weren't making money kept cutting what they were giving to the workers and this was most prevalent in ride help and the bakeries and they weren't making money was they priced the service too low so uber and lift subsidizing the rise by about forty percent. It's the only way they could get such a big market so if they were less greedy. I think the answer to your question is yes. There is a way to do this. That actually takes advantage of the technology is still a reasonable deal for consumers. But isn't you know giving them crazy. Low prices and also is sort of feasible from platform point of view. Your book is called after the gig and the subtitle is how the sharing economy got hijacked. Which is what we've been talking about and how to win it back looking at the how to win it back do see the. The basic model appears structure augmented by digital technology. Do you see that as having potential to expand or to create genuine sharing economy models. I do think that there's tremendous potential here. So there other more out of the box kind of innovative ways that we can think about using this technology and changing the social relations of production basically in ways that would really benefit users and workers in particular so i studied what are called platform cooperatives and these are platforms. They use many of the same technology so they use the matching algorithms. They use the ratings and reputational data. They use the payment systems but instead of being owned by wealthy investors owned by the people who are actually doing the work so i studied an artist's platform of photographers platform that sell stock photography over the web and there are about a thousand artists who are members of this cooperative. They're much much happier when they they used to work for that quote unquote of stock photography. Which is a company named getty images and two longtime industry insiders started. This new company called stocks a united and photographers flocked to it. They're much much happier. They get a much bigger fraction of the sales and they can govern themselves so they have control over what the company does so. I think it's a fantastic model. The reason i have a lot of optimism for it is that the technology obviates a lot of what management does it takes care of the quality control. It does the matching. it does the finance. You know you really don't need much management and you can see that by the fact that many of these companies have very few employees and that means that it's just that much easier for workers actually to own those companies because there's really not so much that management is providing. Can you bring those types of platform co to scale or in trying to grow. Do they risk going down. The path of what we know has happened to some of the big companies. It's an interesting question. Because i think the question of scale is somewhat misunderstood in the gig space many of the areas where you've had rapid growth our in services that are person to person services and are primarily local ride hale and delivery errands and tasks and so forth so these are personal services and people who provide them are locals and they're providing them to local so for those you actually don't want them to get two big. There's no reason that they should all you really need is what we can think of as interoperability in the apps. So let's say. I use a ride hailing app in my city and that's most of the time that's what i'm using it for but occasionally go somewhere else. I wanna be able to open that app and get a ride held. They're all that means. is that those. Local co ops. Have to all be part of a network that platforms where scaling to a large. You know market makes more sense are the online platforms and the accommodations platform. So those make more sense to scale up. We have seen some other kinds of structures at least in nonprofits and so forth not necessarily always a co op structure. But you know something similar where we have some of these platforms that are actually operating more globally and the one i studied stocks is global platform. So yeah they can scale. I think the question is how big do you want them to scale. And i think that really varies by the service. Were talking about

Aguirre Rod Juliet Shore Airbnb Europe Getty
After the Gig: How the Sharing Economy Got Hijacked and How to Win It Back

Future Tense

07:22 min | Last week

After the Gig: How the Sharing Economy Got Hijacked and How to Win It Back

"Juliet shore has been researching. Why the sharing ideal ended up as a form of anti regulation capitalism. Her new book is called after the gig. How the sharing economy got hijacked and how to win it back. So the sharing economy launched in the midst of the so-called great recession of two thousand eight nine and it emerged with a series of could've wonderful promises about all the good things it was going to bring an call that the idealist discourse so it promised it was going to give people a whole new way to work without a boss if people independence and flexibility autonomy that it was going to provide income for struggling middle class people and that it was inclusive because it was so easy to join these platforms and it would reduce discrimination and help low income people. It also promised that it was going to create social ties connections. These were what we call appeared appear person to person exchanges. Somebody in their car. Someone who needs a ride someone with a room. Someone who needs a place to stay and that those exchanges would yield truly personal intimate relationships and then finally it claimed that it was going to reduce carbon footprints. Because airbnb would make it. So we didn't have to build hotels and ridesharing would make it so people didn't have to own their own cars anymore so it was a pretty hefty set of claims and sort of idealistic hopes which we heard from ordinary users. And of course from the platforms themselves as well as the many consultants who were touting the benefits of this new way to run an economy. What does it suggest that flexibility is really the only regional virtue of the sharing economy that still touted by the big gig companies today when whenever they come under attack for their methods and actions. Well flexibility is still at least in principle a key part of gig work in the sense that people can choose to go on the app and go off at any time. They can work as many as few hours as they want in practice. What we do find though. Is that for people who are trying to make a full time. Living on these apps they lose almost all the flexibility they lose a great deal of it. Because there's not enough work too many people chasing too little work so they have to pretty much stay on the apps. Whenever there's any work to be had we know that very quickly. The sharing economy co opted by silicon valley venture capitalists. But we're those original ideals. Plausible could have worked. I think some of them weren't some of them weren't so the environmental idea really warrant for much of the sharing economy. That's because the two biggest sectors which are lodging and transportation are both really carbon intensive activities travel and you know both long distance travel and local travel and these sharing platforms made these services available much more cheaply which meant that more people were gonna use them. So more people getting into private cars as a result of ride hailing because there was so much less costly than taxis. Many more people travelling as a result of the fact that airbnb offered cheaper accommodation so environmental claims weren't laws above the social. Claims are a little bit more mixed. We do find people on airbnb if they're staying with someone who's present in the home rather than renting out a whole place. They are making social ties there. Few sharing platforms like blah blah car in europe which is long distance ridesharing where connecting with someone is really relevant but as far as the claims for the labor side of things economic claims. I think they were feasible. Wall if you had a decent business model and you didn't let too many people on the platform but second the companies started out with pretty decent compensation for the workers in the early days people were pretty happy with many of these platforms but over time because the companies weren't making money kept cutting what they were giving to the workers and this was most prevalent in ride help and the bakeries and they weren't making money was they priced the service too low so uber and lift subsidizing the rise by about forty percent. It's the only way they could get such a big market so if they were less greedy. I think the answer to your question is yes. There is a way to do this. That actually takes advantage of the technology is still a reasonable deal for consumers. But isn't you know giving them crazy. Low prices and also is sort of feasible from platform point of view. Your book is called after the gig and the subtitle is how the sharing economy got hijacked. Which is what we've been talking about and how to win it back looking at the how to win it back do see the. The basic model appears structure augmented by digital technology. Do you see that as having potential to expand or to create genuine sharing economy models. I do think that there's tremendous potential here. So there other more out of the box kind of innovative ways that we can think about using this technology and changing the social relations of production basically in ways that would really benefit users and workers in particular so i studied what are called platform cooperatives and these are platforms. They use many of the same technology so they use the matching algorithms. They use the ratings and reputational data. They use the payment systems but instead of being owned by wealthy investors owned by the people who are actually doing the work so i studied an artist's platform of photographers platform that sell stock photography over the web and there are about a thousand artists who are members of this cooperative. They're much much happier when they they used to work for that quote unquote of stock photography. Which is a company named getty images and two longtime industry insiders started. This new company called stocks a united and photographers flocked to it. They're much much happier. They get a much bigger fraction of the sales and they can govern themselves so they have control over what the company does so. I think it's a fantastic model. The reason i have a lot of optimism for it is that the technology obviates a lot of what management does it takes care of the quality control. It does the matching. it does the finance. You know you really don't need much management and you can see that by the fact that many of these companies have very few employees and that means that it's just that much easier for workers actually to own those companies because there's really not so much that management is providing.

Juliet Shore Airbnb Europe Getty
Global tech giants threaten to leave Pakistan over new rules

Daily Tech News Show

00:30 sec | Last week

Global tech giants threaten to leave Pakistan over new rules

"Prime minister granted the pakistan telecommunication authority. The power to enforce data localization rules and blocked content deemed harmful the asia internet coalition or. Aic has warned that its members may have to stop doing business pakistan if these new rules are enforced as written the includes facebook. Google twitter apple amazon linked in sap airbnb rocketed cloudflare. Line a whole lot.

Pakistan Telecommunication Aut AIC Asia Pakistan Facebook Google Twitter Amazon Apple SAP
House Party (MM #3530)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | Last week

House Party (MM #3530)

"The with kevin mason. Most people have thoughts about airbnb. Bourbeau the rental home industry if you will the alternative to renting hotel room. I guess you'd call him a vacation spot. If you will but national has a unique problem. We have a problem with people renting them whether they're from out of town or here for house parties because nashville is such a popular vacation destination. A lot of the homes are specifically built for parties. They're huge and have party rooms and can sleep eight to ten to twelve people so what happens. Local people rent them out and throw house parties. Sometimes try to make money well of course nationals trying to crack down on spare. Bnb definitely wants to crack down on this because it makes them look bad. We have a few of these party houses. Just down the road from us. And they're far enough away where i don't notice them until i read about them. The next day in the news. Local facebook board where people are talking about the house party that got out of hand the other night sometimes guns sometimes sometimes drug sometimes who knows what airbnb got to get their act together as does virgo but house parties. Real popular here in nashville. You have that problem where you are.

Kevin Mason Bourbeau Nashville Facebook Airbnb Virgo
House Party (MM #3530)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | Last week

House Party (MM #3530)

"The with kevin mason. Most people have thoughts about airbnb. Bourbeau the rental home industry if you will the alternative to renting hotel room. I guess you'd call him a vacation spot. If you will but national has a unique problem. We have a problem with people renting them whether they're from out of town or here for house parties because nashville is such a popular vacation destination. A lot of the homes are specifically built for parties. They're huge and have party rooms and can sleep eight to ten to twelve people so what happens. Local people rent them out and throw house parties. Sometimes try to make money well of course nationals trying to crack down on spare. Bnb definitely wants to crack down on this because it makes them look bad. We have a few of these party houses. Just down the road from us. And they're far enough away where i don't notice them until i read about them. The next day in the news. Local facebook board where people are talking about the house party that got out of hand the other night sometimes guns sometimes sometimes drug sometimes who knows what airbnb got to get their act together as does virgo but house parties. Real popular here in nashville. You have that problem where you are.

Kevin Mason Bourbeau Nashville Facebook Airbnb Virgo
Dow futures extend losses, now down 250 points after weaker-than-expected retail sales

Houston's Morning News

00:56 sec | Last week

Dow futures extend losses, now down 250 points after weaker-than-expected retail sales

"Slimming down this morning as far as futures go after yesterday's record close The down the S and P 500, Wal Mart sales and revenue beating estimates. With U S E commerce sales jumping 79%. The company said it incurred $600 million in covert related expenses as well. And Home Depot plans to invest about Ah $1 billion in permanent compensation enhancements. Sales topped consensus at Home Depot at Airbnb is filed for an I P O also laid out whining losses and plunging revenue and Delta flew around US tariffs on his Airbus deliveries by basing them in places like Amsterdam. That kept them from being considered imports. And right now, the Dow Futures 219 points Lori S and P futures. They're down 24, but as taking many futures up 24 points right now, I'm John Tucker Bloomberg business of News radio's 7 40 ktrh.

Wal Mart Airbnb Home Depot Lori S Delta Amsterdam United States John Tucker Bloomberg
Airbnb plans public share sale despite pandemic

All Things Considered

00:50 sec | Last week

Airbnb plans public share sale despite pandemic

"Airbnb has found for a stock market listing MPR's Shannon Bond reports, the home rental company revealed a financial picture that reflects how the pandemic has up ended the travel industry. Regulatory paperwork made public on Monday. Shows of all the ups and downs Airbnb has weathered the first nine months of this year stood out its losses more than doubled to almost $700 million sales shrank to $2.5 billion. But Airbnb says business is turning around. People are booking stays close to home, and some who can work remotely are renting homes for longer periods. In the three months from July to September, the company turned a profit of $219 million. Airbnb was reportedly valued at $18 billion earlier this year. Well, the company has not said how much it hopes to raise by selling stock. It's public offering is expected to be one of the year's

Airbnb Shannon Bond MPR
Airbnb files to go public

Michael Berry

00:19 sec | Last week

Airbnb files to go public

"The short term rental company revealed it had a nearly 19% drop of net revenue in last quarter from the year before company blamed the decline on the impact of the covert 19 pandemic. The company did say business is rebounding as millions take vacations closer to home. Election Officials in Georgia are finding more

Georgia
Airbnb files to go public, turned a profit last quarter

Axios Today

01:18 min | Last week

Airbnb files to go public, turned a profit last quarter

"Airbnb is likely to make the paperwork for an initial public offering public this afternoon. And that makes it set to be one of the biggest filings of the year. Reuters estimates the company could be worth as much as thirty billion dollars in his host of the exorcist. Recap podcast he's also a business editor at axios. And he's here with the scoop. Good morning. Good morning if you were not paying attention to the market or you don't know anything about ipo's what is to you the most interesting thing about airbnb and what we're going to see this week with it. The most interesting thing about airbnb is that it has survived this. It seems the pandemic better than have the company's trying to disrupt namely the hotel companies. Airbnb problems this year had layoffs this. Ipo is coming much later than the company had hoped. But compared to hotels airbnb seems to be thriving so when we think about sort of this gig economy door dashes also supposed to go public later. This year. I wonder what you think these two. Ipo's will tell us about the role. These types of companies will play in the tech economy of the future. These were both questionable business models as far as silicon valley and particularly wall street were concerned and the fact that they took the punch and seem to have got off the mat and started punching back. I think it's going to be something wall. Street's gonna take a real hard look at in view very positively.

Airbnb Reuters
DoorDash releases filing to go public

Techmeme Ride Home

02:51 min | 2 weeks ago

DoorDash releases filing to go public

"Door dash has filed. Its s with the sec. Which of course is the first step in an ipo. They will be listing their shares on the new york stock exchange under the ticker symbol dash. Das h. and speaking of dash we're expecting there to be a dash of companies rushing to go public before the end of the year. We're expecting roadblocks wish affirm airbnb all to file within weeks but back to door dash. Ns one means we finally get to take a look at the underlying business in a debut in company. Jordache reported that they had one point nine billion dollars in revenue for the first nine months of twenty twenty on which they lost one hundred and forty nine million dollars compare that to revenue of only five hundred eighty seven million dollars a year ago and a loss of five hundred and thirty three million dollars. Coding alex willem in tech crunch door to ashes. A heavily backed company with crush base reporting that the food delivery giant has accessed around two point. Five billion dollars in capital during its life most recently in a four hundred million dollar around this june at the time doordash was valued at a towering sixteen billion dollars post money giving the company big valuation shoes to fill. When at prices it's ipo and begins to trade jordache has grown incredibly rapidly scaling. Its revenues from two hundred ninety one million dollars in two thousand eighteen to eight hundred eighty five million dollars in twenty thousand nine and more recently from five hundred eighty seven million dollars on the first nine months of twenty nine thousand nine to one point nine two billion dollars in the same period of twenty twenty that is two hundred and twenty six percent growth in two thousand twenty thus far these sort of expansion. That explains why door dash was able to attract so much capital at such high prices. How high quality is ashes revenue in the first. Three quarters of two thousand nineteen the company had gross margins of thirty nine point nine percent and in the same period of two thousand twenty the figure rose to fifty three point. One percent a huge improvement for the consumer consumable delivery confab. The result of door dashes epic growth and gross margin. Improvement has been radically improving profitability. The companies operating loss fell from four hundred. Seventy nine million dollars on the first nine months of twenty and nineteen to just one hundred and thirty one million dollars in the same period of twenty twenty door dashes net losses are slightly worse. Five hundred thirty three million and one hundred and forty nine million over the same timeframe respectively but again compared to the company's top line growth and revenue quality improvements are inconsequential. Jordache has around one point. Six billion dollars in cash and equivalents heading into the fourth quarter. Meaning that it has ample cash to fund itself sands an ipo. The company is there for going out because it thinks the time is ripe and quote. Yeah that's a bigger better business than. I certainly expected growing faster than i expected. But then maybe. I shouldn't be surprised because you know covid but also positively improving gross margins. Maybe they think they need to get out the door now before a vaccine actually shows up and maybe stalls their growth a bit

Jordache Das H Alex Willem SEC
Airbnb glitch cancels trips after deactivating user accounts

Geek News Central

00:32 sec | 2 weeks ago

Airbnb glitch cancels trips after deactivating user accounts

"If you've made an airbnb booking recently. Please check it. An airbnb glitch cancelled trips. After deactivating user accounts the problem was caused during a routine maintenance event deactivate some accounts resulting in their bookings also being canceled. Lots of people had problems and they were actually prompted to book somewhere else. So people are pissed. Not everyone we got money back to big issue. So if you've had an airbnb cancelation or he book something on airbnb and make sure you take a look.

Airbnb
DoorDash, Roblox, Wish and Airbnb all expected to go public before year's end

KCBS Radio Morning News

00:43 sec | 2 weeks ago

DoorDash, Roblox, Wish and Airbnb all expected to go public before year's end

"Tech IPO's CNBC reports that Airbnb Door dash retailer wish and kids gamemaker. Roadblocks are all scheduled to go public in December. The Hypo Market has been quiet during the pandemic. Kelly Rodriguez, CEO of San Francisco based Forge a pre I P O marketplace. Says investors were waiting for the results of the election. And now that uncertainty has been lifted. When you think about door death or any other companies that have benefited from the way we are living in this cove, it period whether that's home food delivery delivery in general the gaming sector these have all benefited. Rodriguez believes Airbnb strong business model will propel the company. Past. The pandemic stock market is moving

Kelly Rodriguez Airbnb Cnbc San Francisco Rodriguez
"airbnb" Discussed on Rocketship.fm

Rocketship.fm

03:15 min | 2 weeks ago

"airbnb" Discussed on Rocketship.fm

"I have my then from. There are loads of different virtual experiences. Virtual escape rooms trivia nights. Even brunch with drag queens. And i it. I haven't partaken in any of these quite yet but they look like a lot of fun and it is my wife's birthday coming up and this feels like a totally doable date. Night experience for us. Maybe if we can manage to stay awake after the kids go to sleep stuff to do. Sometimes i gotta admit but anyway these. Ipo talks actually back on. It's rumored that the valuation could be as much as thirty billion. Maybe even more that may not be what valuation would have been pre covid. But it's definitely nothing to take lightly. No look this product journey for airbnb. It's not over although some might have thought that the end was in march But now they find themselves at a bit of a crossroads. Nobody knows what the next few months holds for the world. But brian chaska can tell you that he and the rest of his team aren't about to take anything for granted it. Let's close this episode with this last clip from the the who finance segment and it's going to put it in perspective. Listen when we started airbnb. We started a three bedroom apartment. The name of the company was called air bed-and-breakfasts because it wasn't a bed and breakfast. We were literally leading airbeds. The reason i'm telling you that is because nobody thought it was a good idea to give three guys money that had inflatable mattress company renting if mattress base in so because of that we have learned to be really scrappy and we have to learn to get a lot done without a lot of money and that was in a roots and then something happened we got successful and they were raised billions of dollars in like every company that gets successful racist. Billions of dollars. You know you start new things because you can and it gets easy to seize your day yes than it does to say. No and i think that what the crisis did is that made us like look back and say like we can't do everything we used to but that also that has the benefit of us focusing on what makes truly special airbnb started its rise with the laser focus and it sounds like they know they'll need that same laser focused a persevered through twenty twenty and beyond and my bet is that they harnessed that focus and come out even stronger. Thanks so much for listening to rocketship that f. m. rocketship. fm now has a premium ad. Free feed all you have to do is go to glow dot com forward slash rocket ship and subscribe and help support show in the gives you an ad free experience to actually get an exclusive fees. You can listen to on. I tunes or wherever you listen to your podcasts. Yeah and rocketship. Fm is produced in partnership with product. Line which is a community for software product product collective is also the home of industry. The product conference industry personal workshops and one of the largest slack groups for products people anywhere and were also on the pod. Glummer it so huge. Thanks to pod lama. You can listen. To all the pod garments shows at the pot. Laminant dot com. We'll see you next week rocket ship..

airbnb brian chaska
SAP's Failure to Adapt Just Cost It $38 Billion

Equity

00:14 sec | Last month

SAP's Failure to Adapt Just Cost It $38 Billion

"Software giant sap loss tens of billions of dollars in market cap this morning after its earnings and forecast missed expectations. The company said it renewed lockdown other. COVID nineteen related issues for its gloomy outlook investors dumped shares

Reid Hoffman and Fei-Fei Li on Human-Centered AI

WSJ Tech News Briefing

03:03 min | Last month

Reid Hoffman and Fei-Fei Li on Human-Centered AI

"I'm Llewellyn for the Wall Street Journal and I have a guest co host today are artificial intelligence report jared council hey jared. Thanks for having me. Okay. So last week, Lincoln founder Reid Hoffman and the computer scientists faith Lee or part of a session at our Tech Live Conference, and we sat down with them for a conversation as a special episode of Tech News Briefing we'll get to their conversation but I want to tell you a little more about what you're about to hear dared verse things first who are Reid Hoffman and fairly so reid. Hoffman was one of the CO founders of Lincoln which he sold to Microsoft in two thousand sixteen. And he's now a partner at the venture capital firm gray lock. He's been involved with a number of Tech Company boards, including Microsoft, and AIRBNB. Our other guests doctor Faye Faye Lee is a professor of computer science at Stanford University. She's widely considered one of the leading experts in a I. Computer. Vision. She used to be the chief scientist of machine learning in. Google and the to work together at Stanford's Institute for Human Centered Artificial Intelligence. Dr Lee is one of the CO directors air and Mr, Hoffman is a member of its advisory council. Okay. Got It. So Hofmann and Lee were at tech live to talk about human centered ai you guys will get into what that means in the interview but I wonder if you could just give a little background information as our artificial intelligence reporter, why is it such a hot topic of conversation right now? Yeah. Hey, I is a is a hot topic because it's becoming ingrained in a just so many aspects of our lives from predicting next next word or phrase in an email to recommending products on Amazon or songs on spotify. Those kind of innocuous aspects but also more high stakes decisions like what kinds of sentences. A person may serve or what kinds of jobs opportunities they may have access to so. Has Benefit Society but there's also a lot of a lot of risk know one of the biggest ones has to do with bias. There's been studies out there that that show that facial recognition systems for instance are better at detecting white male faces than they are at detecting women and people of Color, and so you know when you have a technology that is really infiltrating our world, there's going to be a lot of attention paid to it. Especially, some of the the issues that come with it and for read and Faye. Faye, with they're trying to do is really elevate somebody ethical issues and concerns and try to get as many stakeholders as possible whether it's businesses or governments to think hard about an of course developers to think hard about what they're creating in in how they're designing.

Faye Faye Lee Reid Hoffman Institute For Human Centered A Microsoft Wall Street Journal Llewellyn Jared Professor Of Computer Science Benefit Society Stanford University Lincoln Google Stanford Advisory Council Founder Airbnb
Airbnb Sues Party Organizer Over Glendora Summer Mansion Party

The John Phillips Show

00:10 sec | Last month

Airbnb Sues Party Organizer Over Glendora Summer Mansion Party

"Airbnb is suing the organizer of a party in a Glendora mansion this summer that attracted about 700 people, despite concerns by health officials at such events could be spreading grounds for

Airbnb Glendora
Do You Need a Change?

The $100 MBA Show

07:18 min | Last month

Do You Need a Change?

"WanNa preface topic with a little bit of context I'm not talking about that on one day you feel tired or you'll feel like Kinda doing the tasks on your to do list. I'm talking about consistent days maybe even weeks where you start feeling like I don't know why I'm doing this. I'm not happy. This is not the way I wanNA live. I built a business maybe that I don't want or simply just don't enjoy I I want to recognize that these feelings are real. This is not uncommon it's very common and it doesn't make you a bad entrepreneur doesn't make you a week and this is not the time to start blaming yourself for putting yourself in this quote unquote position. First of all, it's an honor it's a privilege for you even have a business. And free to even be in this position where you making this decision. So recognized that I the next thing is that it's very easy to make really big decisions in moments like this in moments of frustration in moments of feeling down feeling low feeling really just you know fed up and tired, it's very dangerous to make big decisions like leaving your company selling your company, closing things down changing things. So the first step I would like you to take if you're in this position is actually do nothing you have to make some time put it in your calendar, see as like mandatory for Your Business and Your Life to take a few days off I recommend taking two to three days off. That is maybe bridged with a weekend. So maybe you'll be in total four or five days and when I, say off I literally mean off like you have to take a digital detox you have to shut off all notifications you have to step away from Your Business, and this is not asking you should be able to step away for your business for a couple of days we also need to step out of your current environment whether you work. From home or out of an office or whatever it is, you need to spend a few days away and this can be something as simple as just getting an AIRBNB in a location. That's maybe in nature or trying to do here is you wanNA start looking inward and not really worrying about the outward now worrying too much about what's going on the news or on off twitter you want to settle things down a little bit. We want to minimize the noise so that our thoughts can manifest so that we can have time. To think clearly. So we have time to really things in perspective when you're in the weeds. When you're in you know on the battlefield, it's really hard to focus on how to get out of the war. You know Y- bombs dropping on, you got bullets flying UNITA retreat a little bit. You need to go away for a little bit away from the violence and all the noise. I know this is a weird analogy but just hang with me here so that you can come up with a strategy you can come up with. A practical way you to resolve the issue I would call this more of a sabbatical than a vacation. This is a chance for you to really work on yourself a little bit This could be maybe an exercise retrea or some sort of meditation or tree. It could be even just you going out again getting an AIRBNB somewhere in nature out in the woods or by the beach and just having you know a fresh food and medicine time just read and have a chance to just like be with yourself without having to have any distractions any noise of the business this is a chance for you. To step away from things. So if there are other obligations, you have I really recommend trying to do by yourself. So you have kids try to like see if you can get you know the parents to to to take a look at them or take care of them for a bit or a family friend or something you know I would recommend would be going You have to be alone you can with your significant other or maybe a friend were you can actually have some discussions and just have some moments of peace and the point here. Is that you don't have any other obligations to do anything other than focus on yourself. This is the first step. You just need some time away because sometimes we just need that we need a little perspective need a timeout. We need some things to kind of pass a little bit and we come back maybe feeling you know it's not that bad This is just a bump in the road. I just need to change a few things in his change a few habits that I'm making I'm maybe doing too much need to hire for this position. I can fix this situation This often is all you need to do because it just you know that time away makes you think of solutions allows you to think, Hey, what I really don't like about the situation what are they don't like about my business right now Why don't we just hire out for that? Why don't I change my involvement in that? I know people that have made the decision instead of selling your business or giving it up just hiring a different. CEO Saying I'm hiring somebody replace myself I still own the business so make the money but I want to be involved that much I'm just going to be the chairman of the board I'll be part of the decision making I'll be owner founder but I don't want to deal the day to day maybe that's an extreme step or maybe something you can't afford right now but. You get the point there. Some things you can change nothing is not solvable. You can always solve especially in established business that's growing. That's maybe generating revenue. These are all positive. You don't WanNa Kinda just throw the baby out with the bathwater but what can happen is after your sabbatical, you come to the conclusion that it's time to move on You may be had your full of this opportunity of this challenge maybe enough ild anymore maybe you changed over the years and you're just not. Feeling it, and that's not necessarily a bad thing. Now, you know now you have a plan of action. Now, you just need to plan how you going to transition how you going to give. Are you going to sell the business to somebody? Or you again to step away and have somebody run it the day to day, and you just be the owner and you work on some other things with your time. These are all great options. But the one thing I do recommend is if you are going to change if you're are gonNA leave and stop doing what you're doing you better have something else you're going to be doing there's nothing to prepare you for the challenge of leaving something and having nothing to do a lot of people talk about this but if you ever sell your visit. Out Your Business Changed Management and you work on something else they'll be a gap. They'll be something that you miss the sense of purpose, a lot of your you know significance in who you are as a person is intertwined with your relationship with the business. So it's always good to make sure grab onto another vine before you let go veal vines. Have some sort of plan even if I'm GONNA, write a book I'm going to start a new blog I'm going to. Be Like I'M GONNA throw my money on my time and my energy. But you should have some sort of starting point. Some sort of thing I'm going to do I'm going to get into this new thing I take some classes I'm gonNA. Learn had to do some woodworking because I'm going to be a star furniture business whatever the you want to land safely onto something.

Airbnb Wanna Twitter Unita CEO Chairman Founder
"airbnb" Discussed on The Information's 411

The Information's 411

07:14 min | 3 months ago

"airbnb" Discussed on The Information's 411

"Posts often don't have to get explicit approval from cities or neighbors. Start listing their homes. AIRBNB generally hasn't been liable for what happens in those homes. But as we know being large Internet platform means inviting a lot of problems. What's twenty billion dollar start up to do about? Corey, you recently dug into the issue of the growing number of parties that people are throwing it short term rentals. How'd you get him on a topic? Well, one of my favorite hobbies especially, these days not really going outside much is reading online forums and facebook groups for airbnb hosts, and usually it's just a lot of posts asking for advice. About which photos to use in their listings. But recently, there were a ton of posts about parties host. We're talking about hiring security guards and swapping tips on how to tell if guests was up to no good. There are these people who are sort of like airbnb online influencers and they make youtube videos about hosting. They were even lamenting about parties. AIRBNB. Is Not in control of this so I'm going to teach you how to take control of Your Business in this video I'm going to. Okay. Is there any way to know if this is a real trend or just people complaining on the? Internet. It was it was definitely a trend even though people do like to complain on the Internet, they love it by called up over Binsar. He runs a software firm called host compliance. His company runs hotlines for local governments which are trying to regulate short term rentals like airbnb he's. Actually, seeing a huge increase in the number of noise complaints and party related complaints hotline you're talking something like two hundred and forty percent over last year. Why is this happening? There's a lot of theories. Most of these are unauthorized parties, which means people who own the homes or manage the homes they don't. Want these parties, but guess throw them anyway. I do think it's worth looking at AIRBNB business model through this lands. A big thing the company has touted over the years that it has quote unquote digitized, trust. It's fascinating because at first airbnb was basically a couch surfing platform was a lot of people staying in the same home as their host and staying spare bedroom or on a PLO mattress. Yeah. That's right. I. Mean. But a major part of being these growth over the last several years five six years has come from hosts renting out full homes where they're not on the property at all, they use digital code to do remote. and. They might even be in another state AIRBNB gets blamed a lot for the increase in housing prices in some cities for this reason. But that has also made some of these homes and easy target for people who want to party and Olympic told me he's noticed club promoters are taking notice what's happening is it putting it out on snapchat or face mobile whatever social media platform that there's a party of this house in it's like seven to fifty dollar admission show up at ten PM and bring vodka right? So the big problem recently. Though is that these parties are turning violent in LAS, Vegas Police captain held a press conference a couple of weeks ago urging people not to gather short-term rentals. Those of you who own these properties are those of you promoting parties at these properties be warned and just the past several months there have been fifteen shootings and three murders at these types of properties in Las Vegas. So what is airbnb about all this most recently, they announced that for the first time, they would pursue legal action against a guest who rented a house in Sacramento where. The shooting and they have banned people who are under twenty five years old from booking on the same day and booking full homes in the areas they live Those are most likely to be the kind of customers is looking to party. But what's striking to me is that this recent string of party is happening despite AIRBNB, pledges last year to control the problem. CEO Brian Cherokee said he was committed to stopping this when he was interviewed last November following a shooting in an AIRBNB Louis night in the bay area about two million people a night stay in Airbnb in most without incident. But. Very often, there are moments in your company's history and there was a moment. In Our past that defined us and this is another one of those moments where tragedy happens and we say enough is enough weed Gal. So just talked about more manual screenings for high risk reservations, AIRBNB was spinning up its own neighborhood hotlines. It would verify more of its listings to make sure the homes are legit, but they clearly haven't gotten their arms around the problem. What else could they do I? Think? Some of the problems will be solved by hosts themselves actually. An AIRBNB needs it to the company talks a lot about the quote unquote community and the company working together and host can deter some of the problems by scrutinizing more of their bookings more closely or restricting how guests can book a but people tell me they think airbnb needs to do more as well. Even if it impedes growth. AIRBNB is different than competitor Virgo in an important way. Virgo doesn't allow any same day bookings from guests that reduces risk parties, and those are the types of things that airbnb could change which hosts are talking to me about one is Louise's roles. She hosts a three bedroom apartment at the tach to her home in Sydney Australia, and she's dealt with a string of bad guests on three occasions it's turned out to. A party and you know absolutely trashed the joint. She said one group guests ripped out the pages of coffee table book to snort cocaine. into a copy vanity fair I would have been annoyed PEPs not quite as much and Louise thinks airbnb isn't doing enough to handle the problem she dealt with a lot of customer service delays and she thinks airbnb should actually collect a security deposit from guests for potential rentals. She said she talks to are fed-up furious and many of them have said that once Laga probably won't be going back to obey there is no protection. Next week, we look at another problem AIRBNB facing companies that try to build a business off of AIRBNB, platform. Brings us to the curious case of Domingo and I was like, are you kidding me like I said I found out accidentally talking to the city manager in Nashville that was hush hush. That's next week on the four one. Thanks for tuning in this episode was produced by Ariella Markovits. Thanks to Paris. Martineau. Chris. Fling over kinser and Louis Strolls for their time and thank you for listening..

AIRBNB Las Vegas Corey Louise Domingo youtube Paris Ariella Markovits Binsar facebook Martineau Olympic Sydney Australia Sacramento Chris CEO Brian Cherokee kinser
"airbnb" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

WSJ Tech News Briefing

07:19 min | 7 months ago

"airbnb" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

"The pan-demic has rectangle on so many parts of the US economy but one sector. That's been hit especially hard has been the sharing economy less than a decade after. Silicon Valley turned many people into Uber drivers door Ash Delivery people and AIRBNB hosts the corona virus and ensuing stay at home. Orders have made many of those jobs obsolete or else incredibly dangerous uber or lift jordache other Gig. Economy companies have taken a hit but as travel screeches to a halt. None has been quite as broadly head as AIRBNB. Our reporter trip. Michael joins us to explain why that is hatred. Thanks for being here for so much for having me all right. So global travel has dried up. What kind of damages is airbnb seeing? Both the company and the host right now pretty much overnight in March about one. And a half billion dollars in bookings dried up and this is across the more than seven million listening. So that's that's a big loss of revenue and the fascinating thing about Airbnb is these are people who own property that have bills to pay on that property and the question immediately became how am. I GONNA pay my mortgage or how? How am I going to pay the rent on the apartment that I've leased? I'm subleasing on AIRBNB. I feel like that's the interesting part here. We're talking on the one hand about the company itself. And then about all the homeowners who kind of for some of them at supplemental income for some of them. It's probably even main income now. Yeah airbnb really pitched the business model and the platform that it created is a great way to supplement your income. You know you just list your bedroom your spare bedroom and you can bring in extra cash on a monthly basis and as people want to do they'll look out an opportunity like that and they'll figure out. Well how can I make the most of this and that led to people listing not just a bedroom but an entire home and then it was like well if I can list one home. Or how much money can I make it? By two? And the reason they added more and more and built many little property empires if you will was because they could earn more than double what they would if they just had a renter renting a twelve month basis. We had historically done before airbnb kind of turned us all on to this idea of short term. Rentals AIRBNB has been criticized for this and other places. And they've really pushed hard saying this is supplemental income for the most part. But what are the numbers? Look like how many of their listings are actually in this kind of category entire homes or apartments. So according to Air DNA which analyzes all of airbnb listings about a third of the supply comes from people with one listing property. A third comes from people with two to twenty four listings and a third comes from people with twenty five plus so if you look at it on balance. Two-thirds come from people who were depending on this for more than just you know renting a bedroom if you will so basically right now. Those properties are sitting empty if their owners are no longer able to pay the mortgage. What could the broader impact of that bay? Well that's that's a fascinating thing like we've seen everybody's probably jumped into a brand new ver. That's pick you up outside your place and you're going well how you're probably thinking right now. House I guy going to pay his. You know carline. In the case of Airbnb these people not only have mortgages to pay but they have cleaners they began to pay to keep the places SPIC SPAN for wind gusts showed up. They have landscapers and maintenance workers who would do many repairs between guests visits and so the ripple effect of of this travel industry seizing up as those cleaners. There's landscapers the maintenance workers. They're not getting paid either. So so. The effect is much broader in the AIRBNB aspect of the shared economy than it is and say Uber or lift or other other kind of GIG economy sectors. Is this enough to launch a new housing crisis? No AIRBNB is still just a small fraction of the housing market. But it's complicated to fix if you think about right because the type of people who list and hosts who list on airbnb really berries and their wherewithal varies too. I talked to one couple and Tulsa bought a half million dollar home that they wanted to list. It's kind of like a kind of a wedding bridal plays right like a half million dollar home and Tulsa and they did it right before this happened and they had a ton of listings and they're gone now the fortunate thing for them as they been in the property and real estate world for a long time. They have the wherewithal to make it about six months and cover the mortgage. They should be okay but others are more strapped and so when you have a market seize up like it has and the income dry. There's no guarantee that they're going to be able to pay those mortgages. And they're seeking forbearance or they're looking to try to get some of the small businesses that are being handled handed out by the federal government. Right now AIRBNB. Itself has raised about two billion dollars in emergency funding since the pandemic began. Is any of that money going to help these hosts? It's unclear if any of that money is going to help the host. The one thing that Airbnb did was initially in refunded or allowed guests to cancel and get full refunds which absurd host who felt like they were entitled to some of those cancellation fees that they would normally get airbnb. Tacked back and later said they're gonNA provide twenty-five percent cancellation fees. They are going to get some relief from AIRBNB but for most of these hosts their preference would have been to be able to just re book. Guess later in the year and that way they could stagger out the hit. They were getting financially so we talked about this before. A lot of states and cities have really been clamping down on these short term rentals especially in places like San Francisco New York. Who SAY THAT? You know this kind of these kind of many. Landlords are have been contributing to the affordable housing crisis in those places with new regulations. And now this hit from the pandemic can we expect airbnb shifted strategy. And Anyway after this we've seen airbnb shit their strategy and it's unclear exactly why but in the face of the pandemic number of states including Georgia Vermont. Pennsylvania have passed temporary bans on short term rentals. And so in the face of that AIRBNB has said you know what actually we want host to do. Long-term Reynolds closer to thirty day. Reynolds is what they're characterizing that as now. That's not the same as what you you. You hear. Many kind of local civic leaders call for which is a return to normal if you will and twelve month reynolds. We're not seeing that. Well WE ARE. Seeing are some hosts scrambling to to get income turning towards the long term rental market enlisting their places on Zillow and craigslist as they try to find somebody to kind of plug the hole for them all right partnership Michael. Thank you so much for joining us for me. Okay before we go. We are still taking your work from home tech stories and questions our senior personal tech columnist Joanna Stern..

AIRBNB US jordache Michael reporter Silicon Valley Tulsa Reynolds Zillow Joanna Stern San Francisco craigslist Pennsylvania Georgia New York Vermont
"airbnb" Discussed on Tech News Today

Tech News Today

06:37 min | 7 months ago

"airbnb" Discussed on Tech News Today

"Way beyond its initial mission branch. Husky the CEO co-founder man being the often talks about the mission of the start of his community driven. Abby is nothing about its community of hosts that's true for a very very thin veneer right at the top These sort of sharing economy tree houses beautiful mountain top villas that you can stay on Airbnb that it makes a big deal about but beneath that. Is this bus lowry of hotel? Like rentals being run by synthetic shady characters. I found previous investigations. So what could I be done? It could have remained true to sharing economy routes but it didn't it expanded into the biggest hotel chain in the world and I'm sure like a lot of standard hotel chains. It's finding how painful it is when business completely dries up. Yeah absolutely just never know. What's around that corner and here? We are so speaking of that right around the corner was this big. Ipo that was going to happen. This year Gray valuation now. We've got this new reality How how do we know I mean? Obviously this is not good for for AIRBNB. Ipo Do we know whether their plans are still move forward? I mean are there just missed being made. How is that going? Yeah well said they taken on a billion dollars in you Dan. A billion dollars of new investment with a fairly shot interest rate on that according to some sources speaking to press in the United States. So airbnb is pretty rocky shape right now as said booking numbers the down nearly a hundred percent every bees effectively closed in terms of its is happening this year in terms of this still being airbnb year. It's kind of impossible to see that happening right now isn't it? I mean we've got a company. That effectively has no business model while the world remains on not down and even when outlived the big questions about how much people be flying between countries. How much people will want to go on holidays? If they do go on holiday and travel would want to stay in a hotel where they know. They'll be standard of cleaning or the be happy staying the Abbie M B Who knows what is being claimed who knows who staying it beforehand. And then the question of hosts AIRBNB might be able to ride out this crisis but will it's hosts as I said these people bill huge empires but very very precarious. And if they're not able to pay these rental bills then they're going to go bankrupt. They're gonNA fold unless prompt he's GonNa go somewhere else. They might come back to AIRBNB on the different businesses but more than likely that will go to long term or medium term rental knock. It's so there'll be a redressing. The balance between diamonds that MPM be has seemingly done to north cities around the world and the scale of Ebony will have seven million listings toward the middle or end this year. It seems very very unlikely. And that's going to really impact ebbing B.'s. Value Word saying figures floating around that. It's maybe not worth in the region of a dozen billion dollars. Maybe fifteen billion dollars said fatty. Recently it was worth a billion dollars or that was that was installation of its boundaries. So this is a really really shop decline for AIRBNB Sunlight clay is going to want to go public one. It's in this kind of shade. No kidding no kidding fascinating stuff. I find it very fascinating. James Templeton wired DOT CO DOT UK. Definitely go to wired and check out James's article and James People WanNa follow you online. Where can they find you? You can let me up on twitter. I'm Jay Templeton. So just the first initial and the Senate is the best place to me down on twitter right on James. Thank you so much for taking time for us today. We appreciate. It could still all right. Take stay safe. Thank you very much up next. The convenient choice isn't always the right one especially when there are some alternatives more on that rather cryptic ts in a moment but first this episode of Tech News weekly is brought to you by express. Vpn You've talked about how important it is to have a VPN and now a lot of you are out there working from home. It's even more important to choose a VPN you trust. I like to do research on my sponsors. In fact we all here at twit do research on the sponsors that we invite onto the network in only recommend brands that We believe in and express. Vpn Is the best VPN on the market hands down and that is because expressed VPN doesn't log your data. There are lots of incredibly inexpensive and free. Vpn's that make money by selling your data to add companies while express VPN was developed In order to make sure that your data is not logged. There's technology they use called trusted server. That makes it impossible for express. Vpn servers to log any of your info now there are lots of other VPN's at Iva attempted to us in the past and the problem. Is they all slow down your connections so much he turned on and you go okay well connected the VPN now with express VPN. It's not like that. Internet speeds still remain incredibly fast. And even if I'm connected to service a server over in the UK I can still watch The television shows that I want to watch at speeds that I appreciate now. Another thing is that express. Vpn Is very easy to use unlike other. Vpn's you don't have to input a program anything you just fire up the APP you click the one button to connect and boom so easy. Anyone in your family can use it and honestly. It's not just us here. Twit saying that wired scene at the verge and many other tech journals rate express. Vpn The number one VPN. In the world I use experts. Vpn regularly to connect to Servers across the pond here in the United States and in fact on my Iowa's devices I have it pretty much turned on at all times. It's pretty great. How even the next day when I swipe up to unlock my phone? The VPN is still connected. So don't have to worry about not being on that Virtual private network now protect yourself with VPN we use and trust you. Can Use twits link.

Airbnb twitter United States UK James Abby CEO James Templeton Jay Templeton Abbie M B Gray Iowa Tech News co-founder Senate Iva James People
"airbnb" Discussed on The Journal.

The Journal.

10:20 min | 11 months ago

"airbnb" Discussed on The Journal.

"Doc last Halloween at a house in Arinda California outside of San Francisco so there was a mass shooting. The House has been rented out on the home sharing service AIRBNB and the people who rented it threw a big party right right away that evening things started kind of going wrong. There is an incident with like one of the party goers hours running into a neighbor's car it was just loud and crazy and the neighbors were getting really concerned. That's tech reporter Kirsten Grind and and then all of a sudden the neighbor started hearing gunshots. These gone man just came into this party and started shooting and at the end of that five people had died. It was a terrible tragedy was very clear from today's news conference. That party. That large should have never taken place at that house. According to that after the shooting it came out that there had been prior complaints about the property. Police said even warned the owners not to allow guests to have parties there. The incident raised questions about whether airbnb share some responsibility for crime committed on properties people rent through its site in less than a week after the shooting airbnb CEO. Brian Cherokee said publicly that the company had to quote take more responsibility for the stuff on our platform today on the show how Airbnb wrestles with crime and whether or not it's working Welcome to the Journal. Our show about money business and power. I'm Caitlyn bought and I'm Ryan Knutson. It's Wednesday January fifteenth When AIRBNB CEO Brian Chelsea's said after the shooting that AIRBNB would start taking more responsibility for the stuff on its platform? He listed a few different things that the company was going to do. One of them sort of the biggest I would say is that. They said they were going to make sure that all of their millions of listings were verified for quality and accuracy and they also said they would put up a hotline for neighbors to call. If there's an issue previously you know if you had an issue with Airbnb you would be like transacting on the platform like as a host or a guest so this would allow kind of like neighbors like those in Arinda get someone at the company. There is an issue. These new safety measures are a big deal for AIRBNB and come in an important time in the company's evolution AIRBNB is expected to go public this year. Meaning it's about to face a lot more scrutiny. From investors about everything from safety to its profit margins airbnb is at the moment one of our largest so called UNICORNS the UNICORNS out here. In the bay area. It's been privately funded its entire existence and it's valued at about thirty one billion dollars. It's expected in twenty twenty this year to go public and it's one of the most hotly anticipated. IPO's at least in the tech space this year. How big of a platform is it? It has about seven million listings every night. There's an average of about two million traps on AIRBNB. So it's the largest home sharing platform in the US and it's big also internationally way to put that in perspective Marriott which is the world's largest hotel operator has about one point three million guest rooms around the world according to one estimate that means AIRBNB has about five times as many places on a platform as big as AIRBNB. At least some crime is bound to happen and over the years. All kinds of incidents have been reported everything from minor crime like theft morning San Francisco police releasing this new video of an AIRBNB. Renter allegedly ripping off the owner total heist over thirty five thousand dollars mostly in jewelry. According to police there have also been reports. Parts of violent crimes like sexual assaults and shootings. But there's not much information out there about how big a problem crime is airbnb. Or what kinds of crimes are being reported. Most often AIRBNB doesn't release any kind of statistics broadly again. They're a private company so oh they've released a figure out. Basically said point zero five percent of all trips in the year ending July thirty first. I had some sort of safety related incident but without any kind of detail or without an aggregate figure zero point zero five percent might sound small. But it's a small percentage of a big number remember. There's an average of two million people booked into airbnb Abi listings per night. What do you make of those numbers? So the statistics might be small for the total number of stays that AIRBNB. She has around the world but for example Uber just came out with its first kind of transparency report on problems on its platform and sad at there were almost six thousand reports of sexual assault involving drivers and the US and twenty seventeen in two thousand eighteen and even even though those were statistically low. That's still a large number way larger than anyone would want right so the same for Airbnb like statistically even though that's a small amount I don't think anyone wants to see any amount crime obviously happens vins also in hotels. So is there something about airbnb though that makes it different absolutely like booking a hotel room at the Marriott you you expect this sort of certain level of protection I would say but with an AIRBNB. It's it's just kind of unclear. We're still what you're supposed to expect and even get from them. It's like basically questioning. What is the role of the middle man here right even as a middleman AIRBNB does get involved with safety? It has a dedicated team called the trust team which sets policy in handles any kind of issues that come up. Their job is to deal with problems once they happen but then also to predict where problems might take place and so this is a really important team at any company but especially at a company like airbnb over the years. This team has grown from just a few people bowl to three hundred employees but there can sometimes be friction between this team and other parts of the company including the parts most focused on growth. So one of these issues was in twenty seventeen some of these employees and the trust and safety team really felt that AIRBNB would do better on safety issues and help weed out bad actors on the platform if they required all users guests and hosts to produce a government. I D for example in the. US like a driver's license. It might help verify identities but it would also be he likes deterrent. Like if you're getting on AIRBNB for some kind of nefarious reason if Airbnb then ask for an ID that might just give you pause and this moment airbnb had really face some high profile incidents like prostitution on the platform there were some cases of hosts. You know watching guests using hidden video cameras. There were stories of death so while of course they didn't think this was is going to rule out all crime. They really thought that this would help. At least deter some bad actors so they brought it up with senior execs Atas but they were rejected in. We don't know exactly how but that. Brian Chest Ski airbnb see was aware of it. That's according to people familiar with the matter and one of the reasons was because there had been a study and the study had shown that some users stirs would stop signing up if they were asked for so it could hurt their growth prospects even users who may not have any criminal record occurred or any reason to hide. They just might not use the platform if they had to go through the additional step of showing their I d that's right like an additional hassle These were the sorts so debates. Where sometimes you know the trust and safety team lost out AIRBNB? Say about its decision decision not to use the ideas. Well AIRBNB has told us that. It's because they have a superior verification system they use according to them a bunch of other signals to make sure you are who you say you are like your social media profiles or your phone number or other factors like that so airbnb says that those signals are actually better confirming someone's identity than government issued shoe driver's license. Yes they also said to us that when they looked at this they told us that will some people in developing countries don't have an ID so that would be discriminatory towards them. AIRBNB may not require government issued photo I. D.'s from everyone but it does do background checks on all its users. Globally it checks all hosts and guests against terrorist and sanctions watch lists and in the US. It also checks sex sex offender registration and felony conviction lists but AIRBNB is back check is limited and sometimes even people with red flags slip through the cracks cracks..

AIRBNB US Brian Chest Ski airbnb Kirsten Grind San Francisco CEO tech reporter Ryan Knutson Brian Cherokee Arinda California Arinda Journal Brian Chelsea theft assault prostitution
"airbnb" Discussed on Reset

Reset

07:09 min | 1 year ago

"airbnb" Discussed on Reset

"So Brian Chessy AIRBNB CEO recently said in an interview with Cara Swisher that his company has been slow to implement strong verification education policies. We think that we're making up for lost time. And if I could have done over again I would've done a lot more sooner. I think that's one of the lessons here. Is that you know when you grow really fast. You sometimes fall behind and I think the lesson of all of us is. We've been a little either wishful in our thinking or naive in not being imagined enough about how the platform could be used in ways. We didn't intend it. We have to use more of imagination and we have to be bolder. And I think that's kind of a head. Fake honestly like part of the whole philosophy of becoming platform and you know airbnb is if not the largest just one of the largest platforms for home sharing renting your your place in. The world is expanding as fast as possible and that means just getting people to sign up in a a list of their houses or apartments or whatever and I think by design those verifications and checks in the process are not going to be built in from the beginning just because you have to have what's called liquidity on the platform you have to give people as much selection as possible. And I think the way that technologist view it is some subsection of our properties are always going to be false or at least not properly vetted and and that's the sort of percentage that our platform form is willing to deal with in order to make this To make this work in the long run so I would argue that. It's kind of a built by design that way initially and then later on once you get to a big enough scale than they could say. Oh we're going to start doing the proper due diligence to make everyone safe and happy so in some ways these policies that would be designed to keep people safe to make sure that there's a very low percentage of scams on the platform because friction. Right these stop people from signing up there a barrier to entry an companies like AIRBNB. Don't really like that one hundred percent. I think that all all of these in a very interchangeable you know what airbnb might have said you know we could have had better vetting policies upfront. But that's the same as Uber which has gone through this process of background checks for drivers and and making it harder for people to sign up for the platform if they didn't have identity if you're verification but that'll comes later once they get to the scale that they are you know early on Uber was just Kinda taking as many bodies whether as writers are drivers offers on the platform as possible. Just as AIRBNB was trying to do and then I think honestly. They're like software corollaries to this to. You could look at Youtube in its earliest earliest days. All they wanted was just getting as much video content on the platform as possible to grow and that included copyrighted material and sort of ripped off or was called free booted material from other networks. And and that's just I think that's just the nature of being a platform. You have to get big before you can police a your content and then you know I would also argue that at the same time it kind of becomes impossible to properly police it once you get that big so it's kind of a catch twenty two. What is it? What about that culture that these companies respond only after something bad happens and a reporter writes about it is the Silicon Valley thing? Yeah this is why I take all of these You know were very concerned statements with a real grain of salt because everyone who's building these platforms knows exactly what they're doing and sort of by design. This is how it was meant to scale and I mean I think it's fair to argue that you don't know exactly how the platforms are going to be exploited because you know criminals or thieves thieves or whatever are very creative and we're finding new ways that you know let's say facebook is being manipulated every day and it's hard to really predict how your platform is going to be used but but that said I think there's an acceptable amount of risk built into building any of these things in the first place. It's really about getting getting scale. Oh and doing that as quickly as possible before some other competitor be to it. I feel like this is the thing that we just understand about these companies that they want to get as big as possible and as quickly as possible. Why is it so important for these companies to reach scale? Yeah I mean in part There's the advantage Israel. What's called a network effect? Which means like the bigger you get the more your platform sort of reinforces its own entrenched? You know incumbency. Or you're the dominant enforce basically exactly. Yeah and so. It's I mean that's facebook facebook greatly benefit from that More more people that use it the more people are going to continue using it basically weekly over time and so part of that is maybe the the nature of of the the business itself and then I can't imagine most of the folks in Silicon Valley wanting to be defined with a small modest and sustainable business that isn't growing by one hundred or two hundred percent every other quarter. I think it's just about changing the world old world domination. And you know I think for maybe the past fifteen or twenty years. That was a lauded approach to how we look at. CEO's and now I think that sort review is becoming questioned as as as tech is in for this reckoning right. Now it's interesting because I think that for a lot of people listening to my question they would just go well money obviously clearly. It's it's it's not just money right. It's more than that yeah. I think I'm always like hesitant to to put all this this stuff on money just because a lot of the guys and again it's mostly guys that are running these companies. A lot of the guys out here have money right. They're they're set for life Zuckerberg isn't doing it for the money. He has more money than we'll ever be able to spend. You know it's about conquest. It's about history. It's about making ones mark on the world. Or IF YOU WANNA go Steve Jobs as the dent in the universe thing and and really. It's about ego a lot of this too and so I am hesitant to say you know these businesses only care about money because I thank you know while it's obvious that money is a factor. It's not the thing that really drives them at the end of the day. It's about maintaining power and beating your competitor's so that you can you don't have to worry about being usurped or becoming you know irrelevant at some point right in order to do that. You say I'm okay with with. Let's say I'm going to throw a number out here for three percent of listings being fraudulent and be damned the customers that that's that's that's just their problem. Yeah yeah it might be hard to to hold the platforms two hundred percent standard of keeping everything pristine or whatever but that said like they also know. I know what they're getting into when they're building as quickly as possible without proper verification. So you have to sort of at least at some point. Come in and be like look. You need to forget worrying about a growth at all costs and start protecting people on your platform especially when it's having real world intentionally life threatening consequences. Uh.

airbnb facebook CEO Brian Chessy Cara Swisher Youtube Steve Jobs Israel reporter Zuckerberg two hundred percent one hundred percent three percent twenty years
"airbnb" Discussed on Listen Money Matters

Listen Money Matters

02:20 min | 1 year ago

"airbnb" Discussed on Listen Money Matters

"Traditional tenant, I guess, versus an Airbnb hasn't even really crossed your mind or or has. Yeah. I don't. I don't prefer that. I mean so with Airbnb, you get paid up front. There's no chasing anybody for the rent. With. Yeah. Victims can be a scary scary thing. I've never had to do that. Yeah. So like those kinds of things maybe go like Lou don't wanna do any of that. I'm not writing leases, you know, like it's and it's not like you put an ad on Craigslist. And then you've got a field all these calls, and all these people that want to look at it. And they like it is, like, no, they book it the money's there. The come yet. But then once they're in it's the same people times. But a lot of people you never hear from. Sure. And they stay the came and stayed in his over, you know. Yeah. All right. Cool. Listen. I wanted to break, you know, mindless, you have more questions. Andrew, you're looking at me like Lenti. All right. We have a whole nother half. Yeah. Yeah. Okay. Because there's a whole another side of this that we haven't even really talked about yet. But we need to take a break. And when we come back, we're going to talk about making money on Airbnb properties that you do not own because that's a whole nother thing, which I think, is really cool. So we'll be right back. And we're back. Casting works spinning fingers. And it's does you spend your fingers and magic happen. So let's talk about managing other people's properties open p if they call that, right? That's right. You do this, this is not. So you not what I what I find interesting because I know other people who are property owned properties, not Airbnb specifically, but they own those properties. And that's like fulltime job like yeah. Four who six properties, you know what I mean? You, you manage those six but then you manage other people's properties. How does that not get out of control? Yeah. Automation is a short answer. So there's so much software. Now that has been built as soon as every and be became popular all these companies around decided. Oh my gosh. How can we like stuck into this energy, and like try to make money on the side? And so there's so many companies for automated messages or just property management software pricing software. I mean, it's endless really all kinds of services, you can have for gas..

Airbnb Craigslist Andrew Lou Lenti
"airbnb" Discussed on This Unmillennial Life

This Unmillennial Life

03:21 min | 2 years ago

"airbnb" Discussed on This Unmillennial Life

"Differences and saying an Airbnb, I think for me personally for business travel, especially when I want to rule out a lot of the uncertainties that may cause me to sleep less soundly or just have an unfamiliar setup. That may break my routine, I will tell you. I am a person who craves and loves routine, then Airbnb might may not always be the best choice for me in those instances. I also think the same thing holds true for the entire booking process. While I knowledge Deanna is the one that did the booking and the NF you're listening. I'm so appreciative of the time and effort, you put into making this trip, very very special the process of reading reviews and trying to search out and find the exact right place. For me at times, probably wouldn't be my first choice, and that's really because for me finding somewhere that is very predictable and very standard is and that I can book very quickly is more important for me personally than that element of surprise in that element of somewhat of adventure to see something new and to walk in to someone's home and kind of think about life from their standpoint. I really think that there's something to that. For a lot of people. I'm probably not that person. But I think it's a great alternatives and a new way to just make travel a little bit more special indifferent for lots of different people. But I think for those of you all who are apprehensive about giving it a try for security or safety reasons. Obviously there are no guarantees with a hotel or with an Airbnb, but I certainly didn't feel like even a has apprehensive as I was about driving up in the middle of the night. I didn't have major concerns about. My safety. I was admittedly with the French. I don't think I would have stayed in that particular cottage had I been alone, traveling as two people think Airbnb was definitely the best option. One additional note before we wrap up this episode of this Molyneaux lives. Deanna pointed out to me this morning as we were pulling away from the cottage at one thing. People need to understand about Airbnb is that it's very similar to for instance, e bay or Uber in that not only are you able to give a rating for your host home. They are able to give a rating for you. And I think that's really important to know. I don't know about you. But sometimes when I'm in a hotel, I don't necessarily keep it as toddy as I probably would if I were in my own home. I have been on the other end of renting out a home to people, and you do as the homeowner really respect when people come into your home and treat it as good as they would their own. So do keep that in mind that with these disrupters services like eight. Airbnb and Uber that are really changing the face of transportation hospitality that in many ways. What it does is somewhat democratize is the system, maybe that's not the right terminology. But it at least gives you the option to provide feedback in a two way fashion, and that brings you to the end of the play by play we're gonna take one more quick break. And when we come back, I'm going to feature a couple of different messages I've received from listeners of the show talking about what makes them so a millennial..

Airbnb Deanna
"airbnb" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"airbnb" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Sherby Gupta. You are a director of engineering at Airbnb, welcomed software engineering, daily. Thank you for having me. So you are director of engineering and you've been at Airbnb for more than five years. How did you get started? Airbnb. Shar. So I maybe I can start with a bit actually what I was doing before that I spent six years at Google and I worked on search and I worked with, you know, the such ranking team and then on a project that became part of Google now. And you know, I was always fascinated by travel and data, and I actually had made a booking this was early on twenty thirteen with my family. We'd gone to Venice, and we just had this really great listing. And then I got introduced to Airbnb and that sort of what got me interested in the company. And just as I spoke to more people, and I heard about the vision, it was very exciting and it was something that I wanted to be a part off when you. Look at the search challenges of Airbnb, what's unique in the set of challenges in doing searching on Airbnb? Yeah, it's a good question. And you know, I remember a Leon, I used to talk to a lot of candidates that would say, okay, you know, you walk on, so it's a Google or one of these other companies, and you know how can it be that different? But it actually I like to think of it as you know this traditional search where you express what you're looking for, you expect the most relevant result right at the top, right? Like if you go to Google, you don't want to click on the second or third result us want expect the top result at the first position, and if it's something that you that you're not happy with, you'll reformulate what you're looking for. If you think of a mock marketplace searches, you know it's, it's typically based on what's available, right? What's the available supply and you want to match supply and demand? And I would say that Airbnb adds another layer to this, which is that both. Sides of the marketplace have preferences. So what this means is that a guest comes in, let's say, I want to travel. I was on that trip to Venice. I had, you know certain expectations of that trip where we wanted to stay, how many people were there. It was my family. So that meant that we, you know, we wanted to stay near where that was good food available and maybe not too loud, but then the host also has preferences. The host also, you know, might say that, hey, actually might place is good for these types of guests or or maybe you know, guests that are traveling. Maybe it's actually great for families and for another place. You know, it might. They might have a lot of stairs inside might not actually be be perfect. And so you know, this is what makes fundamentally what makes or BNB. So it's very complex, which is that you know the preferences that a guest has a very complex and then matching those with what is right for the host. You know, that's where the magic comes in, and I think a lot of people sort of assume that, okay, you know, if you. Worked on traditional, so it's where you know you'll optimizing for that. I click sort of translates over to marketplace. I would say that, you know, that is all to another layer of change where Airbnb we optimizing for that booking right in the process of searching, figuring out what's right for you, figuring out the inventory and then making the final booking that entire process can take multiple days. You know, typically you think of or people are not used to thinking of such as this, you know, long process that you know, you find you wanna get the booking conversion. Somebody who's thinking about search at Airbnb might say, oh, it's just a matter of star ratings. And is it a positive or negative review? And you kinda mix that with a geo location, search and wallah. You've got a search engine, but actually it's much different because in Google search, you are not supply constrained..

Airbnb Google Venice Sherby Gupta director of engineering Leon five years six years
"airbnb" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"airbnb" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"So this particular team had lots of web resources in not enough mobile resources to actually build out what they needed to before launch in. So that became this sort of pivotal moment for reactive because that team in particular just decided to go all in on react native for their products prior to us ever launching the first one for a a really, really important in highly visible lodge. And so this is it was an opportunity that had it could have gone a number of different ways. It certainly wasn't painless, I think was it was kind of hectic getting that out the door. There was a lot of work to be done a lot of long hours, but at the end of the day did launch at launch. On time did not launch bug free, but it did launch on time and it would not. They would not have been able to finish building out there feature said without pulling engineers off of other teams in order to launch time. So it became this interesting case where one team kind of just for their hand got forced into this direction and it ended up really dramatically accelerating the reactive adoption. Very early. Let me see if I understand correctly. So react native, comes out different teams on Airbnb, mobile development said, yeah, let's tinker around with this experiment with it. Let's do a few things internationalization, etcetera. And then experiences gets announced as a feature that we're going to build. And the experiences team makes very rational decision. We got a lot of web resources. We've got fewer mobile resources. Well, let's see if we can go all in with react native. Let's see what happens. They went all in with react native. And they did ship on time. They had to pull people off of other teams, but, but it sounds like it did get shipped. Okay. Do I understand things correctly so far it launched an I with every launched, their few losses are perfect and smooth and bug free. And this is not one of those just like others, but it went out the door. People were able to use it. People are able to book on it. So in a sense, it did allow them to get to their goal. And I sense that there were some sounds like there were some foundational things as experienced was being built or as it was being released. You were sort of like, oh, no, this is there's something wrong here. So I think it's really important to to understand exactly at break it down a little bit further. So reactive is when you when you add to an existing code base your, especially if it's a larger one with a lot of infrastructure of its own as ours was and still is, is really important to think about what that interaction's can look like and what kind of institutional. Infrastructure that you have to either recreate rebuild or bridge. And so in this particular situation, it was it was kind of like a cat and mouse game where they're just in order to in order to build a screen. You want to be able to leverage our networking stack. You want to be. It was critical that we Ron experimentation, all the internationalization has to go through internationalization pipeline. There's just, no, there are no other options. If we want to actually Shiva product, we have to do that work up front in. So there was just a huge, a huge amount of work that had to be done to get from zero to one in the case of react native. I mean, it was not. It was not the sort of thing. We could just tack on top in just right, right one screen and 'isolation and ship it. It just simply that would never have been a good experience and it would have hamstrung the teams that have would have chosen to use it. I think in in this particular case, because everything was happening so quickly, I think there was a combination of things that were made difficult specifically because of reactive, but also simply because we were tacking on a huge new platform. There was just an incredible amount of work that had to be done. And I was just a matter of hours in in some in some you and I were talking before the show about how now the main thing you're focused on his Android infrastructure and you said, eighty thousand lines of code in the.

Airbnb Ron
"airbnb" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"airbnb" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"So this particular team had lots of web resources in not enough mobile resources to actually build out what they needed to before launch in. So that became this sort of pivotal moment for reactive because that team in particular just decided to go all in on react native for their products prior to us ever launching the first one for a a really, really important in highly visible lodge. And so this is it was an opportunity that had it could have gone a number of different ways. It certainly wasn't painless, I think was it was kind of hectic getting that out the door. There was a lot of work to be done a lot of long hours, but at the end of the day did launch at launch. On time did not launch bug free, but it did launch on time and it would not. They would not have been able to finish building out there feature said without pulling engineers off of other teams in order to launch time. So it became this interesting case where one team kind of just for their hand got forced into this direction and it ended up really dramatically accelerating the reactive adoption. Very early. Let me see if I understand correctly. So react native, comes out different teams on Airbnb, mobile development said, yeah, let's tinker around with this experiment with it. Let's do a few things internationalization, etcetera. And then experiences gets announced as a feature that we're going to build. And the experiences team makes very rational decision. We got a lot of web resources. We've got fewer mobile resources. Well, let's see if we can go all in with react native. Let's see what happens. They went all in with react native. And they did ship on time. They had to pull people off of other teams, but, but it sounds like it did get shipped. Okay. Do I understand things correctly so far it launched an I with every launched, their few losses are perfect and smooth and bug free. And this is not one of those just like others, but it went out the door. People were able to use it. People are able to book on it. So in a sense, it did allow them to get to their goal. And I sense that there were some sounds like there were some foundational things as experienced was being built or as it was being released. You were sort of like, oh, no, this is there's something wrong here. So I think it's really important to to understand exactly at break it down a little bit further. So reactive is when you when you add to an existing code base your, especially if it's a larger one with a lot of infrastructure of its own as ours was and still is, is really important to think about what that interaction's can look like and what kind of institutional. Infrastructure that you have to either recreate rebuild or bridge. And so in this particular situation, it was it was kind of like a cat and mouse game where they're just in order to in order to build a screen. You want to be able to leverage our networking stack. You want to be. It was critical that we Ron experimentation, all the internationalization has to go through internationalization pipeline. There's just, no, there are no other options. If we want to actually Shiva product, we have to do that work up front in. So there was just a huge, a huge amount of work that had to be done to get from zero to one in the case of react native. I mean, it was not. It was not the sort of thing. We could just tack on top in just right, right one screen and 'isolation and ship it. It just simply that would never have been a good experience and it would have hamstrung the teams that have would have chosen to use it. I think in in this particular case, because everything was happening so quickly, I think there was a combination of things that were made difficult specifically because of reactive, but also simply because we were tacking on a huge new platform. There was just an incredible amount of work that had to be done. And I was just a matter of hours in in some in some you and I were talking before the show about how now the main thing you're focused on his Android infrastructure and you said, eighty thousand lines of code in the.

Airbnb Ron
"airbnb" Discussed on Self Made Man

Self Made Man

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"airbnb" Discussed on Self Made Man

"Look into absolutely well it's it's a fascinating business once you learn about it i think it's the new way to do real estate in this sharing economy thing it's it's it's absolutely huge nowadays how did you get into this well let's see a few years ago actually many many years ago as a real estate investor i was i was flipping homes back in the early two thousand and did really well up until you know everything stopped when the big bubble collapsed and so i ended up a basically you know losing all my properties virtually bankrupt and having to start over again and so i wasn't really anxious about the idea of going out and getting more mortgages and taking on debt again and starting over that way and so i really didn't know any way to get back into real estate except that i was renting a two bedroom apartment i lost my home that i was living in it was really bad i literally have my own personal residents for closed on and so i was just renting an apartment and i had a roommate and at that point he one point he moved out and i thought you know what this airbnb thing sounds kind of cool list that room just kind of on a on a whim and it ended up bringing in enough money to actually pay the rent and all the utilities on the place and i thought wow this is kinda cool so what would happen if i could go get a standalone property i used to be a landlord i knew how to manage properties i thought let's try this and i just found a little apartment a couple blocks away this little lady had behind her house and i just asked her can i can i listed on airbnb and she said yeah and so at least it from her turn around put it on the site and the first month i made roughly double the rent in the by the next month i was making triple rent and it was just like i i.

airbnb
"airbnb" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"airbnb" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Now airbnb is a company that could spend a lot of time and is spending a lot of time doubling down on its core competency eventually it will have that core competency so ironed out that it it will expand creatively into into other areas i know it's expanding creatively into other areas right now but it's it's such a greenfield that there is a question of the proportion of time and resources that should be spent on greenfield opportunities versus doubling down on the core competency we don't have to speak about airbnb specifically but if you take a communist in airbnb position you even take a stripe for example you know company that has so much greenfield but also so much competency to double down on how do you allocate resources i mean this is what the best founders and the best management teams know how to do right like you can't sit on your laurels on your existing moats but you have to expand and so you have to do two things right you have to use your existing moats and you have to use your existing stack if you w will to both keep pushing on that existing front but also taking on new businesses and the best companies are the ones that can leverage their strengths to do both not just start something brand new but leverage their strengths to do both so for instance airbnb i'm happy to talk specifically about this one you know has very extreme motes in certain places and they need us to leverage both dominance in the homes market as well as start to focus on new businesses like experiences that are using the moats that they've established from the homes business to trigger a start to the experiences business and they're doing extremely well at balancing that when you're in that position where you have the greenfield as well as the core competency doubling down options you probably aren't a position where you could raise additional financing you could get debt you could raise a series however laid it is.

airbnb
"airbnb" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"airbnb" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Now airbnb is a company that could spend a lot of time and is spending a lot of time doubling down on its core competency eventually it will have that core competency so ironed out that it it will expand creatively into into other areas i know it's expanding creatively into other areas right now but it's it's such a greenfield that there is a question of the proportion of time and resources that should be spent on greenfield opportunities versus doubling down on the core competency we don't have to speak about airbnb specifically but if you take a communist in airbnb position you even take a stripe for example you know company that has so much greenfield but also so much competency to double down on how do you allocate resources i mean this is what the best founders and the best management teams know how to do right like you can't sit on your laurels on your existing moats but you have to expand and so you have to do two things right you have to use your existing moats and you have to use your existing stack if you w will to both keep pushing on that existing front but also taking on new businesses and the best companies are the ones that can leverage their strengths to do both not just start something brand new but leverage their strengths to do both so for instance airbnb i'm happy to talk specifically about this one you know has very extreme motes in certain places and they need us to leverage both dominance in the homes market as well as start to focus on new businesses like experiences that are using the moats that they've established from the homes business to trigger a start to the experiences business and they're doing extremely well at balancing that when you're in that position where you have the greenfield as well as the core competency doubling down options you probably aren't a position where you could raise additional financing you could get debt you could raise a series however laid it is.

airbnb
"airbnb" Discussed on Clark Howard Show

Clark Howard Show

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"airbnb" Discussed on Clark Howard Show

"Rates are so much cheaper if your son's willing to car pool with uber lift and i do that routinely unless i have a reason i in the only reason i think of that i don't do pool is if my wife's with me because she hates pool and lift line but otherwise only if it's not offered where i am like sometimes at an airport you can't do all guber pool or with line but they reduce the cost enough that often that may be cheaper than a car even if through touro he can get one at the same price even though he's only twenty one okay okay and then the places were looking at i didn't answer hotels did right right or renting rooms or you know personally from somebody yeah so airbnb if he's willing to just rent a room and somebody's home the definitely the cheapest way for him to stay okay all right now not as safe as well was sure what we need to be what can four under the anything that's worth thing airbnb and that's why you read the reviews and you read what people say about the safety of the area how they felt staying at the place and look at a lot of pictures and i know that the area is going to be an acceptable one a lot of times cheaper hotels are not necessarily going to be in the safest place when you read on airbnb though like for there to be a minimum dozen.

airbnb
"airbnb" Discussed on The Cryptoverse

The Cryptoverse

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"airbnb" Discussed on The Cryptoverse

"That right so i think i understand what say in on that what have you actually spoken to like existing airbnb vendors and asked them that i will there be frigates frustrations are things like that or if you just analyze the market objectively yeah offsite talking about hard financial numbers or just just being be able to interact with air beautiful airbnb current or former airbnb hose employees yet like the actual current hosts 'cause i mean that's what i'll do as a marketing guy out of them because they are ways a mock is that said the two sides if it is the guests and the vendors books too this is all a demand out that right and i think uses heaven is switching cost than the hosts right because out the released all of their stuff on the platform so what i wonder is like what why is the number one biggest frustration or challenge for existing airbnb vendors that would be the major hook to bring them over to the platform yes so i think i think for us the the the the the tanya segment we're targeting our airbnb hosts and crypto duty is like that x mark what were not hugging every airbnb host budgets decrypt a once so a lot of airbnb host through our talks and through our our journey we've been we've been building this prompt for about six months now shin and and we definitely do plan to launch a flagship product in san francisco with about fifty airbnb super hosts and i i think you general the feedback is is people are interested in using that cryptocurrency and they're not really willing to part with their cryptocurrency for much like it not for fiat now for a lot of things but for a memorable experience there i it's something that they're they're willing to consider an an analogue decrypt ugh hosts who are also the busiest watt morfitt though have closed so i think in general the the reception has been pretty good it's it's more about making sure that it's currently usable rather than about whether or not.

airbnb san francisco fiat six months
"airbnb" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"airbnb" Discussed on Developer Tea

"Our support is so important on airbnb you know if you have a problem oftentimes your across the world's maybe you don't speak the language there are lots of different things that can you going wrong answer we we have to be very fast and good in our response to when people are having a problem either using the sider or when they are travelling in the range of challenges that people can face is pretty large like that it's not a short list airbnb is not a simple product to use and uh you know there's a huge variety there in terms of like what can go wrong can one of the challenges that we have is that you know when something goes wrong it's it's not something that like any one person can address like usually there is like a special eits person who can adjust saddens so you know we wanna make sure that were routing the issue to the right person and said that's a really interesting case how do we use the data that we're getting in about what the issue is whether it's tax data whether it's voice data and essentially understand not using machines to some degree and help to find who's the right person to answer this so that we can get that fast turnaround time and you know the idea is not cheer removes the human by its to assist in the process to help their customers four teams to effectively respond and you'll get the right kind of questions that are prepared to answer quickly and so that's a really interesting space i mean i think that's one of the cool things about machine learning and deep learning is is thinking about how you can extract information from tax our images and information that you really didn't have that same understanding our before those techniques uh were more readily available and widelyapplicable so that's been really interesting i am a lot of coal applications they are an end really across all of our attacks data and image.

airbnb