35 Burst results for "ADA"

How to Make Your Website Accessible to All

The $100 MBA Show

06:18 min | Last week

How to Make Your Website Accessible to All

"Hello My name is Jeff White. And I'm the CO founder of Kula Partners, a marketing and web design, and Development Agency based in Halifax Nova Scotia Canada. We work primarily with BT manufacturers located throughout North America and I'm also the CO host of a podcast called the Kula ring where we interview those manufacturing marketers and learn about their successes and failures and the things that they're most interested are excited about. But today, I'm here to talk to you about how to make your website accessible to all. It's a really important topic and not one that a Lotta people understand or even know. The importance of. But the fact of the matter is. Over thirteen percent of adult Americans have some form of disability with vision and hearing loss being the most prevalent and in this day and age there are actually lawsuits being levied against organizations that do not have. Websites in fact, the same laws that apply to accessible places such as having wheelchair ramps or accessible washrooms the ADA. With disabilities, act applies to the web. So what are we going to talk to you today about how you can structure your site in a way? So that is going to be available and accessible to everyone and I'm GonNa show you exactly what you can do in order to make your site available to all. With thirteen percent of Americans having disability, and the fact that in many beat be sales relationships having eight ten to fourteen. Members of buying committee. There's a very real chance that some of the people that you're trying to sell to actually do have a disability and as such ensuring that your site is available to those people is not only the right thing to do but it also may impact your ability to sell to the companies that you want to sell to. So, let's talk about that. From a foundational perspective. One of the very first things that you need to consider when you're building an accessible website is that your navigation is clear and concise and that it makes sense and adds value to the content on the site. Many. People when they're putting together their information architecture, there's main sitemap navigation? Used general categories such as products services about us, things like that. But those don't really begin to describe what kinds of content you're going to find underneath of them. and. I often urge our clients and others that we work with to use more descriptive language that talks about the actual categories of products at the top level of their site. This ensures that upon first glance or I read through of those navigation categories that someone can actually get more information about what it is that your company does or cells. So I would encourage you to put those key categories into the navigation to ensure that it actually makes additional sense to someone who's breeding it or viewing it for the first time. While it's very important for your navigation to be well-structured and for the link names to be relevant and descriptive of the content that people are going to find behind them. Structuring the page hierarchy of the site is of equal importance. And not only does this help to organize the content within the site, but it also helps to ensure that visitors to the site are able to find where they are in the overall site structure. You need to add signposts, breadcrumbs, and other elements help people exactly what page people are on within the site and what category of content they're looking at it in. This will help them ensure that they know where they are spatially within the site. One of the great things about using semantic. For your navigation is that not only are you going to make it easier to understand in use for all of your site visitors, but it's going to have a positive impact on your on page search as well. So as you're creating this navigation, the second thing that you need to consider is that people with certain disabilities are going to have a hard time navigating the site with traditional tools like track pads and mice, and touch. They're going to be using screen readers and other assistive tools. And they need to be able to move through the site in a way that isn't necessarily the same as what a sighted person would be able to do. So, we like to employ something called keyboard navigation that allows a user to quickly skip past all of the chrome or navigational elements that they can get right to the meat of the site this happened by hitting the tab key and allowing somebody to actually skip directly to the content within the site, and if they choose not to do that, it will actually read to them what the different navigational elements are. So implementing keyboard navigation is one of the quickest things that you can do to actually make your site accessible. If you're looking for a guide to all of the requirements for website accessibility you need look no further than the website content accessibility guidelines or why Cag-. This is a list of all of the available accessibility features and things that need to be built into your site to meet or exceed the accessibility standards. There are currently two core levels that we are concerned about, and that's Aa and. AAA. AAA guidelines actually add additional scope for higher level contrast, as well as devices and considerations for those with cognitive disabilities, not just hearing or sight. And there are two different levels of this. The AA guidelines have less stringent contrast requirements. In. Small text. It's four and a half to one in the triple A. Guidelines looking at a difference of seven to one. So this insures that text that is smaller than eighteen point in Roman or fourteen point in bold has sufficient contrast between the foreground, the background. So as to be legible to those who may not have the ability to see it as clearly as those with regular normal site.

Jeff White North America Kula Partners Halifax Nova Scotia Canada Co Founder Development Agency
"ada" Discussed on The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

04:35 min | 2 weeks ago

"ada" Discussed on The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

"Our back maybe now we're back baby. Ada Della Tuck was born in Solomon Alaska to. New P. ought to parents. Okay. Let's go into this. So the term that is offensive that used to be us..

Ada Della Tuck Solomon Alaska
OOPS! I Screwed Up!

Build A Big Podcast - The Marketing Podcast For Podcasters

06:07 min | Last month

OOPS! I Screwed Up!

"It's a big podcast David Hooper here. In when I was a kid maybe fifth or sixth. Grade. Junior high. I was doing something stupid. And I got caught by a teacher wasn't just any teacher it was the principal of the school. talked my way out of it. The next day I was bragging some friends about what a smooth talker I was and what an idiot the principal was. I was in art class and we these huge tables. Maybe I don't know three or four kids at a table. And when she picks you this. The Art. Room, it was in a house. That was next to the school. My school was in urban neighborhood and I guess there was a house next to it or something they bought it run out of room. Made it offices and made it the art room. So anyway, I'm in the House for art school, but it's on the third floor. It's in the attic 'cause they did all their business downstairs it all up stairs, and you had to go up several flights of stairs. Very narrow. This was before. Ada. It wasn't easy to get to you, but it's kind of cool for a kid because you felt you were safe kind of hanging out and I got my friends they're around the Big Table and I kept going on and on that. Then, I turned around and she was right behind me at the top of the stairs you come out of nowhere because that's other thing worked imagine going into your attic and you're right there anyway a turnaround she's right there. And I taught my way out of that sort of. Not Really Fast to a couple of days ago. I got this episode of building podcasts with Dave Jackson that are released and always download my own episodes I. Subscribe to my own podcast because I want to make sure the feed is working sometimes I listen sometimes I don't happen to listen to this one and I'm hearing sloppy edits. Thought to myself that's Weird I. Guess I decided to keep things loose. Talk and things like filler words. Apart when I asked David question wasn't clear on it or stumbled or something. I asked him the question again normally, I would add those things out and thinking to myself man sloppy edits then interview ins and Dave and I keep talking and that was my ocean moment. I knew at that point this is the raw tape. I think what had happened is I was in the middle of netted got distracted by something else. I should have gone back to it. I didn't. It seems like an easy thing to remember. But because this was a three part episode, it's got confused in way back to the tape I'm listening to. The interview ends. Dave. Keep talking and I think to myself I. Hope. I. Didn't say anything bad. And I didn't. Just. A word that I'd normally be out I said. And then Dave said. And also said mother And then I said. And then I said I think. Is a mother. and. I'm kidding but I did say which on this podcast should have been beeped. Because this podcast is classy like that. Lesson number one from this episode. Assume all Mike's are hot. The message is being broadcast and everything you say is on tape. But there was a second mistake that I made in that episode to completely screw up the sequence of things. You probably heard something that I call the double intro. This is pretty common. Where somebody does an interview? And introduced the guest. Hey, we got Joe Schmo from Blah Blah Blah dot com. He's a good friend of mine and today we're GonNa talk about Blah Blah Blah, welcome Joe, you got that introduction. But before that, you got the basic intro to the podcast where somebody will come in and they'll say something like, Hey, I'm David Hooper and this is the Joe Schmo Blah Blah Blah podcast. Today we're actually interviewing Joe Schmo he's the king of Blah Blah Blah and JOE SCHMO DOT com. Here's the interview you. You're a sound effect and then it goes to that previous recording that I just mentioned hey, it's David. So you repeat the same thing that's the double intro, and it happens usually because people are doing things at a different time. That is exactly what happened with the Dave Jackson episode. Not only was I doing something at a different time. It caused me to lose track of where I was in the editing process because this was a three part episode I had an introduction episode I had the Dave Jackson part of the episode and I had the Larry Roberts part of the episode things got really screwed up for this three part series a record, the Larry I then I did the one with Dave and then I did the intro episode but how release things how you heard them With, you heard the intro episode. You heard the Dave episode. Then you heard the Larry episode. So instead of one, two, three, it was three to one and that's not a huge deal except that I mentioned something on the Dave episode. which you hadn't heard yet I talked about what had already happened on the Larry episode that hadn't been released yet. Another one of those things it's not a huge deal, but it's worth talking about because when something like that happens, it breaks up the fantasy. That the podcast or radio show whatever you're making is a well oiled machine. It's like you hearing question being repeated again. When you edit that out, it makes the Ho- seems so much smoother. You like man that Guy's great on the Mike he knows exactly what to ask. Not In real life. If you heard the mistake that caricature that you think is real that's blown. As lesson number two here. Sequencing is important.

Dave Jackson David Hooper Joe Schmo Principal Mike House For Art School David Larry Roberts HO GUY
"ada" Discussed on Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls

Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls

03:24 min | Last month

"ada" Discussed on Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls

"On, with the show. Once upon a time, it was a girl named Ada. She loved machines. Ada Byron was born in London? More than two hundred years ago to parents who were polar opposites. Her. Father. Lord Byron was a famous poet known for doing some over the top and unusual things. He said to have kept to aim bear as a pet in his college dorm room. Lady Byron on the other hand was a proper gentlewoman with little patience for his antics. To make matters worse Lord Byron. Drank too much, and was often unkind to his wife. So, Ada was just five weeks old her parents short marriage ended. An Ada would never see her father again. Now Lady Byron with a single mother and her top priority was making short. Ada didn't grow up to be anything like her father. She decided that there was just one cure for any eccentric tendencies eight, a may have inherited. Mathematics. Lady Byron hired tutors for Ada and planned a rigorous schedule of study. She studied history geography and music, but her mother was most concerned with her mouth and science lessons. To her these subjects were the opposite poetry. When eighty began studying mathematics, she was fascinated by the curious ways, formulas could be transformed. Said, she couldn't help but imagine them as magical fairies that changed shapes as they pleased. Despite Lady Byron's best. Efforts. Found poetry. Numbers A. I'm Jodi. Kantor. And this is good for rebel boroughs. Fairytale podcast about the extraordinary women who inspire us. This. Week. Eight a lovely. Mother was often sick and her doctors prescribed long trips to spa resorts, serene places with fresh air where she could recover. So Our Lady Byron was away eight estate at their country house with her governesses and tutors who were nowhere near as strict as her mother. After her lessons were done, lead, eat a wander in the garden with her best friend, a cat named Mrs Puff. When Ito was twelve years old, she'd sit in the garden with Mrs, Pathan and watch the birds. Occasionally, they'd swooped down to eat bits of stale crumbs in the grass. It was then that she could get closer long. Edelweiss transfixed. She wanted to figure out how birds fly. So that one day. She could fly to. She began her own study of flight. Mrs. Path does in the grass next to her aided through sketches and took notes. She was engaged in her own analytical study asking how fast does Bernie to flap its wings, how bigger wings compared to a bird's body. Every detail was an important part of the puzzle..

Lady Byron Ada Byron Lord Byron Ada Mrs Puff London Pathan Ito Kantor Bernie Mrs. Path
The Internet Is Everything. But Is It Accessible?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:03 min | Last month

The Internet Is Everything. But Is It Accessible?

"We spent some time digging into just how crucial Internet access is during the pandemic. But even if you have access to the Internet, many parts of it are still not accessible this summer, the Americans with Disabilities Act the ADA turned thirty years old and a lot of the tech that makes things convenient for everyone can be game changing for people with disabilities, screen readers that help visually impaired people read websites and software that lets us type with our voice, Nicholas? Dean, how does a Web accessibility consultant and trainer? He says that? That despite these advances, some products that claim to help actually make things worse. There is no doubt in my mind that we must include people with disabilities at every stage of any project. An example here there's a solution for web accessibility that his being pushed really hard lately, and those are overlays. So you you go, you pay for a service, they inject one line of code and your site, and they claim that it makes the site accessible. When in fact, it reduces accessibility, it is not reliable it conflicts with users. assistive technologies, and we have a solution that is really appealing to people that don't have a disability. They're appealing to people think that can get quick fix. But in fact, it's breaking things. So. When you are advising companies, what features do you tell them that they should include in their websites to make those sites more accessible while there's there's a few things to to focus on to look at making sure you can use the site with keyboard. Only you WANNA, make sure your color contrasts are sufficient something that's been very fashionable as great text on grey background That's really Really, really hard to beat for people that have low vision, and incidentally, if you try to read it on your cellphone outside in full sun chances are you're not gonna be able to read it either, and this is where I'm saying accessibility is good for everyone. Those are really good tips for companies designing their websites. But what can we do to make say our social media posts more accessible. Twitter now offers the ability to add descriptions or alternate text for images and I urge everybody to actually take a moment and described image. They're posting be careful about using emojis too much screen reader users are really going to struggle always think as to how is this? GonNa. Be perceived and how can I make sure that more people can get the message? What kind of innovations in tech are you excited about? As it pertains to the disability community? There's a lot of things happening when we're looking at tick a lot of the excitement, Ron that right now is Rhonda. Emergence and there's a lot of that that can be leveraged for for accessibility. For example, you may have heard of using a I to. Interpret. What a photo is and be able to give her a description of that fo four screen reader users or using air. I. For automating transcription for shows like the one we're having right now. So there's there's a lot of promise in in that field at the same time I. Think we have to be aware that there's there's promise, but it's not quite ready. For Primetime, a lot of the automated transcription or automated captions. You may see on, Youtube, for example, are not one hundred percent accurate. Especially if people have a bit of an accent or use a tech lingo. The accuracy is not perfect. So as a result, people who rely on captions or transcripts will not get. All the information. So they may get eighty percent or eighty, five percent and those ten or fifteen percent missing can be crucial. So. That's that's exciting. There's stuff moving. It's going to, it's going to help, but it's going to. It's not helping now because we can't rely on it and I think that's That's probably a a trap that we have to be careful not to fall into, is that while the technology is there, the technology's not perfect yet? So we can't rely on twitter can't decide well, I don't need to bother. Describing my images when I post on social media, because there's no intelligence that can do that yet while we're not quite there yet. So we have to be careful to. Not Get carried away with excitement as to what's new and shiny and make sure that we still you ju-, diligence to make sure accessibility is taken care of by humans. Nicholas? Is A web accessibility consultant and trainer.

Youtube Twitter Dean Consultant Nicholas Rhonda ADA RON
"ada" Discussed on Up First

Up First

04:06 min | Last month

"ada" Discussed on Up First

"The participation of the largest group that has power that has buying power has Florida power. You know bad have all these things back. In. Shape society. We have. Such enormous exclusion still to deal with which is rooted very much in poverty and in. Racial. Injustice that the great message of the ADA gets a little bit I think camouflaged and over shadowed by these remaining challenges. But I, do hope that the the media attention is not only on. The people who made it possible to have the ADA but also You know the real story is that we really have seen a transformation. In Society in a way that's ultra necessary or forced take the next steps. You know the really transformative aspect of the day. I think is about Making it possible for people to be out and about in the world and have a right that they can assert in water different situations, and by doing that people are more likely to be feeling that they that they are part of their communities they belong and there were likely to be perceived that way socially. and to me, that's the most important message of the thirtieth is to celebrate the extraordinary things it's done. And how it's made a difference in so many people's lives. You know overall it was a life changer I? Mean I'm talking to young disabled people. Who never knew a world before? The Ada? Never knew a world. If the AGA had been around back, then I would probably be a doctor. But you know it was a blessing in disguise because I got to do I think so much more with my life. You know doctor might see you know over a career a few hundred maybe even a few thousand patients. By the work that I've done, I got to help millions upon millions of Americans..

ADA AGA Florida
"ada" Discussed on Up First

Up First

03:18 min | Last month

"ada" Discussed on Up First

"After the capitol crawl most politicians from both parties supported the bill. Still the odds looked pretty grim. Washington was not very open to civil rights laws, but another key supporter turned out of the and turn out to be President George H W Bush. He had won election in nineteen, eighty eight. And he had been vice president on a Ronald. Reagan. Compared to his predecessor Bush had promised a kinder and gentler nation. Now, the White House was Roy split on the way he had some advisers who were vehemently strongly opposed to the ADA and there are others who might. and. The ones who liked it succeeded because. They realized that George H W Bush can understand disability. There was disability in his family. Walk. Barbara Bush big issue was illiteracy teaching people to receive hi I'm Barbara Bush. Did you know illiteracy in this country could be eliminated by the year two thousand the case to get our young people reading now. Why the reason will turn out one of her sons Neil had dyslexia. And Barbara Bush had spent a lot of time when he was in school helping them read. And she was told the Bush's we're told all he'll never go to college he did but they dealt with his learning disability George and Barbara Bush had dealt with tragedy. When a young Robin died she was three she died of leukemia. So, there was disability in that family they understood him. This is what drove most of the. Biggest political allies, personal connections, every family deals with disability. It doesn't matter if you're Republican or Democrat and that's what helped push it over the finish line. So on July twenty, six, one, thousand, nine, hundred, George Bush signs the all this joyous bill signing I believe it was a really nice day out there in this splendid scene of hope spread across the South Lawn of the White House? I. Remember George Bush seated at a desk signing and all these activists and senators are surrounding him then George Bush says I, lift my pen to sign this Americans with Disability Act and say let the shameful walls of exclusion comes tumbling down finally come tumbling down God. Bless you all. Everybody. Knew this was been deal this was a really big deal. I was elated. Wow, this is a whole new era for people with disabilities I thought. that. Beings with just. Change. Life after the Ada, when we come back..

President George H W Bush George Bush Barbara Bush vice president White House ADA Neil Washington Reagan Robin leukemia
"ada" Discussed on Up First

Up First

04:22 min | Last month

"ada" Discussed on Up First

"After five Oh, four Mary Lou and others founded the Disability Rights Education and Defense Fund or Dread F. A national law and Policy Center to protect federal laws like section five, zero, four and advanced new ones by the late eighties their sights were set on the Americans with Disabilities Act. I'm over simplifying here but the ADA was like section five, four on steroids. Well, it globally accepted and promoted the idea that it's illegal to discriminate based on disability five. Oh, four only offered protections to federally funded programs and activities. The ADA protections would be sweeping and brought in. Compliance it applied this nondiscrimination mandate to employers with fifteen or more employees to public and private transportation to tell communications and to what we call public accommodations. Ron feeders, retail parks, all kinds of places you go to every single day. If signed, the ADA would prohibit discrimination on the basis of disability in all of those arenas and more whether they were federally funded or not. So for instance, whereas five four couldn't have forced the movie theater that shut its doors on Mary Lou to figure out a way to accommodate her the ADA would. So what happened was I? Yes. I was assigned to cover a press conference. I believe about the introduction of the Americans with Disabilities Act, which I had never heard of. And I went there and was listening to this piece of legislation being described as a new frontier in the area of civil rights and that just caught my attention right away. This is Steve Holmes a reporter who covered the for the New York Times 'cause like many people I really hadn't thought very much about people with disabilities attended to view them of objects of pity or sometimes even something or someone that you tend to avoid as opposed to a sense that these people had a right to be treated fairly. People just didn't. I didn't think about him that way I must confess. But something changed when Steve started covering the issue he realized disability was not only still largely ignored by people like him but stigmatized in society and it was like a vicious cycle avoiding the issue is exactly what perpetuated the stigma. I remember specifically, there was a one activist. who had difficulty speaking and had difficulty with control of his facial muscles? And as a result, he would often basically drool all over himself. Right? It was not a pleasant sight. He was I will confess sometimes difficult to look at. I realized after a while. This is exactly what this issue is about people that forced you to look them course you and that's that's the whole point the issue forced you to see people as they are. One of the reasons disability was so invisible was that the media barely covered it no, there was no disability beat that I knew of no not even a beat. Now in the health section, there was often stories about disabilities, but it was usually look at from a medical perspective as opposed to a rights perspective people with disabilities were saying we don't see our problems as problems of healthcare it's not our disability. The issue is the issue civil rights, and once Joe and Steve started it that became abundantly clear it so reminded me of black people at lunch counters. In. In the south and the fifties and sixties or gay people at Stonewall at moment you realize that people are really serious about demanding they..

ADA Disability Rights Education an Steve Holmes Mary Lou difficulty speaking Ron feeders New York Times Stonewall Policy Center reporter Joe
How to Run a Paid Live Workshop or Course

The $100 MBA Show

12:12 min | 2 months ago

How to Run a Paid Live Workshop or Course

"Online learning is a multi billion dollar industry in today's world. So you might be thinking, how can I compete with all the courses out there online courses on Eugenie? encore Sarah Skill share on all the different platforms. The private brands that are having own courses will one easy way to stand out from the crowd is offer a live workshop or course. We can go back and forth with your students, answer questions and have an interactive experience. But how do you actually set one up? So you can charge and deliver your workshop or course. Well, that's all cover in today's episode, will go through the aid Z.. Z. The tools. You'll need some tips on the delivery of this course and what you can offer to all your students to make sure that even when the live courses over the have what it takes and they have what they need to succeed with your subject matter, I've personally have offered several live courses in the past. There are so many advantages that will also cover in today's lesson. So let's get into it. Let's get down to business. Support today show comes from podcasting masterclass. If you're looking to launch your own podcast, you can learn from me. I'm doing a live workshop showing you the Ada, Z.. To starting your own podcast I started one hundred MBA show back in two, thousand fourteen, and it changed my whole business and life. I'll show you how to come up with the format of your podcast. How? How to record, it had edited how to produce it. How to host publish. It had a market it to get it to the top of the charts you're interested in joining this live workshop. This live masterclass for only one hundred and forty-nine. Just go to one, zero, zero, NBA, dot net, slash podcasting masterclass again, that's one zero, Zero Mba, dot net slash podcasting masterclass. I run and run currently on demand courses as well as live ones. But there are significant advantages to running a live workshop or course and I wanna go through these right now, the first thing is that live means interactive. It means that you're able to actually answer questions from your audience cater to the audience and make sure you're actually delivering better value that suits their needs. So that automatically gives more value to your actual offering. It also has more perceived value. That's why a ticket to a live on the stage play is more expensive. Then a ticket to a movie third, your audience can experience the course, not only live, but also the recording afterwards, which is fantastic at both worlds they get live and recorded, but the final advantage I wanNA share with you. That is probably the biggest and it's Kinda, hard to ignore. Is. When you offer a live class, statistically have found that a live class will have higher completion rates and higher success rates. What does this mean? Let's say, for example, you have a course and ten people take a life course versus a on demand course. The completion of the course is three X. compared to a on demand course alive three times of the people will complete the course actually show up and go through it. This results in a higher success rate that means that people actually implement what you taught and are able to give you a great testimony about how you've impacted their lives. So alive courses really have that huge advantage. Then this is the. On demand courses are a waste of time. It's just to know that you live courses because of the investment you make being their life, you're going to get these advantages. Now, with all this value, you can charge more with a live course because live again has more value. So you're able to interact you bill answer questions, it just a different ballgame. So how do you set one up? Well a live course? Course is very similar to an on-demand course in terms of the curriculum or the content. So whatever content you'll be teaching with, you have some slides or you're GonNa be teaching on camera. This is going to go the same basically with a live course. So your preparation is the same, but when it comes to delivering the course, you're not recording this and then uploading the video to a course platform, for example. You can actually just do this live and The best thing to do is to use a webinar software. So shameless plug we have been our software called Ninja that allows you to charge for webinars whether it's a one off live Webinar or a series Webinar, which allows you to charged for a series of dates and times. So if somebody registers once on the series Webinar and they register for different dates and time, and you can actually mix and match live and recorded Webinar Ninja. Meaning, you can have one session, that's why the other ones record or can do all live or all recorded. But this is the simplest way to get started with a live course or one off workshop because of our seamless integration is this easy just to charge for people registered for and the automatically get the replay. Now, I like to also offer a workbook with all my courses with fuel can work along and then also do some assignments later on. So I always include the recording and a workbook with my paid webinar. So paid life course or paid live workshop can be easily done with a woman or software. If you're looking to try something for free, we have a fourteen day trial where it we're going to dot com, and that's kind of the simplest way to set up in terms of the software. Now, if you wish you download the video recordings of the sessions and sell them a standalone courses as prerecorded on demand courses. So. That's just a little hint for you after you run your live workshop or course. So what are you going to do is when you set up this, Webinar, you're going to create a registration page landing pages. It's very simple. You can customize this with your images in your logos in your copy in your job. Here is basically to sell people on why they should. Be On this course why they should be on this live workshop recourse. Why should they buy and this is really a sales patient? This is why we recommend if we're GONNA sell your Webinar is to use a video temple. We have a video temple vote are Ninja, and this allows you to insert a record video on your registration page in why do I say you should have video. Video because video is a really good way for you to convince somebody quickly, they should by showing the advantage show, we're gonNA cover and also shows you shows who's going to teach them and allows you to build some trust and rapport, and also gives them a chance to say, okay, I want to learn from this person. Now, all the registration, this is when they're going to. To Register this word, they're going to pay where they have a credit card form. This is pretty seamless with us, and after they check out, they get to the thank you page the. Thank you. Page is exactly what it sounds like. Thanks them. It allows them to add the event to their calendar. It even allows them to shared on social and allow you to get some viral. Viral marketing from there, they email notifications, reminding them about the event reminding them what to do, and I recommend the in those email notifications, you prepare them for that live session for that life course, tell them what to do. They need to bring in some materials, those paper, and pen and notepad something like that. If you're teaching a software, for example, how offer installed. Get them ready. You know ads you're leading up to the course also prepare them to let them know this is GonNa be interactive come with questions You can even reply to the emails and ask questions beforehand will answer those first one. It's time to go live for your session or sessions. It's pretty simply just show up to the studio, hits our broadcast, and you can be on camera. Camera off camera, show your slides across your sides directly very easy and you go ahead and teach your material in the fall appeals. After the Webinar, you can include the replay. An also include any workbooks that you offer during the Webinar or during the class and that way they have a backup kind of link just in case they lose their workbook somewhere, so they can download it any time. Now, I have a few more tips when it comes to the business of selling alive workshop or a live course. Make sure you make it clear to people that, hey, you're running the session once. So show up live with you. I questions answered, but you will get a recording if you don't make the live broadcast also upon registration in the rotation process on the registration form, you want to collect a couple pieces of information to inform you about these attendees about these students find out what industry they're in find out. Any critical information will help you cater the course, cater the level, the course whether there are beginner a novice or. Expert, they've been doing this for some time You could do this with our generation form builder on women I'm sure there are other softwares that do this as well but I know that we to it. So I'm kind of giving you some tips that I do with our own software. I'd also recommend giving yourself at least two weeks time to promote this live session live course Prior to the date, you're going to be doing it. This gives you enough to get some momentum as a marketing. Maybe do some paid ads if you WANNA do facebook. Or instagram you can use even the video that you shop for the registration page, a four, your aunts, guys I got more on today's topic. But before that, let me give love to today's sponsor. Support for today, show comes from ninety nine designs. If you're looking to design anything for Your Business, logo a sticker, a t shirt, a whole website, ninety, nine designs got your back with ninety nine designs. You create a designed contests and several designers submit their design ideas. You choose the ones you like it's that simple. I love this idea because it gives you a chance to get more than one person, one talented person to work on your logo or your designed project. We just did our own design project on. On Ninety. Nine designs for a new product releasing later this year, it was brilliant and with ninety nine. Also, we're GONNA get an amazing bonus for being a listener. It's called a ninety nine dollar power. It's a, it's a boost bundle we got in our deal and we loved it. So just go to ninety nine designs, dot com slash one, zero, zero MBA, and get this freebie this dollar a power pack to boost your first contest again, that's ninety nine designs. Dot Com slash one, zero, zero, NBA. Toronto today's lesson. It's really really fun to run you live workshop or class. You get so much interaction yet. So much feedback. You can go back and forth you can help people out. It's just a great way for you to deliver a lesson to liver course, deliver a workshop. I know many of our users that do this regularly do a workshop. Every single week they charge for it the hundreds of people Even if the charge you know fifty, sixty, one, hundred dollars per course that stuff adds up and what's great about it is again, you have the recordings that you can resell later to new students. Thank you so much for listening to the hundred on the issue of you love today's episode. If you love this show, let us know an I tunes rating and review we read every single review and by leaving review, enter our weekly random draw. We Call Free Gripe, Friday. Every Friday. We have a a lifetime membership to one of our programs were giving away easy. Easy course our thirty day to build your own online course, check it out. Easy courses, dot coat. You can win it for free. Just go and leave his items rating in review and listen on our Friday to see if you want. It's that simple. It's to say thanks for showing US love on itunes. Hurry. Thank you so much for listening before. I, go. Go to leave you with this one of the things. I, love about live courses is that it forces you to improve your communication skills to really understand how to deliver your message a, we all know the information in our head. We are experts that what we know, but do we know how to deliver it and alive workshop live classes really allow you to. To think on your feet and really you know work on that muscle and which, I really love. So the more you do the more you're going to get better at it better on stage me better on interviews, all that kind of stuff. Thank you so much for listening and I'll check you in tomorrow's episode for our Friday. I'll see then take care.

Zero Mba NBA United States Eugenie Facebook Toronto Sarah Skill
"ada" Discussed on Throughline

Throughline

03:52 min | 2 months ago

"ada" Discussed on Throughline

"We have. Such enormous exclusion still to deal with which is rooted very much in poverty and in. Racial injustice that the great message of the ADA. I think camouflaged and over shadowed by these remaining challenges. But, I do hope that the the media attention is not only on. The people who made it possible to have the ADA also? You know the real story is that we really have seen a transformation in society in a way that's ultra necessary in order for us to take the next steps. You know the really transformative aspect of the day I think is about. Making it possible for people to be out and about the world and have a right that they can assert in. Different situations and by doing that people are more likely to be feeling that they that they are part of their communities they belong and there likely to be perceived that way socially and to me, that's the most important message of the thirtieth is to celebrate the extraordinary things it's done. And how it's made a difference in so many people's lives. Ole Overall. It was a life changer. I mean, I'm talking to John Disabled. People. Who never knew a world before the ADA? Never, knew a world. If the AGA had been around back, then I would probably be a doctor. But you know it was a blessing in disguise because I got to do I think so much more with my life. You know doctor might see you know over a career a few hundred maybe even a few thousand patients. By the work that I've done, I got to help millions upon millions of Americans..

ADA John Disabled AGA
"ada" Discussed on Throughline

Throughline

05:42 min | 2 months ago

"ada" Discussed on Throughline

"While I listen was getting the resources she needed in school. The world outside was trying to catch up the ADA passed in nineteen ninety but there was a multi year window to implement accommodations, things like curb cuts and sidewalks, teachers, aides, Braille, sign edge. So cities, schools, business owners they had to figure out how to make all this happen and how to pay for it. All the ADA is basically. An unfunded mandate and it's those of us with disabilities who are the watchdogs. And You know, why should it be the those of us who are pressed have to beat a one to like continuously fight you know for you know rights and the make people do what the law says that they should have to do the ADA is one thing does one thing? In extremely important way, but it's a civil rights law it's not self executing. You have to go out there and make it happen. You have to file complaints and you know talk entities into complying and. Follow lawsuits you have to use it. You know it's a tool I think the thing that angers me so much as a price put on the freedom of people with disabilities or prices put on the rights of people with disabilities. Because of the way the law was written there was no ada police and no eighty bank account. This lack of enforcement end funding meant that the one big fight to pass the Ada then broke into a thousand tiny fights after it became law a lawsuit to get a ramp here a petition before the school board to get large print textbooks, they're all fights meant to make it possible for disabled people to live fully in society to be seen in the world. But the ADA didn't solve these problems overnight or even thirty years later. You can go into a doctor's office and still not have access to accessible examining tables, accessible scales, things of that nature. When I go to the merged with my wife. She's deaf. We still have to fight to get an interpreter Even. Though these fights continue the movement itself has evolved. Joe Shapiro says, so has the mindset. Before the day or people with disabilities were used to. Fighting for what they get Now, the generation, the people who grew up protected by the way they have much higher expectations. Of The promise of the. Expect. Full opportunities to everything in American Life Johnson access to transportation in public places to school. And the ADA has chipped away at the standing stigma changing the way people relate to their disabilities and themselves. So. Younger people are much more likely to say they have a disability and the claim disability as an important part of their identity and claim it with pride. younger people have a broader definition of disability rights. They've expanded it to include disability. Justice. That, when you talk about disability issues, you have to look at it through a lens of protecting racial minorities and and other marginalized people. Identity is something Barbosa thinks about all the time. She's now a social worker and runs a blog called ramp your voice where I could talk about disability from it is affecting only is from different angles that to me when you politics.

ADA Barbosa Joe Shapiro
"ada" Discussed on Throughline

Throughline

04:11 min | 2 months ago

"ada" Discussed on Throughline

"After the capitol crawl most politicians from both parties supported the bill. Still the odds walked pretty grim. The Washington was not very open to civil rights was, but another key supporter turned out of the and turn out to be President George H W Bush he had won election in nineteen, eighty eight. And he had been vice president on a Ronald Reagan compared to his predecessor. Bush had promised a kinder and gentler nation. The White House was split on the he had some advisers who were vehemently strongly opposed to the ADA and there are others who might. And the wants who liked it succeeded because they realized that George H W Bush can understand disability there was disability in his family. Look. Barbara Bush. Big Issue was illiteracy teaching people to read. Hi I'm Barbara Bush did you know illiteracy in this country could be eliminated by the year two thousand the case to get our young people reading now. Why the reason, we'll turn out one percents neal had dyslexia. And Barbara Bush spent a lot of time when he was in school helping them read. And she was told the Bush we're told all he'll never go to college did but they dealt with his learning disability George and Barbara Bush dealt with tragedy when a young daughter Robin died she was three she died of leukemia. So there was disability in that family, they understood him. This is what drove most of the as political allies, personal connections every family deals with disability. It doesn't matter if you're Republican or Democrat, and that's what helped push it over the finish line. So to I twenty, six, nineteen, ninety, George Bush signs the all this joyous bill signing I believe it was a really nice day out. There in this splendid scene of hope, spread across the South Lawn of the White House. I remember George Bush seated at a desk and signing and all these activists and senators surround the him and George Bush says I now lift my pen to sign this. Americans with disability, act and say, let the shameful walls of exclusion comes tumbling down finally come tumbling down God bless you all. Everybody knew this was this was been deal. This was a really big deal. I was elated. Wow this is a whole new era for people with disabilities I thought. that. Banks with just. Change. Life, after the ADA. When we come.

President George H W Bush George Bush Barbara Bush White House ADA vice president Ronald Reagan Washington leukemia Robin
"ada" Discussed on Throughline

Throughline

05:27 min | 2 months ago

"ada" Discussed on Throughline

"I didn't have very many friends might twin sister who was and is non-disabled. And so things were. Pretty different. She was very outgoing and I was a bit shy because I learned to read really early books for my friends. This is Anita Cameron who you also met at the beginning of the episode. My name is Anita Cameron I am director of minority. For not dead yet. A national disability rights group opposed to doctor assisted suicide in euthanasia of. Needed did well in school and was on the path to her dream job I wanted to be a doctor was going to be neurologist. And you know all excited she got into med school with their for about. couple. Of Years and I started losing more eyesight and my epilepsy out of control and the university they just said okay. Sorry you know find another career path. This was one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, four those shortly before my twentieth. Perfect. There was no such thing as the Americans with disabilities act back via. So there was no support. I looked at that letter you know telling me to choose another career path. and. It was like, wow, that was punching in a good. I was depressed depressed I felt like a failure and I just. Wandered you know just hopped on the Greyhound with nothing but a couple of bucks in my pocket and clothes on my back and. Just, kind of wandered. Eventually Anita found her way back to her hometown Chicago and got involved in disability justice work. Specifically working with a group called adapt adapt Americans disabled for accessible public transit. I found out that adapt was organization that did civil disobedience nonviolence, civil disobedience, direct accent. We went around the country protesting Greyhound protesting the American Public Transit Association you know all of that Anita, jumped in and soon learned she had joined a group with quite the reputation we were considered radicals and militants. Okay as especially because we were all poor people, we all disabled people living you know on a fixed income, and so we were we were seen as a bunch of Ragtag. unwashed. Proletariat I mean look we were not considered respectable and that was the reason why a lot of you know the powers that be a what not would not meet with adapt some critics say it was more that adapt wouldn't meet with the powers that be regardless they weren't the ones negotiating the terms of the ADA groups like dread F- were the ones at the table. While they were meeting with the respectable people we adapt the. Radicals militants we were out there. You know keeping the pressure on you know kipp kept on blocking buses, shutting down buildings and and things of that nature won't Congress listened to testimonies and poured over new drafts of the bill adapt was getting impatient and in March of Nineteen Ninety we were allies the capitol crawl. There are hundreds of people still these out of their wheelchairs. And crawled up. The steps of the Capitol none of them could walk until they all just you know painstakingly one step at a time to. The second class citizenship you know that we held to just bring awareness. Not, just to the bill, but again for the ability to be seen. The ability to have people. Look at they have not turn away. Or not look at them in pity or not turn away in disgust. But just to view them as as full contributors to the society. I was one of the ones participated in that crawl up I went backwards carries someone's real chair and it was very hot and I got really exhausted and so the rest of the way up I literally crawled up Studi you know. You know but but bumping up the capitol stairs, it was amazing. We were crawling history we really were. were. Crawling in history..

Anita Cameron American Public Transit Associ Studi Chicago director kipp ADA
"ada" Discussed on Throughline

Throughline

04:22 min | 2 months ago

"ada" Discussed on Throughline

"After five four Mary Lou and others founded the Disability Rights Education and Defense Fund or Dread F A national law and Policy Center to protect federal laws like section five Oh four and advanced new ones. By the late eighties, there were set on the Americans with Disabilities Act. I'm over simplifying here but the ADA was like section five, zero, four on steroids. Well, it globally accepted and promoted the idea that it's illegal to discriminate based on disability five Oh four only offered protections to federally funded programs and activities. The protections would be sweeping and broaden that level of compliance. It applied this nondiscrimination mandate to employers with fifteen or more employees to public and private transportation to tell communications and to what we call public accommodations, restaurants, theaters, retail parks, all kinds of places you go to every single day. If signed, the ADA would prohibit discrimination on the basis of disability in all of those arenas and more whether they were federally funded or not. So for instance, whereas five Oh four couldn't have forced the movie theater that shut its doors on Mary Lou to figure out a way to accommodate her the ADA would. So what happened was I? Yes. I was assigned to cover a press conference I. Believe about the introduction of the Americans with disabilities, act, which I had never heard of. and. I went there and was listening to this piece of legislation being described as a new frontier in the area of civil rights and that just caught my attention right away. This is steve homes or reporter who covered the for the New York Times 'cause like many people. I really hadn't thought very much about people with disabilities attended to view them of objects of pity or sometimes even something or someone that you tend to avoid as opposed to a sense that these people had a right to be treated fairly. People just didn't I didn't think about him that way I must confess. But something changed when Steve started covering the issue, he realized civility was not only still largely ignored by people like him but stigmatized in society and it was like a vicious cycle avoiding the issue is exactly perpetuated the stigma. I remember specifically, there was a one activist. who had difficulty speaking and had difficulty with control of his facial muscles? And as a result, he would often basically drool all over himself. Right? It was not a pleasant sight. He. was I will confess sometimes difficult to look at. I realized after a while. This is exactly what this issue is about. People that forced you to look at them forced you and that's that's the whole point the issue forced you to see people as are. One of the reasons disability was so invisible was that the media barely covered it no, there was no disability beat that I knew of no, it's not even beat now in the health section there was often stories about disabilities, but it was usually looked at from a medical perspective as opposed to a rights perspective people with disabilities were saying we don't see our. Problems as problems of healthcare, it's not our disability. The issue is the issue civil rights, and once Joe and Steve started covering it that became abundantly clear. It's all reminded me of black people at lunch counters in in the south and the fifties and sixties or gay people at Stonewall at the moment you realize that people are really serious about demanding their right..

Disability Rights Education an steve homes Mary Lou ADA difficulty speaking New York Times Policy Center Joe Stonewall reporter
"ada" Discussed on Throughline

Throughline

04:59 min | 2 months ago

"ada" Discussed on Throughline

"Mary Lou Breslin didn't know about Ed Roberts when she felt her own, the option was to enroll in the University of Illinois Program in Nineteen Sixty two the same year he got himself into Berkley but some time after that night at the movie theater that moment she realized she was being discriminated against she started rethinking the mindset you of I had tried to instill in her. It wasn't her problem that the movie theater wouldn't let her in it was the theaters problem and one for them to solve in the seed was definitely. Planted at that point, she started hearing about this movement forming out in California, and by the nineteen seventies she was living in Berkeley working at the Center for independent living I was very quickly caught up to what others had been working on in terms of advancing disability rights policy. By that point, the movement's biggest achievement was one little piece of Big Federal Law Section Five, Oh four of the nineteen seventy, three rehabilitation act. It was really one sentence that says you can't discriminate on the basis of disability if you get federal funding. It was modeled after title six of the Nineteen Sixty four civil rights act and has much the same language title six prohibited discrimination on the basis of race color or national origin in any federally funded program section five four did basically the exact same thing except swap race with disability this new civil rights statute of the nineteen seventy-three Rehab Act was a complete game changer because for the first time, it recognized that people with disabilities experienced discrimination, and for the first time the law itself focused on transforming. The environment, not the individual that shifted the burden from the person being responsible managing everything and dealing with social isolation and barriers to the responsibility being placed on society and community, and it was historic because for the first time with disabilities were considered a protected class. So section five of four is written into this larger act, which is great except nobody paid any attention to it. Nixon four nobody wanted to enact it. They thought it'd be too expensive. How are we going to do this and they did it When section five, Oh four past the Department of Health. Education and Welfare Hew was supposed to come up with regulations that laid out what antidiscrimination protections needed to be put into place things that cost businesses and employers money like building a ramp or hiring a sign language interpreter accommodations that would actually address the architectural and communication barriers people with disabilities feast but those regulations were never implemented reportedly was never implemented the act and now the new hew secretary, Joseph Califano says, he will sign it in May a handicapped want him to sign no. So. There were demonstrations around the country over a period of years and in nineteen seventy seven at the start of the Carter Administration. More than one hundred people with disabilities takeover, a federal building in. San Francisco and they stay there is the longest takeover of a federal building in American history if the I really militant thing that disabled people have ever done. And we feel like we're building a real social movement. And they put their lives on the line. These are people who. Needed attendance they. They left for their medications without their equipment, and because of that, there was national press and a focus on thrill. Really for the first time the issues they're tired they're grubby they're uncomfortable but their spirits are soaring. And one hundred and twenty-five disabled and handicapped are pledging. They'll continue the sit in through tomorrow night if I've longer. squeezes on. Hot Water has been turned off on the fourth floor where the occupation army of cripples is taken over. They stayed in that building for twenty six days. And they forced the Carter Administration to enforce the. A major civil rights while. THIRTY FIVE MILLION AMERICAN.

Mary Lou Breslin Carter Administration Education and Welfare Hew Ed Roberts Berkeley Joseph Califano California social isolation Berkley University of Illinois Program Department of Health Nixon San Francisco secretary
"ada" Discussed on Throughline

Throughline

05:12 min | 2 months ago

"ada" Discussed on Throughline

"Most of American history people with disabilities were supposed to be hidden. This is Joe Shapiro on the author of a book called no pity people with disabilities forging a new civil rights movement Joe's in investigative reporter at NPR who's been covering the Disability Movement for more than thirty years. Let's talk about what now we call the ugly laws. These laws that said that someone who's looks were deemed offensive they weren't even allowed out on the streets. So we're talking about people disabilities. In, the late nineteenth century, these are laws were enforced all across the country. Let's just read what was written into the Chicago City Code in eighteen, eighty, one, it lists the people were not allowed in public quote. Any person who's diseased maimed mutilated or in any way deformed so as to be an unsightly or disgusting object. People, like this are not allowed in public places or they can be fined. Discrimination against people with disabilities goes back long before the nineteenth century. The Bible itself depicts disability not as a natural cause but as a punishment for disobeying God, these messages spread through religious texts, cemented people with disabilities as outcasts of society, and they informed a deeply flawed ideology turned serious scientific study by the early nineteen hundreds. We've got the rise of EUGENICS, right? Darwin's published the origin of species. There's this belief that people with disabilities are a subclass of human beings, their danger because they threaten the human race. eugenics was a term coined by British scientists Francis Bolton. In the late eighteen hundreds, he advocated for improving the genetic quality of the human population by breeding quote desirable traits other sought to weed out the undesirable ones like criminal behavior, poverty and disability. So this is a racist belief and it's one that targets people with disabilities and justifies putting people in institutions. Institutionalization was fueled by these eugenic beliefs. It accelerated in the late nineteenth century as large facilities were built up in Europe and then America to provide care to people deemed unfit to live in the community. These proclaimed misfits were often forced into these institutions against their will as another way to systematically segregate them from society. and. Then there are sterilization laws. Another eugenic practice which was put to the test in the nineteen twenty seven Supreme Court case buck versus Bell. Carrie Buck was born in Virginia in nineteen o six to a poor single mother who was accused of feeble mindedness and prostitution and sent to an institution carry was put in foster care. When she was seventeen, she was allegedly raped her foster parents nephew and became pregnant after she gave birth her foster parents declared her mentally deficient and committed her to the same institution as her mother, the Virginia colony for epileptics and feeble minded. That same year Virginia adopted a statute authorizing the compulsory sterilization of any one. The state deemed genetically unfit. Carry was assigned to be the first person sterilized this law she challenged in the courts but in an eight to one decision, the Supreme Court upheld the law. Shortly after the trial Carrie Buck was sterilized against her will and Justice Olver Wendell homes in the site in the case infamously said three generations of imbeciles are enough. That was the prevailing idea prevent them cure them and when they exist hide them. After the. Buck. Versus Bell Ruling States. These therapies ation laws all around the country resulting in nearly seventy thousand four sterilizations that continued into the nineteen seventies. These laws ended up inspiring Nazi Germany's ethnic cleansing. It would be the Nazi eugenics ends up shocking the world, right the first people to die in the Holocaust they're disabled people in Germany. They were considered life unworthy of life was the German phrase they were the first die before six million Jews, and then after World War Two there's this worldwide revulsion at this as horrifying images of Nazi concentration camps, surfaced photos of life inside American institutions also started to emerge depicting eerily similar inhumane conditions. There were pictures of these horrible places were people were naked and lying in their own filth. American saw these they're shocked because echoed what they just seen from the death camps. So this is what starts a movement..

Carrie Buck Virginia Supreme Court Joe Shapiro Germany Francis Bolton investigative reporter NPR Justice Olver Wendell Europe prostitution Bell America
Comic-Con ‘At Home’ Aims to Rescue Fandom’s Biggest Week

Arizona's Morning News

00:36 sec | 2 months ago

Comic-Con ‘At Home’ Aims to Rescue Fandom’s Biggest Week

"All the events canceled because of the Corona virus. This one will have disappointed fans crying into their capes. Every year, tens of thousands of people, many an elaborate costumes convened in San Diego for comic on a pop culture extravaganza. But not this year. This week's comic con is moving to an online edition. People are posting pictures of themselves in costume seized a not the same, not the same at all. Although masks are a normal part of comic con, right ADA are news times,

ADA San Diego
Chicago shootings leave at least 9 dead this weekend

Nick Digilio

01:46 min | 2 months ago

Chicago shootings leave at least 9 dead this weekend

"It's one scan emerging from a very violent and deadly weekend. Courtney goosing his live at police headquarters with details. Good morning, courting. Well, good morning to you, You know, from Friday night through midnight asshole of 67 people shot that includes nine who are now dead. Now, this is the latest weekend shooting to occur. It happened last night. Around 11 25 people were shot here 113th and Carpenter in the Morgan Park neighborhood. Police are saying At least two people are dead. The survivors taken to various hospitals. And then there was this deadly shooting that took place in the loop. It happened on Wacker near Wall Bash. Ah, 35 year old man was killed while in a vehicle. A woman also in that vehicle was hit, and police say the shooting started with several men arguing on a nearby bridge and one of those men opened fire. Later on that day on Sunday afternoon, two Children shot at 82nd and Ada police say the two boys cousins, ages 10 and 11 were outside in front of a home when someone shot them during a drive by that 10 year old shot in the ankle, an 11 year old hit in the arm, both taking the comer Children's Hospital where the last check they were in good condition. 27 year old man also hit in the leg and armed family members tell us they were gathering on the two year anniversary of the death of another man who was killed due to gun violence. If the Children are gone, the future is gone. The only way we're going to solve this problem in any other shooter, If they talk to the detectives give the detective's information that way. They can identify the subject. If you know the subject, just give their names up. And if this Monday is like any Monday in the past, we can expect to hear from the police superintendent later on today, about the weekend violence

Courtney Goosing Superintendent Children's Hospital ADA Carpenter Morgan Park
Maria Town: Disability Rights Are LGBTQ+ Rights

LGBTQ&A

04:31 min | 2 months ago

Maria Town: Disability Rights Are LGBTQ+ Rights

"Disability looks like so many things right, and in fact over one third of the Lgbtq community, house disability, so if you don't have one, absolutely have a friend or loved one does, and you'll hear Maria. Today disability is not a sign of weakness is a sign of strength, resilience and survival. So, let's get to it. This is Maria town. Know preparing for this interview I was thinking about all the different aspects of queer life, or or should I say my queer life because I was specifically thinking about how not accessible they are yeah, and one of the biggest and most visible examples I think is pride, fried celebrations, and I'm just curious about what is in your experience with pride. Pride is interesting. The idea of walking in a parade is very exclusive for a lot of people. There is always biased towards being able to physically show up and watch or debate in a parade that I think our experience with Corona virus may change I hope that various pride committees and organizations across the country are actually thinking about virtual engagement in subsequent years, and how that can be a complement to in-person engagements, but there's all of the events that surround pride typically in June, that often revolve around alcohol and substance abuse in tree, then is a disability having pride so closely tied to alcohol companies creates a lack of access for a lot of people in. In Our community I've never thought about that is alcoholism is classified as disability to be specific it's it's addiction in treatment, so if you are actively experiencing alcoholism and not seeking treatment than it wouldn't fall into disability, you know that's what the law says I. Think we can look at addiction more broadly as as a disability. Ask something that does impact someone's activities of daily living in their ability to accomplish them. You know for someone who is seeking treatment for addiction. They are entitled to reasonable accommodations in their job. If they need a flexible work schedule, so they can go to a meeting. All of those fit under the umbrella of reasonable accommodations the ADA. Issue that I wish more people in the community understood and were open about new sort of diction falls within the ADA, the American disability act or I guess If you're currently in treatment, right I, think people in the queer community knew so many people in treatment. Is that a Bra Lee known thing that you are legally able to ask you like work for time off to go to meetings and stuff so I don't think it is I think that most people's understanding of disability is fairly narrow, and that's very unfortunate the disability. Disability. Community is huge. It's extremely diverse and I think most people when they think of disability, even people within the community. If they haven't had an opportunity to really get to know the disability rights community, maybe think about disability in terms of someone who uses a wheelchair or someone who is blind, but in fact disability covers. You know people who have cancer people who have AIDS HIV. It's a really really broad category. In fact, so broad that people with disabilities are the largest minority group in the United States, and there are one billion. Billion people with disabilities around the world, those numbers are crazy especially, since on on this podcast, we talk about representation all the time, mainly for Queer people in the media, but we think about representation for those at disabilities, if the numbers are so small, if as you said, it is the largest minority group on even with representations right like we are so as a community, so accustomed to seeing disabled characters, being played by non disabled actors, like what's the easiest way to win an Oscar have able bodied person play somebody with a disability. Disability right like Daniel. Day Lewis in my left foot. Shirley's there on in Monster Forrest gump all Oscar winners, all non-disabled people playing people with disabilities I think when we talk about representation, it can't just be like disabled characters. It needs to be disabled riders writing the stories that needs to be production, the whole kit and caboodle,

ADA Oscar Maria HIV Bra Lee United States Monster Forrest Lewis Daniel Shirley
Parents!

The Past and the Curious

03:37 min | 3 months ago

Parents!

"Exploration is dangerous work. There are unknowns challenging landscapes severe weather to contend with, and that's just the tip of the iceberg at extreme locations or just factual, non metaphorical icebergs and everything gets much more difficult. Early. Expeditions to the Arctic and Antarctic circles near the north and South Poles were some of the most incredible undertakings in history. Of course there were plenty of failures, but every time someone tried. It helps the people who came after. Learn a little bit more. By the early nineteen hundreds several different parties from many different places had succeeded in exploring the frigid areas and returning to tell the tale. Eight! Adele Tuck was born not too far from this brutal cold, She I opened her eyes in eighteen ninety in Alaska, not far from the city of nome, which is on the West Central Coast at one time. Alaska was known to Americans as seward's folly because Secretary of State William, seward purchased the land from Russia for seven million dollars in eighteen, sixty seven. People thought it was a terrible mistake and a waste of money, but when golden were discovered, there seward was like who's laughing now y'all seward's folly more like seward's stroke of genius that you all were super wrong about L. K. man. We get it. Anyway Alaska would still not even become an official US territory until Ada was a teenager, she was initiate one of the indigenous groups of people native to land. But growing up, she never learned the survival ways and traditions of her tribe. She was raised by missionaries people who moved to the area to set up a school in order to convert people to their religion. It's a circumstance that happened to many native Americans and as a result, many traditions were lost for generations some forever. In school eight learned to read and write English read the Bible and learned cooking and other domestic skills, the reading and writing served her well, but as you might have guessed in a story about exploration, these domestic skills would not go near as far in helping her as more traditional skills like hunting, tracking and survival might have. As a young adult! Sixteen! She married a man named Jack Black. Jiang. Yep. You heard that, right? Jack Black Jack. No. He was not a cartoon outlaw, nor was he a professional poker player. He was a dog musher hauling freight across Alaska on a sled pulled by dogs. Together! They had three kids. Sadly, only one survived a boy named Bennett. But one day, Jack Blackjack left the family high and dry. Up and left her in the middle of nowhere which in Frigid Alaska can be a pretty serious predicament. Though he was not the greatest of guys she did keep his greatest of names and earned her future fame as Ada blackjack. When Jack blackjack deserted her. She was forty miles from their home in known, and she and Ben Walked the entire way back in the bitter Alaskan cold to make matters worse than it was very sick with burke. And infection of the lungs, so ada quite a small woman carried the boy much of the way.

Alaska Seward Jack Black Jack ADA Jack Blackjack Jack Black Adele Tuck Ben Walked Russia Nome West Central Coast Burke Bennett L. K.
Lady Antebellum keeping new name despite speaking with singer Lady A

The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

00:38 sec | 3 months ago

Lady Antebellum keeping new name despite speaking with singer Lady A

"And with hits like need you now bartender is distancing itself from its former name of lady antebellum going by lady a bloody Seattle blues singer says well Hey that's my name that's the use the one that I've been using for more than two years is her real name but she goes viral ADA that's her stage name she got very upset with the former lady antebellum apparently they had some kind of discussion though in in joint post they said that they have found common ground no details on exactly what that means but

Seattle
Keeping the kids occupied

Pass It On

04:17 min | 5 months ago

Keeping the kids occupied

"Because we're stolen. Look I'm going to talk about things of the we. The children with amused up in the Nineteen Fifties Vegas undying hope we might Grandparents today might get a notion of to amuse the children. Are we convinced this will definitely work? You can try transcend last no. Yeah the three of us has four and a half year old home so I'll get more to report bag right but let's not. Yep Yeah Jingle me Chris Safety First. There's no crying over spilt ink if you put the incremental insight deep dish or bowl when the children are writing the table V. Stapleton Goblins law school. Does Ada have a fountain pen. Ought to quell. She does know it might. It might be the painting if you put into port and so it might help. I think it's a good idea. Actually and even though Dashi ruined me I remember when I was in high school. I paint with inks Give deep vibrant colors gorgeous very expensive thing to do because those inconven- expensive But it did remind me and it didn't me think maybe I should do some similar with Asia but was something not quite so staining. We didn't say you via kind of pain called a polska pain with which you can write on glass so our living room windows currently covered with the original Ada. Our did once in this little thing. We've had My in-laws visit to drop-off some stuff and oversee all precautions were observed. I'm increment is we didn't meet the ADA and her grandma of a window. And the reclaiming lots and crosses to the window with a muscle utterly utterly tragic. I don't feel like that's the worst tip you've ever given. Steve needs a little going. A little bit of bending perhaps will have again painful to use an old flame foss as a pen pencil holder. Then there's no difficulty for the children to find a pencil. Mrs J B Hutto Will Ellen go and tell us the enj- NBA. I think this has been superseded by inventions. You do not get pinhole. Psych heavily for threes might. My son made several take school. Used to be my favorite thing at the star if each year to go and get like your skill back and your pencil cases like your news station may never quite took the sting of the did. It never quite not was enough to make up the fight by just mom and dad were both teachers on the used to get increasingly irate people to buy Christmas stuff opinion shops tober these furious because the schools broke up for summer pretty much she start to see 'em back to school promotions in. Cna VHS and these kids on the just just gone on holiday some during the back to school so either of you old enough to have gone and bought a metal ten. The contained a truck tunnel. Yeah I had one of them they're selling. Compasses encompasses doctors and like but Fulton half. Yeah Cody's thing as if somehow geometry drop tighter fashion and again up to sixty degrees in a circle. I think that's a good tip. I mean in fairness Most you why it had to be invented particularly like surely is putting pains in in a jar. When I was a small child I do not remember ever seeing any real one of these pinhole those types things that just for children a-plus sort of because thing is difficult to get your Hadrian. These exist

ADA V. Stapleton Goblins Law Schoo Dashi Cody Mrs J B Hutto Asia NBA Steve Fulton Ellen
Dallas - Carrollton police arrest woman who claimed to spread COVID-19

America in the Morning

00:46 sec | 6 months ago

Dallas - Carrollton police arrest woman who claimed to spread COVID-19

"The Carrollton woman who bragged on social media that she had the corona virus and wanted to spread it is now locked up eighteen year old Lorraine Mauer Diego is being held on twenty thousand dollars bond on a charge of making a terroristic threat Jolene DeVito of Carrollton police says the Carrollton woman surrendered this morning after a number of people recognized her from social media the question why she truly positive was she truly putting the public in danger and so our detectives have worked nonstop for the past twenty four forty eight hours luckily were able to find her and get her into custody needles is marred the ada is not believed to be positive for the corona virus bought by court order will be quarantined for twenty one days if she makes bond

Lorraine Mauer Diego Jolene Devito Carrollton
Interview with Butterfly Moon and Jay at PCon 2020

Ravens at the Crossroads

08:44 min | 6 months ago

Interview with Butterfly Moon and Jay at PCon 2020

"We are joined now by butterfly and Jay Wright thanks proper billing to me okay. Wasn't sure just want to make sure everybody's got their own terms. I know it's really late. You guys thank you so much for staying up with us. It's almost one in the morning. We're GONNA miss. We miss the shuttle obviously. Didn't have to root back. That's all I have to do is get the scooter to make it back up the elevator. You've been charging for a couple of hours now. Yeah you'd think you'd think it makes it across the hotel once and then it's out of POW. Wow that gaff rental disclose. This was my pantheon this year. It's all about look. Butterfly Moon is disabled. Sell your post on the official pagan projects. Who the hell's being Earth pigging grouping anthea on facebook community very go. I've had more than one incident. This time that I've become a piece of furniture. People have climbed on me. People have adult people adult people. I mean it's one thing if the kids climb on me that's okay. I looked like a jungle gym sometimes sitting on that thing. But I'm on scooter and I was trying to back up to park the scooter. In a workshop woman came through the door decided the gap between my back end and the chair was where she was going to walk. Even though my scooter was in motion and when the space got to narrow she put her foot on the scooter and her hand on my shoulder went up and over. The back scoops climbed over. You just climbed over like you were an actually. They're not like you're a real person or anything. No I was a piece of furniture. That's ridiculous Shit A and and it's one of those things that it's one of those things that you get used to win. You are disabled. Not being seen not being heard not being looked at or talked to but one of the things I love about. Pantheon is it's one of its one of. I think to pagan events that are held indoors so disabled people can attend. I cannot do outdoor events or camp outs the Ground Jason. Even my mobility devices. Don't work there. I've just not possible. Losing Pantheon means I have to fly across the country to go to another hotel show unless we create another one And I'm hoping that the next version of this will be great and accessible but I also think that we have to create a better space agree. I've heard some of your comments seen them on facebook and as somebody who is not differently abled. I don't face those issues. So it doesn't come to my forefront tell somebody brings it up and I feel bad about that because I don't have to think about it and most people don't and it's good they don't have to think about it but I would like it if they would see that we're here no you don't have to think about it. All the time to my thing is always don't put another obstacle in my way. I think it's just a simple fact that a lot of people don't think it we actually. I went to meet up recently two weeks ago and I know that the group had good intentions ago. We want wanted to paint the connex out in camping. And I'm like for the promises that excludes a large portion of the yes says they even if a mistress prime-1 camping she could easily because she has stuff that she needs it not to mention that traditional camping for those of us who have a knee and back issues. It's it's painful. It's very painful. And if you have allergies or asthma or yeah yeah I have trouble getting off a regular bed let alone off the ground uneven ground wheels volunteer person. I've gone to Ren Fairs where we've left early toes wheels of my walker sink into the silt or the mulch that they put down and I get stuck the wheels on the bus no longer go round and round exactly and it's so much fun to watch him trying to pull me out considering my relative size now getting video of that no sir. No by absolute favorite was I got stuck his. The parade was headed. My Way and my friends are in the Scottish clans. And they realized what was going on and they gave the orders. And the guys big guys marched out and kicked me in the Walker up and moved off to the side. It was hysterical. I mean I knew they were coming in so they sort of had my permission to pick me up and move me but it was along the lines of of watching my friends faces. He realized I was stuck and that the parade was about to walk right over me Yanks and they did it. More or less in cadence. Yeah that was fun But there are times when you know I WANNA be a regular part of the rituals. I WANNA be a regular part of the events and I can't always do it. That's that's a good point for those of us who planned rituals do public events. Yeah think about those who are differently abled than what you are listening pigging specifically but I didn't escape room and one of the things that the ass was are any colorblind. His they had a change was Trials that is in this Abram for that is it would never occurred to me would creating something like that. Actually that was brought up at one of the one of the conferences that I had been at with regards to It was workshop regarding A website and being mindful of color blindness win putting in certain Colored Fonts and highlights for your links so that people could recognize that there is an actual link there sometimes to continue to the next page. Press the Green. Button up your. There's No red green or purple here that I can help myself to rights exactly so it was kind of it was something I hadn't thought of before and so. Oh this is something we need to be aware of. Yeah I've had to learn to have an a conversation differently. I yes su-mei Jay is almost completely colorblind. I have had to learn to describe things differently. I can't say could you hand me my Blue Cane? He just turns and Glares at the because I have a stand with twenty different gains in it. Yes he has no idea what color they run on. Each one will actually. Once upon a time I had ones that had like animal heads in different so we named them all so I could say hand me quite chain. Cain hand me you know. We gave them puns of course Because he couldn't see the colors but yeah there's there's different things could be done. What my one of my big things is. Ada is great except most people in acting it. Stick to the letter of the law and not the spirit of the law

Jay Wright Facebook Ren Fairs Official ADA Cain Allergies Abram Asthma
Trump continues to push for economic reopening

AP 24 Hour News

01:10 min | 6 months ago

Trump continues to push for economic reopening

"Hours before the Senate passed a massive virus economic relief package president trump was looking ahead to the economic recovery amid the biggest health crisis in generations the president remains relentlessly optimistic I don't think it's gonna end up being such a rough patch even as health experts warn the pandemic has not yet hit its peak in the US after killing nearly twenty thousand people worldwide more than nine hundred have died in America though the vast majority of people who get the virus recover soccer make Donnie Washington the massive economic relief packages the biggest in American history two trillion dollars that's equal to half the entire annual federal budget we need to get this money into the American economy and American workers with both battered by the pandemic's fallout as the economy heads toward recession or worse treasury chief Steven Mnuchin was asked how long the ada might keep the economy afloat three months hopefully won't need this for three months president trump says he does not think it'll end up being such a rough patch and is already looking ahead to the economic rebound it's going to open up like a rocket ship

Senate Donald Trump President Trump United States America Soccer Donnie Washington Steven Mnuchin Treasury
Judge rejects bid to delay special election in Philadelphia suburb

KYW 24 Hour News

01:16 min | 6 months ago

Judge rejects bid to delay special election in Philadelphia suburb

"Officials in Bucks county aren't thrilled a special election for a vacant state house seat is happening amid the concerns over coronavirus but polls will open at seven AM at for a Bucks county judge denied a last minute attempt to postpone the election that story from KYW suburban bureau chief Jim mail work the elections to fill the state house seat vacated by Jean de Girolamo after he was elected the Bucks county board of commissioners as for scheduling Bucks county commissioner Bob Harvey says not something the county has any control over it's not even something the governor has any control over that's up the house speaker Mike Turzai he says changing the date would create confusion for voters and could cause problems for those voting by absentee ballot RT says with that in mind we began taking steps last week including says rubber gloves for poll workers multiple bottles of hand sanitizer sent each polling place alcohol wipes for scanners and four pens used to mark ballots are he says those pens are brand new and will be wiped after each use but he says voters can bring their own bands but to protect the scanners that has to be a ballpoint pen it cannot be a sharpie it cannot be a Celtic market has to be a ballpoint pen has to be a black or blue RT says the new paper ballot system requires much less shared services than the old touch screens and he says any services that are shared such as the ADA compliant voting device will be wiped down after each

Bucks County Jean De Girolamo Commissioner Bob Harvey Mike Turzai KYW Bureau Chief Jim Mail ADA
Betelgeuse

Astronomy Cast

09:40 min | 7 months ago

Betelgeuse

"Beetlejuice able juice could use. Try Our weekly facts based journey through the cosby help. You understand not only what we know but how we know what we know. I'm Fraser. Cain publisher of University with me as always Pamela. Gay a senior scientist for the Planetary Science Institute and the Director of Cosmic West. Hey Pamela I'm doing well. How are you doing fraser? I'm doing great and I mentioned this in the preamble but I just wanted to say this again. Which is a huge congratulations to our good friend. Dr E-e-e-e-no Neil who just announced that he's going to be working at NASA jet propulsion lab in their media department in is terrific science journalist. One of the best in the business and it's a pretty good fit that he's now working over at NASA he was the editor for the Astronomical Society of the Pacific's Mercury He has been a columnist for discovery and seeker. He did work with us at Universe today. And and this is great. Congratulations Ian Android. GonNa take the next two weeks off. I'M GONNA call it spring break. I'm not going anywhere. I'm just going to be writing software but you sir are going on a grand adventure. Yeah I'm going to Japan with my son and there is. This is not work. This is literally just him. I said where do you WanNa go and he goes? I want to go to Japan and then I waited for cheap tickets to come around and he did and so we're off to Japan of course rough Japan when there's a corona virus of but you know we'll take precautions and it doesn't look like it's that bad they're currently so And I can't wait to see this place. I've wanted to go to Japan all my life and to be able to do. This is going to be a lot of fun. Definitely take pictures. Might Visit a few spacey. Things like the Japanese space agency but this is about. This is about his trip. Not You know now. My trip are able see. You might be surprised to hear that we've never done episode of astronomy cast featuring beetlejuice. Were good news. This is that episode. Let's talk about the Star. Why it might be dimming. And what could happen if it explodes as Super Noah I? I've had to do a search for I actually You know wrote on my intro and I think we suggest that wanted to pursue put on the calendar and like all of this time. We've talked about a Ryan. We've talked about the way stars die and we've obviously mentioned bill many times as a candidate for new supernova but had never actually spent a whole episode on this one specific star. Well obviously good timing on our part because it's so interesting right now So what does beetlejuice? It is a red supergiant star that is visible to both the northern and Southern Hemisphere. We have no hemispheric bias. In choosing this star it has evolved off the main sequence which means it is no longer burning hydrogen in its very core and it probably did this only about a million years ago and now it is systematically burning through heavier and heavier shells of elements deep in its well. Many many solar mass self as it hangs out shining bright in the northern winter and the southern summer and it is. It is a Ryan's right shoulder. I mean when you look at it. Looks like it's on the left but if you were a Ryan and you were facing towards us than it would be his right shoulder and there's some fascinating history on its name and I have to admit I went down a little bit of a rabbit hole. Prepping for this episode. It's it's name is Arabic and yes over. The years has probably been missed. Transcribed so that there are those who believe that it translates as a Ryan's armpit right and this can be caused by dropping a little dot under one of the characters at wrong moment in time It probably has a much better name than a Ryan's armpit. This is still up for a fair amount of discussion. We'll actually one of our one of our viewers Rami amid who speaks Arabic. He's saying that it is the name comes from the Arabic Abbott L. Josiah which literally means the armpit of the mighty hunter so that sounds better than Orion armpit. It's of the mighty hunter it's true. It's yeah true and we. We're going to mispronounce it and of course. The hilarious thing is is how people give us such a hard time. Because they're expecting that it should be beetlejuice. Yes but and we tend to say bail juice and that is. That's a little bit of a holdover from. I think the way they used to describe it before the movie came out. Seattle has has shifted it to Beatlemania. Even that isn't correct so so maybe we can after. The fact may be get Susie to get maybe Romney or someone to do the proper Arabic pronunciation in the show and then you know then that conserve as the as sort of the standby and I've heard a lot of people like even the German say people are say that well. Actually it's a German word but it's not no near Bec- yes it comes from. Yeah it's has an Arabic root so anyway. Yeah so we're going to say bill. And maybe even shifted beetlejuice every now and then Please just just bear with us and however you choose to pronounce it. This isn't an object that was strictly noted and observed by a people living around the Mediterranean Ocean. This is an object that it's variable in its brightness as all of us can currently go out and see and this variability appears to have. I been noted by the aborigines of Australia. It it is a star crops up in the Lore of society after sisters after society but the science the awesome saw. Science is why we're here today because when you ask which objects in the sky are most likely to go boom. This is one of the two ADA crane has the other it is strictly southern hemisphere. Cirilli beetlejuice is the one we want so that all of us can enjoy the experience. And the problem is we don't know when this is going to occur but scientifically reproduced sure. It's not now right but you can hope to be wrong. Yes yes so. It's it's a random event. We'll talk about this a little bit about what's going on and how we might know but So I wanNA talk a bit about just what stage it is kind of star. It is compared to say a star like our Sun. So so how does this star compare to to our son? I radically different. Our our son is because it is ours. It is used as the measuring stick by which we well measure everything outright. It weighs one the Sun. Exactly yeah exactly one. The Sun Beetlejuice is estimated that when it was in the same of illusionary stages that our son when it was on the main sequence burning hydrogen in its core. It's estimated to have been just under twenty solar masses if we had seen it during that stage it would've been one of those bright blue o type stars like we love to enjoy in the Orion Nebula Orion is a massive star forming region. That entire swath of the sky is rich in all the things needed to make stars and there's lots of young stars in that direction well beetlejuice isn't necessarily young. It finished burning all of that hydrogen. But because it's so massive as it evolved off of the main sequence as it expanded out it didn't go through this massive flash that we see in smaller stars where it suddenly was like boom. I'M GONNA burn helium in my core instead because it was so massive it was able to gradually transition into doing this and as it did it just basically migrated sideways across the color magnitude diagram. That hurts been Russel Diagram ending up in the top center of that diagram being cool red and kind of unable to hold onto all of its atmosphere.

Beetlejuice Ryan Japan Fraser Pamela I Nasa Orion Nebula Orion Planetary Science Institute Cosby Russel Diagram Southern Hemisphere Cain Scientist Astronomical Society Dr E-E-E-E-No Neil Ian Android Seattle Publisher Cosmic West Mediterranean Ocean
Dodgers Acquire Mookie Betts, David Price from Boston Red Sox

KCBS Radio Afternoon News

00:38 sec | 8 months ago

Dodgers Acquire Mookie Betts, David Price from Boston Red Sox

"The rap big baseball trade pending in case you missed it the Dodgers will acquire outfielder Mookie Betts and pitcher David price from the Boston Red Sox for outfielder Alex Verdugo the Dodgers will also send future can't to my ada to Minnesota the twins will send a hard throwing and pitching prospect bruise dog brought a roll back to the red Sox and the Dodgers also agreed to send outfitter jock Peterson and pitcher Ross strip lane to the angels for infield prospect Louise for any file with other players involved that according to Ken Rosenthal of Fox Sports all of these trades

Dodgers Mookie Betts Boston Red Sox Alex Verdugo Minnesota Louise Ken Rosenthal Fox Sports David Price Jock Peterson
Former Kenyan president Daniel arap Moi dies at 95

NPR News Now

00:55 sec | 8 months ago

Former Kenyan president Daniel arap Moi dies at 95

"Second president. Daniel arap Moi has died at the age of ninety five. NPR's Ada Peralta reports from Nairobi. Moi was authoritarian ruler. Who reluctantly ushered in Multi Party Democracy then Illinois came into power in nineteen seventy eight after the sudden death of Kenya's founding father but after an attempted coup against against him in one thousand nine hundred eighty two moy went? After his critics with ruthlessness hundreds of rivals were tortured or disappeared toward days. Moi was was despised and under pressure. He begrudgingly accepted a Multi Party Democracy Musalia Mudavadi. Who was his deputy says that should be his lasting legacy? He lost an election and he peacefully transferred power to me that is a tribute that we must never forget. Daniel arap Moi ruled Kenya for twenty four

Daniel Arap Moi Kenya Ada Peralta Nairobi President Trump NPR MOY Illinois
Where are all the Asian Beardsmen?

Asian Americana

10:40 min | 8 months ago

Where are all the Asian Beardsmen?

"In November of twenty seventeen filmmaker Justin. Chang decided agrout his facial hair for the first time I had never tried to grow out my facial hair before because I was just scared to do so like I wasn't sure how it's GonNa turn out you know. My Dad actually has a pretty boss mustache. And he's known as the Asian Guy with the mustache but I didn't know if I had heard of those genes just in his Chinese American and he says people always treated his dad's moustache like an exception to the norm. A lot of Asian. People were impressed that he could grow it out. On a lot of non Asian people read more impressed and sort of I think I signed him like these masculine values. That a lot of Asian American men MM stereotypically are not granted I think part of that too is because he grew up in Tennessee and Texas and in the sal you know facial hair was even more of a signal. Oh masculinity down there and it helped him get by email. Think that something like phase. Here's that big of a deal but like everything communicates. Justin didn't go up in the south like his dad ad. But he's from San Bernardino California where they're also wasn't a very big Asian community just an always has some scruff but he had never let his facial hair grow now in his late twenties he was about to travel across the country to film a documentary. I found my own production company called J school and we focus on telling stories of underrepresented represented people in other words people caller women and the Lgbtq community and movember provided him with an excuse movember also known as no shave. November is an annual event where men are encouraged to grow mustaches for the month of November to raise awareness of men's health issues. The Movember Foundation a global men's health a charity which began in two thousand three has always focused on educating man about prostate cancer. Anticipation cancer but in twenty seventeen they expanded their mission to include spreading awareness about mental health issues and suicide prevention in issue that was really meaningful to Justin quick onto warning. There's a short mention of suicide coming. Yeah I had a friend when I was younger. Who took her life and it really is what I attributed sparking my career path onto a creative journey and it was my only outlet when I I was younger to write in sort of tell stories as a coping mechanism from when my friend died so when I saw that Movember had expanded its causes to also covering suicide aside if I like the perfect kind of aligning of the stars that I want to try going on? Facial hair was 'cause I believed in and since he was on the road working on his film there there was no one around the laugh at me if it look bad so he started growing at his facial. Hair Okay Caroline. I think this is a good time to admit that we don't have much personal experience. Dance with facial hair right ADA and we're also not Asian American men but we've decided to explore this topic Asian American men and facial hair. Because we've heard it's a thing he's like kind of a thing right now. It's definitely think there was even this article called. Why Asians Dread Movember about difficulties? Some Asian men have growing facial higher. I laughed because I get it. I understand because I know that. Some dudes can't you know what I mean just like hey some dudes like me aren't six feet tall. You know what I mean. It's like you're dealt a hand play it. I do think that there is something very specific about men feeling like they can do anything that that they see other men being able to do. I know some Very Very Astute East Asia gentlemen and if I'm really breaking down what I feel too was them. It's probably jealousy and breaking you know whether jealousy comes from this idea that they can fit into Western perceptions of masculinity better than I can also. It's important to question when you hear the phrase. He's Asian men and facial hair. Do you think of East Asian men Southeast Asian men South Asian men. These communities can have very different issues regarding facial the hair I grew up in a six. I don't have a choice. Beer's become such a hip thing so for me. It's very interesting to observe because I keep a beard for very different reasons. Both to my parents were really worried about me going airports because I mean I'm a brown dude with a beard people get uncomfortable. I can see it in old y people's faces when I am boarding a plane so this is our investigation. What's the vocabulary we don't know what does that have? A Moustache flavor saver. Chinstrap is just like when it goes your sideburns. Connect your cheekbones connect your Chin and how do other people feel about their facial hair. This is something that loves those bugging let me about to because she was so good looking back in the day but first. Let's go back to Justin so he's on the road traveling across the country doing interviews for a documentary series called ritual which is about NFL players and their pre-game superstition and he's also a few weeks into his facial. Missile Hair journey by week three like I had a pretty good moustache. I was pretty sure wasn't able to grow a full beard. I was manicuring it the best I could. He's googling photos those of Johnny Depp. Michael B Jordan and Robert Downey junior to get inspiration on how to style his facial hair into a goatee one day. He was in Denver Filming. Maria's Thomas a a superstar wide receiver for the Denver Broncos who also happen to be doing movember for the first time and he actually flies out a barber from la every every couple of weeks to do his hair and he was doing well for the first time too and his barber was giving him shit basically for being like him. Ed Others Asian duties grown up way better than you can. You can't beat the Asian Guy. So how did that make Justin fail. I dig any offense to it even though like it clearly had racial overtones overtones because I get what he was saying like. They didn't expect me to have such a full mustache. Goatee and this Guy Thomas. WHO's like obviously way tougher for the Niamh as an NFL player? He could barely grow the peach fuzz. It was just kind of a very self aware moment where you're like. Damn I can't handle a tackle or run. The forty yard dash or catch a touchdown in the end zone or win the super bowl ring like he can but for damn sure I cannot gross facial hair this might sound like a nice happy ending of Justin's the number story but it's just the beginning he soon finds out that not everyone has positive reactions to his facial hair one of my friends who will remain nameless she goes. How's your new former birth control but we'll come back to them later so we've learned not the ability or inability to go facial hair can be a source of insecurity or pride for certain men men but for most it's still purely aesthetic choice just like I put my hair in a ponytail or choose whether to wear makeup a certain way for a lot of men facial hairs away the former identity through their appearance? But what if your facial hair could actually affect your job prospects. We're going to take you to Hollywood where your appearance. Especially as an Asian man competing for a limited amount of rules can either get you a coveted role or lead to rejection desmond. Jim I'm an actor on generic barnacles implant season villain in season two saga shake hosts. A podcast called the Bollywood boys and I have facial head. Desmond is an Australian actor Who's been in shows like reef break now chocolates and missionary chronicles and most recently got cast in Marvel's Falcon and the winter soldier? Saga was in a web series called unfair ugly about a Muslim American family in Orange County. He is the Co host of the PODCAST. Bollywood boys and on the cast of the sketch comedy. Show that get Brown. We got them in a room together to talk about their facial hair. Visual here right now is recently shaven. It's an attempt at the Tony Stock Goatee and I haven't pulled it off in addition to Desmond's goatee. He also has long black hair. That goes just past his shoulders that he sometimes wears in half ponytail. Saga wears his hair shorter but he has a full beard like like the beard. Easiest of beards that anyone could possibly have. My beard hair is like as thick as wire. It feels like wires. You're coming out of my face from every possible poor. It's pretty intense. It's a lot of maintenance earns when saga says his beard was high maintenance. He wasn't joking so a lot of work. You you know like I got a shampoo rush it so the shampoo can get like in their condition. It I brush it against the conditioner. Rinse that out and I tell dry air dry for like five minutes. I blow dry. I gave some beard oil and brush that in and I gave moustache wax soccer. Who is Pakistani American? started his acting career without facial hair. In the beginning he wasn't booking anything his agents eventually dropped him. He says he started growing his beard out of laziness. I remember the first year that I grew out my beard. Maybe maybe four or five conversations that I had daily whereabout my beard. The first thing anybody would say to me would be dude sick beard bro. Dude how did we get itself full on my God. That's such a nice beard things like that easier or fuck. It feels like okay. It's catching atun on. People are watching me. I'm doing something right. At least I can grow a beard to get some people's attention because like in this industry you can be Super Knbr talented by the look and you're not going to be seen and so definitely helped get me into a lot of doors in two dozen fourteen. He started art decorating his beard and putting the photos on instagram. We're in Venice and we're sitting like this grassy area and there was like these little white flowers I I was like hold on analogy. Hey grab fifteen of ood beard and then I posted a photo on instagram and got like a couple of hundred likes and this is when like getting a couple of hundred likes. It was like Oh shit. This guy got a couple of hundred likes. He also decorated his beard for Christmas using miniature ornaments and for Easter. He put peeps committee eggs in his beard with toothpicks. By November of two thousand fifteen he had collected a series of these beard photos and a reporter from buzzfeed interviewed for story. The article coincidentally came out the day. Okay before his ten year high school reunion which he thought about skipping. I was really hesitant because people have done things and like they're working regular jobs they are married and have kids and like what do I have. You know I was what twenty eight I feel like. I haven't accomplished anything at this time. Caroline did you go to your high school reunion being in no did you. Yeah I I still have really good friends from high school so I thought it was Super Fun but I totally get it. If you don't don't WanNa go but it sounded like he wanted to go. He just needed a confidence booster and that oddly enough came from his

Facial Hair Justin NFL Saga Guy Thomas Movember East Asia Prostate Cancer San Bernardino California Chang Movember Foundation Johnny Depp Denver Buzzfeed Tennessee Tony Stock Goatee Texas Denver Broncos
"ada" Discussed on Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

02:07 min | 1 year ago

"ada" Discussed on Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

"<SpeakerChange> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> UH <Music> <SpeakerChange> In eighteen <Speech_Music_Male> thirty five <Speech_Music_Male> paid married a <Speech_Music_Male> wealthy <Advertisement> baron <Speech_Music_Male> named <Advertisement> William <Speech_Music_Male> King <Advertisement> who <Speech_Music_Male> later became <Advertisement> the earl <Speech_Music_Male> of lovelace <Speech_Music_Male> so it became <Speech_Music_Male> the Countess Countess of <Speech_Music_Male> lovelace. <Speech_Music_Male> They had three homes <Speech_Music_Male> and lived in luxury <Speech_Male> bull <Speech_Music_Male> sharing a love <Speech_Music_Male> of horses <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> together. <Speech_Music_Male> They also <Advertisement> had three <Speech_Music_Male> children <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> in eighteen eighteen <Advertisement> thirty <Speech_Music_Male> seven <Advertisement> eight. It became <Speech_Music_Male> very <Advertisement> sick <Speech_Music_Male> and due to <Speech_Music_Male> some of the medications <Speech_Music_Male> she was given suffered <Speech_Music_Male> from <Advertisement> other problems. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> At the age <Advertisement> of thirty <Speech_Music_Male> six <Advertisement> ADA <Speech_Music_Male> passed away <Advertisement> from <Speech_Music_Male> Cancer <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Ada was <Speech_Music_Male> alive. <Advertisement> Not many <Speech_Male> people <Advertisement> read her article <Speech_Male> about computer <Speech_Music_Male> programming. <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> It wasn't until <Speech_Music_Male> the nineteen fifties <Speech_Music_Male> is that her article <Speech_Music_Male> was found <Speech_Music_Male> and <Advertisement> people realized <Speech_Music_Male> how <Advertisement> brilliant <Speech_Music_Male> her ideas <Advertisement> about <Speech_Male> computer <Advertisement> programming <Speech_Music_Male> were. <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> Her <Advertisement> ideas were <Speech_Music_Male> shared <Advertisement> in new books <Speech_Music_Male> about computer <Advertisement> programming <Speech_Music_Male> <music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> in <Advertisement> one thousand nine hundred <Speech_Music_Male> eighty. The United <Speech_Music_Male> States military <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> named <Speech_Music_Male> their new <Advertisement> programming <Speech_Music_Male> language <Advertisement> after <Speech_Music_Male> her calling <Advertisement> it Ada <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> also the association <Speech_Music_Male> in for women <Speech_Music_Male> and Computing <Speech_Music_Male> has an eight A. Lovelace <Speech_Music_Male> award each <Speech_Music_Male> year <Advertisement> and <Speech_Music_Male> since nineteen <Advertisement> eighty <Speech_Music_Male> eight <Advertisement> the British <Speech_Music_Male> computer <Advertisement> society <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> awards <Speech_Music_Male> the lovelace <Advertisement> medal <Speech_Music_Male> named <Advertisement> after <Speech_Music_Male> Ada <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> like Ada. <Speech_Music_Male> You can be curious <Speech_Male> about the world around you <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and take the <Speech_Male> time to study <Advertisement> subjects <Speech_Male> such such as math <Speech_Music_Male> and science <Speech_Music_Male> eight and not <Speech_Music_Male> only learn <Advertisement> about these <Speech_Music_Male> subjects but <Speech_Music_Male> she took <Advertisement> what she learned <Speech_Music_Male> and started <Advertisement> her own <Speech_Male> projects <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> like investigating <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> how to fly <Advertisement> and <Speech_Music_Male> riding her own own <Advertisement> book <Speech_Music_Male> data <Speech_Music_Male> showed that it <Advertisement> was important <Speech_Male> to meet <Advertisement> lots of different <Speech_Music_Male> people <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> and learn from <Advertisement> their ideas. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> This <Speech_Male> is another <Advertisement> great way. You <Speech_Music_Male> can learn <Advertisement> to <Speech_Music_Male> buy meeting <Advertisement> New People <Speech_Male> and asking <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> lots of questions. <Speech_Music_Male> Have <Speech_Music_Male> you ever wanted to create <Speech_Male> your own APP or website. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> You can do this by <Speech_Male> learning computer <Advertisement> programming. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> If you're interested <Advertisement> in <Speech_Music_Male> learning more about coding <Speech_Music_Male> checkout <Speech_Music_Male> websites like code <Speech_Music_Male> dot org <Speech_Music_Male> or scratch <Speech_Music_Male> which is a website <Speech_Music_Male> kids can use <Speech_Music_Male> to learn how to code. <Speech_Music_Male> You'll be amazed <Speech_Music_Male> at all <Advertisement> the cool things <Speech_Male> you can treat creed <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> learn <Advertisement> how to Code. <Speech_Music_Male>

"ada" Discussed on Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

03:50 min | 1 year ago

"ada" Discussed on Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

"To bedtime history tonight. We're going to learn about eight of lovelace. The Augusta Ada Byron was born December Tenth Eighteen fifteen in London England. Her father was Lord Byron a world famous poet and her mother was lady and Isabella Byron only a few weeks after Ada was born her parents separated and her father left England. The ADA was eight. He passed away so eight and never met her famous father many times during her childhood. Ada was sick when she was eight. She had lots of headaches. Then when she was fourteen she had the measles and had to stay in bed for nearly a year. Eventually she was able to walk with crutches but during this time she continued to study and learn about her favorite subjects such as math like most girls of her time Ada was taught math and science science by her tutors tutors. Someone who teaches children individually which means she didn't go to a normal school kids in our day he does mother insisted she learned math and science and made sure she worked very hard to be educated. Sometimes her mother made her life still for long periods of time because she thought it would teach her to have self control self control is being able to control your emotions and behavior but from a young age ada showed talent with numbers meaning. She was very good at math when it was twelve. She decided she wanted to figure out how to fly very carefully. FELICIA planned out how she would do this and I. She designed her own wings. She tried different materials of different sizes. She studied birds to figure out how they they flew. She even wrote a book called fly with drawings and descriptions about how someone would fly. Her final idea was to use steam power the fly. She never attempted to fly herself. which is maybe a good thing but her investigations were a good example of how curious she was and the passion and she had for a single project? When Ada was young she met many different famous scientists inventors and authors. I do too her social position. She often went to court and became very popular. Even at her young age due to her smarts at party is some of the famous is people. She met her Michael Faraday Charles Dickens and Charles Baggage the well known inventor Charles Babich became Asia's mentor which means someone who taught her personally she began to learn advanced math at this time and was very interested in badges ideas. Babich average was one of the first people to have an idea for a computer he imagined a machine that could do math on its own and he eventually created this machine in which he called the difference engine. Ada was fascinated by this new machine which became one of the earliest versions of a computer. Babich went onto onto create. Another machine called the analytical engine. He'd also knew many languages so she was asked to translate lead an article about beverages analytical engine the while making the translation she added many of her own ideas the notes an idea she added ended up being three he times longer than badges article. Her article was later published in English Science Journal in the Article Ada shared her ideas about how codes could could be used to handle letters and numbers. She also had the idea for how these codes could be used to loop computer programs because of all the original ideas many consider to be the first computer programmer..

Ada Augusta Ada Byron Charles Babich Isabella Byron London England FELICIA English Science Journal Michael Faraday Charles Dicken Charles Baggage Asia
"ada" Discussed on Fuel Hotel Marketing Podcast

Fuel Hotel Marketing Podcast

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"ada" Discussed on Fuel Hotel Marketing Podcast

"Who says dead to us now used to say it wow that's really funny anyway let's talk about operable yeah let's continue so next for operable we have adding meaningful page titles that will accurately portray the content that you have across your site again is another one that you should be doing seo best practice i mean if you're picking a topic for a page find find the key word you wanna target make sure it's in your page title dama butter describe what's on that page so is this one saying don't be clicked beatty because i'm going to be mad if we come do click beatty titles for pud customers so it's i hate click beatty titles but they work man i make them click but does that does that let the user notes on the page or does it make them question what's on the page it depends on how what kind of click bait you use it if you look at all of that and we kind of ironic click beatty in a way right we deliberately tried to quit you'll never you'll never guess what ada compliance requires but it's it but there's a difference between that because okay so you've asked two question it's click beatty for sure but the page go to better answer that question and if it does you know yes you might be click beatty but your lease oughta right yeah exactly if the if the click beatty subject is about ada and then we're talking about judah then that wouldn't make sense but judah can you say.

beatty ada
"ada" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

VIBES-LIVE

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"ada" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

"The all the time ada paul's have you ask my ears name to bowl la abed louder over here in la or just retain y pool your sir tbi it's too late to stop listen to your heart on us basilio laura sza no no no.

ada paul la laura sza
"ada" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"ada" Discussed on RobinLynne

"The all the time ada paul's have you ask my ears name to bowl la abed louder over here in la or just retain y pool your sir tbi it's too late to stop listen to your heart on us basilio laura sza no no no.

ada paul la laura sza