35 Burst results for "ACLU"

How constant surveillance puts protesters at risk

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

08:23 min | Last week

How constant surveillance puts protesters at risk

"As black lives matter protests continue around the country police are using facial recognition and all kinds of other technology to arrest protesters and organizers, and while in some cases, the people arrested did commit crimes. After the fact, arrests can have a chilling effect on free speech and lead to cases of mistaken identity. They also show us just how much surveillance is part of our lives. Simone Brown is a professor at Ut Austin. She's also author of the book dark matters on the surveillance of blackness. She told me about how police identified and arrested a protester and Philadelphia there was a tattoo on her arm and she was wearing a t shirt. That was you know quite. Said Keep, the immigrants deport the racist and so the police used the images of her. They went to find out you know where did she get this shirt made and they found her comment that she made on Oetzi they looked at her instagram they looked at her linked in profiles and they were able to match her this image to identify her and she was eventually charged. So all this is to say that there's still just kind of trails of data actually that we leave about ourselves that is being used to form a case to what extent to your knowledge is some of this technology being used to find arrest protesters and even protest organizers. Chilling effect that organizers but also the ACLU became quite aware and worked to challenge was around twenty, fifteen, twenty sixteen or so this company Gio Fia, which is really a company that's kind of social media analysis company that was working on hand in hand with various policing agencies to monitor key words, black lives, matter protests, Jihad all of these things were then tagged and flag to. then. In some cases visit, you'd have a policing agency, visit a potential protester, and of course, if you go onto Gio phidias website now there's like nothing really just contact information, but we know if something is out there if gop has gone, another company will pop up and you know fill in that gap when you layer on all of this technology that you described, it sounds like. It could be relatively accurate and I could see police departments falling into the idea that you know that although there have been concerns facial recognition is now is accurate once you add. In social media like this should work. Great. What is the push back to that and so the idea of something you know working great. If just one person is wrongly. Identified, say, for example with facial recognition technology, then it's not working at all these technologies rely on this idea that they are perfect correct but they really they really aren't and so people are asking for a pause because these technologies are not outside of this system in which we live in where you know black people are criminalized right how do you feel like this? The longterm implications of this surveillance might play out will people be less willing to take the risk of exercising their right to protest? I don't think so I think in terms that people you know we're in the middle of a pandemic and yet people are still you know risking a lot to go out and protest and demand something better I think one case and I'll give you an example that I think is important is in terms of DNA collection, and so a lot of people want to their armchair genealogists are also want to find family or some type of connection and they use a company like say twenty three and me or ancestry dot com or jet match, and that same company Jed match was then recently purchased i. Think just last year by a company that has close ties to you know a policing agency and this company is not just about finding long lost relatives, but they save their primarily for forensic analysis. So the question of whether it's sea or whether it's ancestry dot com it's like we have to really think about what happens to that data. Well, it's interesting. It's it feels like it's a thing that that privacy researchers have warned about for a long time that there is essentially a big web of surveillance and were leaving tracks all the time and that it isn't always obvious what the harm might be. Until something like this happens exactly. But you know they're also tech one of the places that I looked to see you know what's what's the future perhaps for the future that's already here is looking at airport security and there have been a lot of push in terms of AI enabled technologies to. Assess risk to assess threat and one of the things that you know a few companies are starting to develop now is emotion recognition, and so that might be that a traveler present themselves at an airport speak to an Avatar one company. Avatar actually stands for Automated Virtual Agent for truth assessments and this Avatar will then ask them a series of questions and then measurements are then taken. By the changes in their voice by. Heat or sweats or any type of what what might be termed a micro expression. Of guilt like your heart rate, increasing those types of things, and then assign a certain threat category to see if that person might be a threat to airport security, and so I don't necessarily know if these types of technologies are being used to monitor protests, activists and other moments of rebellion, but it is something to look out for. That pause was yeah that's. Terrifying. IS THEIR EAR recognition? Is that a thing? Yes. And so there's there's recognition of everything and it's almost like throwing something to the wall and seeing. What hits but the air's been it's a relatively stable part of the body. And that has been known since Al Proteon, which is said to be the father of forensic. Sciences. was using that in the eighteen hundreds as a stable way of recognizing or. Identifying the human body to catalog them, and so there are researchers that are working on every part in piece of the body that you could think imaginable as a way to try and. Shore. Up, this idea. which is just an idea that the human body is stable that the human can be categorized and identified, and we know that's Bodies don't work that way but you know the science does. Your book is called dark matters on the surveillance of blackness. We've been talking about this in the context context of protest. Why is this surveillance of particular concern to Black Americans? It's a particular concern because it's has been the state you know I say surveillance is the facts of anti blackness not only in the US but globally, and so it's been a concern here in the US for centuries we thinking about slave patrols, plantation control, all of these technologies that were. Put in place. To deem black people as. Outside of the right to have rights, but it's also why I think it's important to study the history of surveillance within transatlantic slavery within Plantation Slavery because it also offers US moments of resistance and moments of rebellion and escape to something different something that looks like freedom. Simone. Brown is a professor at Ut Austin and author of the Book Dark Matters.

Simone Brown United States Ut Austin Professor Gio Phidias Philadelphia Aclu Gio Fia JED GOP Al Proteon
Unthinkable Trauma

In The Thick

06:01 min | 3 weeks ago

Unthinkable Trauma

"Hey welcome to in the thickness is a podcast politics race and culture from a POC. Perspective. HORSA and I'm Jerry Galloway. Rela. We have a very special guest joining us from Southern California Jacob Sobre. He's award winning journalist correspondent for NBC News and MSNBC and Hey a best selling author. Now, what's up Jacob? So good to be with you guys you know have wanted to do this for so long with you and I'm I'm just grateful to be here with you together I know he's a fan. He's a fan of in the thick fan. Yes. We love that we love fans of the pod so. We're going to be talking about an issue that you have called an American tragedy and this is the issue and the history of family. I don't even like that term because it's really families being ripped apart torn apart. In your new book separated inside an American tragedy you readers through a very intimate look into the policy into the families that have been torn apart and traumatized. You also talk to policymakers and government officials who ultimately were responsible for creating and really promoting this is stemmed separation of an estimated five, thousand, four hundred children from their parents at the hands of the government and I. Say. And still counting. Yeah and despite the fact that president trump signed an executive orders supposedly ending the policy of Charles Separations in two thousand eighteen, the ACLU alleges that there have been more than one thousand family separation since that executive order and more recently propublica reported on how the trump administration has used the corona virus as a pretext to circumvent the normal legal protections allowed to migrant children. So since March ice has circulated thousands of migrant children through hotel black sites making it virtually impossible for lawyers, family members and advocates to locate them and deported them in order to quote prevent the introduction of Covid nineteen into the US. Even though many of the deported children have tested negative for the virus. So Jacob here have reported on these issues for many many years. These policies you know predate trump. So before we get into the current iteration of this shit show, I wanNA talk about looking back into that history and actually. You great job of setting it and in a moment we'll talk about how it's touched of us. Really personally. But Jacob. From your perspective, talk to us about the origins of family separation and how the stage was being set for these policies way before trump entered the white. House. So yeah, you gotTa tell us how did we get here? Yeah. I think Maria. That what the trump administration did and we talked about ripping families apart family separation what to call this really what it was in the words of Physicians for human, rights and Nobel Peace Prize winning organization was torture at met the. Definition of torture according to the United. Nations it was government sanctioned child abuse according to the American Academy of Pediatrics and you know make no mistake. This is on the trump administration's hands. No administration in the history of the United States of America had ever attempted or done anything like this in a systematic way. But the fact that the trump administration was able to execute this policy was only possible because of decades of failed deterrent based immigration border policy by Democratic and Republican administrations. This will come as no news to you. But for people who don't know in one, thousand, nine, hundred, four, the Clinton administration put into place their border patrol a policy called prevention through deterrence. That's why our administration has moved aggressively to secure our borders more by hiring record number of new border guards by deporting twice as many criminal aliens as ever before by cracking down on illegal hiring, which was designed went along with the first wave of border infrastructure walls. Fences what have you and the idea was that by doing that people who are migrating to this country quote unquote illegally would have to go on more dangerous or deadly journeys to get here and sure enough you know many people have died trying I e let them die trying. Let them die trying. That's exactly right. After the Clinton administration. We had the Bush administration which obviously created H S and expanded the border patrol exponentially dozens of agencies charged with Homeland Security. Will now be located within one cabinet department. With the mandate and legal authority. To protect our people, the Obama Administration obviously deported more people than any other president ever no matter how they are. No matter their reasons. The eleven million who broke these laws should be held accountable and we got to this place where we had donald trump is president saying when Mexico census people, they're not sending their best they bringing drugs. Crime, their rapists, often not the pictures of Jay Johnson walk through the same facilities that I saw separated kids in and look yes. The Obama Administration Limited circumstances did separate parents and children from each other and the reason that they did it was circumstances where you had parents who were perhaps violent criminals or dealing a narcotrafficking but they never did on a systematic basis Jay Johnson? The Homeland Security Secretary, or Cecilia Munoz from the Domestic Policy Council. Bowl said to me on the record in my book we could never do. What the trump administration did it doesn't mean the idea wasn't proposed. It came up, it came up in the situation of the White House but they never did it and the minute Donald Trump became president. This idea was on the table right about a Valentine's Day meeting and twenty seventeen and the officer Kevin McLean then the acting commissioner of Customs and border. Protection they wanted to do this from the get-go and now the results of of this policy are very familiar to all of

Donald Trump Jacob Clinton Administration President Trump Obama Administration Southern California Jacob Sobr United States NBC Msnbc Domestic Policy Council Jerry Galloway Jay Johnson American Academy Of Pediatrics White House Executive Cecilia Munoz Covid Homeland Security Kevin Mclean
What we'll remember from the 2020 Biden convention

Democracy Now! Audio

06:18 min | Last month

What we'll remember from the 2020 Biden convention

"For more on Biden's speech. In this week's historic virtual Democratic convention we're joined by two guests in Massachusetts Dr. Cornel. West with a professor of the practice of public. Philosophy at Harvard. University author of numerous books including race matters and black prophetic fire. His new podcast called the tight rope in two thousand Seventeen Cornell Westwood's in Charlottesville with. Neo Nazis stormed the campus he and other clergy members were protected by anti-fascists from the mob white supremacists and in Baltimore Maryland were joined by Ben Jealous Precedent people for the American way former president of the ACP. He ran for governor of Maryland in two thousand eighteen we welcome you both to democracy. Now, Ben Jealous congratulations on your new position as head of people for the American way. Why don't you start off by responding to this week's Democratic convention your thoughts on. Where the two now nominees the. President not presidential nominee, Joe Biden and historic a selection of Kamla Harris, to be his running away their positions and how. They represent what you do or not. Theme this convention was really one of unity. This was a time. When we have to come together to defeat a president, who is the most evil the most corrupt than any of us have seen and That says a lot. It also was the time we saw two two nominees who we as progressives. No, we can work with. Kamla. Sister who introduced her Maya. The former head of the ACLU of northern. California. Kamo ran for D. A. and much more conservative time and yet did so as outspoken opponent of the death penalty who then held her ground early in term when she was tested, would an officer was killed an the entire liberal establishment northern California came down on her and she said the death penalty is wrong period. Tremendous Kirch and Joe Biden who Bernie himself said is poised to be the most progressive presidents since FDR. And so while it's not Bernie. And while maybe it's not somebody else someone hope for what we do know is that these are people that we can work with. These are people who their best represent our best values literally the daughter of civil rights activists, the sister of a civil rights lawyer who are self told me fifteen years ago she became a prosecutor because it wasn't enough to just fight the power. We also had to hold the POW. And I've seen her act courageously. So I'm I'm very hopeful and I have no doubt that we can work with. Joe. Like addy who spoke so beautifully, and that was the true highlight for me. I believe that we must move towards Medicare for all I also believe that Joe Biden will take us further in that direction certainly. Donald. Trump and frankly further than most presidents that that that we have an opportunity here to move things in the right direction again and as organizers. That's the most important thing to get out of any presidential election is a president that you can move in the right direction. and Professor Cornel West your reaction to this week in the positions of the Democratic candidates for president if I president. Day My points of reference really are the freedom dreams that we just heard from zoom commodores and genius Lionel Richie. Of Ella, Baker, who was invoked by brother Biden and the first sentence. Of his speech the Alabama who was a revolutionary L. A. Baker who was working on the mass party organizing committee would offer annoy the Great William Kuntsler for actually working for third parties because he thought, she thought that the two party system was so decrepit and then also to Curtis Mayfield that they've been playing over and over again, the move on up but you got to move on from poverty. And in order to do it, you gotTa Talk About Poverty. If you go move on from Wall Street greed and Wall Street crimes, you gotTa talk about, Wall Street Green Wall, street cry go move on up from the Pentagon militarism around the world you gotTa talk about it. Those are the taboo issues that we don't get serious wrestling with. So when you really. Talk about the soul of America, the battle for the soul of America much of that so has been evacuated by the Pentagon, cry greed and the Wall Street greed and the inability of the police and other institutions at treat black people and Brown people, Indigenous People as human beings so I agree with brother. Ben. In terms of being part of an anti fascist coalition. That I think we're forced to vote for buying, but we're not going to lie about buying. WE'RE NOT GONNA lie about Harris. We're going to tell the truth about their. Captivity and their. Refusal to hit Pentagon money spending and militarism around the world at Wall Street, green and. Speak substantively to issues of poverty you can have massive protests all around the country, the largest in the history of country, you can have brother Barbara. Assisted theorist talking about poverty, and then when you get to the convention, you get this spectacle that has nothing to do with wrestling with poverty. I think court breath corey was the only one that even talk about it for the most part none of the major figures did thank God that Bernie thank God LLC. Got A little ninety minutes as opposed Republic Ninety Second Major. Sometimes. Ninety seconds, Ninety seconds so that I you know I'm I'm with Ben in terms of we got the vote for Biden but never ever lying about him and not coming to terms with the fact that. This moment with the decline and fall of the American empire it looks as if the system is unable to generate enough energy to seriously reform itself, it remains sanitized superficial. We getting Lawrence Wealth bubbles rather than prince the revolution I want to go to the Princess Revolution Concert I walk fundamental change.

Joe Biden President Trump Professor Cornel West BEN Bernie Kamla Harris Pentagon Harvard Massachusetts Maryland Professor Cornell Westwood California Aclu Lionel Richie Wrestling Charlottesville Baltimore America
Fashioning the Enslaved Servant, an interview with Dr. Jonathan Michael Square

Dressed: The History of Fashion

05:59 min | 2 months ago

Fashioning the Enslaved Servant, an interview with Dr. Jonathan Michael Square

"Thank you so much for joining us today Dr Square. Welcome to dress. You so much for having me. I'm excited about the conversation. Yeah. Me Tell and what that conversation is. Really kind of going to center on today is part just part of your research for a book that you're working on currently. But. Before we get to that I'd like to ask you first how you came to the feel of fashion studies because this is something that I've started recently asking all of our guests. We actually get a lot of questions from people about like how do you become a fashion historian or fashion scholar and I, think it's really really interesting and compelling to hear about all of the various different passes study that kind of leave some of us to what we do. We'll April I was actually born fashion. I love that. But in all seriousness, nurtured a lifelong interest in creative expression. My parents went to art school in I grew up around their art. So anyone who's known me for a long time will tell you that art and fashion. They've always been passions of nine. There was a moment where I like dabbled with being a fashion blogger. Do remember fashion bloggers. Before influencers pre influencers. Exactly like if you Scroll Deacon. Some. Items, you'll see me trying to be a fashion blogger. I cringe. At, those posts. But I won't delete them because I have like this historians archiving in post like just like jump into your head from that moment. But in any case, didn't really start to identify as a fashion scholar into like the tail end of my doctoral studies and did a PhD in history it in my you. Know what I was doing. Created a digital humanities projects. Fascinating freedom. Admitted to be like online resources, people who are interested in the relationship between fashion, the fashion industry in. Slavery. In also being from the Vienna of always been interested in the history of slavery in my own history is an ascendant of enslaved peoples. So this my current research, digital humanities, projects, sort of Mary's those two interests. So but I would say dead, you know it's through that project. I became less a fashion consumer, a lover fashion in that became a real fashion scholar off the tonight fashioned myself. Myself into a fashion scholar, and we will definitely at the end when I ask you how people can find. You can tell people and direct people to that resource, which is still online. You know you're talking about being a historian and an you have remarked me in the past that our research is incredibly important to you, and that you I'm quoting you both fetish is and theorize the archive. In what way does that inform your research particularly, the research that you're doing right now yet, that's a great question. I mean. I think fashion designers, I don't think I know fashion designers use textiles in is story I used ticks in in a Lotta ways. I. Think it's the same intellectual work. In different mediums, my research based in part on abject analysis. So this chapter that we're going to describe amusing to as coastal worn by enslaved valets as appointed departure, but really the grist of the research lies in analysis of archival documentation. In historians, we're taught to think critically about the archive as an epistemological space. Was not just a repository of dusty. Oh documents. It's a place where knowledge is created. It's also a place where some narratives or privilege in other narratives are excluded are sidelined. In, all comes down to power. You know the word archive comes from over in ancient, Greek, which I will not bother butcher. On Your podcast. But the word means to be I, are to rule. So a lot of words that convey power in control whether it's Monarch are hierarchy or anarchy sort of the Ri- from the same word. So archives are about power. In the archive in those who control, they'd have the power to save bonaire to. Are To control. The way history is told whether it's historical figure our nation. In my particular case, it's a for profit company. In Brooks brothers particular. Its archive is run by a DC based marketing firm in corporate archive known as the history factory. It was founded in nineteen, seventy, nine in the history factory helps construct corporate identities and build brand narratives, and so you can think about the survival of Brooks, brothers. Archive is being indebted. To this firm. Founders of the history factory actually restyle to brooks brothers in the late Seventies. Early Eighties when the company was on the brink of bankruptcy, you know people weren't really buying suits anymore and they really had to restructure. In. This firm basically archived at his own expense. It doesn't they believe that it was important. For the history of the company now myself getting lost in. The weeds, the research? When the company was bought by Claudio Delvecchio. Awesome Brooks sputters, enthusiasts, he paid for the the BECO IT expenses. In History Company, she still advises Brooks Brothers. The often tell them to focus on innovation in nonconformity on, of course, their brand strategy sort of ACLU's any connection to slavery, but you can think about the survival of Brooks is being due to like the generosity are the largest of these like to wealthy white man who have emotional connections to the brand

Brooks Brothers Brooks Dr Square History Company Aclu Claudio Delvecchio Vienna RI Mary
Los Angeles - ACLU Files Suit Against Pomona PD Over Deadly Force Policy Alleging Misuse Of Taxpayer Funds

KNX Evening News

01:03 min | 2 months ago

Los Angeles - ACLU Files Suit Against Pomona PD Over Deadly Force Policy Alleging Misuse Of Taxpayer Funds

"The lawsuit accuses the Pomona police Department of wasting Taxpayer money on illegally training and policy designed to undermine a state law that limits the use of deadly force by officers Still use complaint claims the department is misrepresenting the new law, which took effect in January and limits police use of deadly force to only one necessary rather than just reasonable. It alleges public funds and employee time are being misused to promote the erroneous message that nothing has changed. A suit. Notes. Pomona Police have fatally shot three people this year. The people had to say and how police departments get funded, use their funding. And, you know, we have a strong interest in making sure that those funds are spent in accordance with the law you staff attorney we have heard from our community partners and the people who we worked closely with in Pomona, including our plaintiffs, Interrogatory Sada that there really is an accountability problem in the city of Pomona, with who the council listens to in terms of setting policy and spending taxpayer We're re forces Pomona City manager is declining to comment on the lawsuit club can extend 70 NewsRadio.

Pomona Police Department Pomona Police Pomona Pomona City Staff Attorney
Los Angeles Hotel Workers Union, ACLU SoCal, BLM-LA Call For Sheriff Villanueva To Resign

KNX Morning News with Dick Helton and Vicky Moore

00:28 sec | 2 months ago

Los Angeles Hotel Workers Union, ACLU SoCal, BLM-LA Call For Sheriff Villanueva To Resign

"Of groups in Including the hotel workers union and black lives matter are planning to call for the resignation of the L. A county sheriff today. They say that Alex Villanueva has failed to reform the county Sheriff's Department. They also say he mishandled the recent investigation into the death of security guard Andres Guardado. Who was shot in the back Multiple times by sheriff Deputies nor Gardena rally with the formal demand to take place at noon outside the Hall of Justice. A

County Sheriff's Department Alex Villanueva Andres Guardado Gardena Hall Of Justice
Sales of thermal imaging cameras 'that can spot fevers' soar

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:00 min | 2 months ago

Sales of thermal imaging cameras 'that can spot fevers' soar

"Magical fever spotting cameras. You say we have questions from American public media. This is marketplace tech I'm Ali would. This week on marketplace tech were reporting on the innovations that will help us transition to a post pandemic future part of that future will eventually involve going back to work but we're still working on how to do that. Safely. Some companies have spent tens of thousands of dollars on thermal cameras, which can supposedly spot someone with an elevated temperature from a distance. Do they work or is this just a form of health? Security Theater? Meghan mcardle Carino covers workplace culture for marketplace. I always think about kind of like Predator vision. When we talk about thermal cameras, you know this kind of allows for a big industrial camera that does automated instant temperature taking by mapping infrared radiation from people's skins with a lot faster than having a person standing out there you know with one of those temperature guns taking everyone's temperature but I understand that it's not as good as Predator vision. You know there's a question of accuracy with just how well the devices work. They can be influenced by lots of different things. They take the temperature of the skin on the face cold or hot weather that can affect the temperature of one skin. But the FDA has allowed these devices to be marketed on a temporary basis without any kind of verification of their medical. Veracity. So the FDA does suggest that if someone is determined to have a temperature with one of these devices that they get some other kinds of secondary verification, you know using an internal temperature taker, you know your just your regular thermometer, but there's really nothing requiring these workplaces to do. So what other concerns are there around sort of scanning workers constantly in this way? The fact that these devices generally also come with facial recognition software as part of the deal, you know this is something where you know these systems could kind of become part of a greater surveillance infrastructure that groups like the ACLU are up in arms about having these installed at, say all airports and hospitals and all kinds of businesses all over the place. So if this thermal scanner says that you're sick and you are sent home, you can't come to work. Will you still be compensated for that time? Well, that is. A bit of a question mark. The Cares Act did provide for two weeks of paid sick leave but it excluded a lot of people were talking about gig workers. We're talking about people who work for companies with more than five hundred employees or less than fifty employees. So there are a lot of workers who may get sent home and not be able to collect any pay.

FDA Meghan Mcardle Carino ALI Aclu
"aclu" Discussed on ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

01:30 min | 2 months ago

"aclu" Discussed on ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

"Will we heed the warnings from the wall of Moms? I'm singer Songwriter Patty Larkin. Civil Liberties Minute with ACLU Attorney Bill Newman. The Wall of MOMS are women in Portland Oregon who are trying to stand between protesters behind them in federal law enforcement in front of them to keep those two groups apart and prevent and forestall violence. The New York. Times recently reported the story of Jennifer. Christianson, a family law attorney who was part of the wall, moms, Christianson and the other MOMS were cleared out by the federal agents so that those federal agents could get to the protesters. Christianson reported that you heard one federal agent claiming to another federal agent that she. She Christian head just struck him, but according to Christianson. That's total fabrication that just didn't happen. And then in officer assaulted her, and groped her chest and her backside while he was arresting her. Who thinks that officer who committed those acts will be held to account, and what does this interaction tell us about the tactics ethics of this deployment of federal law enforcement over the objection of the mayor and the governor who say that the presence of federal law enforcement is usurping the function of state law enforcement and making the situation way worse, far more volatile, much more violent. Christianson said. This is not creeping authoritarianism. The authoritarianism is here the civil liberties minute is made possible by the American civil liberties. Union, because freedom can't defend itself..

Christianson Patty Larkin attorney ACLU officer Bill Newman Portland New York Oregon Jennifer
ACLU Asks Washington DC to Require Police Officers Wear Masks

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:26 sec | 2 months ago

ACLU Asks Washington DC to Require Police Officers Wear Masks

"The American Civil Liberties Union is demanding the D C. Police officers wear masks in public in a letter to D C Mayor Muriel Bowser and police chief Peter Newsom, the A C L U claims officers at protests and elsewhere in the city have been seen without face coverings, Chief Newsham tells our news partner NBC for He encourages officers to wear masks and any officer C not wearing personal protective gear should be reported to their supervisors.

American Civil Liberties Union Chief Newsham Partner D C. Police Mayor Muriel Bowser Peter Newsom A C L U NBC Officer
ACLU Asks Washington DC to Require Police Officers Wear Masks

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:27 sec | 2 months ago

ACLU Asks Washington DC to Require Police Officers Wear Masks

"The American Civil Liberties Union is demanding the D C. Police officers wear masks in public. A letter to D. C Mayor Muriel Bowser and D. C. Police chief Peter Newsom comes as the value claims officers at protests and elsewhere in the city have been seen without face coverings. Chief New Shin tells our news partner NBC for He encourages officers to wear masks and any officer C not wearing personal protective gear should be reported to their

Mayor Muriel Bowser American Civil Liberties Union Peter Newsom Chief New Shin D C. Police D. C. Police NBC Partner Officer
ACLU and Oregon governor accuse Trump administration of abusing power

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:27 sec | 2 months ago

ACLU and Oregon governor accuse Trump administration of abusing power

"And Oregon's governor are accusing the Trump Administration of abusing power. That's after video emerged on Twitter, apparently showing federal officers dressed in camouflage grabbing protestors off the streets of Portland and using unmarked cars. Acting Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf says state and local officials are to blame for not putting an end to anti police protests, which have continued in Portland for nearly 50 straight night

Portland Chad Wolf Twitter Oregon Secretary
Facial Recognition Leads To False Arrest Of Black Man

Daily Tech News Show

05:32 min | 3 months ago

Facial Recognition Leads To False Arrest Of Black Man

"Now there's a technology out there that I bet would have benefited from having ethics built into it from the beginning, rather than putting it into the hands of people and finding out. Oh, wait, there are problems with it, and that technology is facial recognition In fact, Boston has joined cities like San, Francisco Oakland California and Cambridge Massachusetts in prohibiting the use of facial recognition technology for most municipal uses. They made exceptions for unlocking your phone or using facial recognition to preserve privacy in in which case the facial recognition software is just removing faces. It doesn't have to tell you who they are basically if it's not identifying you or just looking for faces, you can't use it. Cities are banning facial recognition over the fears of its misuse. All they shall recognition della technology has some rate of false identification, and that's a higher rate among people with darker skin. Since machine learning is often trained on data sets of predominantly lighter skinned people. In fact, we now have an example of that in the real world, the ACLU of Michigan has lodged a complaint in Detroit Wednesday alleging that a black man spent thirty hours in custody after facial recognition software mistakenly matched him with a shoplifting suspect. He is no longer suspected of being the shoplifter, but he had this be under arrest for thirty hours before they realized they had the wrong person. The match was made in facial recognition from the Michigan. State polices digital image analysis section, which uses software from rank, one computing, not using Microsoft not using Amazon, not using any of the big ones like IBM. Who are all saying well? We're going to hold off using somebody else. Michigan police rank one guidelines do say that arrests should not be made on the basis of facial recognition, and it's unclear at this point. If the police had other evidence again other evidence, that was wrong, but other evidence that may of pointed and giving them to reason to suspect this man but the ACLU says it doesn't matter. You shouldn't have been using facial recognition in this arrest because it wasn't him. The worry I would have always had about this sort of thing is if they make it too much of a factor in the arrest too much of the reason why you're arresting them or too much of the burden of proof is on his on the match that they got from facial recognition. Them what would happen is I. Don't know I'd end up. Some actor who looks like me would get in trouble for doing a terrible thing, and then I would suddenly be a database because I kind of looked like that guy. They got a false positive because I look like him. was gonNA use an exact example, but I'm not going to want to get myself in trouble, but look there's an actor I look like because all I'm saying anyway, the point is. Yeah I. Don't want I. Don't want that to be i. mean it makes these things these things they get developed and make sense as like supporting arguments right like if if you've got other evidence that points to the thing, and you say well, and also there's the facial recognition. It's not the. But it's this other thing. We gotta figure out where that is yeah I. Mean that's I mean at the very least. Yes, supporting something else the fact that the police in Michigan and also ranked one which makes the software have guidelines saying well, this should happen based on facial recognition. There may be other you know parameters here, and like you said Tom that that's not necessarily known, but it was just facial recognition. I mean you can't just have a guideline. Sane probably shouldn't do that. It's not enough information it should be. You legally cannot do that and if you do that, you're in trouble. Yeah, I mean. If if the case is, they just use facial recognition to bring the guy in. Then it becomes a question of. Why didn't you follow the guidelines? Should the guidelines be law That is one aspect of this conversation. If they say look facial recognition just pointed us to the guy. And then we found out he was in the store that day he was driving a car that fit the description of. Of the shoplifter, you know it was just a case of mistaken identity because he fit, the description could have happened to anybody. That's still a problem because my guess is. If it weren't for facial recognition, they wouldn't have bothered this person. They would have gone. They wouldn't have made him stay in a jail cell for thirty hours. They wouldn't have arrested him in front of his wife and two little daughters. You can say well okay, but how often does that happen? I think we're all very clear that for black people and happens all too often, and having another instance of it certainly isn't helping. Yeah, to be to be to have been somewhere. You know at a at A. Coincidental time yeah, and maybe driving a similar car, and that sort of thing it's like okay. Well suspects. Get questioned all the time and you know if they're not the right person or it's. It's deemed that they they aren't guilty. After all, that's something that were used to. That happens all the time, but yeah, the whole facial recognition thing is like if that's sort of the the nail in the coffin of like well, we got these three things you know. Where were you at three PM? That Dan? Oh, you just happened to. To look a lot like this. Other person must be i. mean that's that's. That's a real problem. Well, that's where the guidelines are not being violated right, but the fact that you had the facial recognition like you said Dow becomes the the Khuda gross at to say like we might have let the guy go to say well. Don't leave town. You're a person of interest, but instead we had the facial recognition that may have given them the confidence to like. Let's just arrest. Him could be other things to of course, yeah.

Michigan Aclu Boston SAN California Oakland IBM Detroit Microsoft Shoplifting DOW Francisco TOM Cambridge Massachusetts DAN Amazon
'The Computer Got It Wrong': How Facial Recognition Led To False Arrest Of Black Man

Morning Edition

02:51 min | 3 months ago

'The Computer Got It Wrong': How Facial Recognition Led To False Arrest Of Black Man

"Police in Detroit we're trying to figure out who stole five watches from a show I know watch store and so they pulled security video that had recorded the incident they zoomed in on the grainy footage and ran the suspect to a facial recognition system I hit came back forty two year old Robert Williams of Michigan when I look at the denture of the gallon I just see a big black guy I don't I don't see a resemblance I don't think he looks like me at all in January police in Detroit arrested Williams for the watch theft Williams says he was placed in an interrogation room and police put three photos in front of him and he says so I guess that's not true either so I picked it up into my face when I told him I said I hope you don't think all black people look alike Williams was detained and then released on bail until his hearing that's when prosecutors dropped the charges against him academic and government studies have demonstrated that facial recognition systems misidentified people of color more often than white people what makes this case extraordinary is that police admitted that facial recognition technology prompted the arrest typically the tools used in secret lawyer Phil Maher is with the ACLU of Michigan they never even asked him any questions before arresting him they never asked him if he had an alibi they never asked him where he was that day the ACLU has filed a complaint against the Detroit police department the complaint asked that police stop using the tool in investigations in a statement to NPR the Detroit police department says after the Williams case the department enacted new rules now only still photos not security footage can be used for facial recognition and only in the case of violent crimes according to Georgetown law center on privacy and technology at least a quarter of the country's law enforcement agencies have access to face recognition tools Jamison's feedback is a researcher at the center most of the time people who are arrested using face recognition or not told at face recognition was used to arrest them the government use of facial recognition technology has been banned in half a dozen cities in Michigan Williams says he hopes the case is a wake up call to lawmakers Williams says there should be a nationwide ban let's say that this case wasn't retail for a one of those rape or murder what I got out of jail on a personal bond or but I never come home Williams and his wife Melissa worry about the long term effects the arrest will have on his daughters he was arrested on his front lawn his young daughters cried as her father was taken away in a police car in order to get arrested and that was their first interaction with the police so it's definitely not shape however seem long course man in his complaint Williams and his lawyers say if the police department won't ban the technology out right that leaves his photo should be removed from the database so this doesn't happen

Detroit
'The Computer Got It Wrong': How Facial Recognition Led To False Arrest Of Black Man

Morning Edition

03:05 min | 3 months ago

'The Computer Got It Wrong': How Facial Recognition Led To False Arrest Of Black Man

"Now a man who says he was falsely arrested after a computer algorithm mis identified his face is speaking out as NPR's Bobby Allen reports critics of the technology said case shows how unreliable the tool is police in Detroit we're trying to figure out who stole five watches from a show I know watch store and so they pulled security video that had recorded the incident they zoomed in on the grainy footage and ran the suspect to a facial recognition system I hit came back forty two year old Robert Williams of Michigan when I look at the picture of the guy out I just see a big black I don't at all I don't see a resemblance I don't think he looks like me at all in January police in Detroit arrested Williams for the watch theft Williams says he was placed in an interrogation room and police put three photos in front of him and he says so I guess that's not true either so I picked it up into my face when I told him I said I hope you don't think all black people look alike Williams was detained and then released on bail until his hearing that's when prosecutors dropped the charges against him academic and government studies have demonstrated that facial recognition systems misidentified people of color more often than white people what makes this case extraordinary is that police admitted that facial recognition technology prompted the arrest typically the tools used in secret lawyer Phil Maher is with the ACLU of Michigan they never even asked him any questions before arresting him they never asked him if he had an alibi they never asked him where he was that day the ACLU has filed a complaint against the Detroit police department the complaint asked that police stop using the tool in investigations in a statement to NPR the Detroit police department says after the Williams case the department enacted new rules now only still photos not security footage can be used for facial recognition and only in the case of violent crimes according to Georgetown law center on privacy and technology at least a quarter of the country's law enforcement agencies have access to face recognition tools Jamison Spivak is a researcher at the center most of the time people who are arrested using face recognition or not told at face recognition was used to arrest them the government use of facial recognition technology has been banned in half a dozen cities in Michigan Williams says he hopes the case is a wake up call lawmakers Williams says there should be a nationwide ban let's say that this case wasn't retail for a one of those rape or murder what I got out of jail on a personal bond or but I never come home Williams and his wife Melissa worry about the long term effects the arrest will have on his daughters he was arrested on his front lawn his young daughters cried as her father was taken away in a police car in order to get arrested that was our first interaction with the police so it's definitely not shape how they perceive law enforcement in his complaint Williams and his lawyers say if the police department won't ban the technology out right that leaves his photo should be removed from the database so this doesn't happen

Maryland police chief resigns after reports of discrimination within department

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:45 min | 3 months ago

Maryland police chief resigns after reports of discrimination within department

"Four prince George's county police chief Hank Stawinski resigns following a scathing report outlining complaints of discrimination and retaliation within the police department's more from WTOP's Kate Ryan prince George's county police chief Hank Stawinski resigned hours after the ACLU of Maryland released in ninety four page report alleging dozens of incidents of racist conduct by white officers the same reports said that when black officers complained of racism within the department they suffered retaliation Bob Ross with the prince George's county chapter of the N. double ACP said his organization had called for a no confidence vote against storing ski who is white prince George's county executive Angela also Brooks issued this statement announcing Stravinsky's resignation effective immediately Kate Ryan W. T. G. O. P. news and I'm Michelle bash the report supports a lawsuit filed on behalf of thirteen officers of color prince George's county police lieutenant Sonya's Allah coffer is one of them I think your report was able to gather understanding of the police department and provide a clear understanding of the unfair practices under chief Kaminski she believes the chief's resignation was coming because she and others were asking for change for so long and nothing was done we want to see equity fairness unbiased policing and genuine transparency Michelle bass WTOP news also Brooks is holding a news conference tomorrow at noon about there's the ACLU also releasing a report that says DC police disproportionately targeted targets African Americans when they stop people on the streets we are still awaiting a response from DC

Kaminski DC Michelle Bass Kate Ryan W. T. G. O. Executive Prince George Kate Ryan George Sonya Stravinsky Brooks Angela Bob Ross Maryland Aclu Hank Stawinski Wtop
Big win for LGBTQ community

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

01:02 min | 3 months ago

Big win for LGBTQ community

"One a landmark decision from the Supreme Court CBS news special report the L. G. B. T. community is rejoicing over a ruling from the U. S. Supreme Court that says federal civil rights law protects LGBT people in the workplace the ACLU's Karen stranger whom we hope for a moment that it felt odd on the work of so many people over over so many decades Matthew Lasky is with the group glad for gives us hope that as a country we can unite for the common good around the continue to fight for LGBTQ acceptance conservative justice Neil Gorsuch wrote the majority opinion joining with Chief Justice Roberts and liberal justices legal scholar Laurie Levinson says Samuel Alito pen the descent cues as the majority of basically legislating going outside the language of the nineteen sixty four title seven and saying that in fact they were putting into it concepts and decisions that were not anticipated at the time CBS news special report I'm

L. G. B. T. Community U. S. Supreme Court Aclu Matthew Lasky Neil Gorsuch Chief Justice Roberts Laurie Levinson Samuel Alito CBS Karen
Trump administration revokes transgender health protection

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 3 months ago

Trump administration revokes transgender health protection

"Chinese the American authorities civil liberties have union looked on is eleven ready for residential a fight after communities the trump in administration the wholesale revokes food market transgender in Beijing to health try to protection stem a new outbreak the rule of finalized coal with nineteen Friday by the trump city administration officials say overturned that forty five Obama workers era at protections this in fading for transgender market tested people positive against for the coronavirus sex discrimination though they showed in health care no symptoms LGBTQ groups that was in say addition explicit to an protections announcement are of seven needed people for people with seeking symptoms sex with reassignment visited or treatment worked at the market and even for transgender the market has people four who need thousand care for common tenants illnesses city officials such as have diabetes said forty or environmental heart problems samples taken the ACLU's out the market Louise also smelling tested the trump positive administration until can two days ago Beijing change had the not rag had I a can locally try to transmitted roll back protections case of crown of but ours the statute for more than seven says what weeks the statute authorities says have and not she says revised that statute some recent provides moves protections to relax coronavirus I'm Julie restrictions Walker I'm sorry I shockingly

Beijing Aclu Market Louise Walker Barack Obama
Big tech companies back away from selling facial recognition to police

The Vergecast

05:49 min | 3 months ago

Big tech companies back away from selling facial recognition to police

"Big companies are saying they're not gonNA make facial recognition technology so just the quick rundown IBM announced it's no longer offer, develop or research facial recognition technology. There's some important caveats that Amazon has banned the police from using its. Facial recognition system called recognition for the next year. Which is the other caveat? Internally. Microsoft, which is sort of talked about this? A lot has said we will not sell facial recognition to the police. Insult Congress Passes Privacy Law. Another caveat they're all caveated announcements, but. Just before we started recording, I was saying you do not see a technology at this stage of development. Halted in any way because of social concerns, so walk us through what's happening? Obviously in the context of black lives matter the protests, but walk us through what is going on anouncements and how they work? Yeah, I mean so I. Think something that I definitely want to highlight up. Top is the history of criticism of these systems which goes back years, and there's a few researchers particularly enjoyable Weenie Timmy Gebru who, in two thousand, eighteen published a paper called gender shades. which they really sort of provided the first comprehensive empirical evidence that there are racial and gender bias with these systems, so that's been alone of criticism that's been picked up. Push forward by people like the ACLU. Now obviously with protests across America and greater scrutiny on. Police and law enforcement in January that's now pushed out to the four, but these criticisms go back years, so it's really important that they're now. Being taught about an action is happening as you said, there's been three announcements IBM on Monday Amazon Wednesday, Marcus often Thursday, but each of them deserves different caveats. Amazon Microsoft announcements obviously goes together because they're going for a twelve month. Ban and IBM's goes in a different slot. Because they're saying we're going to stop doing this. Totally however I would say. I've been desperately trying to get IBM to answer some specific questions. About the scope of this band and they have been very unhelpful. You both will have experienced this before when you go. Okay, so I have a little question here, and just like a yes, or no answer. And how do you feel about giving that? Go? James We've written a blog post. Just like to read the blog posts. Donald explain everything and. Post but I had some questions about the blog post and they will not. Have you really read the? Anyway. For a company who who make software that claims to like understand the of human knowledge, and is able to like actually literally debate you. The inability to engage in a discussion about its products is fascinating. Maybe you're actually talking to their debate. Ai and not to real human. Oh, my God yeah, it turns out. Watson sucks. It only generates blog posts with ambiguous claims. And cannot answer a follow up so James Real quick just give us a brief intro. How does facial recognition work so facial recognition is based on machine learning. which is sort of technology that looks for patterns in large data sets, and then tries to predict or find those patterns elsewhere. In this case, the patterns it's looking for our measurements based on your face now there's lots of different ways that these algorithms work, but basically they're looking for say the distances between certain landmark features on your face that could be the distance between your eyes from your nostrils to the tip of your mouth between your eyebrows all. All those sorts of things so they will be scanning faces. They will be measuring those little points, and then they will be comparing them to a database. There's different ways that could happen. You might be doing a one, too many find where you have a face that you've say record on TV and you're looking for it in a big watch list of people, or it might be a one to one thing which is what happens at a passport. Border check where you have one picture one face, and you're just looking to see if there are match or not, those technologies are implemented in very various ways. You know some people use them to pull footage from TV that they analyze later. Some do live TV stuff that's happened in London for example and somewhat to integrate them onto body cameras as well so there's a lot of different ways is coming up, but you're basically getting an algorithm that looks at your face and looks to see if it matches another. Let's start at the top right. There is the gender shades paper. There is this just enormous body of evidence that. Facial recognition systems are biased against gender and race. Just unpack that a little bit, and what does that actually mean in practice for people? What should people understand about that? So that means that the same? System when it's looking at a white face when it's looking in the face of a person of color. It is going to be just less accurate when it comes to matching identities when it comes to just simply saying say what gender, it thinks that person is these algorithms consistently get lowest scores for non white faces. It's really as simple as that. The huge terrifying scary things is when you think about how those judgments then going to be used by people with power over your life, whether that's the law enforcement, or whether that's a private company. Many of whom are buying these systems and integrating them say into a watch list for the shop, and they are going to start going well system says your on our. Nautilus, and you can't come into the shop and you know what recourse you have in a scenario right, so I always think of this in terms of the TSA. A Brown man who regularly travels the bag, full batteries and wires I have many interactions with the TSA, but I'm in the airport.

IBM Microsoft Amazon James TSA Aclu Timmy Gebru Nautilus America Donald Trump AI Watson London Marcus
All about Section 230: What It Does and Doesn't Say

a16z

05:12 min | 4 months ago

All about Section 230: What It Does and Doesn't Say

"Hi everyone welcome to this week's special episode of sixteen minutes on the news, our show where we cover the headlines from our vantage point in tech, and covered tech trends, offering analysis frameworks, explainers and more I'm sewn. All your host and today's episode is special, not just because at three times sixteen minutes long, but this is our very first time on the show now thirty two episodes in bringing on a special outside guest. Our topic is section two thirty of the Communications Decency Act, which makes sure. Sure that interactive websites are not liable for their users content as their distributors, not producers of content, and so we also cover the recent news around twitter and the president's tweets, and the subsequent Executive Order Unquote Preventing Online censorship all from this week, which is also all bang out against the broader, more profound cultural context of George Floyd. Minnesota and way beyond and this episode we do a deeper dive on the technology and Policy Aspects of platforms and content moderation, including an explainer on the evolution. Evolution of section, two thirty, and all the key nuances of the debates around it and content moderation to understand, my special guest is Mike Mas- nick, founder and editor in chief of tech dirt, which is a leading tech news and analysis website and my longtime go to source for these topics he also by the way, recently launched new section, dedicated to tech and covid coverage as well as a new form with different voices, called the greenhouse, which focuses on tricky tech topics and lots of the. The trade offs involved like privacy and so on you can find both of those at Tech. DIRT DOT COM, so that's the INTRO and why? This is a special three x episode of sixteen minutes. Let me now kick things off by asking Mike. Since the premise of the shows, the tease apart. What's hype? What's real and to break down and explain what section to thirty does and doesn't say especially since the Broader Communications Decency Act Mike has been around since one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety six. The laws actually very short and very simple and very straightforward, and I should note that the Communications Decency Act itself did have. Things that I did, but all of that was determined to be unconstitutional. So the only thing that survives is section two thirty. There was a big lawsuit ACLU versus Reno in the late nineties, and that throughout most of the communications, Decency Act is unconstitutional. The thing that remained was to thirty so what section to thirty does it really does two things, and they're somewhat related, and they're both incredibly important to the functioning of the modern Internet the first thing that it does is it puts the liability on the person actually violating the law, so if someone goes onto. Onto a website and says something that is defamatory or otherwise violates the law, the liability for that action belongs on the person who is speaking and not the platform or site that is hosting that content. The second thing that it does is that it says if a website chooses to moderate its content or anything that is put on the site. Then it is not liable for those moderation choices I'm so glad you're bringing that up because this is the number one thing I wanted to start with which is the flip side of it, not just the protection. Protection, but the fact that they can moderate whatever they want, so can you actually break down Mike? What does that mean so where it came from? Which I think is important is to give sort of the history very quickly is that there were series of lawsuits in the early nineties that tried to hold Internet services that had moderated some content, and the were defamation cases effectively brought up the most famous one is stratton oakmont versus prodigy, and as a little fun aside. Stratton oakmont was a financial firm that was immortalized in the movie The wolf of Wall. Wall Street, that's a fun fact. Yes, and Stratton. OAKMONT got upset. Because people in prodigies message boards were accusing the company of being up to no good, and so they sued prodigy, and a court said that prodigy was liable for the libellous statements, because prodigy positioned itself as a family friendly service that would moderate content, and because it moderated some content to try and take down cursing or porn anything that it felt was inappropriate that anything it left up according to the judge, it was now liable for as if it had written that content itself and that. FREAKED OUT! People in Congress namely the time to members of the House Chris Cox. A Republican and Ron Wyden a Democrat, and they put together section to thirty to say wait, that's crazy. If a website wants to moderate content to create for example, a family friendly environment, it shouldn't get sued for the content that chose not to take down. And so that section of CBA two-thirty is designed to make sure that any website can moderate content how it sees fit in good faith to present the content in a way that meets with the goals of the service

Stratton Oakmont Mike Mas Twitter George Floyd Ron Wyden Stratton Aclu Minnesota President Trump Executive CBA Reno Congress Chris Cox Founder Editor In Chief
"aclu" Discussed on ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"aclu" Discussed on ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

"Can gangs run prisons. I'm Bill Newman and this is the civil liberties minute quest consider private prison companies the three largest being core civic g the company insists it's making improvements the civil liberties minute is made possible by the ACLU because freedom can't protect itself

Bill Newman ACLU
"aclu" Discussed on ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"aclu" Discussed on ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

"New Hampshire has abolished the death penalty. My name is Ramsey cork. And this is the civil liberties minute with ACLU attorney Bill Noonan, the Vermont Senate and house of representatives both have voted to override Governor Chris nuno's veto of the Bill that repealed capital punishment, with votes, they could not have been closer, the override received exactly the two thirds necessary in both the house, and the Senate in the house of representatives the vote being to forty seven to one twenty three and in the Senate, sixteen to eight passage of this legislation makes New Hampshire, the twenty first state to abolish the death penalty of the other twenty nine states four have issued a moratorium on capital punishment, so ineffective twenty-five or half the states in the United States today, have no death penalty. The Bill to abolish capital punishment in New Hampshire. Interestingly was sponsored by Representative. Renny cushing. Whose father was murdered in nineteen Eighty-eight Cushing. I asked the legislature to abolish capital punishment twenty one years ago as Representative Cushing said the death penalty doesn't work. It doesn't work for victims and it doesn't work for society. It's time to let it go. The minute is made possible by the ACLU because freedom can't protect itself.

New Hampshire Renny cushing Representative Vermont Senate Bill Noonan ACLU Cushing Ramsey cork United States Chris nuno attorney twenty one years
"aclu" Discussed on ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"aclu" Discussed on ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

"Aren't poll taxes illegal forbidden unconstitutional? Well, we thought so my name is Ramzan cork. And this is the civil liberties minute with ACLU attorney Bill Newman, the twenty four th amendment to the United States constitution ratified in nineteen sixty four made poll taxes unconstitutional in federal elections and a supreme court decision in one thousand nine hundred sixty six rule that poll taxes were unconstitutional in state elections as well a violation of the equal protection guarantee of the fourteenth amendment. So between the supreme court's decision and the constitutional amendment. We all thought that the poll tax was dead. But now in Florida it's returning last November, Florida voters approved about measure to restore voting rights to one point four million persons with felony convictions who would serve their sentences, but now Florida is on the verge of requiring persons who. You want to have their voting rights restored to have to pay any in all court costs and fines before they can get on the voter rolls. Really you twenty five dollars in court costs and the penalty is you can't vote in Florida. That's the proposal to discriminate against poor people disproportionately people of color, a two thousand and nineteen version of the poll tax. The civil liberties minute is made possible by the ACLU because freedom can't protect itself.

ACLU Florida Ramzan cork Bill Newman United States attorney twenty five dollars
"aclu" Discussed on ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"aclu" Discussed on ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

"A big booby award given to a girl high school student, a member of the cheerleading squad by the coaches. Are you kidding me? I'm Bill Newman. And this is the civil liberties minute, and that is a real thing that happened a mock award at the Tramper high school in Kenosha, Wisconsin, all in good fun. According to the coaches, but not fun at all or procreate or legal. According to parents students, some other coaches at the school and the ACLU a female coach wrote an Email to the school administration saying that it didn't take much to see that. This is extremely degrading to women women athletes shouldn't be paraded in public like that. A mother said she wanted quote for these girls to be treated with respect. I don't think that's too much to ask and Emma. Roth an attorney with the ACLU women's rights project said, quote, it's important that we intervene at a young age and the girls are taught they're worth and are treated. Equally. When this doesn't happen. They carry this message for the rest of their life in response. So far the school has agreed to cease giving out these degrading mock awards in the future. The ACLU has demanded that the district appropriately disciplined, the cheerleading coaches and has called for mandatory anti harassment training, and and other remedial steps and has threatened litigation. The civil liberties minute is made possible by the ACLU because freedom can't protect itself.

ACLU Tramper high school Bill Newman Kenosha Wisconsin harassment Emma Roth attorney
"aclu" Discussed on ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"aclu" Discussed on ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

"Can you be arrested for being mean to the police on the internet? I'm Barrington day Thurston from the onion. And also. You're listening to the civil liberties minute with ACLU attorney Bill Newman, recently, the Exeter, New Hampshire. Police arrested local man for riding a comment on a news website that accused the police chief of covering up for a corrupt officer that statement allegedly violated New Hampshire's criminal defamation law. It makes it a misdemeanor to intentionally and falsely disparage another person New Hampshire is criminal defamation law along with others like it in twenty four additional states in essence makes it a crime to say mean things about people now to be sure freedom of speech does not give anyone the absolute right to spread lies about a fellow citizen. Which is why civil remedies are available, but criminal defamation laws are another story. I you shouldn't go to jail for saying something mean about somebody and second the laws chill speech and third. They are disproportionately used against people who. Criticize the police or politicians. Fortunately, the criminal case in New Hampshire has been dismissed and the ACLU has sued in New Hampshire federal court to have that states criminal defamation law struck down as violating the first amendment. The civil liberties minute is made possible by the ACLU because freedom can't protect itself.

New Hampshire ACLU Thurston Bill Newman Exeter officer attorney
"aclu" Discussed on ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"aclu" Discussed on ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

"Fake news is real news. I'm Barrington day. Thurston from the anion? And also. Mother. You're listening to the civil liberties minute with ACLU attorney Bill Newman in this sense until recently few people would have referred to the mainstream media as quote fake news. Sure people had different views about different networks in anchors. But on the whole newsgathering and reporting prior to the ascendancy of Breitbart, and FOX and Trump was a highly regarded profession and journalists were respected. That's changed Trump and authoritarian governments around the world have branded facts as fake news. If the reporting does not toe the party line and support the government the rebranding of the first amendment in America and its effects around the world is ingenious public relations. That is also deeply disturbing and highly dangerous as Shaheen Pasha a journalism professor at the university of Massachusetts recently wrote quote countries accused of genocide and unspeakable violence against their own people. Are using the concept of fake news made popular by this US administration to mask their atrocities and punish the journalists. Trying to bring these horrific acts to light that should trouble us as Americans. Indeed, it should the civil liberties minute is made possible by the ACLU because freedom can't protect itself.

ACLU Shaheen Pasha Trump America FOX Bill Newman Thurston Breitbart US attorney university of Massachusetts professor
"aclu" Discussed on ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"aclu" Discussed on ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

"Can taxpayers be forced to pay for religious schools? I'm Bill Newman. And this is the civil liberties minute some rural areas of Maine lack of public high school and a state law permits parents at taxpayer expense to send their kids to secular private schools and not overtly religious ones, but to Christian schools have sued to require the state to pay for students to go to their schools where the curriculum in every discipline is quote Christ-centered and quote Biblically based even in math and science the goal of the school. According to its website is quote to provide students with essential opportunities to actively pursue God's plan for their lives. The American Civil Liberties union and Americans United have moved to intervene that is to become participants in that federal case, the reason according to Zachary Haydn legal director of the ACLU of Maine is quote, main state and federal courts have consistently held that the states will. Law is constitutional because taxpayers cannot be required to pay to teach children. How to pray we've helped defend this all four times already, and we hope to do. So again, this case has proved among other things that battles for freedom, including the freedom provided by the first amendment guarantee of separation of church and state needs to be report and one time and time again, the civil liberties minute is made possible by the ACLU because freedom can't protect itself.

American Civil Liberties union Maine Bill Newman Zachary Haydn director
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ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"aclu" Discussed on ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

"Here's a vote for a pro democracy movement in America, I'm Bill Newman. And this is the civil liberties minute voting is the foundation of democracy, but voter suppression has been threatening to undermine that foundation. The supreme court has gutted the Voting Rights Act and state legislatures and officials have engaged in pernicious gerrymandering past illegitimate voter ID laws purged voter rolls. So that eligible voters can't vote limited early voting. So that eligible voters can't vote made inaccessible or shutdown voting locations. So that eligible voters can't vote made required state ID's too difficult or expensive to obtain. So that eligible voters can't vote and in some states like Texas put enormous obstacles in the way of registering to vote for the same reason making the problem worse voter apathy, although voter. Participation in America remained small in comparison with other democracies in two thousand eighteen there was a large voter turnout for the midterm elections, by American standards. Maybe the two thousand eighteen election is the beginning or a resurgence of a pro democracy movement. It's a movement that everyone regardless of political persuasion can endorse. The civil liberties minute is made possible by the ACLU because freedom can't protect itself.

America Bill Newman supreme court ACLU Texas
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ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"aclu" Discussed on ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

"Here. You are nobody I'm Bill Newman. And this is the civil liberties minute, and that's what immigration and customs enforcement ice told Guadalupe Placentia who had been picked up by the San Bernardino, California county sheriff's office and handed over to ice because there was a ten year old court order to appear as a witness issued for someone with a similar name, MS Placentia kept protesting. She is after all and has been for decades a US citizens. She has nothing to do with immigration nothing and the agents in response mocked her and added for emphasis, you are nothing ice eventually let his Placentia go after her daughter showed the ice agents. Her mother's US passport waiter with the ACLU as her attorneys, MS Placentia sued and just recently, the federal government and the county sheriff's department settled her case for fifty five thousand dollars her ACLU of southern California attorney Adriana Wong said quote. San Bernardino county residents like MS Placentia have the right to live and work and raise their children in peace without fear that ice will arrest them without cause and the government should be held accountable. When it violates people's rights this case shows, fortunately, it's still at times the government can be held to account. The civil liberties minute is made possible by the ACLU because freedom can't protect itself.

Guadalupe Placentia Placentia ACLU San Bernardino county federal government San Bernardino Bill Newman California county Adriana Wong US California attorney fifty five thousand dollars ten year
"aclu" Discussed on ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"aclu" Discussed on ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

"Jeff Sessions was the worst attorney general in modern American history. I'm Bill Newman. And this is the civil liberties minute, and that's with the ACLU executive director. Anthony Romero recently said Romero went on to say that sessions was quote in agreeance violator of civil rights and civil liberties who plotted to deport dreamers to discriminate against trans people to perpetuate and expand senseless enforcement of racist drug laws to use religion to discriminate against LGBTQ people to undermine reproductive rights to abandon protections for women subjected to violence, there's more to this list. But our time is limited Romero, then continued quote, the dismissal of the nation's top law enforcement official is a huge step that should not be based on political motives or done to protect the president or his cronies from the law while the constitution grants, the president the authority to dismiss his cabinet members. The Senate must demand that. Any nominee for attorney general commit to not interfere in the special counsel's investigation, and quote, indeed, the Senate must make that demand and stand by no flimflam. No capitulation nothing less that is because today right now, we are engaged in a fight for the rule of law a fight that we must win because our constitutional system is at stake. The civil liberties minute is made possible by the ACLU because freedom can't protect itself.

Anthony Romero Jeff Sessions ACLU Bill Newman Senate president executive director attorney special counsel cabinet official
"aclu" Discussed on ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"aclu" Discussed on ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

"Dr. Christine blazey Ford's testimony was full of bravery, integrity and grace. I'm Bill Newman, and this is the civil liberties minute, and it stands in stark contrast to the cynicism were so used to seeing. So recently wrote the ACLU deputy legal director, Louis mailing who went on to say, quote, we're deeply disappointed in the Senate vote, but this isn't a moment to despair. I saw in recent days of courage that have never before witnessed on such a massive scale, the voices of survivors poured forth in the aftermath of Dr Ford's testimony, daring to shake the foundation of a culture and system that has seen time and time again to be unassailable. We thank Dr Boise Ford for active civic bravery. She unleashed a collective fearlessness among those of us who have remained silent for too long. She spoke with humanity and honesty of traumas that are difficult for many to imagine and did. So on the Senate floor. Before flashing cameras and into a microphone that was no match for the deafening truth in her voice. Dr Boise Ford's bravery represents Louise mailing wrote what and who we can become as individuals. Imagine what change we can create if we strive to exhibit even an ounce of her courage. Thank you Dr Boise, Ford, the civil liberties minute is made possible by the ACLU because freedom can't protect itself.

Dr. Christine blazey Ford Dr Boise ACLU Senate Bill Newman director Louis Louise
"aclu" Discussed on ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"aclu" Discussed on ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

"Wight woman mistakenly believing. She was groped calls police on a black boy. I'm children's book, author j Nolan, and this is the civil liberties minute with ACLU attorney. Bill Newman recently in Brooklyn, New York, deli. A fifty three year old white woman dialed nine one one and reported to the police quote. I was sexually assaulted by child the video taken inside the Bodega show something very different. What happened is this a boy who is black and nine years old dressed in his school uniform and wearing a backpack was inside the store as he turned to talk to someone his book bag brushed against the backside of the white woman Teresa Klein who then call the cops, causing the nine year old child and his friend to burst into tears thinking he was about to go to jail, MS Klein, mitigating the situation bit in a television interview later said she was sorry. This incident is part of a much bigger story. Too often, police departments are used as instruments of oppression for biased callers, a longtime flatbush resident who recorded the commotion outside the Delhi said, quote, you think something like this only happens in the south, but it's all over the world. Yes, it is. It's a countrywide phenomenon and a countrywide disgrace. The civil liberties minute is made possible by the ACLU because our children's freedom can't protect itself.

ACLU MS Klein Teresa Klein Bill Newman Wight j Nolan Brooklyn Delhi attorney New York fifty three year nine years nine year
"aclu" Discussed on ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"aclu" Discussed on ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

"You can say this for the war on drugs in the war on crime. They took a lot of prisoners. I'm Bill Newman, and this is the civil liberties minute and Massachusetts. For example, the prison population today is triple what it was in nineteen eighty. The reasons the increase in the average length of a criminal sentence. Parole is not often granted and mandatory minimum sentences make parole impossible, and prisons are being used to warehouse persons with mental illness and or with substance use disorders. The prison population in Massachusetts and across the United States should and can be reduced by half. This goal can be accomplished with alternatives to imprisonment with pre arrest and post arrest diversion programs with restorative Justice initiatives and treatment and support services and by eliminating mandatory minimums. And by reducing the length of some sentences and increasing release on parole and by stopping the unconscionable sentencing disparities and by not locking up people with mental illnesses and substance. Abuse problems, and let's start by eliminating cash bail reducing the prison population in the United States. Now, two point, three million people by half will require leadership by prosecutors and lawmakers and judges and parole board members to let's agree on this. It's time to end it's past time to end the failed racists experiment of mass incarceration in America. The civil liberties minute is made possible by the ACLU because freedom can't protect itself.

United States Massachusetts Bill Newman ACLU America
"aclu" Discussed on ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"aclu" Discussed on ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

"Can the Trump administration make millions of people invisible. I'm Bill Newman, and this is the civil liberties minute in a two thousand sixteen case, the United States Supreme court reaffirmed that the constitution requires representation in the house of representatives and thus the electoral college to be determined by a states and the country's total population which includes voters and non voters. Children and adults, long-term and short-term residents, citizens and non-citizens alike an accurate enumeration the constitution's eighteenth century word for a census is the prerequisite, but the Trump administration is disingenuously trying to circumvent this constitutional requirement by inserting into the twenty twenty cents as a question about citizenship, which serves no legitimate purpose has not been included in the census for some sixty years and targets immigrants after all, who would answer a question or fill out a form that could cause law enforcement thing, immigration and customs enforcement ice to target you a parent or your child, or even. A distant relative or friend living in your home for possible incarceration or deportation. The answer is no one would do that, which is why seventeen state attorneys general have sued in federal court to stop the citizenship question from being included in the census to stop the Trump administration for making immigrants invisible, and rather to ensure that in America, everyone is counted because everyone counts, the civil liberties minute is made possible by the ACLU because freedom can't protect itself.

Supreme court Bill Newman United States ACLU America sixty years
"aclu" Discussed on ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"aclu" Discussed on ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

"How about a five hundred eighty dollar co pay for your next doctor's visit? I'm Barrington day Thurston from the onion, and also. Mother, you're listening to the civil liberties minute with ACLU attorney. Bill Newman as the executive director of the prison policy initiative. Peter Wagner recently put it a three dollar co pay for a doctor's visit really doesn't sound unreasonable until you learn that. The person paying is earning fourteen cents an hour, which is what happens in the Massachusetts prison system. It's the equivalent of a minimum wage worker being charged two hundred and thirty five dollars as a co pay for an office visit in Oklahoma prisoners at the bottom of the wage scale, earn five cents an hour. And so the required Ford, our co pay for a medical visit is roughly equivalent to a five hundred eighty dollar co-pay outside the razor wire. These co pay requirements often leave persons in prison with two bad choices either do without the medical care or rely on family members who don't have the money to send it to them anyway for their needed treatment squeezing a few dollars from incarcerated. People and from the poorest families puts the health of other inmates, the prison staff and persons outside at risk. It's a terrible system cruel and self-defeating, but most states do impose it on the most vulnerable among us. The civil liberties minute is made possible by the ACLU because freedom can't protect itself.

ACLU Bill Newman Thurston Peter Wagner executive director Massachusetts Oklahoma Ford attorney five hundred eighty dollar thirty five dollars three dollar
"aclu" Discussed on ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"aclu" Discussed on ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

"Shame on Massachusetts Governor. Charlie Baker, I'm Bill Newman, and this is the civil liberties minute the Massachusetts state Senate as part of its budget included provisions that would have guaranteed basic rights. And I mean really basic rights to immigrants in the state by telling law enforcement to not ask people about their immigration status and instructing them to not collaborate with immigration and customs enforcement ice, in essence, to stop acting as voluntary immigration enforcement agents. It's an unfunded mandate something they have no legal obligation at all to do, but the house budget did not include those provisions. So as is customary, the two budgets went to a conference committee to be reconciled. And when the budget came out of the committee, those provisions had been disappeared, which is apparently exactly what governor Baker wanted rose. The executive director of the ACLU of Massachusetts said in response that governor Baker has abdicated his responsibility to public safety. And chose to deny immigrants even the most basic and narrow due process protections that makes everyone in Massachusetts safer. Make no mistake rose went on the decision and tries the politics of fear and silences the politics of hope and compassion. This is disgraceful decades from now. History will judge how Massachusetts's leaders treated immigrants. At this time. The civil liberties minute is made possible by the ACLU because freedom can't protect itself.

Massachusetts governor Baker Charlie Baker ACLU Bill Newman rose executive director