36 Burst results for "AIDS"

Fresh update on "aids" discussed on Chris Krok

Chris Krok

01:08 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "aids" discussed on Chris Krok

"Off co office furniture. New allegations against New York Governor Andrew Cuomo's administration took steps to conceal the state's actual number of covert 19 deaths among nursing home patients. Governor Cuomo's administration had a complete picture a total picture of nursing home deaths as far back as last summer, but chose not to release that information to the public. On top of that The Wall Street Journal reporting that Cuomo's top advisers also convinced state health officials to change their reporting. On nursing home debts. But here is what the journal is reporting the changes. Mr Cuomo's AIDS and health officials made to the nursing home report, which haven't been previously disclosed, revealed that the state possessed a fuller accounting of out of facility nursing home deaths as early as the summer of 2020. Boxes. Ushi Husni reporting, Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins says some educators can register to be added to the one B group to get vaccinated, He says it's teachers, staff and bus drivers at pre primary primary and secondary schools as well as head start programs, Jenkins says they need to work out some things with the state. And they're waiting for more shipments is well. Jenkins also wants to know if there will be specifics amounts of them. Vaccines allocated for teachers. Again. Right now. It's fair 59 degrees and Fort Worth from the W B A P News desk. I'm Mike trainer. Your next update at midnight. 24 7 coverage at WB ape.

Ushi Husni Mike Jenkins 59 Degrees Governor W B A P Last Summer Summer Of 2020 19 Deaths Dallas County Fort Worth Clay Jenkins New York Andrew Cuomo Judge WB 24 Cuomo Wall Street Journal 7 Coverage
Cuomo Aides Rewrote New York Nursing Home Report to Hide Higher Death Toll

710 WOR Programming

00:25 sec | 3 hrs ago

Cuomo Aides Rewrote New York Nursing Home Report to Hide Higher Death Toll

"New York Times is reporting that senior aides to Governor Cuomo rewrote a report containing the number of pandemic related dance and nursing homes. The original report our third my state health officials in June of last year stated that more than 9000 died. Allegedly. The governor is AIDS and already been hiding figures for months prior. In fact, the figure reported may have been as much as 50% lower than the true total at that point.

Governor Cuomo New York Times Aids
US jobless claims tick up to 745,000 as layoffs remain high

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 17 hrs ago

US jobless claims tick up to 745,000 as layoffs remain high

"The number of Americans applying for unemployment benefits edged higher again last week the labor department report seven hundred and forty five thousand people filed initial claims for jobless aid an increase of nine thousand from the previous week it's a sign many employers continue to cut jobs despite evidence that the overall economy is improving all told four point three million Americans are receiving traditional state unemployment benefits and when you factor in supplemental federal unemployment programs set up to soften the economic blow of the corona virus pandemic an estimated eighteen million people are collecting some form of jobless rate the nation still has nearly ten million fewer jobs than it did in February of last year Ben Thomas Washington

Labor Department Ben Thomas Washington
Philadelphia union leader John Dougherty charged with extortion for alleged threats against contractor

KYW 24 Hour News

01:15 min | 1 d ago

Philadelphia union leader John Dougherty charged with extortion for alleged threats against contractor

"Electrician's Union leader, John Dougherty is facing new extortion charges. Ky double do Crime and Justice reporter Kristin Joy Hansen tells us the powerful Philly union bosses accused of threatening to contractor And the indictment alleges his nephew physically attacked the man, John Dougherty pleaded not guilty to 18 counts of extortion as well as aiding and abetting and conspiracy to commit extortion. The feds say he and his nephew, Gregory for Yoga, threatened and intimidated contractor and worker after Fujioka didn't show up for work and then wasn't paid for the full week in the unsealed indictment, a piece of a transcript of what the feds safety Oka said. I'll break your face in the parking lot. We're pulling the whole job. You know that right now. I'm calling my uncle. All right. Officials, adding that Dougherty then stepped in and threatened the contractor with economic harm, saying he would pull electrician's off the job and prevent him from working in the future. Daugherty's attorney said they're surprised and disappointed by the charges. A spokesman for the union echoed the same, adding that this is persecution, not prosecution. Dougherty is now out on bond under house arrest. New extortion charges against the longtime local 90, a business manager Ron on top of a scheduled May trial date, Johnny Doc is preparing for in his pending larger corruption

John Dougherty Electrician's Union Kristin Joy Hansen Philly Union Fujioka Crime And Justice KY OKA Dougherty Gregory Daugherty Johnny Doc RON
Philadelphia Union leader John Dougherty charged with extortion for alleged threats against contractor

KYW 24 Hour News

01:13 min | 1 d ago

Philadelphia Union leader John Dougherty charged with extortion for alleged threats against contractor

"Electrician's Union leader, John Dougherty is facing new extortion charges. K Y W Crime and Justice reporter Christian Joe Hansen tells us the powerful Philly Union boss is accused of threatening to contractor The indictment alleges his nephew physically attacked the man, John Dougherty pleaded not guilty to 18 counts of extortion as well as aiding and abetting and conspiracy to commit extortion. The feds say he and his nephew, Gregory for yoga, threatened and intimidated contractor and worker after for Yoko didn't show up for work and then wasn't paid for the full week in the unsealed indictment, a piece of a transcript of what the feds safety, Oka said. I'll break your face in the parking lot. We're pulling the whole job. You know that. Right now. I'm calling my uncle already officials, adding that Dougherty then stepped in and threatened the contractor with economic harm, saying he would pull electrician's off the job and prevent him from working in the future. Socrates attorney said they're surprised and disappointed by the charges. A spokesman for the union echoed the same, adding that this is persecution, not prosecution. Dougherty is now out on bond under house arrest. The new extortion charges against the local 98 business manager are on top of a scheduled May trial date. Johnny Doc is preparing for in his pending larger corruption

John Dougherty Electrician's Union Christian Joe Hansen Philly Union Yoko OKA Dougherty Gregory Socrates Johnny Doc
Zion man sentenced to 12 years in federal prison for conspiring to assist ISIS

Chicago's Afternoon News

00:38 sec | 1 d ago

Zion man sentenced to 12 years in federal prison for conspiring to assist ISIS

"Zain Man has been sentenced on federal charges of conspiracy to aid foreign terrorists. Joseph Jones was sentenced to 12 years in federal prison on Wednesday after a six year long investigation into he and his partner Edward Shim, NT, the two said to have been helping the Islamic state terrorist group by selling cell phones to be used as detonators for bombs. They were actually buying the phones from an undercover FBI informant. The case mark the only time and Islamic state related charge has Gone to trial in Chicago instead of ending with a guilty plea, the feds one more time for cement E because they say he lied to the FBI. Chen

Zain Man Joseph Jones Edward Shim FBI Chicago Chen
Traumatic waiting game for Syrians unsure of the fate of detained loved ones

UN News

01:36 min | 1 d ago

Traumatic waiting game for Syrians unsure of the fate of detained loved ones

"Ten years of war in syria there are likely. Tens of thousands of detainees across the country held by the government and opposition groups. A traumatic waiting game for the families unsure of their fate in an interview with. Us news daniel. Johnson writes investigator. Hannie mig alley from the commission of inquiry on syria explains what steps. The international community is taking to resolve the situation and what obstacles it still faces. It's really a very very short picture. After ten years of conflict over half the population are now displaced. Many of the cities are in. Rebel is a staggering twelve point. Four million syrians are food. Insecure international aid and assistance is being denied because the borders are being closed. There's only one crossing left to bring outside aid into syria. Necessarily do it through the rascasse. Which many aid organizations are reluctant to do because it tends to then be diverted by the government in syria to the most neediest places population has suffered aerial bombardments chemical attacks Arbitrary arrests in the disappearances the inside the country more than six million internally displaced in horrific conditions. Now it's winter if you see the pictures of slumps where comes setup etcetera so we're prioritizing of course a way to stop the conflict now immediately so that people can begin to tackle the real problems. They're facing to live within country. That's been devastated by ten years

Syria Hannie Mig Commission Of Inquiry Daniel Johnson United States
21 Republican governors attack Biden's COVID-19 stimulus bill for 'penalizing' their states

C-SPAN Programming

00:53 sec | 2 d ago

21 Republican governors attack Biden's COVID-19 stimulus bill for 'penalizing' their states

"Taking aim at one component of the covert 19 relief bill, arguing that a proposed allocation of money does punish those states that did not full Lockdown businesses during the height of the pandemic. The governor's led by South Carolina's Republican governor, Henrique Master issue a statement that criticizes what they call a biased formula used to decide how much money in direct aid each state receives. The Democrat who joined that list is Kansas governor Laura Kelly. The American rescue plan does propose $350 billion in direct a two state and city governments money that would be used to replenish those tax revenue collections that decline during the pandemic. Now he Here's the issue. Most of the funding for each state would be based on its unemployment figures, not overall population, so states were the most citizens were out of work last year would receive a greater share of money. Meanwhile, on the Senate floor Republican leader

Henrique Master Laura Kelly South Carolina Kansas Senate
2 Americans Accused Of Helping Carlos Ghosn Escape Are Extradited To Japan

Buck Sexton

00:40 sec | 2 d ago

2 Americans Accused Of Helping Carlos Ghosn Escape Are Extradited To Japan

"Two Americans wanted and former Nissan chairman Carlos Cones escaped from Japan are now in that country's custody. Michael Taylor needs some Peter, a suspected of helping Gone, skipped bail in Japan and flee to Lebanon in December. 2019 Detained in a Boston jail since last May. They now be extradited from the U. S on have arrived in Tokyo. Tokyo deputy prosecutor says the Taylors were arrested on suspicion of aiding a criminal and will be held at a Tokyo detention center where they'll be questioned and investigated. Japan has put gone on Interpol's wanted list, but Lebanon has no extradition treaty

Carlos Cones Japan Michael Taylor Tokyo Nissan Lebanon Peter U. Boston
India's Farmer Protests: Why Are They So Angry?

Morning Edition

06:54 min | 2 d ago

India's Farmer Protests: Why Are They So Angry?

"Next on a protest movement movement in India. in India. It has drawn the It interest has drawn of pop the interest stars of pop and stars climate and activists climate activists and sent people and sent into the people streets into for the streets a cause. for a cause. What's fascinating What's fascinating about the cause about they're the cause fighting for, they're fighting for, is how is unfasten how unfasten ating ating it initially it seems, initially seems, farmers are protesting farmers are protesting over new rules over new for rules wholesale for wholesale markets. markets. One of those rules One matter of those rules so much. matter so much. The answer reveals The answer something reveals about something a giant about nation, a giant its nation, past its past and its possible and its future. possible future. NPR's Lauren NPR's Lauren Frayer begins at one of the markets in western India. Yeah, I like all day. So this is a wholesale market and sort of a dusty lot between looks like warehouses here. Yes, Yes. This is far. Good skunk. Oh, yeah, Wholesale agent, but this is all regulated by the government. Yes, they're appointed by the government. They're being market fees can vote How is showing me around his local wholesale market, one of thousands run by the government where Indian farmers sell their crops in auction. Takes bids for eggplants trucks disgorge bales of collie flower wave through waist high piles of green beans. These markets were set up in the 19 sixties in India's Green revolution. When the government started subsidizing pesticides and irrigation. It helped boost yields and made India self sufficient in food. It did not lift many farmers themselves out of poverty. My father has not much educated Lord Howe comes from a long line of grain farmers. The average Indian farm is about 2.5 acres. These are not big commercial farms like in the American West, and with climate change, mechanization and rampant development, not to mention the pandemic. Indian farmers are struggling load houses at our place. Water is not Copper supplies water. Not there. That's right. That's water as much as when you go. So exactly exactly exactly lot off problem is that the production costs off. Traditional farming is going higher day by day, so the help the Indian government passed three new laws last year they aimed to deregulate the way produces bought and sold. Wholesalers and grocery chains no longer have to buy it. These government run markets they could do deals directly with farms. Many farmers are not happy, though, because you know Agriculture prizes are subject to a lot of volatility. Economists seem a bad lawyer says farmers got used to selling of these government run markets, which guarantee them a minimum price. So it's a safety net for the farmers. When prices go down, the government says it will still set prices for certain crops, and it's not closing these markets just adding more options. But Sanjay Cohade is still worried. Ginger Allah Miggy. Eventually he's a middle man who buys from farmers here. He says he's worried big corporations will circumvent these markets and obliterate small traders like him. As we chat, another man interrupts. We have brought up Narendra Modi's. You will be the King of World nine innings, and this is basically what's happened with the farm laws. It's all devolved into political arguments. Agriculture reform has long been the third rail of Indian politics. Successive governments avoided it. Prime Minister Narendra Modi is trying to do it now on a national scale. The rules have always varied by state and by crop economist giant ego says mode. I made a mistake by not explaining this well. The amazing thing is that the more the government passed these laws in the middle of a pandemic. They just quickly passed it without any discussion. You could have gone to people talked about it Godfrey back because these are long term proposals proposals now laws that affect the approximately 800 million Indians who depend on farming for a living. There's been a lot of confusion. Farmers here in Western India don't have the same concerns as in the north of the country, but that didn what model? Is it? Me getting shit carry those air. The rich farmers from the north you see protest, Ng says a tomato farmer here named um, but a sun up. He's got nine family members to feed. He can't afford to take a day off to protest. The protests have been dominated by farmers from northern India, the country's bread basket. They grow mostly grain and rely on government markets. More than a tomato farmer like sun up who can sell out of the back of his truck. Northern farmers see these laws is the first step toward dismantling all the aid they've gotten since the Green Revolution. Including price guarantees for wheat, rice and 20 other crops. I'm your bony I mean about me, but not for my tomatoes. Sun up, says he's never been eligible for the price guarantees that wheat growers get a majority of India's farmers or not. Meanwhile, farmers in several states are already circumventing these government wholesale markets and have been for years well, These conveyor belts are moving quickly. This produce packing collective started more than a decade ago, when eight farmers banded together. Now it has a sprawling campus. It's co owned by more than 10,000 farmers. This is the man on I think Chambers Banana ripening chamber. This collective bypasses government wholesalers and sells directly to stores. The last Shin Dae is the founder. Market is ready to pay me back better place then I should capture that market is rapper Depending on government. He says he got fed up waiting decades for government reforms, so he took matters into his own hands and started this collective. For others, the pandemic has forced them to consider new ways of selling their produce. So these air your grapes here's yes. Yes, grandfather and then grape farmer Abby shake shall kisses. His harvest came right when government run wholesale markets closed last year because of Cove. It Actually long known there was opportunity. So he and his friends all farmers in their twenties who've gone to college, started selling on Twitter and got more for their produce. Abby Shake says his heart is with his fellow farmers who've been pro testing even if they don't share all the same concerns. His head, he says, is on how to solve some of the inefficiencies he sees in the way his forefathers have long done business and he doesn't really trust the government to do it when I'm just out to get the amulet and the mighty by it guys out the causal Calabrese. I think our generation is going to have to try to figure this out, he says. Lauren Frayer NPR news in Nash IQ. Maharashtra, India

India Lauren Frayer NPR Lord Howe Sanjay Cohade Ginger Allah Miggy Prime Minister Narendra Modi Western India American West Indian Government Narendra Modi Godfrey Northern India Shin Dae NG Confusion Government Abby Shake Abby
$1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief package bashed by Kemp as backers in Atlanta stress benefits

Morning Talk with Martha Zoller

00:38 sec | 2 d ago

$1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief package bashed by Kemp as backers in Atlanta stress benefits

"In a statement Saturday, Governor Brian can blasted senators Raphael Warnock and Jonah's off on the $1.9 Trillion Covert 19 relief bill passed by House Democrats, Theo governor said quote I strongly urge our two U. S senators to use their considerable influence in an evenly divided Senate to level the playing field for hardworking Georgians and put the people of our state ahead of Chuck Schumer and Nancy Pelosi's pandemic politics. CBS 46 reports Senator Ossoff's often Said. Under the bill, aid will come from federal authorities and go directly to cities of mayors who will then distribute the federal dollars to needy Georgians.

Governor Brian Raphael Warnock House Democrats Theo Governor Jonah Senator Ossoff Chuck Schumer Senate Nancy Pelosi CBS
US men accused of helping Ghosn flee arrive in Japan

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 2 d ago

US men accused of helping Ghosn flee arrive in Japan

"Two Americans wounded in full Nissan chairman Carlos Ghosn's escape I'm now in Japanese custody Michael Taylor unease some pizza the suspected of helping gone skip bail in Japan and flew to Lebanon in December twenty nineteen detained in a Boston jail since last may they've not been extradited from the U. S. have arrived in Tokyo the Tokyo deputy prosecutor says the Taylors were arrested on suspicion of aiding a criminal and will be held at a Tokyo detention center where they'll be questioned and investigated Japan has put a cone on Interpol's wanted list but Lebanon has no extradition treaty with Japan I'm Charles de Ledesma

Carlos Ghosn Michael Taylor Tokyo Nissan Lebanon Japan U. Boston Charles De Ledesma
India's Farmer Protests: Why Are They So Angry?

Morning Edition

06:54 min | 2 d ago

India's Farmer Protests: Why Are They So Angry?

"Next on a protest movement in India. It has drawn the interest of pop stars and climate activists and sent people into the streets for a cause. What's fascinating about the cause they're fighting for, is how unfasten ating it initially seems, farmers are protesting over new rules for wholesale markets. One of those rules matter so much. The answer reveals something about a giant nation, its past and its possible future. NPR's Lauren Frayer begins at one of the markets in western India. Yeah, I like. Okay, So this is a wholesale market and sort of a dusty lot between looks like warehouses here. Yes. Yes. This is good, Skunk. Oh, yeah, Wholesale agent, but this is all regulated by the government. Yes, they're appointed by the government. They're paying market fees can vote How is showing me around his local wholesale market, one of thousands run by the government where Indian farmers sell their crops Auction. Takes bids for eggplants trucks disgorge bales of collie flower wave through waist high piles of green beans. These markets were set up in the 19 sixties in India's Green revolution. When the government started subsidizing pesticides and irrigation. It helped boost yields and made India self sufficient in food. But it did not lift many farmers themselves out of poverty. My father has not much educated Lord Howe comes from a long line of grain farmers. The average Indian farm is about 2.5 acres. These are not big commercial farms like in the American West, and with climate change, mechanization and rampant development, not to mention the pandemic. Indian farmers are struggling load houses at our place. Water is not Report supplies water, Not there that much water as much as when you go. So exactly exactly exactly lot of problem is that the production cost off. Traditional farming is going higher day by day, so the help the Indian government passed three new laws last year they aimed to deregulate the way produces bought and sold. Wholesalers and grocery chains no longer have to buy it. These government run markets they could do deals directly with farms. Many farmers are not happy, though, because you know Agriculture prices are subject to a lot of volatility. Economists seem a bad lawyer says farmers got used to selling of these government run markets, which guarantee them a minimum price. So it's a safety net for the farmers. When prices go down, the government says it will still set prices for certain crops, and it's not closing these markets just adding more options. That son Jake Ohad is still worried. Ginger Allah Miggy. Eventually he's a middle man who buys from farmers here. Don't he says he's worried big corporations will circumvent these markets and obliterate small traders like him. As we chat. Another man interrupts. We're proud of you will be the King of World Niners, and this is basically what's happened with the farm laws. It's all devolved into political arguments. Agriculture reform has long been the third rail of Indian politics. Successive governments avoided it. Prime Minister Narendra Modi is trying to do it now on a national scale. The rules have always varied by state and by crop economist giant ego says mode. I made a mistake by not explaining this well. The amazing thing is that the more the government passed these laws in the middle of a pandemic. They just quickly passed it without any discussion. You could have gone to people talked about it Godfrey back because these are long term proposals proposals now laws that affect the approximately 800 million Indians who depend on farming for a living. There's been a lot of confusion. Farmers here in Western India don't have the same concerns as in the north of the country that they moved more delicious than me getting shit carry those air. The rich farmers from the north you see protest, Ng says a tomato farmer here named um, but a sun up. He's got nine family members to feed. He can't afford to take a day off to protest. The protests have been dominated by farmers from northern India, the country's bread basket. They grow mostly grain and rely on government markets. More than a tomato farmer like sun up who can sell out of the back of his truck. Northern farmers see these laws is the first step toward dismantling all the aid they've gotten since the Green Revolution. Including price guarantees for wheat, rice and 20 other crops. I'm your bony I mean, bony, but not for my tomatoes. Sun Up, says he's never been eligible for the price guarantees that wheat growers get a majority of India's farmers or not. Meanwhile, farmers in several states are already circumventing these government wholesale markets and have been for years well, These conveyor belts are moving quickly. This produce packing collective started more than a decade ago, when eight farmers banded together. Now it has a sprawling campus. It's co owned by more than 10,000 farmers. This is the banana, I think Chambers Banana ripening chamber. This collective bypasses government wholesalers and sells directly to stores. Villas. Shin Dae is the founder market is ready to pay me back. Better place then I should capture that market is Roper. Depending on government. He says he got fed up waiting decades for government reforms, so he took matters into his own hands and started this collective. For others, the pandemic has forced them to consider new ways of selling their produce. So these air your grapes Here's yes. If grandfather and great farmer Abby shake shall kisses. His harvest came right when government run wholesale markets closed last year because of Cove, it actually opportunity, so he and his friends all farmers in their twenties who'd gone to college, started selling on Twitter and got more for their produce. Bobby Shake, says his heart is with his fellow farmers who've been protesting even if they don't share all the same concerns. His head, he says, is on how to solve some of the inefficiencies he sees in the way his forefathers have long done business and he doesn't really trust the government to do it. When I'm just out to get the amulet and no I did buy it guys off the coast of Calabrese. I think our generation is going to have to try to figure this out, he says. Lauren Frayer NPR news in Nash IQ. Maharashtra, India

India Lauren Frayer Lord Howe Jake Ohad Ginger Allah Miggy Prime Minister Narendra Modi NPR Western India American West Indian Government Niners Godfrey Northern India Shin Dae NG Confusion Government Roper Bobby Shake
Democrats Press Ahead With Covid-19 Aid Bill

WSJ What's News

00:29 sec | 2 d ago

Democrats Press Ahead With Covid-19 Aid Bill

"President biden and democratic allies are hoping to push the corona virus relief package through the senate. This week. they spent monday trying to iron out. Remaining disputes. there is left wing frustration over the exclusion of a minimum wage increase in a virtual meeting. With the president some members of the democratic caucus said the discussion focused on targeting. Some of the bills aid. Some democrats are focusing on how funding for state and local governments is allocated

President Biden Democratic Caucus Senate
New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo under pressure in harassment probe

All Things Considered

04:28 min | 3 d ago

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo under pressure in harassment probe

"Harlem, is growing on where Andrew the kitchen Cuomo is busy. after a Even second if the front woman accused is empty, the Democratic This'll New York governor tiny of restaurant sexual has harassment. always relied heavily One former on deliveries. Cuomo adviser had previously But a couple of accused years ago, him of kissing Ding got her without tired consent. of the high fees The second on third woman party told APS The New York Times and that complaints when she was a from Cuomo customers aid, the governor about meals asked being intrusive late. questions So currently about her you sex see these life, orders hear including whether she it, slept but I didn't with order. older Ding men. chose to channel The governor most issued of his an apology deliveries on through Sunday a and service gave New York called State's Relay. attorney general Leticia This James, way. the power He to pays appoint grubhub an outside just investigator. for an order, not New a delivery. York State Senator He shows Alessandro me on his Biagi phone. And is then a fellow once Democrat I'm finished and with longtime this order, critic of Cuomo, and I she would joins just us now press welcome. it and drag it Thank to you for having ready me. and You were then one of the first a driver state Democrats is automatically to calm the governor assigned. to resign. You called Come him and pick a monster it up on really Twitter and also have said lawmakers lets him track should be removed the driver from office. so If they Ding don't can hold answer him questions accountable. from customers wondering Why not when wait to their see food what an is investigation coming. uncovers He can't first? do that on Grubhub So and other it's a APS. great place to start. I mean, Being I want pays I want to be really very a percentage clear about on where each order, I'm coming from. but estimates I it am cost a survivor 35% of sexual abuse. less I'm during a legislator, the pandemic a New Yorker than Grub like many hubs delivery chair of service. the ethics and Internal I think Governance I was just Committee, lucky that I found really and I also Before the am pandemic. someone who has a zero tolerance Ding also policy included for leaflets and each Sexual delivery, harassment in the urging workplace. customers It's one of the to most help him important save money issues by ordering to me. directly It's what I from ran his on. Web site. That's what I've been Overall, fighting for. It's the he legislation says, the we hand pass pulled in 2018 noodle not only survived Andre. 2020 Thank Lee. You know, It it's made part about of 5% why Albany more money has than in 2019. been calcified with the A number secrets of city of eateries abuse using that have relay really like lying jumped the 70% halls and so last in year, order according to to be Alex able Bluhm, to not only CEO rid Albany and of sexual founder harassment of the something New York the sexual based company. harassment working We group had like record Was created numbers of restaurants to do signing up We the have to only have but a zero tolerance is policy these restaurants and so that the are way signing that I'm up looking our restaurant at this that set typically of circumstances have never done is delivery, by and the totality those new clients of information didn't do that a lot I know of volume. about the governor's behavior, Bluhm says relays his revenues behavior declined and what's been described by 20% and also what I know last year from my own experience door working Dash there, and also others that offers I am. delivery You know, only you worked now, in his for office restaurants before looking you were an to elected lower their official fees. yourself. We should note. The delivery That's right. sector That's is right. one That's of very right. So I few was I city worked in industries his counsel's office. that hired more For roughly workers eight months during in 2017 the pandemic, It s would not O. I mean, be this unthinkable. is part of a pattern All of abusive the and manipulative behavior total numbers from him and now it's are It's also around part of a 80,000. bigger culture of fear that is Maria pervasive Figueroa throughout is director his administration. of labor You're and policy saying you speak research from first at hand the experience, Worker Institute But wouldn't there at be Cornell value University's in having a School thorough, of Industrial exhaustive and investigation Labor relations. so that you get things She's on basing the record that and find 80,000 out how widespread figure this on is the number and give of commercial the truth cyclists an opportunity who to were be registered aired? before Absolutely. the pandemic, Yes, plus Absolutely. an estimated Yes, I do increase. support an independent investigation. Like the restaurants. I believe that we're These going workers to be able to have needed that now, the APS since to survive, there will be a special and prosecutor they appointed felt by exploited. the attorney general, so They we include could many be thankful low for income that. immigrants But and people when of I color look at at the the greatest words that risk the governor of contracting used and the Cove. questions It that he asked You seen? Charlotte Aviano Bennett says she spent Which hundreds the governor of has dollars not denied on equipment things to deliver like food Do you on have her sex e with bike older men? company Do you and have sex not the outside of your mother, relationship, she and he repeated says the companies to her over don't and over pay again, for knowing anything. she was a sexual She abuse bought her survivor. own delivery bag, You helmet were raped and and winter abused gear. and attacked Deano and assaulted. lives in Washington Heights These are things and used to that work in a not restaurant. only did he say She to her switched personally to running deliveries and alone, but for he door said them dash while he and relay they were in a couple his of years office ago because in the Capitol she's got a young child in Albany, and wanted and more he flexible mentioned hours. that But you know, she as says his the work response got to this, harder it was meant in the to be pandemic. playful. Yeah, There is when no an gray abandoned area. me in Have you heard A from your Gemma constituents Donati about this? What the are hand they saying and Calvin to you? you, she I think that says there are restaurants people who won't are let her really use shocked their bathrooms that and she this has is to take you breaks know, coming outside in the cold. to the surface. Why? The workers Because justice ah project lot of people has been know organizing the governor delivery from drivers what they see on and television, its lobbying Right? Go the back city to Council last for March a law in April requiring and May and bathroom June and July breaks, the whole summer sick when pay the governor and was protective doing his press equipment. conferences about covert, Its which executive Provided director, a lot of Lee safety Hia Wolpe for people. It calls made them feel the apse really like disruptors. they were like, They're like not the governor really had paying their backs. minimum wage, The which problem is in New here York is that that's $15 the perception an hour. What that's the persona. they're offering is Behind opportunities the scenes, to especially work with Charlotte without Bennett, right. She describes a weight this happening and without during the essential, peak of Corbett. right. Because We these only workers have a minute are left, independent but I'm curious. contractors. You know, as a Democrat, Gord Cuomo Ash, is Grubhub your party's defacto and the others leader pay for in the state. each He's delivery been governor item for a decade, plus tips. and there's a gubernatorial Drivers say election they can make in New York $20 next year. an hour So what or more does when they're this busy, mean for but your party there's no in the state? guarantee I mean, I Relay think the most is unique important and thing paying that we a fixed can do as hourly legislators wage and as of members 12 of 50 any political plus party tips is collectively a few years ago have relay a zero settled tolerance a lawsuit policy after for being abuse. accused And of I think not that paying when we overtime. are confronted with these When kinds asked of whether issues it's independent we should contractors not should be To be classified thinking about as employees. party. We should be thinking Bluhm, about the people the CEO, who have been harmed said. They and usually how we're don't going want to get full them justice time hours, and also how right, So I think we will there's hold a huge accountable flexibility the people that who is actually overlooked caused these that harms. So frankly, for me, this it is would not be a political impossible issue. I know for it's being us seen to that keep way. if But I would have The the same reaction, employee no matter model who it was. got inserted. I

Cuomo Bluhm Aps The New York Times Attorney General Leticia This Grubhub Ding York State New York Albany Maria Pervasive Figueroa Worker Institute Cornell Value University Alessandro Charlotte Aviano Bennett Andrew Andre
How the pandemic is affecting states unequally

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

04:21 min | 3 d ago

How the pandemic is affecting states unequally

"Of the characteristics of this virus economy as we have said on this program. I cannot tell you how many times is how uneven its effects have been on people black and brown and low income. Americans do in way worse in health and jobs and just getting by than whiter and wealthier populations are uncomfortable. As to how they're doing depends on what industry they're in and on states some of which have been really hit by this pandemic less revenue from income and sales taxes and higher virus expenses and some of which states that is doing all right so as the senate takes up. President biden's relief bill this week. And it's three hundred and fifty billion dollars in aid to state and local governments marketplace's mitchell hartman starts us off with a tale of several states. The pandemic recession has delta significant blow to tax collections. State revenues were down by nearly two percent from december. Last year overall. All but according to the urban brookings tax policy center tax revenues actually increased in twenty two states. This disparity has a lot to do with the mix of jobs in layoffs in a state. Says carl davis at the institute on taxation and economic policy so many lower income people have been laid off higher income. People have been much more likely to keep their jobs so tax. Revenues are down by double digits in states with lots of low-wage tourism jobs in hotels bars and restaurants florida and but states with more jobs that can be done from home at higher wages. Like in high tech and professional services are faring better. Washington's one example thinks in part to folks like darby megan of spokane he's a manager for tech startup. his wife's an accountant for an architecture firm. They're both working from home. We've maintained our salaries and that's been huge blessing. Haven't had to take a step back hours or anything. Like that with the stimulus checks. That was a nice little bonus. The couple owns a home. That's gone up in value. So they're paying more property tax but they've improved their overall balance sheet. We've been able to save significantly more right. We're not eating out as much and they made one really big purchase. A new van built into an rv. So we've sort of taken some of our vacation money that you budget and instead may domestic vacation mobile now not every high earner has come through the pandemic recession unscathed. Fiona greek at the g. P. morgan chase institute has been tracking household checking balances. There are some high income families that have seen cuts in their income cuts in their salaries but most of seeing their bank balances and assets grow and she says one reason is the booming stock market the broader trend. There's the growth and wealth. We see a lot of families transferring money into brokerage accounts to take advantage of those games but some states are missing out on taxing. Those income gains at the top. Says carl davis at the institute on taxation and economic policy. He points to nevada heavily dependent on tourism dollars revenue down about twelve percent where there is no broad based income tax. You're leaning a lot on sales taxes. Regressive taxes in general. Your revenues aren't going to do quite as well as progressive taxes at a time. Like this of just soaring income inequality contrast that with california that's opted for a more progressive mix leaning a bit more on the income tax most states do with higher top income tax rates on top earners. Especially that's staring a whole lot. Better with revenues up around two percent since the pandemic started. That's helped a good bit by silicon valley which attracted v and his family from texas. So i'm a software engineer. I was in iran for about four and a half years. And then during the pandemic My wife connor fulltime opportunity and bay area so we moved. He says silicon valley employers are hiring. Like there's no tomorrow. There were plenty of opportunities in the to offers in my hand. Some states are now considering hiking taxes on top earners to boost revenues and fund recovery from the pandemic including new york. Minnesota connecticut rhode island and

Institute On Taxation And Econ President Biden Mitchell Hartman Urban Brookings Tax Policy Cen Carl Davis Darby Megan Fiona Greek P. Morgan Chase Institute Senate Spokane Florida Washington Nevada California Connor Iran Texas
Johnson & Johnson begins shipping single-dose COVID-19 vaccine

Mark Mason

02:54 min | 3 d ago

Johnson & Johnson begins shipping single-dose COVID-19 vaccine

"About. It is a couple of things with this particular shot from Johnson and Johnson again Once Johnson and Johnson got the approval on Saturday for their their vaccine immediately, they went to shipping pallets of the vaccine out on Sunday. They've been shipping them out today. You're It's the expectation is that they're going to be putting them into people's arms beginning tomorrow, which is really good news. But it's a game changer because it's a one shot deal with the visor and the modern and you have to get Shot and then follow up three or four weeks later with the second shot before they consider you to be fully vaccinated. This is just a one shot deal. You only have to get the one shot and that's it. No need to return. You're good to go. It does have also had a benefit of not having to be stored at old for cool temperatures like the Fizer vaccine, where you had to create all new types of carriers that had special cooling equipment and boxes that were holding with the special, almost airtight to a certain extent, holding that special level of cool air in and he had a Get in and get the viral that I mean the virus medicine out first, quickly close everything up with the vial. Then get your shot and put I mean it was like a whole rush thing. This is not that case with the Johnson and Johnson. It could be held in a regular refrigerator unit that you would have in most hospitals or Pharmacies, So it's all going to be a little bit easier to do. And we are getting from Johnson and Johnson here in the U. S. 3.9 million doses of that vaccine up front here Now that's kind of a down payment market. What's gonna happen is They're going to send another 16 million pace of doses out to us by the end of the month, so it's taken them a little while going through their paper work and getting everything that they were supposed to have 100 million shots. At least that's what they told us. Once they got the green light from the FDA. Well, they had production problems were unable to get that kind of number on, so they promised us 20 million up front. Once they got the green light and the thumbs were up, and then what they're saying now is between now and June. They will have the 100 million doses out there, so there's going to be a little bit of lag time. But it's not that bad, considering the fact that you've got still Fizer, which has been ramping up their vaccine production. Modern has been ramping up their vaccine production. So this is kind of a nice additional band aid to have. It's a nice way to get even Morva vaccine in the arms of more people out there at a time when we should be able to take advantage of it. When the numbers are down low enough, and before anything, starts to swing and pick up, look, laugh again. This time last year shortly around this time was one would not only had things kind of kicked in for Corona virus, but there is also concerned about spring break and people going to spring break and those turning into super spreader events. That kind of stuff is a thing that we're getting closer to some warmer weather here in parts of the country. You've got a concern from health officials that that is something that could take off again. So while numbers were subdued right now, we need to take the best advantage we can with these vaccines. Well, you're right. The numbers are subdued. But there's concern that were kind of plateau Ng

Johnson Fizer Morva FDA
Time running out to help 16 million Yemenis avoid disaster

UN News

01:06 min | 3 d ago

Time running out to help 16 million Yemenis avoid disaster

"U n chief antonio guiterrez has led a call for support for sixteen million yemenis including starving children amid a massive funding shortfall for the aid operation in the war crippled country in an appeal for three point. Eight five billion dollars this year mister gutierrez said that nearly fifty thousand yemenis are enduring. Famine like conditions. Yemeni children are starving. The secretary general insisted adding that nearly half of all children under five will likely suffer from acute malnutrition and four hundred. Thousand of those children could die without urgent treatment. The worst hunger is in areas affected by six years of conflict. He said in opening remarks. At a pledging event for yemen organized by the governments of switzerland and sweden some four million people have been forced from their homes. The un secretary general said adding that the hootie offensive in maarib could displace hundreds of thousands. More militarised reiterated his appeal for the water and it has to stop. He said calling for an immediate nationwide ceasefire and confidence building measures followed by an inclusive. Yemeni led political process coordinated by the united nations.

Antonio Guiterrez Mister Gutierrez Maarib Yemen Switzerland Sweden United Nations
Wet Notes for 2-28-21

Scuba Shack Radio

07:40 min | 4 d ago

Wet Notes for 2-28-21

"This is wet notes on scuba shaq radio for sunday february twenty eighth two thousand and twenty one. Well i up today. I'm going to do an update on dry suit talq now ever since i've owned a dry suit i've been using those little pouches of talk to dust my wrist seals and neck seals. And that makes it easier to put on especially if it gets a little humid. Well we used to get these little pouches from magnet who then became gear aid when we could no longer get them from juried. We switched to getting them from diving unlimited international or dui. Recently we ran low on these talca pouches. Wanted to order some more. But do you. I stopped producing those talk pouches. I guess i'm guessing near some concern around. The safety of talk i noticed has been in news over recent years. So donna reached out to peak from dui and he suggested cornstarch to dust are seals. Make sure you do it every time now. That sounds a little strange to me. But it looks like people are using it in place of the talq. We'll give it a try. And i'll let you know how goes cornstarch. It's not just for cooking next up. Is things start opening up and we travel outside the country. We're going to need to get tested for in nineteen before we can come back well. Resorts are out there. And they're starting to accommodate their customers and making it easier to get tested. So for example. I just saw where enroll roett to resorts. The turquoise bay dive resort and the mayan princess beach dive resort are offering onsite cova testing on thursdays and fridays. And then what happens. Is you'll get electronic. Results are available in three hours. And then you'll have a hard copy the next day now you still have to pay for it in a costs about fifty bucks. Then i also check the cocoa view site down there and roett tan and it looks like they are also offering onsite testing but their prices coming in at eighty five dollars so it looks like if you're going to travel to row attend you'll find it easier to get tested for corona virus and get back home as long as you test negative but i think more and more of these dive operators out there are going to provide that cova testing or options for people so that you can go travel and then make it easier for you to get back home. Also last i think a couple of weeks ago. The president of the united states signed executive order. One three nine eight and with that executive order it mandated. That masks are to be worn on all public maritime vessels including ferries. What does that mean for dive boats. Well deana did. Some research and found out that this mandate includes commercial vessels used for dive charters and dive related activities. You'll need to be masked up upon boarding disembarking and the duration of travel. Obviously this can only apply to us. Operators i think this makes sense and i'm sure common sense will prevail given our unique circumstances when we go diving way back in the beginning of two thousand twenty i did a segment on dive travel insurance then in mid two thousand and twenty. I noticed the divers alert network. Dan their travel insurance was not available on their website is back now. However there was a short article on dive newswire that indicated that there are qualified cove in nineteen related cancellation and interruptions covered. There's a lot of detail on their website. You can read through. Essentially they cover prepaid travel arrangements. If you your host at your destination you traveling companion or family member test positive for covid. Nineteen there's also levels of coverage while traveling but you need to do your research. The good news however is that the dan travel insurance is back and it looks like they are helping to try and address the corona virus issues. It's always a good day when i go out to the mailbox and that the latest issue of the journal of diving history has arrived. That happened earlier this week. The cover of the first quarter two thousand twenty one magazine features to five women who made up the team of tech tight to mission six dash fifty. Which was america's first off female saturation team. The five women included peggy lucas. An hurley hotline renata lynch true elena schmidt and sylvia earle the journal of diving history. Formerly historical. diver magazine is the official magazine of the historical diving society. Usa and is part of your membership. I can't wait to dive into all the articles i saw. The other day that there's been a an oil spill off the coast of israel and lebanon and it's impacting over one hundred miles of coastline. Now what's a little disconcerting about this is that they don't know where this is coming from this washing up on the beaches. It's the seems like there's some sort of gag order on the release of information. I'm just not sure why there was. Also a thin whale washed up on the beach apparently with oil in its loans. They say this is undoing. Much of the progress made over the last thirty years. Let's hope they figure out where this is coming from or where it came from. And if they're able to minimize the impacts and finally here's some really big news in the scuba industry especially related to scuba tanks. Luxembourg is getting out of the aluminum tank business on february twenty third. Luxor held their fourth quarter and full year. Two thousand and twenty analysts call and that's where they announced their divestiture of their aluminum product lines now. The rationale according to their press release is that they wanted to focus on high performance magnesium alloys zirconium catalysts and high pressure composite cylinders. Guess to profit margin. Just wasn't there on the aluminum tanks. They plan on selling those two aluminum forming operations in the united states and one in the in the uk. But we don't know who they're going to sell it to just yet more to come on. This is it as it. Unfolds now luxembourg. They produced a lot of tanks. And there's a lot of them out there and we're going to see what that does to the supply chain as we move forward. Well that's it for wet notes for february twenty eighth two thousand and twenty one here on scuba shock radio

Roett Turquoise Bay Mayan Princess Beach Roett Tan United States Donna Deana Peggy Lucas Renata Lynch Elena Schmidt The Journal Of Diving History Diver Magazine Historical Diving Society Sylvia Earle DAN Lebanon Israel
"aids" Discussed on Consumer Watchdog Podcast

Consumer Watchdog Podcast

02:44 min | 3 months ago

"aids" Discussed on Consumer Watchdog Podcast

"Podcast. Where we discuss important topics of the day. And the current issues that we're exposing confronting and changing i'm your host carmen vulgar executive director of consumer watchdog. And my guest. This week are here to talk about a lawsuit. Consumer watchdog filed this past tuesday on world aids day to challenge doctor and a medical groups discrimination in refusing to treat an hiv positive patient with us to talk about the case is a consumer watchdog staff. Attorney danny sternberg. Welcome danny garmon. Happy to be here and q. And justin smith. Who is the plaintiff and our suit. Thanks for joining us. Justin thank you for having me so Let me start with just the basics. Danny why don't you tell us about the case and What we hope to achieve with it sure. So a cardinal rule from the supreme court going back twenty thirty years is that blanket refusal to provide medical care on the basis of individuals. Disability is illegal under federal civil rights laws so in practice as a result doctors nurses and other healthcare professionals. They have a legal duty to take into consideration the medical facts of the patient before them so objective medical evidence not stereotypes not assumptions. And it's the this medical This medical evidence that the doctor healthcare professional must rely on to make their determination about whether surgery or other medical care is safe to be performed on a patient. But that's just simply not what happened here. And that's why consumer watchdog our co-counsel theresa barreda brought this suit on a mr smith's behalf and so just a with that foundation. Just a big picture to talk about what actually happened to justin that day This past april justin had consultation with dr patel of orthopedic specialty institute over in orange county for a routine hip. Replacement surgery and dr patel. He agreed to perform this hip. Replacement surgery on justin. But then later he refused to do the procedure once he learned that justin was living with hiv. So during what was supposed to be justin's last visit with dr patel before the surgery. Dr patel was reviewing a justice. Pre-operative physical exam so just kind of the standard last step in the last box to check in the process before surgeries completed and this preempt physical. It included a lengthy review of justice medical history including that during the three decade.

carmen vulgar Attorney danny sternberg danny garmon dr patel consumer watchdog justin smith hiv theresa barreda aids justin Justin Danny supreme court mr smith Dr patel orange county
"aids" Discussed on American Innovations

American Innovations

05:39 min | 4 months ago

"aids" Discussed on American Innovations

"Their messaging is going to turn this around. But it's not like people are looking towards the sea of san francisco every it's not complicated. Everyone knows what when needs to be done. And i do think we're going to do better Going into these next couple of months..

"aids" Discussed on American Innovations

American Innovations

11:01 min | 4 months ago

"aids" Discussed on American Innovations

"Was early community spread there and it's the second densest city in the united states. So you would've if you'd been looking at the map in march she would have said well sandwich. You new york's gonna hit really hard and probably san francisco will be right behind it and yet if you look at the overall picture the city has done probably as well as any large city in the united states probably better than any other city. I think that the data is why. Why did that happen. I think that there are many reasons why this happened. But you're absolutely right. San francisco has had great outcomes especially in terms of severe disease mortality. And not is fundamentally what matters with anything is your doctor. You don't want anyone to get ill and die. And so our rates of mortality have been very low from sars could to emulating the same kind of mortality rates that we're seeing in asia where things are going much better east asia So why. I think that partially public health officials are trusted here because they combated and had a raging hiv epidemic and That all changed and it was really a partnership between the sexes could department of public health and our mean university. Where i work. Ucsf that epidemic change so there was trust in public health officials when they said on april seventeenth. Which is pretty early wear masks. People are not fighting that wearing the mask things. They're really not like people are yesterday. There were some major celebrations in the streets. And everyone wears that mask it. Just it just isn't kind of Fraught topic We're distancing masking ventilating. We're kinda lucky because we can ventilate meaning. Were not freezing cold as we're going into the winter as just a different climate And so there. There's it's freezing cold in the middle of the summer in san francisco problem which not. Everyone knows that you're miserable of everyone. It's very weird like everyone had fires out in the summer if they wanted to hang out with each other on their dax. bide But yes it is called it. So there's an element of trust. There's an element of not fighting Cut public all the recommendations and then we could have gotten lucky and maybe it has to do with ventilation and outside and constant wind from the water like who knows all the things that go into play. I think it's very complicated. And no one should be congratulating themselves. Necessarily i think we also had an element of luck And so i think we're lucky and then we trust our public health officials. He thinks francisco's experienced with the aids crisis. Informed how the city's public health infrastructure responded to covid nineteen. I ain't there's no doubt that the hiv epidemic in san francisco has completely informed everything. We do. Because what happened was a major partnership happened between the university and the san francisco department of public health of this city and i Advised infectious disease fellows about this when they come interview. But i don't think there's any city that i can think of in the united states except for perhaps seattle whether such a linkage and hand-in-hand between the academic university and the department of public calls so that makes things work better makes things where scientists quickly happening at the university and it gets translated in what of the of the informs the risk of facts. And so i think all of that has made our Our efforts more seamless. There's not a lot of fighting here about how to manage this. You talked earlier about the disproportionate impact of both hiv particularly in the later stages of the disease in more recent years on low income communities communities of color. Obviously we've seen that happen again with covid. How is your response in san francisco to the health equity side of this outbreak complicated. I can't say it's perfect. And what i mean by that. Is you're absolutely right like any infectious disease by definition affects the poor disproportionately so you like superimpose. Amapa poverty of the united states. You got map of hiv actually especially in the south and southeast of this country and why because with the respiratory virus. At least there's built living environments that are crowded people have absolutely have to go to work. They are essential workers are living day to day. They're not going to go and just sit at home and do their tech stuff online. That isn't the population that isn't What at least our next immigrants in san francisco can do with their work. Lives and so It really is a population. That's more risk. So i feel like it's been mixed with lat next population meaning. Most of our cases have been in our latin x immigrants. And there's some good things. There was a lot of testing done by ucsf there was partnerships between the city and san francisco to do a lot of testing. What i haven't been as pleased about. Is that if you're going to test someone with this infection you gotta give them money to stay home like i wanna test if my day-to-day livelihood depended on going out and delivering food and going to my job. I wouldn't even testify testings. Run away because you have to have an ability to isolate in quarantine and that means staying home with funding or funding for the population. Who's lawn next. Where we test has been sporadic. It hasn't been a steady as it should have been that disappoints me. I also think that mask provision in essential workplaces because i'm really interested in masking as a form of pandemic control. I think it's really important. I think it's not just like saying stuff like mask and just do whatever you want. I think it's actually providing standardized masks. I think that's something that i would have done as well. But in general it's been pretty good and it's kept our numbers lower and it's kept our rates of illness. Lower is our emphasis on the disproportionate impact. But no one in the united states. Have we done that perfectly. I've been thinking with the masking. Just in the context of the new administration coming in and perhaps a new interest in trying to get a a a unified public health message around masking that one of the most basic things. Which certainly everyone. I has accepted. Is you cannot have an indoor conversation with anyone who is not in your immediate family without a mask on. You should try to avoid into our conversation if you can. But there's never a situation where you're talking to someone face to face you know with without both of you wearing masks like and that's not a huge ask of people right. You can still do a lot of things but that would if you just got universal by on that you would make a lot of progress. Yes i mean that's in general like if there's ventilation and there's distancing and there is some exceptions that absolutely you're right that in general this facial masking element especially in the inside as opposed to you. Know it's ventilated. Outside is profoundly important as a pillar of pandemic control why. It's been so hard. Well it's been hard because april third is when the cdc recommendations mask. And i remember how they were announced in this country. Because i just like. I don't know. I keep getting flashbacks to but it was the president then. The president trump announced it to the united states and he He did it from his white house. Task force Press conferences that he hoped he was holding daily at the time and he said you know what they just said mass. But it's actually totally voluntary. And i'm not going to do it because i i'm going to be like if i had a king or queen in my office. I'm just i'm not gonna do it. I mean i mean that was how it was announced so the difference in announcing a public health recommendation by the premier public health agency in our country. The difference in how that was announced as opposed to tokyo with the mayor of tokyo came out with a mask. Everyone was already masking anyway. 'cause they were used to it from sars but anyway he came out with the mass pulled. It down Everyone who's way from him and he made the announcement. This is absolute mandatory In our city that it it's night and day like he modeling behavior from from leaders and from public health officials but especially leaders. Because believe who's on tv it's like the leaders of our country Modeling cannot be underestimated. How important modeling behaviorist so. I am quite sure that we're going to see going into the winter even though president-elect by won't be the actual president till january. I think he's just going to get a lot more play and so is his. I mean yesterday. We saw them all day. And i. I just think even that modeling of behavior with with the news reports. I think evenly masking better. We may there may be some people who don't and that's when Just to get back to the behavior thing. I think the other thing that hiv doctors do really well is they. Don't yell at people. So i think it's It's a concept of harm reduction even if there are people who don't model show that eighty percent of the population has to mask for us to really get to almost zero deaths with sars kobe too. So there's going to be some leeway that has to give where people are not yet. I'm bored and i think yelling at people mask shaming they call it calling people stupid saying wherein f mask. I think this is the wrong way to message. That is exactly what people did with People living with hiv wherein a condom. You know i. It's not that easy. it's not. It's complex we need to message differently and that's at messaging of harm reduction that i also think. Hiv researchers doctors do batter. What's the response been like from other cities to your efforts around covid. You know that is a great question. i do think that san francisco has gotten some attention for doing with covid. Nineteen but every city in a way Fundamentally actually knows six elements that it takes to do well. Which is social distancing. Masking ventilation when i possible contact tracing as a result of testing and isolation quarantine. It isn't actually at this point in mystery those six elements of pandemic control. It's actually not that complicated. Kind of as dr fauci said so. Every city is going to make its decisions on how they put things into play. Also based on their local populous and politics in this city may have been more willing to mask and other places. Haven't and i really genuinely think that we have had you know We have about three thousand counties in the united states in every county had a different response and it is complicated and what. I'm hoping is that a federal government. That's more organized about their messaging and has a stronger sense of consistency about.

san francisco united states hiv san francisco department of pu ucsf asia president francisco covid new york department of public seattle dr fauci tokyo Task force Press president-elect white house trump
"aids" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

07:14 min | 8 months ago

"aids" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

"Small or even. Devices. And by that point they were well known as a large consumer market and a group who were willing to pay an initial high price for small innovations for these so-called luxury items that we're hearing aids. Hearing aid users became the first consumer market for printed circuits, transistors and integrated circuits, although those components were invented for other purposes, they were marketed I and with hearing aid users. Nowhere was this more evident than when it came to what is arguably the most significant invention to come out of bell labs, and quite possibly the most significant invention to come out of the twentieth century. The, transistor? And then one, thousand, nine, hundred, forty seven. The transistor is a miraculously small device. They can amplify or sweat electrical signals. It paved the way for the computerization of the next seventy years somewhat amazingly at and T. lead companies working on hearing AIDS use transistor technology. Royalty free. Those companies and their customers would go on to push the technology even further down the road. The hearing aid market was so important for the further development of the transistor that in one, thousand, nine, hundred, fifty, three, the New York Times even called hearing aid users, the Guinea Pigs of transitory. Am All hearing AIDS had reached an acme of evolution as analog electrical devices. There was still more that the new computer technology could bring to the table. Computer processors could do much more than just amplify sound. They could reshape smooth and changes properties to better adapt to the hearing aid users users who each have their own unique auditory challenges. The only problem was that computers in the nineteen seventies, but very large, and by today's standards very slow. My view in the very beginning was. Let's get the most fads. You're hearing I that you could possibly think of digitally. This is Harry. Levin is a former member of the digital century AIDS laboratory at the Cuny Graduate School. It was also a researcher at Bell Labs. Is Goal was to help create a digital hearing aid the dynamic range of human hearing. Changes as a function of frequency, and it is very different for a person with hearing loss. You have to know what the here putzer. The hitting Los has a limited dynamic range of sound. That's very difficult to deal with with the traditional analog signal. Levin arrived at Bell Labs in the early nineteen sixties when it was at the peak of its powers, campuses were bustling complexes, full of scientists in white lab, coat and oversized computing devices with pointing lights, big plastic dials and cables running in every direction. The age of the microprocessor and the Compaq personal computer was in its infancy. But the hearing would be one of the first to benefit from this new technology. In the nineteen seventies Levin and his team pushed the very limits of computer technology. They were committed to improving the audio processing capabilities of the errands hearing aids really using a mainframe computer very large. Had developed I special device now does an analog to digital converter and you had to play your tape recorder. Play what you wanted to be digitized hours later. The computer department would call okay. Your stuff has been digitized in the computer and then I arrange for a to go from a digital to analog converter then that send me the actual types I. This is like a twenty four hour turnaround for any attempt at to any digital work. An analog electrical signal digitized by computer, and then printed onto a tape so that the digital signal could be read by an analog hearing. s quite a process. and not a very efficient. So the solution ended up being a semi digital semi analog hearing aid. Wasn't untold, nine, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, four that the first fully digital hearing aid would arrive on the market. Did work as a consultant to the company that produced the first commercial digital hearing. was called the Phoenix. was body worn inconvenient to use how to wire between the body unit and the thing you want. It was very visible. And people could have benefited from. It didn't want it because it was inconvenient and told everybody that they had a big hearing. So died, but it was the world's first commercial digital hearing it. Once again the conspicuous nece. The hearing aid worked against it. And I know false beards are decorative headbands hiding. But a new hearing technology was in the works that would utilize our hardware. That was far more internal. In more ways than one. while. Research is like Harry Levin worked on methods of amplifying and enhancing audio signals. Another approach began to take shape in the early nineteen seventies. Instead of clarifying the signal that reach the damage art of the year. This new method involve routing around the damage completely. It sent an audio signal directly to the auditory, nor of that bridges the ear and the brain. Auditory nerve is usually significantly in intact indebtness, even though the ear is substantially or completely dysfunctional. Michael Merson, there is a professor emeritus at the University of California, San, Francisco, and one of the scientists who helped create the coke lear implant, and that's because the most sensitive structures in the ear to damage to laws. Are actually the cells that trend's deuce the acoustic information. The sound information is sound energy. So they die I their most sensitive damaging loss, but almost always even after they die the nervous dill significantly intact. And it sitting there inactive, because there's no way that can be excited by sound now that the translational machinery as Staffordshire destroyed. Merson Nick and his team had a big challenge had to figure out how to send audio information that was detailed.

AIDS Harry Levin bell labs New York Times Cuny Graduate School Compaq Michael Merson Staffordshire researcher Los Nick University of California consultant professor Francisco San
"aids" Discussed on Medical Mysteries

Medical Mysteries

09:11 min | 1 year ago

"aids" Discussed on Medical Mysteries

"Unfortunately this time they're optimism was misplaced Ryan died April Eighth Nineteen Ninety at eighteen years old. He was surrounded by his mother sister grandparents and even his most famous cheerleader. Elton John who had flown to Indianapolis just to be there. Ryan had passed away one month shy of graduating high school a few months later congress passed his namesake legistlation the Ryan white comprehensive AIDS resources. Emergency Act or care act in August nineteen ninety. The Care Act was a bipartisan measure. Signed into law by President George H W Bush. It provided two hundred twenty point five million dollars in federal funds for care and treatment including grants to help low income PEOPLE AFFORD EXPENSIVE. Aids medicine managed by the US Department of Health Resources and Services Administration. The first grants under the care. Act were distributed just a short time later in nineteen ninety one nineteen ninety one also saw finally another drug that could treat HIV and AIDS. Die Dancing an oral solution of powder and water when a person sells absorbed identity. Seen It. Slow down the HIV's ability to replicate and spread through the body. Unfortunately didanosine couldn't cure AIDS and it had dangerous side effects including potential neural damage however it was very effective at slowing the progression of AIDS in patients who previously used. Act if he'd lived long enough to see it hit the market Ryan. White might have responded to die dancing very well and thanks to people like Ryan who helps de Stigmatize AIDS researchers were able to raise funds and keep looking for better cures their efforts led the FDA to approve the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy heart in Nineteen ninety-six heart referred to any treatment regimen. That involved two or more prescription medications for example researchers found that didanosine could be more effective when used in combination with a C. T. Each form of heart is customize to an individual specific needs. It works best when patients can have honest conversations with their doctors about what is and isn't working conversations free of judgment or shame while Heart Camp Cure AIDS heart can help people manage their symptoms and it will slow the progression of HIV and related conditions after five years the care act was reauthorized in nineteen ninety-six including several additions to make the initiative more accessible part of the legislation introduced funding for the newly approved heart treatment the following year the health resources and Services Administration created the HIV AIDS Bureau responsible solely for overseeing an administering funds in relation to the Ryan White HIV AIDS program. In two thousand. The Care Act was reauthorized again. This time with new provisions for enhancing the health outcomes of patients with HIV and AIDS and in two thousand six it was renamed the Ryan White HIV AIDS treatment modernization. Act of two thousand six up until this point. Most AIDS breakthroughs had been about managing the disease in slowing its progress. But then something remarkable happened. Something that had never happened before Timothy Ray Brown was cured of AIDS. He didn't go public until two thousand ten until then he was simply known as the Berlin patient Brown tested positive for HIV in Nineteen ninety-five on February. Sixth Two thousand seven. He underwent a stem cell transplant to treat his leukemia within three months. Hiv couldn't be detected in his blood stem cell. Transplants are highly controversial and incredibly expensive. But another possible solution appeared in two thousand nineteen that year nature reported on an HIV patient in London. Who received a bone marrow transplant? He currently has no detectable. Hiv in his blood while the procedure is too expensive and risky for widespread use researchers view the London patient and the Berlin patient as proof that HIV can be cured meanwhile other strides are being made to prevent its spread in the past decade the FDA approved a more accessible drug that would prevent HIV transmission through sacs and drug use prep or pre exposure. Prophylaxis is a highly effective medication for HIV negative individuals who are at risk of contracting the disease. Thanks to prep. Scientists today have the tools to halt AIDS in its path but they still have to work around a lot of social stigma. Nearly forty million people live with the disease worldwide. One in seven are unaware that they're infected and may inadvertently spread it if they're too embarrassed or afraid to get tested. Information campaigns have helped a little as efforts to fix the mistakes of the past including the demonization of Gaetano. Duga or patient. Oh as we discussed last week. Duga was identified in the early days of the AIDS epidemic. He was dubbed Patient Zero by Randy shifts author of and the band played on the nineteen eighty-seven book and the Nineteen ninety-three movie adaptation on. Hbo depicted Duga as simply a bad guy. Somehow he got infected with the virus and then he continued to sleep around and spread the disease. It took more than thirty years but Gaetano Gaas name was finally cleared in a study published in nature in two thousand sixteen. It describe a new genetic analysis of stored blood samples from Duga it proved DIGOS. Specific strain of HIV was prevalent in the country long before he began globetrotting with Air Canada. In nineteen seventy four. In other words he wasn't responsible for the spread of AIDS. Since dugas name was cleared. Scientists have continued to search for solutions and for ways to right. The wrongs of the past. Nobody can bring back those individuals who died when AIDS was so hated. That officials refused to cooperate to find a cure. But there's still time to build a better future. New Breakthroughs are promising but only so long as doctors patients researchers in the federal government are willing to work together the history of AIDS and HIV is one of stigma government irresponsibility and unnecessary deaths with better education in open communication. The future can be one of hope. Thanks for listening to medical mysteries. We'll be back next week with another episode for more information on Ryan White amongst the many sources we used. We found the biography Ryan White my own story extremely helpful to our research. You can find all episodes of medical mysteries and all other park has originals for free on spotify. Not only to spotify already. Have all of your favorite music but now spotify is making it easy for you to enjoy all of your favorite podcast originals. Like medical mysteries for free from your phone. Desktop or smart speaker to stream medical mysteries on spotify. Just open the APP tap browse and type medical mysteries in the search bar. And don't forget to follow us on facebook and Instagram. At podcast and twitter at our cast network. We'll see you next time. Medical mysteries was created by Max Cutler. And disappear cast studios original executive producers include Max and Ron Cutler sound designed by Juan Boorda with production assistance by Ron Shapiro Carly Madden Freddie Beckley and Joel Stein. This episode of medical mysteries was written by Geno Lennon with writing assistance by Maggie Admire and stars Molly Brandenburg and Richard Rosner..

AIDS HIV Ryan White HIV AIDS Ryan White Ryan HIV AIDS Bureau Gaetano Gaas spotify President George H W Bush Duga FDA Elton John didanosine Indianapolis US Department of Health Resour congress Berlin facebook twitter
"aids" Discussed on Medical Mysteries

Medical Mysteries

10:05 min | 1 year ago

"aids" Discussed on Medical Mysteries

"The spread of the virus. Thousands of lives were at stake for some HIV positive people. It was already too late. Rock Hudson died on October. Second Nineteen eighty-five that day. The government finally allocated one hundred ninety million dollars nearly seventy million dollars more than had been requested to expand AIDS research. In addition to these public funds. Hudson himself left two hundred and fifty thousand dollars to Amfar the American Foundation for AIDS research while activists raised awareness in Washington. Dc Ryan fought the law in Kokomo. His court case was long and exhausting but he was finally allowed to return to school on February twenty. First one thousand nine hundred eighty six. It had been almost a year and a half since he'd been in a classroom and nearly just as long since his diagnosis. It seemed like a miracle that Ryan was still alive and able to go to school but it didn't last long on his first day back. Three parents in the district filed an injunction to prevent Ryan from returning. It took almost two months for a judge to throw out the injunctions. Eventually fourteen year old Ryan was allowed to attend western middle school again but he could never go back to being an anonymous ordinary boy instead Ryan was becoming a hero to AIDS patients everywhere serving as a sympathetic face of the disease. And helping fundraisers tug on heartstrings. He was invited to the amfar benefit party in New York City. A star studded event where he'd be surrounded by his favourite celebrities the morning of the soiree. He told Good Morning America that he was most looking forward to seeing Elton John. When Ryan and his family arrived at the benefit they were welcomed with open arms. Elton John Wasn't there but Ryan still managed to have a great time. It was a nice change of pace for the boy who couldn't catch a break back home the next morning amfar sent them limo to bring them to the airport. They were cutting through. New York's traffic when suddenly the car phone started to ring when they answered they were surprised to hear a man with a British accent on the other end of the line. It was Elton John. He'd seen Ryan on Good Morning America. Elton apologized for missing the amphora event and instead invited Ryan and his family to his next concert in Texas. Obviously Ryan was thrilled. Sadly he never made it to the show. He had to be hospitalized due to a persistent cough. This was becoming something of a routine for Ryan. He spent so much time in the hospital. He became friends with the doctors and staff but soon they gave him good news on March twentieth. Nineteen eighty seven the FDA approved the first anti-hiv drug in the United States Zoo medine or azt like the Gamma Globulin. Treatment couldn't cure HIV or AIDS. But it could stop the viruses spread. Azt was discovered almost by accident. A scientist developed in the nineteen sixties to fight cancer. But it never made it past animal trials because it was ineffective in the nineteen eighties. Researchers found that easy T- could block the enzyme. Hiv uses to take over a sell. It couldn't kill the HIV but it could severely limit the viruses ability to spread and take over the body at least in theory the approval of AZT was controversial from start to finish. Clinical trials only took twenty months when a test of that size would usually last up to ten years but the FDA was under immense pressure to speed up the process. That pressure was in part. Thanks to people like Ryan White. His face was splashed across front pages reminding people of the human cost of untreated. Aids people's lives depended on finding a cure fast during the brief trial. Three hundred participants diagnosed with AIDS were randomly assigned a prescription a placebo pill or AZT. The participants didn't know which pill they were getting and neither did their doctors and just four months into the human trial phase researchers ended the test during those four months one person taking adt had died in contrast nineteen placebo patients had passed away the FDA claim this was enough evidence to prove. The drug was safe and effective. Why carry on the trial when people were dying and this drug could help them. The problem was the trial wasn't as scientific as researchers hoped. They measured results in terms of how many patients survived while ignoring the fact that AIDS isn't an inherently fatal illness AIDS deadly because it weakens the immune system. It's other opportunistic infections. That technically kill the patient and when study participants got sick with pneumonia or diarrhea. There was no standardised procedure for how to treat them so if doctors gave lifesaving care to a sick AIDS patient during the clinical trial. Azt got the credit rather than the treatment that actually help. In addition rumors suggested that some study participants shared bills with one another to increase the odds that a placebo patient could try the lifesaving drug if these rumors were true researchers had no way of knowing which patients were actually on easy. T- and which weren't those nineteen deaths in the control. Group may have been people who are taking the test drug finally as e t has serious side effects including nausea vomiting and liver problems. There were a lot of drawbacks. But even with all of these concerns doctors thought that a flawed AIDS treatment was better than no treatment at all so the barely tested drug hit the market soon after the US Department of Health and Human Services launched the act drug reimbursement program. This initiative assisted people. Who couldn't afford the medicine on their own even with Insurance Ryan didn't know about the flaws in the AZT drug trial. When he heard about the treatment he just saw hope for a cure for he had a hard time getting on as e t because of his history of hepatitis which could cause liver problems. Ultimately his doctors decided. The risk of liver damage was less than the risk of living with untreated AIDS. So he finally got the treatment he needed by this point. He'd been living with AIDS for a year and a half about ten months longer than he'd expected to with AZT treatments. It seemed he just might beat the condition but he couldn't be the stigma against as though Ryan got healthy enough to return to school and finish eighth grade. He did so amidst bullying harassment and discrimination. Strangely he felt most accepted among strangers and celebrities Ryan and his family finally met Elton John in Los Angeles. The Star even threw a little party for Ryan at Disneyland. They took private jets to various concerts and received handwritten notes roses after they returned home much to genie surprise. Elton and Ryan shared drinks and handshakes and hugs to. Elton Ryan wasn't the boy with AIDS. He was just Ryan. Sadly Ryan was starved for this kind of acceptance and dignity even though the CDC had debunked the MIFID AIDS could be transferred from casual contact. Students and teachers didn't want to shake Brian's hand or use the same bathroom as him. He was the punch line to the homophobic jokes that his classmates made people claim that he coughed on food in the grocery store and spit on people who made him mad. Classmates defaced. His Locker and road slurs on his shoulders. Everything came to a head the day. The whites came home from a family outing to find broken glass on the living room floor. Further investigation revealed a circular hole in the window. Someone had fired a gun at the house. Enough was enough in nineteen eighty seven Ryan and his family knew it was time to leave. Kokomo even though it would be hard to abandon the little town where his mom had grown up and where his grandparents still lived but there was no better time to leave. The LANDSBERG company was interested in making television movie about what had happened to Ryan in Kokomo. His family received an advance almost large enough for a down payment on a house. One hour south in CICERO. Indiana and Ryan's new friend. Elton John provided the rest of the money. Things.

Elton Ryan AIDS Ryan White Elton John FDA HIV Elton Kokomo Rock Hudson persistent cough New York City Washington liver damage CICERO pneumonia western middle school scientist Indiana American Foundation hepatitis
"aids" Discussed on Medical Mysteries

Medical Mysteries

07:54 min | 1 year ago

"aids" Discussed on Medical Mysteries

"Ryan white a young boy from Kokomo. Indiana was a mystery from the beginning he was born with haemophilia. A disease that prevents blood from clotting properly however while hemophilia is typically an inherited disease. No one from Ryan's family had ever had it and from the beginning Ryan hated being different. He kept his diagnosis a secret from his friends and schoolmates. Sometimes he'd come to school severely bruised from his Mafia and try to play it off as a result of an ordinary playground fall. Even though as him failure was a secret the other kids knew he was hiding something Ryan got used to being the subject of gossip but he tried to always stay optimistic he was religious and trusted that God would help him live with haemophilia. Everything was going to be okay around. Nineteen seventy-six Ryan's doctors started him on regular at home. Injections of blood. Clotting protein factor eight it ensured that the energetic and rambunctious kindergartner could play without worrying about excessively bleeding from minor. Bruises and scrapes factor. Eight permitted Ryan to live a seemingly normal life but it brought new risks in his biography. Ryan White my own story. He remembered an argument between his mother. Jeannie and his grandfather in the early nineteen eighties. Ryan's grandfather had recently read. That AIDS was transmitted through the blood and Ryan's injections which were derived from blood. Donations could be contaminated. He pleaded with genie to stop the treatments but she was convinced. That the factor eight injections were keeping Ryan Alive. She refused to listen to Ryan's grandfather's fearmongering and Ryan kept taking the Medication Ryan wasn't concerned. Though an article he read in time claimed that less than one percent of haemophiliacs had AIDS. And those who did contract the disease were usually older men. He didn't even think to worry about AIDS when he spent most of the summer of Nineteen eighty-four sick that is until he was finally admitted to the Riley Hospital for children in Indianapolis in December nineteen eighty-four. His grandfather's worst fear came true thirteen year. Old Ryan was diagnosed with Newell Sisters Pneumonia. A disease often found in people with weakened immune systems in the one thousand nine hundred eighty s a PCP diagnosis was usually an indicator that the patient had contracted aids. It turns out that the Statistics Ryan had read were wrong in the nineteen eighties. Ninety percent of patients with severe haemophilia were infected with AIDS through tainted factory but genie. It seemed impossible that her young boisterous son could have a deadly disease. She went into denial. When Ryan's teachers would come to visit him in the hospital. Jeannie would say they say he has aids but I think they're going to find out it's something else. His teachers often responded by becoming nervous or frightened. It was the first time. Genie recognized the stigma associated with AIDS. Like his mother Ryan's first instinct was to ignore the diagnosis. Not because he didn't believe it but because he wanted just a few more weeks of normalcy even though he was only thirteen Ryan already knew the harassment and discrimination he'd face if he was open about living with HIV. A lot of the mistreatment stemmed from early incorrect theories about the spread of AIDS which were reported in the news as fact in the mid nineteen eighties many people believe that HIV positive people were all drug users or game in people who already faced discrimination in society and some believed the opposite that AIDS wasn't confined to certain groups but easy to catch through physical touch drinking from the same water fountain or using the same toilet seat those people tried to limit what HIV positive people could do or where they could go in the name of Public Safety Ryan didn't want to face discrimination. He didn't want people to assume he was sexually active or a drug user. He insisted to his mother that he wasn't in denial. He knew he had aids. He just wanted to pretend for a little while. Then he didn't but pretending wasn't an option. Because AIDS diagnosis was a death sentence. In nineteen eighty-four the AIDS mortality rate was over seventy five percent. Meaning three out of four people to receive a diagnosis died within the year. At that time not only was there. No sign of a cure but also no treatment for aids the reason AIDS so deadly is that it targets the patient's immune system HIV the AIDS virus attacks CD four cells also known as T. cells. They're a type of white blood cell that fights off infection. Not only does the loss of CD four cells mean the infected person is at risk of other serious diseases like PCP but HIV can take over CD for cells and use them to produce more viruses to control his PCP symptoms Ryan returned to the Riley Hospital for children at least once a month for Gamma Globulin. Therapy Gamma Globulin. Therapy is like a blood transfusion but with antibody rich blood plasma instead of whole blood while Gamma Globulin can't curates or stop the spread of HIV. The boost in uninfected CD. Four cells can help a person fight off infections. Short-term Ryan also had to take nasal medication an aerosol spray of contaminating the main drug that treated PCP the spray and the Gamma Globulin helped him recover from Numa sisters pneumonia but they did nothing to treat his HIV infection. At the time there were no treatments that could Ryan and his family just had to wait hoping someone would find a cure while Ryan was still able to manage his symptoms. Unfortunately time was short. Ryan's grandfather read that after diagnosis AIDS. Patients usually only lived about six more months. Ryan's doctors agreed with the prognosis. That meant that when Ryan was thirteen and most of his peers. Were thinking about first dances math tests. He had to think about dying Ryan's best hope was in the knowledge that AIDS was getting more news coverage every day. If he survived long enough he might even survive to see a cure in Ryan. White my own story. He said I bet. If I live five years I can beat this thing or I'll die trying at the end of January nineteen eighty-five thirteen year. Old Ryan was finally discharged from the hospital. But he couldn't go back to school right away he hadn't fully recovered from the PCP. He's still had a nasty cough and often felt too weak to really do anything and he certainly didn't have an appetite Ryan's frequent trips.

Ryan white AIDS PCP cure Riley Hospital Indiana Jeannie Kokomo HIV infection cough Indianapolis harassment Newell Numa
"aids" Discussed on Part of the Problem

Part of the Problem

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"aids" Discussed on Part of the Problem

"I've heard some people who have mentioned some interesting theories about that. The saudi aspect of it is like the most well documented. I mean that's like that's actually pretty much. Just fact i mean first off. It was a bunch of saudis who flagging attacked us on nine eleven and they very clearly had helped from high level saudi officials so both private and public individuals in saudi arabia helped these saudis you know like i. I don't know it's like if you had a fuck in a bunch of new yorkers who went and hid like we're hiding out in new jersey for a few years and then they planned and an attack on you with the help of like high level people in the new york government. You wouldn't fuck and be like you're like eight. You wanna talk about new york attacking us. It'd be like your conspiracy theorists. It was just one little group and <hes> yeah so obviously and whether or not you know ah at a certain point. It's like it doesn't really matter to me 'cause whether or not israel was in on nine eleven. They were certainly in on all of the war plans that were drawn ron up immediately after nine eleven so the real you know like i mean i shouldn't say it doesn't matter it matters if you were involved in a conspiracy to kill thousands of americans of course but what we know for sure is that israel was involved in the war in iraq and all of the subsequent wars that followed afterwards so that that to me is the real evil. I tend to just feel like let's focus on what we have them on. If i see proof of something else i'll look into that. I know there's been some people have talked about. You know the all the different people involved volved nine eleven. I just i actually think if you look at the evidence there is a lot of evidence that like ju just to take on some of the conspiracy. There's there's a lot of evidence that like al qaeda was a real thing that they really planned this and that they really did it. I don't buy into the like a <hes> <hes> that it was just the israelis or just dick cheney or j- you know like i think al qaeda was involved that being said it doesn't you know al qaeda had been getting a lot of support short years before by the who supporting them in the meantime who the fuck knows. There's a lotta shit. Look what we know for like what we know. Ooh la is done. The different secret services that the pentagon the military industrial complex have done what we know is outrageously horrific horrific and if that's what we know believe me. There's a whole bunch more shady shit going on so my my inclination. My guess would be that if we knew what was really going on. If one hundred percent of everything was declassified tomorrow it would be worse than mere. You can imagine that's kind of my guess but who knows could be wrong but even if there was nothing else going on. It's still enough to you know to justify putting a whole bunch of people in fucking prison for the the rest of their lives if not up against a wall in front of a firing squad after trial and conviction. It's for all just for the n._s._a. <hes> who's listening in on that one after after being duly prosecuted then we then we moved to face number two all right. Let's go through. Let's see what else we got to wrap up pretty soon guys. It'll be a little bit of a short episode without my muse rob robbie the fire..

israel new york saudi arabia dick cheney ron iraq pentagon one hundred percent
"aids" Discussed on Part of the Problem

Part of the Problem

03:29 min | 1 year ago

"aids" Discussed on Part of the Problem

"I just don't really think he's built to be like a host of a show. He's a good he's a very good writer and he's very good panelist but he doesn't. I don't know maybe i'm wrong. I just don't see him in that in that role <hes> but that is a that is a good question. Look look the truth. Is that it none of that shit really matters. I mean the world has changed the rules change. The fucking rogin gets the more views on every episode then the number one show in cable news. He's he's probably close to twice as big as the number one show in cable news which is usually either hannity or tucker carlson so he's probably doing doing three times what rachel traumatic does every night and then your average like c._n._n. Show probably doing ten times what they are so you know. It's like at a certain point at least for me. I start to go like well. I don't think the goal is to get a cable news. Show like why the fuck would i wanna do that. Why why would i wanna go get a show. That's like fucking. <hes> you know. I interrupted by commercials constantly. I got networks execs telling tell me what i can and can't say being fucking always put into this box. I just want my podcast to get fucking bigger and bigger and bigger which it's been doing so the really that's the goal is to just get this just compromise. Nothing say exactly what i want to say. Curse i wanna curse have on whatever guests i want to have on on and fucking you know do it that way it just it just that just seems to be the writer the right path and there's something kind of beautiful about that but you know i'm sure we'll all get big enough. I'll be fucking now. I'll be i'll be on persons pretty soon. <hes> hopefully not okay okay. <hes> jimmy says the whole beef between the coke and rothbart and how the libertarian react yeah okay. I think i pretty much <hes> mentioned that already eddie <hes> justin says bonus apps bro every wednesday his a bonus episode every wednesday. I've been killing it with bonus episodes you out of your mind. People are very ungrateful very ungrateful succession again my reading the same fucking things. Oh no no oh it's just it's just there's only so many topics people want to talk about all right. Madrick's magic's <hes> who i always feel like i'm pronouncing that wrong <hes> saudi pakistan and israeli role in nine eleven <hes> well. That's an interesting question. I don't i know that i have too much to offer on that. I mean i've heard the conspiracies and as i've said before when it comes to nine eleven conspiracies. I'll just say i'm not i wouldn't call myself a trooper or somebody who believes in. I because i'm not i hey. I don't like believe a lot of these crazy theories. I don't believe in the controlled demolition thing and i don't <hes> however my reaction to nine eleven conspiracy is never liked. Get outta here. It's always kind of like you know so if you're like israel was involved in nine eleven. I'm kind of like all right. Go on you know continue..

writer hannity israel jimmy tucker carlson pakistan rachel Madrick
"aids" Discussed on Part of the Problem

Part of the Problem

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"aids" Discussed on Part of the Problem

"I do notice things are around me like i notice that there is this weird double standard. <hes> where somehow israel is is you know like all democrats and republicans all come together to unquestionably support israel. I'm not a fan of that. I do you notice the jewish overrepresentation in some very damaging industries like you know i again. I don't don't have the exact numbers right in front of me but it's like you know in in banking and media in neo-conservatism like all these different things. There's there's like this. A huge like eight thousand percent overrepresentation of jews and i find all of these to be kind of damning like you know it's these are or not helpful areas. These are some of the you know the people who i have the most contempt for so. I don't think you shouldn't be allowed to talk about that. I don't believe that it's it's a a jewish conspiracy or be some genetic. You know like a desire to subvert host nation i i. I don't believe in any of that but i also don't think you shouldn't be allowed to explore these questions. So when there is anti-semitism that's rising up. I tend two and maybe just because it's the more useful <hes> approach from my perspective. I tend to go like well. What is it that jews are doing that are pissing all these people off and and i don't say that as somebody who dislikes jews i say that as somebody who you know has a vested interest in their not being like a large antisemitic movement <hes> building up up and you know i. I certainly don't wanna see that gain any real traction so you know it's like hey. What are we doing. What could we maybe not. Maybe it's not a good idea. I don't think it's that crazy for for any group of people who are and i would say this to like all minorities in any country across the world if you're like two percent percent of the population. I think it's reasonable to ask yourself. Hey are you helping the nation that you're a part of. Maybe you should try to make the effort to be a positive force because you know in your own self interest. You're outnumbered so if you're kind of fucking over a lot of people that's not a great strategy because they might realize and then they might be kinda pissed off and there's ninety eight of them for every two that there are a view so maybe that's not the best idea so that's kind of my impulse with the jewish question. It gets me in trouble on all sides. One of these issues that it's just kind of like the alt-right guys think i don't go far enough. Everybody else thinks i'm alt-right for even talking about it. I don't know whatever and as far as the white part goes i do i. I'm very just turned off by the openly anti white bigotry. That's completely accepted in polite society in america in two thousand nineteen. I can't stand it. I just think it's horrible. It's like i don't know i don't hate white people like i guess i consider myself a white person. I don't really know like yeah..

israel neo-conservatism america eight thousand percent two percent
"aids" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

Conspiracy Theories

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"aids" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

"HIV gals work. To engineer monkey viruses to cause cancers cancers like Kaposi sarcoma. A common symptom in aids patients Gallo didn't just focus on cancers, but also similar diseases that would slowly deteriorate human health until death. Just as aids does Horowitz believes that by engineering viruses from a variety of animals gala would have been able to produce one virus that was capable of causing many of the symptoms of aids. We also know that in nineteen seventy gala was actively sharing research in this vein with the military as his company worked with the military firm. Maybe this is my gala was the go-to researcher. When aids first appeared in the US, or maybe he already knew about the disease, perhaps he was even the one who created the HIV virus to help the US government with its overpopulation problem. This theory, basically hinges on the Assange. Shen that Nixon's population control initiatives, the US military's biological weapon research and the CIA's covert operations in central Africa. Were all connected, but the only link connecting them is Henry Kissinger who as national security adviser was necessarily involved in overseeing all three Regina lot of conclusions based on pretty flimsy evidence. But the story isn't quite over the crux of this theory lies in Kissinger's links to Merck sharp and Dohme a drug company known for Tempa Titus b vaccine and for being the world's largest supplier of aids related drugs..

Henry Kissinger US Horowitz Kaposi sarcoma engineer Gallo CIA researcher Regina Assange Dohme Shen Africa Nixon
"aids" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

Conspiracy Theories

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"aids" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

"Possible to create targeted viruses, designed to only affect people with certain DNA sequences or specific Gino types, if we know anything about the aids epidemic, we know that it disproportionately affected gay and black populations. Yes. But that wasn't due to the properties of the virus on a scientific level. HIV is biologically capable of the FEC anyone equally. Okay. That argument falls apart under scrutiny, but we still have overpopulation bio weapons and. And the knowledge that these weapons can potentially be targeted towards specific than a graphics. What's more? We have Henry Kissinger who in addition to overseeing the overpopulation and bioweapon efforts also reviewed all covert operations by the US these included CIA operations in Zaire where aids originated, we don't know the details of these covert operations in Africa because well, they're covert. But we do know that the US military worked with one research contractor named Robert Gallo. That's the same Robert Gallo who discovered HIV in nineteen eighty three. At the end of the day. Everything we've laid out could just be coincidence. The first key bit of evidence for the conspiracy theory takes us back to American researcher, Robert Gallo and French researcher Luc Montagnier as the official story tells it to separate labs led by Gallo and Montagnier respectively simultaneously discovered aids in nineteen eighty three but Dr Horowitz argued that given what's known about gallows research. He realistically could have synthesized HIV virus years before aids. First appeared in nineteen seventy one let's take a ride through gallows resume beginning in nineteen sixty eight he worked with a company called Lytton bio networks, which in turn was linked with a military contracting firm, which was overseen by Henry Kissinger before he was famous for discovering.

Robert Gallo Henry Kissinger HIV US Dr Horowitz researcher Lytton bio networks Gino Luc Montagnier FEC CIA Zaire Africa Montagnier official
"aids" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

Conspiracy Theories

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"aids" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

"These leaders were trying to avoid. It's a logical fallacy and a dangerous one to assume these politicians were conspiring together simply because they shared the same sexuality that seems like the hushing up of the aids epidemic was more of a side effect of institutional homophobia than a malicious act of its own. There's no hard evidence of any organized attempt to bury the connection between HIV aids. And the gay community rather, it was downplayed by many gay activists because of ignorance and misinformation, and it was ignored by politicians who were afraid of the stigma. I'll give this theory is six out of ten what happened was more circumstantial than purposeful. But at the end of the day, it did still lead to the same public health crisis. It's undeniable that aids was pushed aside, whether it be from ignorance fear or malicious prejudice. But is there any proof that the government purposely engineered HIV to harm gay in black populations on purpose? Coming up. We'll dive into conspiracy theory number two. What would you do to stay alive? When you drink your own urine. Would you? Wade through snake infested water, would you cut off your own arm? I'm not sure I could do any of those things every week par. Cast new show. Survival tells the high intensity stories of people in life or death situations in explores the strategies they use to survive survival. Also examines the lasting psychological effects of living through a traumatic event. And what's like return to normal life won't want to miss the astonishing story of one survivors heroin escape from the North Korean internment camp in the amazing account of a pilot and passenger who crashed in the snowy, Canadian Yukon their stories, exemplify the human spirits ability to triumph over deadly adversity. New episodes come out every Monday search for and subscribe to survival where every listen to podcasts. Again, search survival or visit podcast dot com slash survival to listen now survival..

aids heroin Wade
"aids" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

Conspiracy Theories

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"aids" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

"Normalizing aids. And making sure everyone knew they were at risk. This has its pros and cons. It dulled. Some of the fear and bias toward gay people, but it also diverted money and attention away from the communities who needed most, in fact, although the government now had a six hundred million dollar budget towards fighting and preventing aids much of that budget was spent educating college students and heterosexual women were much less at risk even as the government began to work on saving American lives. It was evident that bias still ruled the handling of this epic. But how far does the bias go? We can clearly see that HIV aids was not given the proper scientific and public awareness attention. It deserved dismissed by the media as a gay problem or a black problem or a drug users problem, it was ignored by the press and the government until it was too late to contain the everyone problem and once media coverage and campaigns did start to kick in aids awareness campaigns were still full of fear mongering that led individuals being outcast from their communities instead of supported as for the government. They didn't want to appear as though they were aligning themselves with the gay community stepping in to fight aids was bad politics. But to what extent is this neglect aside effect of prejudice into what extent were these malicious targeted acts at what point does inactivity begin to look like a targeted genocide? If HIV was. Targeted act were any of its objectives achieved and in what ways do we continue to be affected today by past mistakes and biases women comes to HIV aids. There's a lot to dig through. We've given you a basic understanding of what it is. And how it spread and in theory. Wyatt spread but there are a few other explanations for how aids became an epidemic next week will look into the conspiracy theories behind the aids epidemic starting with a surprising theory that points to those at the top of the gay community's hierarchy on all. That's a twist at twist, but not without a strain of thinking we are unfamiliar with just a standing with aids. Patients could have been bad PR for the government. It could have also been considered unsavory for gay leaders, particularly those in New York who were trying to make a place for healthy gay people in America. So conspiracy theory number one. Gay community leaders suppressed media coverage and government response to HIV aids. In an attempt to keep their name clean gay plague would only worsen American homophobia. Then there's conspiracy theory number two HIV aids did not come about because of government complacency, but because of an overt effort by the government to spread the disease. This is a two parter when it comes to government motive, some people believe that the government was targeting gay African American populations specifically while others believe HIV was an attempt to coal overpopulation in general. And then there's conspiracy theory number three which brings us into two thousand eighteen while we now have drugs to prevent the spread of HIV and to slow the progress of HIV there still is no actual cure for aids. Many people have noticed that high profile or wealthy HIV positive. Of individuals like Magic Johnson seem to be doing surprisingly fine modern medicine is affected at keeping HIV patients healthy. But is it that good or does our government havoc? You're that they're not sharing with us. If they're not sharing with us. Why not who are they targeting will look at all these questions and try to get to the truth next week? Thanks for tuning into conspiracy theories will be back

HIV New York Wyatt America Johnson six hundred million dollar
"aids" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

Conspiracy Theories

04:52 min | 2 years ago

"aids" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

"But with aids the focus was on looking for blame. It's not surprising that scientists ended up pointing fingers at gay tone. The people wanted someone to blame as soon as science. Chested. There might be a patient zero the media honed in on this exaggerating the story for the public's ears. When scientists took a sample of Gatanzi blood HIV was certainly present. However, we now know the strain was the same as the one already present in men in New York, the strain that was present before Gaetano even began his career as a flight attendant. The patient zero theory was completely unfounded looking back. Scientists never really even suggested Gaetana was patient zero. If anything it was just a simple slip up likely, the story found its roots in nineteen Eighty-four study that examined forty game than with Kaposi sarcoma or other issues related symptoms and mapped out their sexual partners as it turns out, eight of the forty men had had sex with a nameless flight attendant, four of them lived in New York and four in California. But are nameless flight attendant was nameless. So what did they call him patient? Oh, standing for out of California. Now, I'm sure you don't need a pencil and paper to work out with the letter o. Looks like the entire patient zero phenomenon was due to nothing more than a misread letter. Oh and immense social bias since. There wasn't really an understanding of what HIV aids was it was easy for the media spent spread misconceptions that is when they chose to speak up for the most part the media barely said anything about the disease. The American public turned a blind eye because a gay disease was not a problem for the nation at large. Most Americans didn't even know any openly gay people it was easy to ignore an epidemic that for all. Most people knew was only affecting small segment of the population. The government certainly wasn't saying anything to clarify. What was going on either? And as we know Reagan's press secretary and the press were treating the gay community and their problems as a joke, all the general public really knew was that HIV aids usually infected gay men, and that it was scary. Well, we like to think that our social behavior reacts to our scientific findings. This been a lot of moments in history that baked differ often. It's our science that follows our social climate and perception of an issue's importance if US -ociety at large didn't care about the gay community new. Either with the US government, which meant there would be no funding for response from the scientific community. We just kind of crazy aids was beginning to make it self known as a terminal and spreadable disease affecting young people in the strongest healthiest years of their lives in nineteen eighty one. There were one hundred and fifty nine new cases of the disease reported by nineteen eighty two it grew to seven hundred seventy one just three years after that it had exploded to fifteen thousand five hundred twenty seven cases with twelve thousand five hundred twenty nine deaths, and it was all swept under the rug the nineteen eighty nine Dr Jonathan Mann director of the World Health organizations global program on aids explain that the disease was still growing exponentially in warned of inaction at the end of the nineteen eighties. The world's vulnerability to aids remains and is. Increasing overall the global epidemic is gaining momentum. Major barriers to more effective actions still exist and complacency about aids is spreading worldwide the World Health Organization believes that the world struggle with aids during the nineteen nineties we'll be much more difficult than it has been during the decade of the nineteen eighties. The World Health Organization predicts that by the year, two thousand six million people may have developed aids a tenfold increase over today. Luckily by the nineteen nineties anti retroviral therapies were invented which slowed down the progression of HIV stirring us away from the Berge in of history. Dr Jonathan Mann describes however his claim speak to the severe apathy towards funding HIV aids research and sexual education in the US. Think about an Ebola outbreak hitting the United States. It would be on the front page of every. Paper..

US World Health Organization New York California Dr Jonathan Mann Kaposi sarcoma Gaetana Berge Gaetano Ebola Reagan press secretary director three years
"aids" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

Conspiracy Theories

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"aids" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

"Were sick HIV can go undiagnosed for years, in fact, in twenty fifteen there were more than one point one million people in the US with HIV. However when in seven don't even realize they have it when the HIV virus is I contracted a person may feel like they have the flu as the virus works its way into. Person sells it triggers and immune response from our good old friends the T, Sal, our body responds just as it does when we have a cold fever fatigue. Swollen lymph nodes. Then the symptom stop just like the flu of intially does. But unlike normal virus, the HIV virus is still there. The patients just don't feel sick anymore because their immune systems developed antibodies to suppress the HIV, they're not cured by any means, but they're managing to block the disease and stay healthy for now for decades. Even this is why it was so difficult for scientists to get a grasp on how the disease worked and why it was so difficult to stop its spread. So decades later the patient get sick again why because HIV is extremely sloppy at replicating itself. This means that every now and again a mistake strain slightly different from the strain. The patient's body has learned to manage breaks through and makes the patient sick again depleting further T cells, what was once around one thousand or more T-cells per. Cubic millimeter of blood is now under two hundred a dramatic change in our body's ability to fight off disease. And this is a Mark of shift in the individuals disease. This is where HIV becomes aids otherwise known as acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Aids is the last in most relentless stage of HIV marked by an extremely impaired immune system and a heightened likelihood of contracting, opportunistic infections to put it simply this is the point where simple diseases can now be killers due to a weakened immune system without medical intervention HIV will progress to aids within five to ten years. However, the time it takes for HIV to progress. In aids varies greatly from patient to patient, depending on treatment and other factors in twenty eighteen. Not everyone reaches the.

Aids flu immune deficiency syndrome US Sal fever ten years
"aids" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

04:45 min | 2 years ago

"aids" Discussed on What It Takes

"Maybe this is an opportunity i did that when i stopped doing my autoimmune more in switched hiv aids i did that when i became the director of noaa id and then i realized as a director of this institute when you had challenges like outbreaks influenza anthrax and all those kinds of things that what we needed was a scientist who is a serious scientist who could articulate to the white house to the congress and to the public the kinds of things that are important that we need but being the public face of research for infectious diseases has put dr faucher in the hot seat at times if you're listening to this podcast and you were born after nineteen seventy you may not remember or know about the years when so little was known about hiv that there was public hysteria maybe you could catch it from just touching someone infected or using the toilet seat they'd used and there were also years of mass protests by those with the disease gay activists and others who were demanding more resources more research faster better treatment a cure and dr anthony fatty who was at the forefront of hiv aids research but came there stupidity and competent and down that way citing research priorities the nationalist dollars and in fact down here because we think we should be deciding to these are the people who know what's going on dealing with it every day he was called a monster that was a very interesting period that has continued to the day because now very activists or my in my dear friends my comrades my collaborators back then there are a couple of things that were going on that caused the activist community to galvanize and try to gain attention number one the first administration of reagan didn't take this seriously as they should have secondly even as we got into understanding that it was a virus and we would developing drugs the rigidity of the scientific community the regulatory community and even in many respects the budgetary approach towards something was not commensurate with the reality in the potential for this catastrophe that was unfolding for us and it it triggered a seachange in the both the scientific in the regulatory community in i was sort of in the eye of that hurricane because i was so involved and devoted to doing something about this horrible thing that was happening that i became very visible person i was testifying hundreds of times i mean i mean literally hundreds total now after thirty four years thirty three years i've been director i probably testified before congress more than anybody purely because of the longevity what i do but it was constant that in the newspapers with interviews all the time so my face was the face of the federal government most scientists would you know do their thing and not be visible and then it became clear that when we had clinical trials we the scientific community in the regulatory community did not listen to them because they wanted to be part of the discussion of how you design a trial of how you get drug of a available or not but no one was listening to them because it was at the time an attitude that many of us had an i probably had it myself but i changed pretty quickly and that was we're scientists were regulators we know better than you so you know meanwhile they have a disease they see all of their friends dying and we say well a new drug takes x number of years to get through the process of the standard clinical trial and activists hussein wait a minute if i look at my friends i probably have about a year.

thirty three years thirty four years