40 Burst results for "AI"

Fresh update on "ai" discussed on Telecom Reseller

Telecom Reseller

00:51 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ai" discussed on Telecom Reseller

"So I think any time that, you know, even for me, when I'm looking at marketing technology solutions, you start out with what's the problem that you're trying to solve or what's the question you're trying to answer. So take the AI example I was just providing. If the question I'm trying to answer is, what are people feeling and how are they interacting with our contact center and what's their, what is their sentiment, and I want something that's around sentiment analysis. If it is, if it's different, if the problem you're trying to solve, for example, is I need a better forecast, then you probably want work management solution that helps provide that AI's optimize your forecast. So I think you first have to start with what's the problem you're trying to solve and then try and match the solution with it as opposed to, you know, you find the solution. You're like, oh, this is really cool. But it might be really cool, but maybe it doesn't solve the problem that you're really struggling with. Well, Michelle, I want to thank you for sitting down with me. Second time, and cutting another podcast this time focusing on AI and maybe the promise AI really has an improving both the experiences people have as employees and as customers. Where can we learn more about the playbox? You can go to play box dot com to learn more about our solutions. And thank you for having me. It's been a delight. Well, Michelle, we'll look forward to our next podcast, which we're now thank you very much indeed. Thank you again.

AI Michelle
Silencing the iPollo V1 Mini Ethash/ETChash ASIC Miner Among Other Things

Crypto Mining Blog

00:29 sec | 5 d ago

Silencing the iPollo V1 Mini Ethash/ETChash ASIC Miner Among Other Things

"6 a.m. Monday, November 21st, 2022. Silencing the eye pollo V one mini F ash slash ETH asic minor, among other things. A few days ago, we have shared our first impressions from the ai pollo V one mini FACT chache asic minor, and now it is time to dig a little bit deeper into this compact and pretty powerful home oriented minor. One of the first things that came to mind when we have opened this 300 MH at chas ec.

Fresh update on "ai" discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

Techmeme Ride Home

00:31 sec | 7 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ai" discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

"Only produces kid friendly content, quote from the get go, we use carefully curated data sources to train AI models. Head of product for Alexa AI set in a blog post today. We have multiple guardrails such as content filtering and curated prompts to ensure this experience is both delightful and safe. Additionally, create with Alexa requires parents to enable the feature before their kids can use it. Create with Alexa arrives in an atmosphere of uncertainty surrounding Amazon's voice assistant. Earlier this month, the retail giant confirmed it had begun laying off employees reportedly slashing around 10,000 jobs. Its devices and services division, which handles echo show and Alexa, reportedly bore the brunt of it in October, Amazon also killed off glow, its kid focused video calling device. Create with Alexa is available on echo show devices starting today in the U.S.. However, it's only available in English and the United States at launch. And finally, today,

Alexa Ai Alexa Amazon U.S.
The Generative AI Revolution in Games

Andreessen Horowitz

00:28 sec | 5 d ago

The Generative AI Revolution in Games

"2 p.m. Thursday, November 17th, 2022. The generative AI revolution in games to understand how radically gaming is about to be transformed by generative AI, look no further than this recent Twitter post by Emanuel two M in this post he explores using stable diffusion during booth, popular 2D generative AI models, too. The post degenerative AI revolution in games appeared first on andreessen Horowitz.

Emanuel Twitter Andreessen Horowitz
Fresh update on "ai" discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

02:29 min | 13 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ai" discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"Been testing with researchers at northwestern university. It's an inflection point for us, says Greg corrado, cofounder of the Google brain team and principal scientist on Google's AI healthcare team. We're moving from academic research to being able to deploy our algorithm in the real world. In an earlier study published in 2020 in nature, Google's algorithm for mammograms performed better than radiologists and logging fewer false positives and false negatives in reading the images. The study involved mammograms from more than 91,000 women in the U.S. and the UK. In the U.S., where most women ages 50 to 74 are recommended to be screened every two years, Google's system lowered the false positive rate by 6%. And in the UK, where women ages 50 to 70 are advised to get screened every three years by 1.2%. The machine learning algorithm also decreased false positives by 9% in the U.S. and nearly 3% in the UK. That benefit will now be available commercially for the first time to the 7500 mammography sites globally, including university health systems that use icad services, while corado declined to detail how Google's algorithm differs from those being tested by other researchers and companies in the field. He said the system incorporates data from a wide range of images, even beyond those of breast tissue, to refine the machine learning process. I cat and Google will continue to develop and refine the technology as part of the partnership agreement. The algorithm is not designed to replace radiologists. At least not in the near term, but in Europe, says Stacy Stephens, president and CEO of icad, it could help to relieve the burden on radiologists since many nations, including the UK, require two readings of a mammography image. I cat is working with health regulators to earn the proper authorization, so that the company's AI based interpretation could eventually be one of them, she says. In the U.S., Stevens expects the first product, including Google's algorithm, to be rolled out in early 2024. Stevens also anticipates that the AI based system will bring mammography to more people around the world, particularly in lower resource areas that could not support the infrastructure required of hosting hardware related to mammography image storage. With Google's cloud based storage capabilities, she says, we have the ability to expand to new geographies and new regions of the world, and to scale our tools across a greater number of patients in areas of the world constrained by infrastructure challenges. As with any machine learning system, the more data from mammograms that are fed into the algorithm, the better it gets at detecting the smallest differences that distinguish normal tissue from potentially cancerous tissue. Women receiving mammograms using the AI based system will have their information fed back into the algorithm minus any identifying data. At the moment, most people getting mammograms likely aren't aware that an AI system might be in the background, complementing the radiologist, since for now, no regulatory agencies have signed off on an entirely AI based interpretation of mammograms. But as more AI algorithms like Google's enter the market, that may change. And radiologists may end up discussing with patients how their images are interpreted. Ultimately, such machine based readings could begin to pull out patterns that human eyes can't see. Stevens says eye cat's current AI based algorithm already detects the presence of minute calcifications in the breast tissue that scientists are beginning to link to a heightened risk of heart disease..

Google Greg Corrado UK U.S. Corado Stacy Stephens Icad Northwestern University Stevens Europe Heart Disease
Art Isn’t Dead, It’s Just Machine-Generated

Andreessen Horowitz

00:30 sec | Last week

Art Isn’t Dead, It’s Just Machine-Generated

"4 p.m. Wednesday November 16th 2022 Art ISN T did It is just machine generated Why AI models will replace artists long before they'll replace programmers Perhaps the most mind bending implication we're seeing from generative AI is that contrary to the common view that creativity will be the last bastion of human ingenuity in the post art is indeed it's just machine generated appeared first on andreessen Horowitz

Andreessen Horowitz
Fresh update on "ai" discussed on AI in Business

AI in Business

00:45 min | 17 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ai" discussed on AI in Business

"That <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Male> if <Speech_Male> a computer can process <Speech_Male> a <Speech_Male> trillion items <Speech_Male> and a certain <Speech_Male> period of time in a human <Speech_Male> can purchase ten or 12, <Speech_Male> then if <Speech_Male> you can find a way to <Speech_Male> take care of that because <Speech_Male> the most <Speech_Male> important point I think Dan <Speech_Male> to realize is <Speech_Male> that when you start talking <Speech_Male> about supply chain, <Speech_Male> if there's a <Speech_Male> 107 items <Speech_Male> that make up that <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> bomb of that bill of material, <Silence> <Advertisement> if you <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> have a 106 <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of them, you don't ship <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the product. Yeah. <Speech_Male> No, it's <Speech_Male> not about an 80 20 <Speech_Male> rule. Oh, we'll just get <Speech_Male> 80% of it right. <Speech_Male> You've got to get a <Speech_Male> 100% of it right <Speech_Male> in order for that <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> product to go in <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and be able to shift your <Speech_Male> customer on <SpeakerChange> time. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Yeah. So <Speech_Male> the stakes <Speech_Male> are obviously <Speech_Male> remarkably high <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and in many, many domains <Speech_Male> are procurement. It's <Speech_Male> similar. <Speech_Male> And I think <Speech_Female> to your point, <Speech_Male> a bit of the take home <Speech_Female> here is <Speech_Male> maybe in the past <Speech_Male> and I <Speech_Male> like that you're calling this out, <Speech_Male> frankly, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> we've operated within <Speech_Male> perfect data. And so <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> we've had to just use <Speech_Male> kind of a little bit of bravado <Speech_Male> and a little bit of confidence <Speech_Male> sometimes and say, <Speech_Male> well, this is what it is. <Speech_Male> This is where I think a <Speech_Male> normal price is. And <Speech_Male> this is how this works. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> But <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> more and <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> more, people <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> need to be <SpeakerChange> coming from a <Speech_Male> place of, well, <Speech_Male> what is the actual <Speech_Male> data there? What <Speech_Male> information would I <Speech_Male> really need to make this a <Speech_Male> good decision and not <Speech_Male> just a bold decision? <Speech_Male> I think <Speech_Male> that's a lesson for <Speech_Male> every industry, not just <Speech_Male> procurement. And I think it's also <Speech_Male> a good note to end on. <Speech_Male> So David, I know that's all <Speech_Male> we have for time, but thank you so <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> much for being able to join us <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> on the show. This <SpeakerChange> has been fun. <Speech_Male> Yeah, thank you. <Speech_Male> And I hope the information <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> for some of the listeners <Speech_Male> and I'll <Speech_Male> continue to listen as well because <Speech_Male> I learned things and <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> new things every single <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> day. <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> So that's all for this <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> episode of the AI <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and business podcast. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Thank you so much <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> for tuning in and a big <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> thank you to David <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for being able to join us <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> on this episode. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> After this <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> little podcast series, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I got to fly <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> out to Las <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Vegas for our Castro's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> big optimal <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> supply chain <Speech_Music_Male> event to do a little <Speech_Music_Male> bit of panel moderating, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> speak to some of the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> other enterprise folks that <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> are there and got to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> shake hands with David myself, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> since COVID, it's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> actually been pretty darn <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> rare since I've been able <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to see podcast guests <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in person, so that was a <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> lot of fun for me. I hope some <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> of the energy in the episode <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> came through was fun <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> for you and <Speech_Music_Male> that some of the nuances <Speech_Music_Male> of manufacturing <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and also some of the <Speech_Music_Male> challenges of <Speech_Music_Male> decision making and procurement <Speech_Music_Male> in general are <Speech_Male> a little bit more clear <Speech_Male> thanks to David today. <Speech_Male> So we'll wrap it up <Speech_Music_Male> from here. I look forward to <Speech_Music_Male> catching you next week on <Speech_Music_Male> the AI and business podcast. <Speech_Music_Male>

David Castro
"ai" Discussed on AI in Business

AI in Business

04:53 min | 2 weeks ago

"ai" Discussed on AI in Business

"N one, check it out if you're not already a reader, but I do appreciate you as a listener. And without further ado, let's fly into this episode. This is Sanjay the CEO of symphony AI here on the AI and business podcast. So Sanjay, thank you so much for joining us on the show today. Thank you, Dan, lovely to be here. So we're going to be getting into actually selecting and deploying initial AI projects. But before we do, I want to talk about setting the table from an enterprise perspective. There's a lot of considerations around what the C suite needs to understand about our strategy, our data infrastructure, our teams, that we might want to get right so that we have kind of a ripe environment to start leveraging AI. What kind of advice do you have for leaders who are thinking about becoming AI ready? So their first projects can really succeed. You know, that's a very, very important question to for the enterprise leadership to think through very carefully. I think it starts with sort of defining what are the business outcomes that they are trying to achieve with the digital transformation, especially using AI. So making sure that is clear is very important. Behind that is the data and information strategy. AI is as good as the data that it's able to acquire and use. And there is absolutely no point going through the AI journey in the enterprise without having a very clear data strategy. So that's the second point that the leadership team must consider. The third is all about the culture team, the organization, the product engineering and the talent culture. That becomes extremely, extremely important. In the journey, because without the talent, the journey is going to be very, very difficult.

Sanjay symphony AI Dan
Fresh update on "ai" discussed on AI in Business

AI in Business

00:49 min | 17 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ai" discussed on AI in Business

"Let's talk a little bit about sort of where artificial intelligence starts to add some additional value here. Obviously, the data that we're using is helping us make smarter decisions as helping us anchor in the right spot is helping us stay on top of these very quickly fluctuating norms of pricing for different kinds of orders, different methods of shipment, et cetera. Where does AI start to come in to either automate or streamline some of this heavy lifting? Yeah, so I think with the AI comes in is in the past they used to be a lack of data. Now there's probably almost too much data. There's so much data you have to figure out what to do with it. I mean, I think I think I read one time that, you know, a jet engine on a 7 37, every hour compiles 20 terabytes of data, right? So when you start looking at things like onboard diagnostics and maintenance that you're going to need on machines and so on, it's really, really important. As that relates to supply chain, you know, you want to really be able to look at predictive analytics then. You want to look at, you know, how to predict the potential disruption to the supply chain. So an example I can give you that's very close in right now is all the way up until about 6, 8 weeks ago, we have all these robust orders for all of our CPG customers and so on. And then you keep reading in the news that the targets and the walmarts of the world are saying that their warehouse is a busting at the seams. And everybody's warehouse is a full because of everything we talked about earlier in this discussion. What you do then is you say, okay, my normal system might my information might say, I need to order this much for my supplier now, but as you look at that data and it becomes smart data and it takes some of those complex tax and identifies and exposes, you know, unknown patterns in the past, you look at it and you say, well, you know, maybe I do need to slow down my purchases of this. And you question some of that. And then you get ahead of the game now because you didn't bring in all that extra inventory and you could

Alvarez blasts Astros to World Series title in G6 vs. Phils

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 3 weeks ago

Alvarez blasts Astros to World Series title in G6 vs. Phils

"Gordon Alvarez crushed a 6th inning three run Homer that traveled 450 feet as the Astros beat the Phillies in game 6 of the World Series four to one to claim the franchise's second world championship Astros manager dusty baker These guys ain't know how to win They come to play No alibis no excuses You know you can come in our Clubhouse You can't tell if we the next day if we lost her if we won Trevor Valdez earned the win by allowing one run over 6 innings while Jeremy Pena collected two hits and was named series MVP Adam Spillane Houston

Gordon Alvarez Astros Homer Phillies Dusty Baker Trevor Valdez AI Jeremy Pena Adam Spillane Houston
"ai" Discussed on AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

04:25 min | Last month

"ai" Discussed on AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

"We do need a group to enforce it, right? So if you want to think of the ethical and responsible AR AI framework committee has sort of the legislators, the Congress, making the laws, we need to have the judicial and the executive system enforcing the law. So the AI governance committee board, they are primarily internally facing, and they provide the actual management governance and guidance and the final authority in ownership of all the AI projects in the organization so that if someone has a complaint, they go to the governance board. If someone wants you to, you know, someone wants to do some data privacy to enforce a data privacy concern, comply with the law, the AI governance committee, the group, they're the ones that come and say, okay, we need to comply with these laws. We need to enforce that your project is violating the framework. You're doing something that's not correct, right? That's what the AI governance committee board is for. And it feels kind of onerous, but we'll talk about ways to make it collaborative.

AI governance committee Congress
Crime and Punishment

The Officer Tatum Show

01:43 min | Last month

Crime and Punishment

"I saw a video just recently of a guy who was kidnapped and he was fear. He was kidnapping people and that's how he was making money on social media. He was acting like he was an entrepreneur, but him and his friends were kidnapping people. It was just in Africa somewhere. He was kidnapping people, and then he was extraordinary. And then that's how he was making money. But when they called him, they had him out there in the middle of the street in his underwear. With handcuffs on his hands, and I just looking at him on his knees, the whimpering, they probably was beating him. He was getting some lashes. And you know, nowadays, and I'm not, I'm not trying to dig and promote violence in it like that. I'm just saying, what are we doing ain't working clearly? You get the kids after they go to jail and they have a good time. They go up in there and they, they join the game, they have a little bit of protection. They are. Maybe if they don't join the game and get raped in there and that just what it is. But for the most part, they go to these prisons and they get three hots and a cot. They finally put money in their books. They get little meals and they get to read. They become Muslim and all this other stuff they do in jail. They ain't that ain't that hard for some people to do a couple years. It ain't that hard. That's why residency is that high, 'cause clearly when they go to jail, it's not they ain't feeling the pressure. Some of these countries man, they beat you. You get, oh, you get exposed openly. I remember when our countries do the firing squad. You know, now we don't want to let your chairs too much. Oh, no, corporation. No, death penalty is too much. Just let them live off taxpayer dollar for the rest of their life. When they mutilated somebody, we're afraid to give them the death penalty. Man, put these people to death and quit playing.

Africa AI
"ai" Discussed on Pulse of AI

Pulse of AI

05:10 min | Last month

"ai" Discussed on Pulse of AI

"Pulse of AI. I'm Jason stoughton, here in Silicon Valley. Joining me on this podcast is Jonah time who is the CEO and cofounder of desi AI. Does he recently raised $25 million in a series B to support their ongoing R&D and go to market efforts? As AI becomes more ubiquitous across companies systems, there are two big elephants in the room. One is the black box and bias issue, which we talked a lot about on this show. And the other is the big cost of training AI models. If you could solve the cost problem, you would have a $1 billion note, you would have a $1 trillion business, which is why I had yonatan on the show because he believes that his company has the answer. Don't forget if you like what you hear, subscribe to the podcast, follow me on Twitter at the pulse of AI, or reach out on LinkedIn. Let's get to it. Welcome to the show. Great

Jason stoughton desi AI Silicon Valley Jonah yonatan Twitter LinkedIn
Kyle Mills on New Vince Flynn/Mitch Rapp Thriller 'Oath of Loyalty'

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:24 min | 2 months ago

Kyle Mills on New Vince Flynn/Mitch Rapp Thriller 'Oath of Loyalty'

"Call mills, let's start about with placement. I always talk to my thriller writers about where they begin and where they Uganda and South Africa play big roles here. It's South Africa is familiar to Mitch rap readers. Why you ganda? Why are we in Uganda at the beginning? This is where one of the characters lives. And I like the idea of it because it's really off the map in a sense of if you really wanted to get away from everything and get away from any threats to you. That's a nice place to be because there aren't very many agencies that have a lot of capability there. It's a little more chaotic. The other thing you have to think about now when I'm writing is cameras, you know, it's extremely difficult to operate somewhere like London or Beijing or many countries Saudi Arabia that you're not constantly on camera and being analyzed by AI. Yeah, and what's interesting is when Mitch goes back to his house for the first time, he doesn't even trust his own personal network security, even if it's built into the walls. He has to have a bunco hole. He's got to be able to get away from his own house, even though he's built fortress Mitch rap. But that is, I think, a good caution to everyone. Did you talk to security experts about this? Oh, yeah. Well, the time. Yeah. It's hard to keep up with because the technology just moves among almost monthly. The capabilities of it.

Uganda South Africa Mitch Mills Saudi Arabia Beijing London
Americans Struggle Through Biden Inflation

The Officer Tatum Show

05:29 min | 2 months ago

Americans Struggle Through Biden Inflation

"Maybe this is your Monday. I carries you to have a good week. How do you have a good week? Positive thinking. What is positive thinking is not just running your mouth is believing what you say. That's positive thinking. If you say I am going to have a great week, you feel that your week is going to be great. You anticipate a great week or a weekend. You will see that come to fruition. The article says, a lady named star Parker says when will low income Americans stop looking to the government, new pole data from Gallup shows Americans are not having an easy time through this period of raising prices. A rising prices, I'm sorry. According to Gallup, 56% of Americans say now that rising prices are causing severe or moderate hardship. Drilling down, we see that the hardship is not shared equally. Amongst low income households, those with incomes less than $48,000 a year, 74% report that they are experiencing hardship amongst middle class households with income of 48,000 to 40 9000 a year, 63% report hardship and amongst the upper income 90,000 and above, only 40% report experiencing hardships. So clearly we can see that the poor you are the harder your life is going to be. When I say poor, the less money you make. I don't say poorer. Because poor is a mentality. And also poor is a priority. Some people got $48,000. There's plenty of money. You know, and to be honest, if think about it like this, this one says household income. Well, I'm assuming that only one person working if y'all making 48,000 a year. If two people working and you making 48,000 a year, I don't y'all must be doing law and work under the table because I don't know what job will pay you less than I don't even know what the hourly rate would be to make $20,000 a year. I mean, I guess those jobs are out there. However, if you find yourself in a predicament, you better not be having kids. You better wait. And so you have enough money because then you're going to go to poverty. Because $48,000 could probably take care of us from growing people. And you ain't got to go to a steakhouse and you ain't got to get a TV. You don't even need a TV. Go buy some books and read. You don't need a car, get a public transportation, get you a bicycle. Even in the winter time, it's a guy in my church. Now I know everybody ain't built like this, but it was a guy at my church. He used to walk four miles each way to work. In the snow, they were in like Colorado somewhere. He saw four miles to work every day and then while four miles home. And did complain one time. How much 10,000 hour get you at? Oh, 20 grand, you'll be $10 an hour. I don't even, yeah, yeah. That would be interesting. So $10 an hour would get you what 20,000 a year for 40 hour a week work week. So two people making $10 an hour would get you around 40,000 a year. And I don't even know a job to pay you $10 an hour. And to be honest, listen, let me say this. And then I'm going to get on to my point. But I think people need to not be as entitled. Because if you are making $10 an hour, you need to stay with other people who are also making money that's around your range. If four of y'all get an apartment, three of y'all get an apartment, you go move in with your mama and them, you go move in with some family members, you will fare better. You know, right across the street from my grandma's house, there was a Hispanic family that moved in there. And I swear there was like 15 of them in the living in one house. And like ten of them were adults. And I don't know how they did it because their house was probably 600 ft². But then before you know it, now they got the house next door and then they split it up because what I was told that they did what I was told that they did was they live in a house and they stack money and then they bought another house in their family. They've been in the house and they continue to keep our houses until all the family can move out and have a relatively equal space to live and they partnered on it initially to grow their family wealth enough to purchase houses and live a better life. If you looking for somebody who will hold you tight who will walk you to your doorstep each and every night this is the officer Tatum show. And afraid to tell it like it is.

Gallup Parker AI Colorado Tatum
Life Lessons From Colin Powell: It Ain't as Bad as You Think

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:35 min | 3 months ago

Life Lessons From Colin Powell: It Ain't as Bad as You Think

"First life lesson, he wrote, so he said, ain't as bad as you think it will always look better in the morning. I don't know about you, but this one probably among all the ones that we're gonna give is the one that I struggle with the most. I don't know about you. He goes on and he talks about leaving office, you know, when you leave the office at night, your attitude really will affect how you go through the 9 and really affect the next morning. But I want to think about this from terms of perspective. How many times have you woke up at night? Or I couldn't go to sleep, you were worried about something that was going to happen. Or possibly might not happen. Again, worry is many times worrying about things that may or may not ever happen. And what he's talking about is that it's never as bad as you think. I have had in my own times where I've laid in bed at night or woke up really early and when it's dark and you're only hearing your own voice. It is easy to see or think that the walls are closing in that everything is bad that the only outcome is going to be terrible that everybody in the world knows your problems. Everybody in the world sees your problem and the reality is that most of the time it's just you it's just you there contemplating these actions, contemplating these things in your own mind, making the assumptions that the fear that you've built up or the concern, the anxiety, however you want to put it. Is actually a development. One of the things that you need to remember is it never is he says it never is as bad as you think. Now, for some, I'm not going to say every time there's something that has come to be as bad. But the morning will come. The sun will come up. There's a new day, there's a new opportunity to see things in the light.

AI
Dr. Stephen Iacoboni on Newton and Understanding Life

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:40 min | 3 months ago

Dr. Stephen Iacoboni on Newton and Understanding Life

"Wrote about Newton in your book and Newton actually, it's one of the greatest tragedies in the history of science that Newton said that he was reading the mind of God and limiting what he said to pure mechanics and that he had no jurisdiction. I know ability to talk about living things in the way that Emmanuel Kant later said, of course not. Biology is inscrutable. What happened in the 19th century? About biology. There's a question. He knew a lot about mechanism. He knew a lot about a lot of things, but and so there's something called a Newton of the leaf, there's a famous quote where he said, never will there be an Isaac Newton who can describe the genesis of a single blade of grass. And so that's called the Newton of the leaf. And Kant is famous for a great quote, which actually pertains to telos. And you understanding life, he said, life is cause and effect of itself, meaning that everything else in the world that you make like a car or your battery or your phone is made by somebody else. Life makes itself. Life is self sustaining. And that's one of the fundamental differences of life. In other words, organisms don't need external agents to make themselves. Now they need food and water and they need an environment, but they reproduce themselves by themselves that reproduce themselves and they make themselves. So for example, the whole idea of AI replacing life is first, while you'd have to have an AI to think, which will never happen. But even if you did, it would have to reproduce itself to be life. And that's never going to happen, no matter what they say.

Newton Emmanuel Kant Isaac Newton Kant
Interview with Pradeep Kalmat, CEO of eSimplify - burst 03

UBG Health Talk

06:38 min | 3 months ago

Interview with Pradeep Kalmat, CEO of eSimplify - burst 03

"Yeah, you know, we all know healthcare is a pretty complex, heavily regulated world. Constantly changes every year and there's new policies implemented. And the biggest challenge for a practice, these doctors really want to practice medicine. They just want to provide the quality of care to their patients. The last thing they want to do is follow on the regulations and stay on top of it. And when we integrate our platforms into the practice operations, the operational part of component of the practice becomes that much efficient, right? They no longer have to worry about, hey, is this following the guidelines or am I following the new guidelines? There's 30 plus different guidelines if you look at the CMS side. And especially the primary care doctors, they have like 2500 patients that they see, right? The last thing on their mind is I don't know who I need to see today or tomorrow. And what guidelines do I have, et cetera and when they incorporate our platform into that whole operations component of their practice and the workflow, it's like there are patient engagement goes up drastically. The quality of care gets better. Obviously, the more you interact with your patients today, right? The more credibility you establish and you build that relationship for a future success, not just from a provider point of view, but overall well-being point of view for the patients as well. Yeah, that's fantastic. Now, I mean, I've got to imagine COVID, of course, rocked the world of healthcare. I mean, and I've got a got a foul in that when COVID struck that this became very apparent on the distraction. I guess you could almost say of the patient load just got crazy. I mean, I was talking to some of the practice managers. I mean, they were telling me they went from where they were starting to get worried and if they were over staff to where now they're sitting at like, if they have a person who breathes and has the right credentials, they'll throw them in, you know, and be like, go get them. From your technology side, I mean, how big of a role do COVID play in your side? And what's been some of the outcomes that you've seen from it that even kind of surprising to you? Yeah, so the COVID, I think, had I want to say during the period of COVID, there was a lot of unknowns, right? The negative component, of course, was a stress on the healthcare system that mental health challenges came out of that. And then you also have these staffing shortages because of the burnout, right? And then also, you know, not getting too political. There were policies implemented that kind of kept people at home, right? You're seeing that challenges kind of play out even today. From the positive side of things, the adoption of telehealth and adoption of remote patient monitoring just explored a chronic care management services still. And simply because you could still provide the quality of care using and leveraging technology that you couldn't do before, right? CMS came out and said, hey, by the way, we're going to open it up because of the emergency. You can provide almost every single service remotely. We will reimburse you for that. And that was a strategic move. I think there was a critical component of managing and continuing the quality of care. And that was a significant one. And then we also looked at the data compared to 2019 and 2020. The remote patient monitoring utilization went up fivefold. Chronic care management, it was a little smaller, but you already had a significant population enrolled in the chronic care management program so that you have service kind of continue during that COVID. And telehealth, we all know what happened there. People adopting all these teleconferencing audio video tools that just kind of exponentially grow because of COVID. So I think that's, in my view, healthcare has always been kind of behind the curve on adopting technologies because there was a lot of cultural attitude towards it, but now COVID just exposed that. And you see that doctors are using more technology today than they ever have. I think positive that came out of COVID. And I think the opportunity still will continue because you have AI playing a significant role that can streamline operations for medical practice, right? The doctors no longer have to worry about writing documenting chart notes when you can leverage technology to transcribe and put it insert that into a patient chart, right? Absolutely. So I think there's still opportunities there. And of course, outsourcing is always an option simply because the last thing you want, your doctors to be doing as doing all the paperwork, submitting claims, et cetera, you should really want them to focus on patient care because that's their passion. That's what they went to school for. Outsourcing is a natural component and healthcare slowly adopting that. We had a stigma associated with outsourcing in healthcare. But that's only changing. And I think COVID had a little bit of influence on that as well. I'd agree. I had to totally agree. It's funny. I immediately think of even my doctor, right? My doctor is as old school as you get. I mean, he's a proud white haired man, and he will tell you that. I mean, from the day I've been seeing him until it's funny until COVID, he always took handwritten notes. I mean, I was his thing, right? I mean, I knew I still had a handwritten chart sitting in a file somewhere, right? And I went to go see him finally, just after COVID, I just finally had a checkup. And I saw him and he's like, yeah, he didn't even have his notebook. And I'm like, I'm like, where's your notebook, Charlie? And he's like, he's like, he's like, I had to finally hang it up. He's like, and I agree with you. I mean, it definitely advanced, I think, like you said, technology in the healthcare space significantly. And I think it's really helped the healthcare market see, right? Like that, that technology can support them. It's not a bad thing. It is there to help. And I think that negative connotation, because of when EMR got regulated, right? It was a regulated technology into the market. And I think I understand now why. I mean, I know so many providers who are like, they hated the fact that they got forced to do this. But now if you think about it, it's like, yeah, because if we didn't, you would still be writing on stone

Covid CMS Quality Care Provider Primary Care Chronic Care Telehealth Remote Patient Monitoring Charlie
The Democrats Want You to Be Government Dependent

The Officer Tatum Show

00:54 sec | 4 months ago

The Democrats Want You to Be Government Dependent

"They're evil, these who can defend the Democrats. Nobody. If there's a perspective here, they're not passing, they're not signing these bills into law and doing things like that. They're not doing this just for the heck of it. They have an agenda. They want to take over the country. They want you to be government dependent. That's why I was wondering the other day I said, why would they do this? This is like a death sentence for them. Well, because they're going to rig the election anyway. In their minds, they're going to rig the election, so they'll get who they want to get in there. And then they're going to force this down our throats, and they're going to turn into a totalitarian government. And I said this before, Elon Musk's girlfriend said it, that they're going to create AI to supplement the middle class. Now, it seems like a far stretch today. I don't think it's a stretch for the future. If you have electric cars, what do you need Uber for?

Elon Musk
Jim Hanson and Miranda Devine Discuss the Biden Crime Family

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:54 min | 4 months ago

Jim Hanson and Miranda Devine Discuss the Biden Crime Family

"Told you guys before I'm working on an AI project to find out who was behind the censorship and disinformation of the Hunter Biden laptop story. And guess what? We have now on the show, the woman who wrote the definitive tale of this laptop from hell, Miranda Devine. Good to be with you. Hey, great to be with you, too, Jim. I love your project. It's none of your project. Very important. Well, it's one of the most horrendous things I think has been done as far as interfering in an election in this country, and I want to expose it. And I think everyone needs it exposed. But you did a lot of the hard work in digging into the story as a whole, and it seems to be, you know, there's a lot there and I think there was always evidence of Biden family corruption. Given that we've now got some whistleblowers talking about what's going on in the FBI, do you think there will be any adverse action for anybody named Biden? Well, look, I think that's all up in the air. Certainly, you know, if there's polls show the Republicans take back at least the house, if not the Senate. I think next year they are all systems go, they are locked and loaded. They're doing a lot of work now to live for the work to get on top of all the issues and the whistleblowers are starting to knock on their doors. That's what's really the latest kind of turn in this story because we have had a lot of twists and turns and we first started working on it back in late 2020 just before the election. And so I think that's good news. And I think it really will depend on patriots, particularly within the intelligence community and particularly the FBI

Hunter Biden Miranda Devine Biden JIM FBI Senate Patriots
"ai" Discussed on AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

05:41 min | 4 months ago

"ai" Discussed on AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

"Is that you've really enjoyed when we've spent all of this time on education and training and giving you the understanding and need of what you need to understand to put AI into production. Many of you are implementing AI today. That's why this is called AI today. The podcast, many of you are looking at working in organizations perhaps in the future where you'll be implementing AI. Some of you are actually working to transition your own organizations to implement more of AI. And I think we're in that reality phase of AI we always talk about where people are spending more time with the difficulties of making AI work. And that's where we spend a lot of time. So one of the things that we're doing now we're releasing a new series of podcasts. This is the first of actually many in this series. So if you aren't subscribed to AI today, please subscribe because there will be one of many episodes. And we will be focusing on a part of our education that we do with our CPM EI certified we'll explain that means in a little bit our CP may I certified audience where we've added on and spend extra time talking about ethical and responsible AI. Exactly. So if you've listened to our podcast before, you know that we are big advocates of doing AI right, which includes best practices, methodologies, we're big advocates of the CPM AI methodology, which is the cognitive project management for AI. It really teaches you how to do AI right. It's geared towards project managers and that role specifically at the organization, whether or not that's your title. So it's an individual certification and really helps you understand how best to manage AI projects. We, a few months ago, at this point, had an AI failure series. And it was incredibly popular, really goes into specific areas as to why we see AI projects fail. Many of the common reasons and how you can avoid it. And it should be no surprise that CPM AI helps you think through all that so that you can move forward with it. Well, building on from there, you know, we've talked to a lot of our CPM AI certified individuals and organizations that we work with. And it's really great to know how to run AI projects. And so to be successful so that you're not wasting all of this time, money, resources, energy, on projects that fail. But you also should look to build ethical and responsible AI as well, especially as your, you know, they're starting to make decisions that can really impact people's lives, impact what's going on.

AI
Flashy Preacher Robbed in Pulpit During Sermon

The Officer Tatum Show

01:24 min | 4 months ago

Flashy Preacher Robbed in Pulpit During Sermon

"I want to talk about this pastor in New York. Now, you know, when I first read that a pastor was robbed, thugs came into his church, looked like an online church. I guess he has members there. And I got to read more of the story is developing because there's more stuff coming out as we speak. But when I heard that a pastor was robbed at gunpoint, who came in on live stream, robbed him, had everybody get on the ground. I felt bad for the pastor. I said, man, that ain't right. Look at his brother out here trying to do his thing, preach the gospel of the lord Jesus Christ, and he got brothers in that robbing and stealing and trying to kill him. It make any sense, but you know what I'm saying. But then, when I read the report and he said that they robbed when they came in and they were still a jury says police reported two suspects took $400,000 worth of jewelry from the bishop, his wife and possible other church gores. Now, you know, these other people ain't got nowhere near $400,000 worth of jewelry. However, the past and his wife probably got $399,000 worth of jury and everybody else in their wedding rings or whatever the case may be. Had the rest of the money.

New York AI
How Liberals Place Their Lives Before Your Well Being

The Officer Tatum Show

00:51 sec | 4 months ago

How Liberals Place Their Lives Before Your Well Being

"Now, if the people get rid of our air for teams, that means that there's no AR-15 circulating. Correct? Then why would police officers have AR-15s? Did if we get rid of our air fatigues, then why don't police officers just have pen guns? Why do they mean any other weapons? Oh, because we do realize that criminals are not going to abide by the law. Criminals are going to have AI for teams no matter who has them. The liberals want you to be disarmed because it makes them feel good on the inside. Because they don't want to see big scary guns. They don't want people to have rights because it's barbaric to them. Because many of them live in places where they don't have to fear for their lives. You go to the inner city anywhere in the country, you tell me, do you want a gun or do you not want a gun? What's the consequence of not having a gun in the inner city? And many of these dangerous areas. You get smoked.

 Le'Veon Bell 'Retires' From NFL to Focus on Boxing

The Right Time with Bomani Jones

01:05 min | 4 months ago

Le'Veon Bell 'Retires' From NFL to Focus on Boxing

"I saw a story that was right up your alley, right up my alley, right up everybody's alley. And I kind of forgotten that this has happened. But so Le'Veon bell says that he is not going to be at the NFL this year because he wants to focus on his boxing career. By the way, I'm not going to be in the NFL this year, either because I am focusing on my journalism career. Like, dude, I think that decision was made for you at this point. No big deal. Right? Nah, Le'Veon bail did all that. Do you remember how hard he fought to get his money and he took that year and he missed it and all of that stuff and I had no shade to him about that, do what you need to do to get your money, but if you tell me that you are still going to be out here boxing and you want to make it a career, I can only assume that you didn't keep as much of that money as you should have and confirmation at that point is he have a fight at the crypto dot com arena in Los Angeles against Adrian Peterson, who we know ain't got no money.

Veon Bell NFL Veon Boxing Adrian Peterson Los Angeles AI
Arizona's Jerone Davison Wants to 'Make Rifles Great Again'

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:07 min | 5 months ago

Arizona's Jerone Davison Wants to 'Make Rifles Great Again'

"But when this rifle is the only thing standing between your family and a dozen angry Democrats and Klan hoods, you just might need that semi-automatic. And all 30 rounds. Now that is how you do political communication for the 3 million of you who are just listening on radio and not watching the video feed. That was Jerome Davison, father author pastor, who's running for Congress in the fourth congressional district of Arizona. He's black, by the way. And the people he had to protect himself from were klansmen, Democrats in white hoods dude, that was such an epic campaign ad. He's with us right now, Jerome, welcome to Mark I.. Hey, Sebastian gorka, man. I'm happy to be on with you. I respect you so much. You are a long time hero of mine and a warrior American hero. I'm so happy and delighted to be on your show. All right, well, your former NFL player ASU, you've written amazing book, the broken strongman. You can follow him at Jerome with an N, Jerome the number four Congress on a Twitter. First things first, I got to ask you because I'm a gun guy. That AI is really cool. What is that AI you're carrying in the ad? Man, it was a brand new gun from one of my friends. It was definitely heavy. 'cause it had everything. It had all the bells and whistles, the lamps, the scopes. It was like a Christmas tree. Yeah, man, it was like, it was a beautiful thing, man. And we have t-shirts and pictures with it. And I said, man, that gun is really, really beautiful. And I got to get me one. And the top tweet on your account right now. It has the video of the ad that everybody has to see hang on. Let me just retweet it again. Hang on. Oh, 5.1 million. 5.1 million views. That's why it works. But the top of the tweet, you have one phrase. Make rifles great again. I think we need bumper stickers that say, make rifles great

Jerome Davison Jerome Mark I. Sebastian Gorka Congress ASU Arizona NFL Twitter
Biden Nominee Elizabeth Frawley Bagley Goes on Anti-Semitic Tirade

Mark Levin

01:06 min | 5 months ago

Biden Nominee Elizabeth Frawley Bagley Goes on Anti-Semitic Tirade

"This is from the free Beacon Adam crater The Biden administration's nominee The service U.S. ambassador to Brazil spoke at length about the influence of Jewish money and politics Claiming the Jewish lobby exerts undue influence over the Democratic Party and its major money Where's the anti defamation league Where is it Where are they Where are all these groups I hear a more client I don't hear it from anybody Yeah Where are all the groups Elizabeth frawley Bagley A longtime diplomat and Democratic Party insider Is scheduled today to have her nomination advanced to the full Senate by the Senate foreign relations committee But her comments about Jewish money who else has talked about that Omar and Talib and they Love AI even though she's an anti semite and a bigot They love her

Adam Crater Biden Administration Anti Defamation League Democratic Party Elizabeth Frawley Bagley Brazil U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Commi Senate Talib Omar
"ai" Discussed on AI in Business

AI in Business

02:22 min | 5 months ago

"ai" Discussed on AI in Business

"From financial services to oil and gas and beyond, but we've yet to touch on defense. Obviously, defense is not only a gigantic industry. It's also a rather important area where AI is increasingly being applied, and I figured, well, if we're diving in on defense, why not speak to Jared dunman himself? Jared is a PhD from Stanford in artificial intelligence where he also did his post Doc and he is now the technical director of AI and machine learning for the defense innovation unit. The innovation unit gets to work on the cool cutting edge projects for the Department of Defense here in the United States, a rather important wing of their work. And they do a lot of interfacing with startups. In addition to helping to build out and flesh out AI applications within the public sector. AI applications for Homeland Security and defense. In this episode, there's two big themes that we touch on that are both worth tuning in for. The first of which is looking at some individual use cases and capabilities that are becoming more important in defense now, things that are in the field being used. Namely, Jared talks to us about what we refer to here at emerge from time to time as external search. How do we combine and find patterns in data out in the world, whether it's satellite imagery, social media, news headlines, et cetera that might help us proxy for something that we want to stay attuned to, whether it's something that could be a danger, something that could be an opportunity, we go into that particular use case. And Jared shared some of his thoughts around, again, AI applications in the defense space. But we also dive in on the adoption of artificial intelligence. Adopting AI is hard in a big stodgy enterprise. Now imagine what that's like in the Department of Defense. I mean, there's nothing bigger than the Department of Defense here in the United States in terms of an organization. And when it comes to AI adoption, it's they've got all the same challenges. They've got data silos. They've got executives that don't quite understand AI. Jared goes into some of his most important points around what is it that allows AI to be deployed? What do we need to do with leaders? What do we need to do to collaborate across teams? What do we need to do with our data infrastructure? What are the must nodes in the enterprise to get AI off the ground? And of course, in this AI is here a series, we're talking a lot about applications that are off the ground. So Jared's not speaking about hypotheticals. He's saying, here's what we actually move forward in order to deploy these technologies. And obviously a very mission critical environment. This AI.

Jared Jared dunman Department of Defense AI Stanford United States
"ai" Discussed on AI in Business

AI in Business

04:12 min | 5 months ago

"ai" Discussed on AI in Business

"Bit different. Some of you might remember back in March, we had a series called achieving AI ROI. We had some excellent guests on that program. We had to head of the AI center of excellence for Intel. We had the head of AI at Munich reinsurance..

AI center of excellence Intel Munich reinsurance
Why the Man Is the Leader in His Home

The Officer Tatum Show

01:44 min | 6 months ago

Why the Man Is the Leader in His Home

"I'm going to talk about fathers real quick because I don't know what it's like to be a mama. I know what it's like to be a father. I know what it's like to be a man. I don't know what it's like to be a woman. And I know what God is called us men to do. And that is to lead. The reason our society is struggling is because men are not leading. We're letting our wise lead. We supposed to be leaders. And I know some people may not like to hear that, but boo, if you a Christian, you better follow with the Bible say, Christ is the head of the church. The man is the head of the household. That's not negotiable. And if you married to a man that ain't leading, kicking in his butt and telling me to take his rightful rightful position. Men have to lead ladies and gentlemen. Get you, especially you single folks. You young women, I know some of y'all are powerhouses. I know some of y'all work hard. Some of y'all are smart. You travel, you're well informed, will get you a man that's traveling well informed. Let me give you an example. Candace Owens, for example. Now, y'all know how awesome Candace Owens is. Now, how in the world she gonna find a man, this is awesome. Her husband is one of the smartest men that I've ever met. Business savvy, good-looking, well traveled, ayy, that's what you gotta do. Candace can't be with no simp. He can't be GMB no scrub. Because then she'd be wearing a pants in her family. And I say this all the time with his power for his candidacy is when I go over their house, her husband is wearing the pants of the family. It ain't even up for question. You go in the house, you know who's the man of the house. And they don't mean that a woman can't do her thing. You see what Candace do all over the world? But she has a strong man that can lead and give direction, and she submissive to her husband.

Candace Owens AI Candace GMB
"ai" Discussed on Pulse of AI

Pulse of AI

04:29 min | 7 months ago

"ai" Discussed on Pulse of AI

"Privacy is obviously integral to understanding people's emotions. People have fear around it. Not just with this, but anything in technology. So talk about how you address privacy and overcome those concerns that people have. Absolutely. And I think people's concerns are correct. I think that people should start asking themselves sort of when an AI has access to my data, is it using that data in a way that I intended or that I agree with her. It's beneficial to me. And this isn't some ways exactly the problem we're trying to solve. But people maybe get confused about is that whenever press emotional behaviors are being measured, your privacy is at stake. And it's not always true. If you want to show the behavior, is it being measured on device, right? And they're not finding their way into anybody else's hands. There isn't really a privacy issue. There could be an issue with manipulation. And so you should be worried about, is the algorithm that's measuring these things, good for me. Or is it just surfacing things that get me to buy things or spend more time doing something? That these are all concerned people should be actively interested in looking into. But I think the real privacy concern is who ends up with this data, who has access to it. And that's the same concern for your searches for your pictures that you normally have on your phone. For the things that you say to digital assistants, every company should honor your privacy with regard to any of these things. And in that sense, I don't think emotion AI introduced pathic AI and introduces new concerns here. But it does make more data available, and you should be concerned about who's getting access to. Yeah, now I can see that. So where are you now in the process right now, people are still signing up to get on a waiting list to use your models..

pathic AI
"ai" Discussed on Pulse of AI

Pulse of AI

04:50 min | 7 months ago

"ai" Discussed on Pulse of AI

"I'm Jason stoughton. Here in Silicon Valley. As AI progresses both in terms of what it can do and how widely it is deploying, the ability for AI to understand and empathize with our emotions is still a glaring hole in its capabilities. On this podcast, I am joined by Alan Cohen, CEO and chief scientist at Hume AI. To talk about the state of the technology, unpack the hopes and dreams and fears of an AI that understands and can potentially manipulate our emotions and how humans not only leading the way in advancing AI's capabilities in this area, but is also leading the way in ensuring that AI should serve as human well-being above all else. This is really one of the most important areas of research in AI today. If you like what you hear, subscribe to my podcast, follow me on Twitter at the pulse of AI, or reach on LinkedIn. Let's get to it. Well, welcome to the show. Great to be here. So before we get into all the great things that you're doing at, let's talk about you. What is your journey been like, right? You know, I talk to people all the time and, you know, and the AI space and they just have the most interesting career progression. I know a lot of people are listening to the show and thinking, what is the path look like to become a CEO of an AI company? I mean, just talk about that. Yeah, totally. I mean, for me, it was a winding path. I started in psychology, but I was always interested in data science. So an undergrad, I majored in cognitive science and applied math. I did a lot of research in neuroscience, and I was always fascinated by the idea of the subjective of consciousness of the inaccessible world that really is the most important thing, right? And so when you talk about why we developing technology, why is technology accelerate? It's in service a kind of improving people as well-being if they're conscious state. And because that remains entirely subjective, there's this strange rift between the most important kinds of philosophy and the most important kinds of technology. And I kind of wanted to close that. So I started in neuroscience thinking about where does subjectivity emerge in the brain. And the more you learn about neuroscience, the more you realize that we don't know. And my first project was reconstructing patterns of what kinds of images people were looking at based on their brain activity. In FMRI. And we actually had some success in that. But what I realized is we understand the visual assistant decently well. But there's no sense of where subjectivity of consciousness comes from. And one of the things that would be really interesting to understand is emotion..

Jason stoughton Hume AI Alan Cohen Silicon Valley LinkedIn Twitter
"ai" Discussed on Smarter Than AI

Smarter Than AI

05:28 min | 8 months ago

"ai" Discussed on Smarter Than AI

"So okay, let me mention that third CS professor from Stanford. I don't know why I'm mentioning that so much. It's just they've done great work in the AI ethics and AI AI fairness space. She joined Google to democratize AI and data interview with wired magazine. And I found this really interesting because she talks about AI and law enforcement and how facial recognition is used widely in that. But one of her students in working with her and we've mentioned her before on this show called her name is Tim Nick gebru. We mentioned her in the ethics in AI to talk. She wanted to create a project called gender shades that highlighted racial bias in commercial facial recognition algorithms. And I just wanted to mention this at this gender shades project because after this was released, companies like Amazon like IBM like Microsoft were very cautious in releasing this facial recognition technology into our regular space. And we know that facial recognition in the past has been racially biased where it would traditionally would recognize caucasians way easier than people of other skin tones. And that just shows us that how previous data or the input data, if it's not right, the output will also be similar. That's crazy to think about how something that's supposed to be impersonal and unfeeling still has those racial biases. It's so crazy. Okay, let's speak a little bit more about facial recognition. And talk about surveillance states because, I mean, anyone who's a big fan of police dramas like me, specifically The Blacklist, I mean, everyone knows how fast Iran can pull up a suspect using facial recognition. It's crazy. But let's look beyond the fiction for because this is being widely adopted around the world. I've heard in China, for example, police have started using sunglasses that have a camera on them, and these cameras can upload images to a database containing previously captured images of people. And so if there's a suspect within this large group, the AI can parse that information and the officer is then notified from the sunglasses that there's a match, are we, so it's like, that's just crazy to think about. Like if you get a parking ticket, you can be easily identified and you can have somebody walk over to you to pay it. That's just crazy. So like, are we, are we heading into this weird orwellian future? And is this being driven.

Tim Nick gebru wired magazine Stanford Google IBM Amazon Microsoft Iran China
"ai" Discussed on Pulse of AI

Pulse of AI

03:39 min | 8 months ago

"ai" Discussed on Pulse of AI

"It's IP. So the models do use or be able to machine learn system to build how you run them at scale. That's technical IP. So it's sort of three forms of competitive advantage in one. But in a needle, if you have all three represents something very different to what we've had before, is if it's not just a network effect or it's not just an economy of scale. It's not just one of those other forms of competitive advantage with heard about and sort of tried to discover it in a real world before. It's very different to any of them. So let me ask you this. On the first one on the data itself, right? When AI first came out, I mean, in the last big data, you know, as everybody's kind of excited about it as deep learning really sort of spurred this new wave of AI that we're in right now. Over the last 7, 8 years. There was this thinking that companies incumbent companies who had lots of data. We're going to have a huge advantage in the market, right? But people are finding that's not necessarily the case. I mean, I just love your thoughts on that. You know, at some level, I almost CEOs around the country who are spending billions of dollars in digital transformation and their projects are failing and we'll get into how you do teams and the expectations. But just sort of an existential question on the side. Before we get to that, do you believe that you almost have a better advantage if you are not if you're a pure AI first startup in an industry and a lot of these industries? So you have to put you on the spot, but it's something. I believe they do, right? Yeah, I do. And so look, when a lot of people look at the title of the book, the AI first company, I think, well, I don't know, my company didn't start building AI in the beginning. So how can I be in AF or something? The whole point of the book is you can be an AI first company, whether you're starting today or whether you're transforming an existing company. However your question was like, if you're starting to scratch, do you have an advantage? Yes, and it's for the reason I think you mentioned, which is you can be more targeted about the data you collect such that you only collect data that feeds the system that generates the prediction that you're effectively selling. Or helps you make the decision that you're making better than anyone else in your market. What to put on a shelf for where to send a product or how much energy to produce on a given day, how in your nuclear power plan or your co-pilot or whatever where to look for minerals. The data you're collecting to feed the system that builds the generates the prediction that helps you make that decision. Can be expensive to collect and process, and if you're very targeted about that in the beginning, you can get to that very valuable making that very valuable institution on a very smart decision. Much more cheaply than others. I think where a lot of companies and at the risk of going into an answer to a different question, but sort of in response to something that was part of that question. I think we're a lot of companies get wrong. They say, just spend so much time trying to have their database represent reality perfectly. And just spend so much time collecting all the data they possibly can, organizing it in the best way they possibly can and whatnot..

AI
"ai" Discussed on AI in Business

AI in Business

02:03 min | 8 months ago

"ai" Discussed on AI in Business

"And this is our series on AI success factors every Monday we cover one specific enterprise AI project that was a success. We talk about what was the problem. What was the success measurement? What was the impact? And what made it a success? And today we're talking about an example at a rather large organization. In our recent weeklong series on AI ROI, we had a fantastic guest by the name of Gopalan, who is the head of the AI center of excellence for Intel. He shared some fantastic framework thinking about making decisions about AI projects that will lead to more successful projects. If you have not yet listened to that episode, or indeed that entire series, I would definitely recommend going back and tuning in. The entire week Monday through Friday, march 14th through march 18th, we publish one episode a day with 5 great guests covering AI ROI and I would certainly recommend tuning in. But in this episode, Gopalan dives in on how he puts those frameworks in action and we talk about a specific AI success story in one of the most complicated parts of Intel's operation, which is how they manage their inventory. This is a company that makes a lot of things, and they happen to be very complicated things. They are a hardware company, after all. And so they're dealing with a lot of complex parts and a lot of different suppliers. Similar to some of the previous episodes we've talked about in AI success factors, you will hear some great insights about crawl walk run. Better than hearing from it in a metaphorical sense. You'll see how gopal and put that idea into practical value. Also, you'll hear go pollen's advice for how they came up with the way to measurably determine the impact of this application. And in this case, it had to do in part with selling some of their inventory back to the original vendor. And so being able to factor that into the financial model to make the business case is also a powerful insight from this episode. So in terms of a real example of crawl walk run a real positive financial impact and some great strategy about measuring and determining financial impact in a way that you can really show to leadership, this is a shining episode and one that I'm happy to be able to bring to you. So without further ado, this is our AI success factors episode with gopal and Intel.

Gopalan AI center of excellence Intel gopal
"ai" Discussed on AI in Business

AI in Business

05:14 min | 9 months ago

"ai" Discussed on AI in Business

"To the next stage. Yeah, filters and criteria every single time and you guys are dealing with the process to have confidence in those decisions. So that's a big thing I'm taking away. Anything else you want our enterprise listeners to know when it comes to deciding on and then checking in on AI ROI from today's episode. Of course, finally, the assay spoke about, right? Very upfront deciding with the business. What will be the adoption metrics in the usage metrics, right? So this is something we where we hold both the AI team as well as the business accountable. Because we typically look at what will be the deployment plan for the algorithm. If we want to take it from a pilot to a scale at a large scale, what will be the deployment plan? Will it be like one site per quarter or one per quarter, or what is the deployment plan? That they have in mind. So that we also at the back end or from an infrastructure point of view we are ready to support, such as scale initiative, such as scaling effort. And also implicitly what is happening is that accountability from the business. How are they planning to even scale this algorithm so that eventually there is an increased adoption that is happening. So this is one criteria that we also bake it into our engagement so that the business is super clear that they have a clear path to scale it once a proposal clears the proof of concept. Yeah, yeah. Again, these kind of stage gating ways of thinking in this process way of thinking through AI projects, I think is something that is super important for our folks to tune into. If you're listening right now, you might not have an AI center of excellence, but you're getting to benefit from one by the good graces of a very, very smart guest. So go follow and thank you so much for being able to join us here on the program. This.

AI center of excellence
"ai" Discussed on Smarter Than AI

Smarter Than AI

04:32 min | 11 months ago

"ai" Discussed on Smarter Than AI

"And learn to make decisions on our behalf. We have been delegating that responsibility to AI, why wouldn't we? They only do what we allow them to as precisely and efficiently as possible. But what if that efficiency means that real human suffer unfair treatment that those decisions that are impacting life and death are made by systems with no human compassion, join us as we tackle ethics and AI right now?.

"ai" Discussed on AI in Business

AI in Business

05:01 min | 11 months ago

"ai" Discussed on AI in Business

"While, and that is agriculture. The last time we covered agriculture, we covered AI for detecting the quality of soil. Today we talk about much bigger picture applications a broader set of use cases where AI might bring to bear value for farmers and for the industries that depend on our guest this week is Gregory. He's an engineering lead at landing AI, landing has raised over $50 million. It is run by Andrew ng, who is one of the biggest names in the business AI world. The teacher of probably the most famous online course of AI one that I went through myself on Coursera. He's also one of the cofounders of Coursera. So very prominent machine learning thought leader who has spun off a company focusing primarily on heavy industry and a variety of different heavy industry sectors, agriculture being one of them. Gregory worked with Andrew at the Baidu Silicon Valley AI research lab, which I visited myself some 5 long years ago. So we spent years with Andrew before Andrew spun up landing and now he's with him there as well. Gregory speaks to us this week about the AI use cases in agriculture that he thinks are going to make the biggest impact in the years ahead. There's some great overview here of what might be done with actual physical machinery in agricultural context and just where the technology has had a generally that I hope will bring a lot of value to those new folks who are too dim. So without further ado, let's roll right into the episode. This is Gregory I'm also landing AI here in the AI business podcast. So Greg, we're going to talk about artificial intelligence in agriculture, obviously at landing you folks are thinking about this space among among others. And you and I had talked off Mike about the.

Coursera Gregory Andrew ng Baidu Silicon Valley AI resear Andrew spun Andrew Greg Mike
"ai" Discussed on AI in Business

AI in Business

03:38 min | 1 year ago

"ai" Discussed on AI in Business

"Intelligence research and you're listening to the AI in business podcast. In all of our work with enterprises, it's quite rare that an enterprise research project and most of our work has to do with finding the opportunity landscape for AI for the companies that we work with in the enterprise space rarely do our clients want to draw just from the startup ecosystem or just from their competitors or just from what large organizations are doing. They often want to vary perspective. For helping a bank decide on some kind of a fraud solution or fraud strategy, regarding AI or an anti money laundering strategy related to AI, they want to know about the startup ecosystem. They want to know about other big banks. They want to know about other established software providers in the banking space to genuinely find where the ROI is and what the possibilities are. And for us as a research firm, this means we need to keep a wide rolodex to be able to help companies immediately access the kind of talent that can help them with their strategy, help reduce risks, help to drive the success of their most important projects, but it also means that we're always hunting for people who have experience on both sides of the fence. I love when I'm able to find great smart entrepreneurs who.

AI
"ai" Discussed on AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

04:46 min | 1 year ago

"ai" Discussed on AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

"Everybody even has but different people have about about technology right be everybody's people have different levels of fear of technology and the thing about fears that they may be emotional. But there's always something to it right you know. He has unreal as some of these things might be. Some people are afraid that you know artificial general intelligence. Agi if you attended any of our foundations courses this is sort of the strong ai. The idea that we could build this one intelligence system that can do anything that we that we give it to rather than what we have now which are all narrow. Ai which are individualized ai. Thinks that can only do the task that we have specifically train them to do right and only then with a certain level of accuracy. There's no nobody's built sort of general intelligence but there's a fear that somebody will or some organizations will and that system will become really strong and will take over everything right that that's a fear right. The other fear is that robots will take over their jobs. You know whether it's the physical robots and are moving things around in the real world or the software robots that are doing these. You know these tasks machines right. There's their fears about that right. There's also a fear of loss of control. People are afraid that they're gonna lose control over over their privacy over data their decision making you know their right of choice. You know all sorts of stuff people are worried about. They're afraid that algorithms will will make decisions against them and there may be bias or maybe you know some some other aspects of control you know small number of people control over these are these are fierce right and and you can't dismiss these fears because these these fears are there. The fears are real. You know the thing that they might be people might be afraid of. That may or may not be real right now but the fierce themselves are real right. And so we're we're afraid of these things and and so we have to when we when we think about what we're doing. They asked if you have to address the fierce because if you don't address the fierce then even as you might think of them as non rational fears you know. We don't have a super intelligent. So why are you afraid of it right now but the our fears and there there are fears are real and so we have to do some things in our. Ai systems to make sure that people don't have in the back of their mind this concern. You know that that may or may not ever happen right. And of course you have issues of over-concentration of data right so on the flip side. We do have real concerns. In addition to these fears are mostly driven by sort of What people are thinking in their head is as to what may or may not happen. We actually have legitimate concerns about ai. Based on what we have experienced right we have issues of lack of transparency. These are we have machine learning systems that are making decisions and it is true that we in many cases we have a very limited amount of visibility into what's actually happening. Why did that decision happen. You may not have a satisfactory answer right. The other legitimate concern is that while the systems may be sort of neutral. Neither good nor bad. they're just technology..

ai
"ai" Discussed on AI in Business

AI in Business

05:54 min | 1 year ago

"ai" Discussed on AI in Business

"Intelligence research. And you're listening to the ai and business podcast today. We're gonna be talking about a business. Function that in my opinion does get nearly enough attention. We look across industries of horizontal functions. Things like marketing come up or logistics. Come up customer service come up but what about sales and sales enablement in all honesty. There aren't that many companies chasing down this space. There's plenty of applications and sure there's a variety of startups but if we compare it to again marketing customer service of variety of other horizontal. There's just not as much action but the fact that matter is sales enablement exciting space. It's my perspective that a lot of revenue oriented applications. May i are gonna come after some of the efficiency or risk reduction applications in ai particularly for risk oriented bigger. Stodgy or enterprise firms but there sure is some upside to focusing on revenue when it comes to a adoption and companies who were succeeding in this space Showing that that's the case chorus dot. Ai is a company that has now raised over one hundred million dollars with record growth in twenty twenty and their ceo is jim benton. We speak with jim in this episode. Of the i in business podcast on what. The future of sales enablement looks like in other words. Would we have sales people on the phone or sending out emails or on linked in whatever the case may be how will they be. Ai augmented how will they be. Ai enabled and how will be able to consistently improve sales performance of sales people whether they're in business development or account managers or is it look like to consistently improve performance with artificial intelligence. It's very hard to get to one. Hundred million dollars raised unless you're showing real traction real results for your customers so i think. Jim's perspective is rather warranted on this matter because again there's not that many companies doing what they're doing at this time so i think there's a lot of insight and understanding what they're up you if you are interested in learning more. Ai applications in different horizontal verticals finding wear. Ai is finding its productive fit in the industry that be sure to check out. Emerged plus emerge pluses where you can access our full library. They i use cases as well as our library of a white papers. And our best practice guides for applying ai for our y for adoption for.

jim benton Ai jim Jim