35 Burst results for "ABE"

Will Rep. Mike Gallagher Devote a Hearing to TikTok?

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:46 min | Last week

Will Rep. Mike Gallagher Devote a Hearing to TikTok?

"Was possible to hold a hearing with your democratic colleagues, will you devote a hearing just a TikTok because it seems to me that when very responsible teachers are not aware of the threat bows by TikTok, then lots of Americans aren't or they're churning it out or they're saying, what's the big deal I'm on Twitter a lot. And it's just so completely different. Will you be devoting a hearing to TikTok? I think we will. One thing to flag. Kathy McMorris Rogers on the energy and commerce committee is actually going to have TikTok CEO before her committee. Basically, any legislation on TikTok. So I have the bipartisan bill to ban TikTok. It's referred to the house foreign affairs committee, but energy and commerce also has a piece of this jurisdiction. So we just need to make sure that E and C and foreign affairs and the select committee on China are all on the same page in terms of both hearing oversight as well as moving forward on legislation. And so one option would be for us to partner with the NC and with foreign affairs on a joint hearing or after they do their hearing or around the same time. One thing I've been thinking through is we can have a hearing devoted to TikTok, but teased out some of these bigger issues at play, right? So for example, in my opinion, it's not just enough to ban TikTok or force a sale. You also need to have a bigger proactive strategy for how we share data across borders with free world countries that we actually trust. Shinzo Abe gave a great speech before he was killed, where he laid out this model of data free flow with trust. So I think we can do two things. Identify and expose the threat posed by TikTok or really any app controlled by a hostile foreign power. While at the same time laying out a strategy for cross border data flows throughout the free world that actually makes sense.

Kathy Mcmorris Rogers Energy And Commerce Committee House Foreign Affairs Committe Twitter NC China Shinzo Abe
Suspect charged with murder in assassination of Japan's Abe

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 3 weeks ago

Suspect charged with murder in assassination of Japan's Abe

"A Japanese court says prosecutors have formally charged the suspect in the assassination of former prime minister Shinzo Abe with murder. Tetsuya yamagami was arrested immediately after Abe was shot, while giving a campaign speech in July, prosecutors say a mental evaluation found he was fit to stand trial. Police say yamagami told them, he killed Abe, because of his apparent links to a religious group he hated, some Japanese have expressed sympathy for yamagami, especially children of a followers of the unification church, which is known for pressuring adherence into making bigger donations and is considered a cult in Japan the probe also revealed years of cozy ties between Abe's political party and the church. I'm Charles De Ledesma

Japanese Court Yamagami Prime Minister Shinzo Abe Tetsuya Yamagami ABE Unification Church Japan Charles De Ledesma
Tyler Bowyer Talks Losing the House to a 'Compromise' Candidate

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:59 min | Last month

Tyler Bowyer Talks Losing the House to a 'Compromise' Candidate

"Us, Tyler Boyer, who runs turning point action. It's good to see you. Also one of the one 68 who ronna says I only talk to the one 68. That's what she said. I don't know if she's talking to you though. One 67, it was 77. Confirmed. I mean, look, again, we've talked about this at length, prior to Christmas. You know, this is a big deal. This leadership race and there's only a 168 people, you know, that represent the states and territories who call the shots for the Republican Party at the national level. And I want to reiterate something for a lot of people because a lot of people are like, oh, well, the RNC doesn't matter, now there's a lot that matters. There's a lot that matters to the RNC. That is that is the call point where the strategy and the prioritization of how we win. That's where it all starts. And if you don't have an RNC that's functioning on your behalf, that is smart that is focusing on the states that we need to absolutely win first presidency, and then our most important federal races. We're going to lose. We're going to lose the entire country. So we're monitoring two things. At once, we are monitoring the RNC race that's happening on one 27, right? Is that correct? Yeah, that's correct. The 27th. 24 days. And then also right now, the Speaker of the House race, which is going to put the house into suspense, which they're doing roll call and I think Andy Biggs has ten votes. So there's a lot more people that are defecting from Kevin McCarthy than people would have imagined. This puts it into now conference and therefore there could be a uni party speaker right Tyler. This is a real thing. In fact, I got a text from a hill staffer where he said, now there's a legit possibility, the House majority is eliminated. This is from a house staffer. He says that deals are already starting to get cut to try to bring someone like Liz Cheney to become Speaker of the House.

RNC Tyler Boyer Ronna Republican Party Andy Biggs United States Kevin Mccarthy House Tyler Liz Cheney
The House Speaker Apocalypse

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:58 min | Last month

The House Speaker Apocalypse

"House of Representatives is about to go into recess and the votes they are going one by one by one. So there have been 5 Republicans that have said they are not going to support Kevin McCarthy. And so Kevin has a couple options. I based on all of your emails and our audience, you guys have a very negative view of Kevin McCarthy. And I generally understand the skepticism, the apprehension, and the cynicism towards all Republican leadership. I've told you guys before. Kevin was very sweet to our turning point USA leaders a couple of years ago and he was actually he's always been very honest. I mean, I don't think he's a movement conservative, but he's also not Paul Ryan. I don't think that's fair. But here's a legitimate thing. Now, Kevin McCarthy has an option. Kevin can keep on negotiating with the house freedom caucus. Kevin can try to go to Democrats to get votes or there could be other people that are going to be proposed for Speaker of the House. There can be Jim Jordan. There can be Justin amash. There can be Evan kinzinger. There can be Liz Cheney. And you might say, oh, well, what Republicans will vote for those people? All you need is a few. Democrats would consider it a massive accomplishment right now to be able to block all investigations into mayorkas into Biden by getting a uni party type speaker. And so Democrats right now, they know they're not going to be able to take back the house. That's what I'm saying. People say, Charlie, Democrats are going to take over the house. That's not what I've said. I say Republicans could lose it. That's a completely different thing. So Democrats right now, because Democrats understand power and Republicans were still learning. We got a lot of Machiavelli still to read. Democrats will enthusiastically go for a compromise candidate, all of them, basically, if they could pick off 5 Republicans. That would mean no oversight of any agencies. That would mean no oversight of Google, no oversight of Twitter, no oversight of the FBI, none of it. And

Kevin Mccarthy Kevin House Freedom Caucus Justin Amash Evan Kinzinger Liz Cheney House Of Representatives Paul Ryan Mayorkas Jim Jordan USA Biden House Charlie Google Twitter FBI
Abe Hamadeh on His Lawsuit Against the Tainted Arizona AG Election

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:44 min | Last month

Abe Hamadeh on His Lawsuit Against the Tainted Arizona AG Election

"Us right now is Abe hamade who I believe was treated so terribly by the Arizona election system. Maricopa County and others, the latest tally says he's down 200 something votes and his lawsuit is very sharply written and I look forward to an update from him. Abe, welcome back to the program. Thanks for having me on Charlie. Abe, what is the latest in regards to your ever confusing and contentious lawsuit in the state of Arizona? What's going on? Well, just like, you know, Carrie Lake and me were still in this fight. If you look at what happened over the holiday break, Charlie, there is a recount, right? This is separate from the election contest that I want people to understand. The election lawsuit was separate in the recap. Since my race was closed, it was within half a percentage point. It was the closest race in Arizona history. It was subject to a recount automatic recount. We were down 511 votes going into that recount. And now we are down 280. I mean, that was such a huge disparity. I mean, I won over 420 votes. You got about a 190 votes. And Arizona history, a recounts have only altered about 14 votes. This was a 600 vote spread. It was quite stocking. And the reason why is because canal county, another incompetent county, besides Maricopa, apparently they found ballots luckily they were in my favor, but would also that what happened was that they started to discover that these tabulation machines were not counting certain votes correctly. And so, Amy, I don't mean to interrupt, but that's almost a 45% change in the margin differential. And that's just one recount, right? That's just in one way.

Abe Hamade Arizona ABE Carrie Lake Charlie Maricopa County Canal County United States Maricopa AMY
Dinesh Reviews Arizona Election Lawsuits

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:43 min | Last month

Dinesh Reviews Arizona Election Lawsuits

"After a terrible and botched and messed up election in Arizona in November, there were a spate of lawsuits filed by the Republican candidates. Not Blake masters who conceded to. Mark Kelly, but was it Mark Kelly honey? Yes, Mark Kelly. But Carrie Lake filed a lawsuit, a hominidae filed a lawsuit and Mark fincham filed a lawsuit. And these were for the gubernatorial spot. Secretary of State and attorney general. Now, the fincham lawsuit was dismissed. So this is what sometimes happens. You go to a judge, you make a case, but the judge doesn't want to hear it. It could be the case as no merit. It could be also the judges reluctant to intrude on what the judge sees as territory that's sort of outside the bounds of the judiciary. This is the electoral process. For the legislature and the executive branches to work out, we want no part of it. We're washing our hands off the matter. But the Abe hominy lawsuit I'm happy to report was is moving full speed ahead. And in fact, may well be the most promising of the three lawsuits. It's also the case that Abe harmony is margin in that race is a few hundred votes. It's a very small margin. And so a very tiny amount of either fraudulent votes or invalid votes, votes that shouldn't have been cast. Could be enough to change the outcome of that election.

Mark Kelly Carrie Lake Mark Fincham Fincham Blake Arizona Abe Hominy Legislature
Arizona State Senator-Elect Jake Hoffman on the Latest Out His State

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:03 min | 2 months ago

Arizona State Senator-Elect Jake Hoffman on the Latest Out His State

"Us right now is Jay Kaufman. He is state senator elect. Is that right, Jake? You're now a state senator, is that right? That's correct. Congratulations. I didn't know that. So Jake, I was looking at those Queen Creek precincts and they voted very nicely for Carrie Lake. I wish every precinct in Maricopa and pinal voted that way. So Jake, what is the latest in Arizona here? There seems to be a fight around certification. There's a lot of confusing information. Do you think that Katie Hobbs and governor doocy should certify this election? Well, Charlie, thanks for having me on. You teed it up perfectly. There is a lot to still be thankful for. But in terms of this election, we are watching the most incompetent shoddy election that has ever been run in the history of our country, unfold right now. And no, there is no question in my mind that it should not be certified by Doug ducey. It should not be certified by Katie Hobbs, which to me is a conflict of interest regardless. You know, tens of thousands of voters were directly disenfranchised and millions of voters or disenfranchised by extension. And so right now, what we're seeing is, look, this is coming down very explicitly to carry Lake and her legal team, Abe amade, and his legal team, Tom horn, and his legal team, and attorney general, attorney general has an election integrity unit that the legislature set up in 2019 for specifically situations like this and it needs to do its job. Now, they've started, they've done a great job so far of outlining the litany of issues that exist with this election, but they need to pursue this with the full force of the attorney general's office. And I get it. That's politically that's difficult. It's the holiday season, you know, he's on his way out of office, but he has to understand that this is not about a particular candidate or a particular election. This is about the most foundational element of our republic,

Katie Hobbs Jake Jay Kaufman Carrie Lake Governor Doocy Doug Ducey Queen Creek Pinal Maricopa Abe Amade Tom Horn Arizona Charlie United States Legislature
An Election Day Suppression Operation

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:47 min | 2 months ago

An Election Day Suppression Operation

"Bill Gates was asked the question, hey, why does it take ten days to count votes? Play cut 7. Today they're working on reconciling the election day ballots with check ins. They're also counting up all the right in votes and finally their processing the ballots with signatures that have been cured since the deadline of 5 p.m. on Wednesday. That's what election integrity looks like. Oh, she's lecturing us about election integrity. He's saying that election integrity means taking ten days to count your ballots. But again, it begs the question, what changed, exactly? And now you might say, oh, Charlie, what difference does it make? It's not that big of a difference. This is a monumental difference. 200 and 48,000 people voted in person on election day. 248,000 people. How many people were turned away because of the one hour line, the two hour line that started because of this sabotage machine malfunction and failure that happened in the way of voting that conservatives have a preference to vote more than any others. By the way, we're looking at just a half of percentage of results. We're talking about the current tally has Carrie Lake down so slightly. Kerry Lake currently in the tally down 17,000 428 votes down .6%. In the attorney general's race, it's a statistical tie and Abe holiday is down 850 votes. You see, when you create bedlam and chaos with machines all across the valley, people are less likely to go vote. It is an election day suppression operation.

Bill Gates Carrie Lake Charlie Kerry Lake
Recapping Everything We Know About Arizona With Tyler Bowyer

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:05 min | 2 months ago

Recapping Everything We Know About Arizona With Tyler Bowyer

"Boyer is here. Many of you know him from the last, it feels like a long month this last week. It's been a long year this last week. We've been everywhere and I'm telling you what. Again, I just want to reiterate for the entire audience, Charlie. There are only a few states that matter for 2024. We happen to be sitting in what I think is number one or number two. I think it's a really hard call to say that you've got Arizona. You've got Georgia. You've got Wisconsin. Those three states are going to really determine what the future of the fate of the country is going to be in 2024. And I'm, you know, we've been we've been working hard. We've been busting our tail. But I'm infuriated because the national apparatus, the national Republican apparatus has not taken that seriously here in Arizona. They just have it. And so we are now staring down doing everything we can, claw, tooth, nail, everything to make sure Abraham Hamid gets across the finish line. And I know that people are following that very closely. I've been throwing up 304 votes. Right now. Subject to change, obviously. And he's got to win in order to give us any kind of fighting chance for the future of Arizona. He's got to win. And so God bless those we've seen a lot of haters come out, a lot of moderates who did nothing. In fact, they were working against us. Working against conservatives in Arizona throughout this and now it's very clear that they were doing that. And now they have the gall after we are about to win or barely barely lose like a hair lose for Carrie or hair loose for Abe, our hair lose for these other guys. I mean, even Blake was like 2%. Our issue here is that now those people are coming out saying, oh, the Republican Party needs to refine itself. This is Liz Cheney stuff, guys. Let's change. You just got body slammed. If we want to get body slammed like Liz Cheney across the ballot, listen to these people. The heroes of Arizona this week were the ones that were chasing ballots and curing ballots because Abe amade. When he wins, it will be because of the cured ballots.

Arizona Abraham Hamid Boyer Charlie Wisconsin Georgia Liz Cheney Carrie Blake Republican Party Abe Amade
What Constitutes a Family?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:36 min | 2 months ago

What Constitutes a Family?

"So what counts as a family, amazing email from Dana, Charlie, I observed the Arizona state university Jim voting center. And they authorized sororities to bring in ballots for their entire sorority up to 40 people by a single person. Because they assume that they all live there full time and therefore they qualify as a family. I recorded this in real time and asked questions and election officials at the sites at its fine. And I was told it was okay because they all lived together in a sorority and they should be able to drop their ballots off as a family. This is a bombshell. Where are the lawsuits? I'm waiting for lawsuits. You should sue on this in particular. Now, in certain states, housemates are legal for ballot drops, but is that really what considers to be as a family is housemates? That's a stretch. By the way, how many of the members of the fraternity and sorority are actually living on site? Are they members of the sorority or are they just there? And obviously, if they're a sorority at ASU, they're very pro abortion. As I've said, I have recorded this in real time in my book, and I will email you the details if possible. So they just go to every single sorority and ballot harvest around this. And we have footage after footage after footage after footage of people just dropping off piles of ballots. It's funny, we did the entire movie 2000 mules. And they didn't stop their nonsense, but our side got more cynical. It's just, we need Abe to get across the finish line, don't we?

Arizona State University Jim V Dana Charlie ASU ABE
Charlie and Producer Andrew Talk Voter Disenfranchisement

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:24 min | 2 months ago

Charlie and Producer Andrew Talk Voter Disenfranchisement

"So Andrew, I tweeted and I am now of the opinion that looked the rules of the rules and if you're able to ballot harvest, then we need to do this. I mean, look, we are not going to just accept this below average depressing result. First of all, I think Carrie Lake needs to fight this thing to the bitter end legally. It is so wrong what happened in Maricopa County and we support her completely and totally in this. And it's been very interesting Andrew. The media has actually been very quiet in kind of how they've been talking about this. And I'm sure that's going to change. But I think even deep down the media knows that there was a legitimate voter disenfranchisement and suppression that happened in Maricopa County. One in 5 voting centers went down on election day. Listen, I, you know, I'm usually pretty skeptical about the legal challenges. I think I've been a little bit jaded after 2020 and everything that we went through in that cycle. I think there's a really compelling case to be made in Maricopa. And I think, you know, again, no hopium here, it's an uphill battle any time you say, hey, let's run it back. Let's do this election again. I think there's a really, really compelling argument just given the scale given the number of testimonials. I mean, we have that clip that we could play for the audience here. I mean, it's amazing. And if you guys have that story, go to defend democracy AZ dot com that's defend democracy AZ dot com. Your stories are going to be taken down for possible affidavits and a legal battle that it's going to play out in Arizona. People are asking us how they can support the potential legal bills that are going to come with this legal challenge in Arizona. Just go to Carrie Lake's campaign. I know they're getting that ready right now. But yeah, I mean, it's a really compelling case, Charlie. When you have 70 voting polling places that are not able to tabulate ballots on day of, that's going to disenfranchise overwhelming majority conservative voters that are going to go Carrie Lake and Abe holiday. Now, Carrie Lake still down in the thousands, but Abe's down to like 500 votes right now as of as of right now as we're doing this. So you can't tell me hundred votes. Yeah, you can't tell me that we can't find 500 people that got disenfranchised that day and that would have made a holiday the next attorney general of Arizona.

Carrie Lake Maricopa County Andrew Maricopa Arizona Charlie ABE
How Is It Possible That Kari Lake Lost in Arizona?

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:32 min | 3 months ago

How Is It Possible That Kari Lake Lost in Arizona?

"There are several developments in connection with the midterms that I want to talk about very shockingly, Carrie Lake has lost her race in Arizona for the governor and Katie Hobbs who didn't debate and didn't campaign and was acknowledged even our own side even by her own side to be a lackluster candidate somehow pulled it off by what 20,000 or so of votes. This makes absolutely no sense, polls actually showed Carrie Lake leading by ten points. In fact, the whole slate, including Abe holiday for attorney general, Mark fincham, for Secretary of State, all of them were leading. And it looks like fincham has lost hominy. I'm not sure, Carrie Lake has lost. And the question becomes, how is this really possible? What's really going on here? I don't know if I have the full story. One part of the story is voter suppression by the Democrats and by the left. And perhaps by Katie Hobbs, who, after all, is overseeing the election, you have this bizarre spectacle of Katie Hobbs, a Secretary of State overseeing an election which sees the candidate. That goes, this is like being the referee in the quarterback in a game at the same time, but another way to look at it is here's Katie Hobbs, she's the she's the judge of a beauty contest in which she is herself a contestant. It's profoundly stupid. It erodes confidence in the process and all of that is becoming an even bigger and more urgent question now.

Carrie Lake Katie Hobbs Mark Fincham Fincham ABE Arizona
Kash Patel and Sebastian Talk Election Integrity

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:29 min | 3 months ago

Kash Patel and Sebastian Talk Election Integrity

"Back with the legend, the patriot extraordinaire himself cash Patel follow him on true social at cash with a K, we'll talk about his new book in a moment, but we've got to talk election integrity. Florida, millions of mail in ballots, lots of aged voters who vote early, and they get to declare their results, you know, almost before the polling stations close. Other states not so much. So we are two years down the road from 2020, where are we right now? What did the last 24 hours tell you about cheating in America and election integrity cash? Because I know you're on the front lines. So the Florida set up is the perfect juxtaposition. Look, I live in Nevada. We have three and a half million people in this entire state. Florida has 15 million people. There were the earliest to call all statewide races. And there's no issue over there with Democrats saying you'd miscounted, you rigged it, you stole it. They did it because they put election integrity on front. Nevada needs to do that and the rest of the country needs to do that. But what the civics lesson they learned said was it's not the federal government that's going to fix that. It's your state secretaries of state. Your state AGs. That's why people like Abe Hamada and Arizona and folks like Seagal Chad are so important because they are going to change the election law. So they are fair. They are going to change the mail in voting requirements. They are going to pass the voter ID requirements. That's what needs to happen over the next two years in every single state where we carried statewide officers in those positions.

Florida Patel Nevada Abe Hamada Seagal Chad America Federal Government Arizona
2022: The Year the Grassroots Fought Back

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:03 min | 3 months ago

2022: The Year the Grassroots Fought Back

"Last evening, we had a spectacular event with the next governor of Arizona God willing. It sure looks like it's going to be trending that way. Kerry Lake. Carrie Lake is a special candidate. Abe homme was also there, Mark fincham was there, Blake masters, I think, had another event. One of the things I want to build out for you today is how the Democrats are increasingly synthetic we've talked about that. They're increasingly artificial. And how much money they have spent and despite all the money they've spent, they can outspend the grassroots. They can't outspend you. They've tried, but there is something that shows the long-term viability. The long-term health of the conservative movement. That is unlike anything we've seen over the last decade. You see, the conservative movement, America first, maga populist, parents party, pro freedom, pro liberty, whatever label you want to put on. We had a choice. We had a choice post January 6th when every major corporation came after us. When the government decided to go after moms and dads that show up at school board meetings, we had a choice when all of a sudden we had our backs against the wall. We could have given up. We could have just threw our hands up. We could just surrendered. We could have said no more, but instead we started to mobilize. And it's very interesting. It will go down in history. As one of the best things ever to happen to the Republican Party was corporations going woke. Now, corporations going woke, created a baseline, where all of a sudden, the Democrats were able to get unlimited amounts of money with very little effort. So they got very lazy. Democrats were able to get money from Coca-Cola and Goldman Sachs and Boeing and all these major corporations, where Republicans usually used to enjoy support from these companies. Coca-Cola said that whiteness is a plague on society, major corporations are saying men can become pregnant and Republicans wanted nothing to do with it. And so Republicans had to decide what kind of party we wanted to be.

Kerry Lake Carrie Lake Abe Homme Mark Fincham Blake Arizona America Coca Republican Party Cola Government Goldman Sachs Boeing
Founder Rob Collins Tells Us About His Conservative Credit Card Coign

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:15 min | 3 months ago

Founder Rob Collins Tells Us About His Conservative Credit Card Coign

"Joining us now is rob Collins from coin as many of you remember. We really partner with coin and they have a waiting list very long, which is a great problem to have. Rob, welcome back to the program. Give us the update from coin. So we continue to grow. We launched being in May, exceeded our expectations. Even our lofty goals, and we've been onboarding customers since July, the experience has been great. We're in both app stores. We're in the Apple wallet. We're getting in the Google wallet. And I spent the summer criss-crossing this country talking to patriots and saying, here's what we did with a little bit of money. I need more money. Let's grow this thing. The great thing about credit card businesses is that we don't need cardboard or labor or anything we just need money. And to grow. And so we had an unbelievable summer. The people who stepped forward and said, I really believe in the vision. You know, a conservative credit card that will not only push back and organize conservative commerce to have a voice in every boardroom in America and reorient boardrooms in America, but also build up the conservative movement with charitable donations to conserve great conservative causes. Please, can I invest? Can I help you out? And like I said, I spent the summer raising money and we had an unbelievable success. And every day, our membership goes up, the number of cards that are out in circulation continues to grow. We're doing a big push right after the election, because I know everyone's really focused on the elections, but our customers are. The email and call us about it. But we're not political. We're just trying to make sure there's a conservative voice in corporate America through credit cards. So if some of our audience is on a wait list, you guys are working through that, right? Because we got an email every so often. Is that right? Yeah. I know it's frustrating. I hate weightless. Like every other American lists lines, Disney, whatever it is, I don't like them. But we're trying to disrupt a $100 billion 80 year old market. And so we're a startup. So we're growing our customers, our weightlifters have been super patient. We've been trying to tell them our path. We're going to keep talking to them and saying, this is a journey. Listen, I can see the top of the mountain. The path isn't straight. It's not level. But it's right there in front of us. And we just got to keep moving our feet every day and

Rob Collins America ROB Patriots Apple Google Disney
Arizona AG Nominee Abe Hamadeh Discusses Cash Bail

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:00 min | 3 months ago

Arizona AG Nominee Abe Hamadeh Discusses Cash Bail

"Play a piece of tape here. And this is about Illinois. It's not about Arizona, but it's about what will happen if we allow Democrat AGs and these maniacs to get into power. It's a clip of Joe Rogan discussing the elimination of cash bail, play cut 35. They're essentially eliminating cash bail for almost everything dangerous. The law includes secondary murder, arson, so you let a guy's house on fire, get right out of jail. Drug induced homicide, robbery, kidnapping, aggravated battery, burglary, intimidation, aggravated driving under the influence, fleeing and alluding drug offenses and threatening a public official. No bail. No bail. Now, I'm not saying that's happening in Arizona tomorrow, but it is a theme, isn't it Abe if we let down our guard, we allow people like Hayes and these marxists to take over all of a sudden you get ideas like that. Absolutely. And we already have one at DA George Soros prosecutor here in pima county actually down in Tucson. And that's exactly the policies that they're implementing so quickly. There's also very important county attorney race America county. I encourage every Republican to vote for Rachel Mitchell because her opponent Julie gungal would bring those type of views and same with my opponent Chris mace, but look at every single city that's implemented ending cash bail Charlie. It's literally turned those cities into less safe. A lot less safe and what you're seeing right now is it turns them into Gotham and chaos and misery. So New York, Portland, San Francisco, every single city that's actually implemented these policies have turned them to hell holes. So I don't know why Illinois wants to bring that on, but you know, I think this is exactly why there's going to be a huge push on November 8th. Look at even new yorks and play Charlie. I just saw that poll at Trafalgar poll today that actually had Lee zeldin up. And if you're looking at penry, Michael Henry, he's running against letitia James, you know, who's a crooked attorney general in New York. I mean, he's, he's right on the cusp. I'm hoping they have a red wave in New York all across the country. We need to elect Republicans up and down the ballot.

Da George Soros Joe Rogan Arizona America County Rachel Mitchell Julie Gungal Illinois Chris Mace Pima County ABE Hayes Tucson Charlie Lee Zeldin Penry Michael Henry New York Portland San Francisco Letitia James
Arizona AG Nominee Abe Hamadeh Talks About Growing GOP Momentum

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:33 min | 3 months ago

Arizona AG Nominee Abe Hamadeh Talks About Growing GOP Momentum

"A very important race happening. In Arizona, Kerry Lake is looking really good. Another poll showed her up 11, but we can not stop. I'm telling you, Carrie Lake, such an important candidate, and she is carrying the entire Republican ticket, and I don't think our I think our next guest will agree with that sentiment. I don't think he'll find that an insult or offensive at all. In fact, I think they're welcoming this kind of energy and this kind of enthusiasm. And joining us now is the next attorney general for the great state of Arizona, Abe, amade, we need everyone in Arizona to vote all the way through the ticket, including for attorney general, Abe, welcome back to the program. Thanks for having me on Charli. Abe, how's your race going? What are you hearing on the ground? It's going great, Charlie. And as you said, Carrie Lake masters all of us right now are working together because we all have that America first new Republican Party movement going on and everywhere we're going are promoting one another and you know the rest of the countries watching what we're doing right here in Arizona because it's quite unusual, too often they consultants and the political class, they run your own race, right? But here we all recognize we need each other. We need Blake masters. The United States Senate in order to secure our border. I need carrier because our next governor to declare an invasion at our southern border. So we all need each other right now. And I feel the momentum and the energy. People are exhausted. They're sick and tired of the lies by the media. And by the Democrats, every single place Democrats have taken power, they've turned our cities and states into misery and chaos. So November 8th will be their day of reckoning, Charlie.

Carrie Lake Kerry Lake Arizona ABE Amade Charli Republican Party United States Charlie Blake Senate
Why the Four Republican Candidates in Arizona Are the DREAM TEAM

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:00 min | 3 months ago

Why the Four Republican Candidates in Arizona Are the DREAM TEAM

"Midterms are right around the corner, not many weeks away, really. And at this point, things are looking really good for the GOP. Really good on the house. And I would say pretty good for the Senate. Now, one of the themes that the left has been stressing is election deniers are on the ballot. There have been various attempts to count the number of so called election deniers on the ballot. I think the website 5 38 sets 60% of Republicans who are running our election denies. I mean, all this means is that the themes of 2000 mules and concerns about the 2020 election have become quite mainstream in the Republican Party. And not only in the Republican Party. If you've seen surveys by Rasmussen another, as you've seen that there are fair number of independents and Democrats who have doubts, questions, and in some cases, outright skepticism about the 2020 election. Now, Arizona, in particular, has been excoriated by the left for rampant election denialism, which is to say that all the four main candidates, Blake masters for the Senate, Kerry Lake, for governor, Abe hominy, for attorney general, and Mark fincham for Secretary of State, have all been, you may say, skeptics about 2020 in general, champions of the movie 2000 mules, in the case of Kerry, of course, attends a screening of 2000 mules, has been speaking outspokenly about it. So by the way, it has holiday and fincham recently when there was a controversy involving Bernabeu, the existing and outgoing attorney general, fincham weighed in and basically goes, listen, I side with true the vote over barnaby on this one. So you have at least from my point of view, a kind of Dream Team in Arizona.

Republican Party Senate Kerry Lake Abe Hominy Mark Fincham Rasmussen Fincham Arizona Blake Kerry Bernabeu Barnaby
"abe" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:31 min | 4 months ago

"abe" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Time in order to be closer to him. Two years later he fell ill and sought a nursed him through his final days. A few years later, sada moved to Nagoya, where she got a job as a maid in a local restaurant. There, she had an affair with the restaurant's owner who convinced her that opening a restaurant of her own would allow her control over her life. In 1936, sada moved back to Tokyo to take a job as an apprentice in a restaurant called the Yoshi daya. The head chef and owner, a notorious womanizer named ishida kichizo, quickly convinced sada to begin an affair with him. Almost immediately, the two became deeply infatuated with each other and spent nearly two weeks straight together in a local hotel. When kichizo finally had to leave to check on the restaurant, sada was distraught. She drank heavily and went to a play to distract herself. The play called new tales of the erotic, featured a scene in which a geisha killed her lover with a knife to prevent him from leaving. According to sada, she was deeply affected by the scene. The next day, she went to a hardware store and bought a large knife of her own. When kichizo returned to sada three days later, she introduced the knife as a prop for erotic foreplay. The two then began experimenting with erotic asphyxiation, using the sash from sada's kimono. Sada and kichizo spent the next week together in a hotel. With sada becoming increasingly infatuated with her new lover. On the 8th day of their sojourn, kichizo told Sara more about his home life, particularly about his children and how much he loved them. The conversation led sada to realize that kisho was deeply devoted to his family. And would never leave them to start a new life with her. That night, while kichizo slept, sada strangled him to death with her kimono sash. She then fell asleep beside him. When she woke up the next morning, she cut his genitals off with the knife. Left a message that read sada and ishida Chi Chi's or alone and then fled. When kichizo body was found the next morning, the story immediately became front page news. started a highly publicized manhunt for sada. Sada suddenly became the real-life embodiment of many of Japanese societies greatest fears surrounding women and their slowly expanding place in society. Particularly with regard to the perceived dangers of unbridled female sexuality. People across Japan reported sightings of sada. One mistake inciting in a Tokyo shopping mall led to a stampede and mass panic. But sada hadn't left the city. She was holed up in another hotel under a false name. Sada's arrest was highly publicized. She immediately confessed to the police and her highly detailed confession was quickly transcribed and published, becoming a nationwide bestseller. Sada was sentenced to 6 years in prison for second degree murder and mutilation of a corpse. She was released in 1941. Following World War II, Japanese society was in complete disarray. Many of the social norms that had governed Japan for centuries began to disintegrate. One major component of this was the advent of greater rights, freedoms and empowerment for women. Including finally getting the vote in 1946. The social realignment also led to a revisiting of sada's case. People then developed a more nuanced view of sada. Rather than seeing her as pure villain. They also saw her as a victim of male exploitation and deteriorating mental health. Writers of the period, including sakaguchi ango, cast her as a sort of feminist hero. In 1947, a novel called the erotic confessions of Abe sada was released. The book portrayed sada as an erotic sadist and was based on her confessions to police. In response, sada published her own memoirs and they became immediate bestsellers. She then spent several years touring around Japan in a play based on her life and crime. For the next few decades, sada's story continued to inspire new films plays and books. Including two famous 1970s art house films called a woman called sada Abe and in the realm of the senses. The last recorded sighting of sada was in 1971. By that time, she was in her late 60s. Living as a Buddhist nun in the Japanese countryside. All month, we're bringing you the best of villainy magic and mystery. Tune in tomorrow for another of our favorite episodes. Special thanks to Liz Kaplan, my favorite sister and co creator. Talk to you tomorrow.

sada kichizo Sada sada Abe kisho ishida Chi Chi Tokyo Nagoya Japan Sara sakaguchi ango Japanese society Liz Kaplan
"abe" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

03:02 min | 7 months ago

"abe" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"Govern Japan for years after his death. By Tobias Harris, Harris is a senior fellow for national security and international policy at the center for American progress and author of the iconoclast. Shinzo Abe and the new Japan. The assassination of former Japanese prime minister Shinzo Abe not only came as a tremendous shock to Japan, but it also leaves a tremendous political power vacuum. Although Abe resigned as leader in 2020, he had not only reasserted his role as the champion of the ruling liberal democratic parties, LDP conservatives. He also formally assumed the leadership of his party's largest faction. Meanwhile, as a highly respected global statesman, he enjoyed a bully pulpit through the domestic and international media, a powerful tool to influence Japan's policy agenda. This was never more clear than in February when he used an appearance on a Sunday talk show to raise the possibility of nuclear weapons sharing with the United States. Over the first 9 months of prime minister fumio kishida's tenure, Abe appeared determined to force kishida to defer to his policy ideas. A sizable victory in Sunday's upper house election could help kushida's stature grow. But it is not guaranteed that he will be able to consolidate power among the LDP's factions by himself, particularly as the shock of Abe's assassination fades and the public remembers its growing discontent over kishida's handling of rising inflation of household Staples. That said, after another election in which opposition parties failed to dent the government's majority, the center left constitutional Democratic Party lost seats. Kishida will face little pressure from the opposition. However, while the LDP balance of power after Abe's murder could remain fluid, Abe's policy legacy could be even more secure. Even before his death, his influence could be characterized by the phrase that abbe borrowed from Margaret Thatcher. There is no alternative. While not everyone in Japan or even within the LDP agreed with Abe's vision for the country or policy direction. There have been no better ideas on the table for plotting Japan's course in politics, economic policy and international relations. Abe and his allies managed this feat through a long-term campaign to reform the central government, particularly national security institutions and the prime minister's office, but also economic policy institutions like the bank of Japan, and by reshaping the LDP into a more ideologically coherent top down party that would be more uniformly committed to Abe's goals.

Abe Japan Shinzo Abe LDP kishida Tobias Harris fumio kishida center for American progress kushida Harris Kishida United States Democratic Party abbe Margaret Thatcher government
"abe" Discussed on Between The Lines

Between The Lines

05:36 min | 7 months ago

"abe" Discussed on Between The Lines

"After the Second World War. That was always a dream of Shinzo Abe. Why is that something that Shinzo Abe wanted change to what purpose? Well, I guess to be able to put Japan on the world stage as a military equal. You know, the article 9, which is the piece article, the article that most focus is given to does prevent Japan going to war and in fact having any military forces at all and for a lot on the right and that nationalistic further we said being imposed on them as they say by the Americans. So there's a lot more nuance in that debate, of course, that we don't have time to go through, but it's seen as bringing Japan back to the Japanese and it's much more important that Japan can stand on its own two feet. So for kisha is in an interesting position, he is political basis, of course, is Hiroshima and even when he was standing for the presidency. You know, he made a part of his for him, it's important that we consider a 19 nuclear weapons world, and yet he's also trying to balance this with what Abe was trying to do. Now, of course, with the death of Abe. Certainly, kishida has been talking about pushing on now with constitutional revision. It's not at the top of the list. I mean, there are a lot of other things that the selection has shown that people are concerned about. But given now that he's got three years until the next election, given that he ostensibly has the numbers. Now in the house, if the pro constitutional change parties can agree on some sort of coalition, he has promised a robust debate through parliament, which is a small deviation from I guess what abbe is intentions were. And of course, it has to go to a national referendum. And so there's still a long way to go with that. Whether or not he should have now and the old EP want to now push that through as part of his legacy and use that down the track to get the changes. I guess something we'll have to wait to see. But it certainly there is an option, I think. Just finally, where all reading and hearing about speculation of the motivation of the gunmen, whether he, this was a political act or an act by an individual with a particular grievance that meant he blamed Shinzo Abe for something that had happened in his family. Is it solidifying into a firmer single motivation for you there or is it still swirling around in the realm of discussion?

Shinzo Abe Japan kisha Abe kishida Hiroshima abbe
"abe" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

06:07 min | 7 months ago

"abe" Discussed on Today, Explained

"I mean, there was a really thorough revulsion of the idea of military power. And so, you know, I think there was an acceptance of the fact that, okay, the self defense forces exist where people didn't like it. And how is that changed in recent years? Over the last 30 years, shortly since Abe entered anthropologists in the early 90s. A lot of those taboos have eroded. And some of it is because the public has come to appreciate the self defense forces for other reasons. The self defense forces are really capable at disaster relief and recovery. I mean, not surprisingly given Japan propensity for earthquakes. And so they've been present in some of the big disasters last few decades and I think that really has helped enhance their reputation. But there's also, I think, a realism among the Japanese public that maybe even during the Cold War was not there where Japanese have looked at North Korea's missiles and nuclear arsenal and our cognizant of the threat that that poses. They've, of course, more recently watched the rise of China, watch China's military power and our very aware of that. And I think the last maybe other part of it is generational change. You know, I think for Japanese who grew up during the war, grew up immediately after the war. That's a very visceral feeling about what war brings to a country. And not wanting to see that again. Hey, welcome. Of course, Japan should have a military rather than a self defense force. They should be able to fight with full capacity to defend us and be as strong as armies in other nations. Do not have that visceral disgust at the idea of military power at the idea that Japan should have the capabilities of defending itself from threats in its neighborhood. And that's a big change. And I think there's every sign that that can continue to be a permissive condition in the future for efforts to expand Japan's role, defending itself and also just in regional security more broadly. How is Japanese remilitarization viewed outside Japan in the region? It depends on where you look in the region. I think it's Southeast Asia. Japan has been a partner for a number of countries that have territorial disputes with China and the South China Sea. Has been quietly engaged in capacity building, providing them with equipment, particularly with the coast guard equipment. So generally benignly. And in fact, welcome. And the fact that you're now seeing maritime self defense forces warships passing through the South China Sea more, I think it's welcome. I think certainly Taiwan would welcome a more capable Japan that was more explicitly committed to come to Taiwan today. Of course, then you get to northeast Asia and the picture gets a lot cloudier. South Koreans have been polls in recent years that show that South Koreans view Japan as one of the major military threats that South Korea faces. China, of course, is going to look at changes to Japan's defense policy changes to the equipment it's acquiring and will accuse Japan of arms racing. But really what's shocking, of course, is how long it's taken Japan really to enter the arms race that's already going on in the region. So it's clearly a question of when and not if. So when this dream of Shinzo Abe, you know, to fully militarize Japan is realized. Will that end up being his most prominent legacy? I think you can make that argument, but even bigger than that. I mean, I think just given how much his efforts changed how the Japanese government works. And that you have a Japanese government that is just able to respond to crises conduct foreign policy, basically formulate a national security policy in a much more coherent way and then actually execute it. That ultimately this can be even bigger than you have a Japanese government that looks out at the world in a more strategic way than it used to is determined to play a leadership role in ways that it could not in the past. That ultimately I think is going to be the legacy and the fact that Abe after his death received as many tributes from world leaders as he did and President Biden ordering flags flown at half mast to honor Abe, you know, that's an extraordinary tribute to the ways in which he changed how Japan acts in the world. Tobias Harris, he's a senior fellow for Asia at the center for American progress and he's the author of the iconoclast, Shinzo Abe and the new Japan, which is the only English language biography of the late prime minister. Our program today was produced by halima Shah edited by Matthew collette fact checked by Laura bullard and engineered by Paul Mao zi, the rest of the today explained team includes my co host, Noel king, abishai artsy, Hadi mawa di, miles Brian, Victoria Chamberlain, and a theme the dream Shapiro. We had extra help this week from John aarons, our audio fellow is Tori Dominguez, our supervising producer, is Amina Al sadi vox's VP of audio's Liz Kelly Nelson muse music by brake master cylinder, and Noam hasn't felt we're on the radio in partnership with WNYC. Today explained as part of the box media podcast network.

Japan Japanese government China Abe earthquakes North Korea Shinzo Abe South China Sea Southeast Asia South China Asia President Biden South Korea Tobias Harris halima Shah Matthew collette Laura bullard Paul Mao zi center for American progress new Japan
"abe" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

02:41 min | 7 months ago

"abe" Discussed on Today, Explained

"I'm Shireen ghafari. And I'm Alex heath. We're hosting land of the Giants, a podcast about the biggest tech companies of our time. This season, meta, formerly known as Facebook. It's a company in a particularly controversial and vulnerable moment. Mark Zuckerberg is placing a multi-billion dollar bet towards an imagined metaverse future. Meanwhile, the rest of us are still grappling with what he's already built. This season, we're going to talk to the executives steering meta's biggest decisions. And you'll hear from some of metas sharpest critics, its former employees. We'll explore why Zuckerberg is taking the company in a bold direction, and how Facebook's past will inform its future. Land of the Giants, the Facebook meta disruption, from recode, the verge, and the vox media podcast network. This season is sponsored by clavio. Subscribe for free wherever you listen and get our first episode on Wednesday, July 13th. Support for the show today comes from coda and I'm pretty sure we're not talking about this year's winner for best picture at the Academy Awards. We're talking about a company that wants to help you work from home a little better because we know that you love working from home. You love working while you clip your toenails because no one knows and you love walking your dog while you're in that meeting or whatever it is. Anyway, coda thinks that's all great, but they could maybe refine the process a little bit better. They got a road map for your products. They got remote

Shireen ghafari Alex heath Facebook Giants Mark Zuckerberg clavio Zuckerberg meta Academy Awards
"abe" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

07:17 min | 7 months ago

"abe" Discussed on Today, Explained

"Today explained, Sean Rommel's firm with Tobias Harris. Author of the iconoclast, Shinzo Abe and the new Japan, which is the only English language biography of the late prime minister. Tobias is still in a bit of a state. Shock that I think I'm still working through to be honest. The whole thing's extra shocking because Japan. Japan has some of the strictest gun control laws in the world. Unlike some countries, not a ton of guns. The suspect was quickly apprehended, police say he used a homemade gun. And a little ironic if we're being real because Shinzo Abe's whole thing was beefing up Japan's military autonomy, which it lost after World War II. This hawkish former prime minister who wanted to militarize a conflict of verse country shot dead with a homemade gun by a former Japanese soldier. On the show today, we're gonna try and understand why Shinzo Abe was so gung Ho on remilitarizing Japan and whether his death could ultimately secure his vision. What is becoming clear? What really has become clear in the last few days is just how monumental and towering a figure who was in Japanese politics and around the world. Tobias is our guide. Globally, he was an extremely activist prime minister of traveled the world 80 something trips over the course of his second premiership constantly meeting with world leaders constantly trying to raise your pans, profile in the world stage. It's an honor to have my friend prime minister Abby, Japan. We have many things to discuss. And the tributes that came in from around the world immediately after his death are just, I mean, just is a measure of just how big his footprint was globally. India's prime minister Narendra Modi said he was shocked and saddened beyond words. India has declared one day of national mourning for RB on the 9th of July as a mark of respect for the fallen statesman. No Japanese leader has matched, maybe ever certainly not in a long time. What's his backstory? How did he come to power? With abbe, you have to start with his family. Both of his grandfathers were in politics. His maternal grandfather kishino busque is the one who's certainly more famous. He was a member of tojo's wartime cabinet, including the cabinet to declare war on the United States. Wound up in prison as a suspected war criminal after the war was not tried, returned to politics in the 1950s, became prime minister again. I mean, just this really fascinating figure whose career spanned a lot of years. 18 years after Pearl Harbor, premier kishi, a one time war criminal, links his country's future more closely with the United States. And he really bequeathed to his grandson this vision of removing these post war restrictions, helping Japan reclaim its rightful place in the sun, so to speak. The prime minister of Japan. He very much got that from his grandfather. 19 57. Noble scare, tissue. My grandfather standing right here began his address. By saying it is because of our strong belief in the democratic principles and ideas. That Japan associates. With a free nations of the world. But his father shintaro was also a really important political figure in his own right. Faction leader in the 1980s, longtime foreign minister who Abe actually worked as a private secretary to during those years. And so he kind of traveled the world and saw from his father how to succeed in personal diplomacy. And then also tragically died young just before really, he was due to become prime minister. And so Abe enters politics two years after his father's death, inherits a seat. And is kind of helped along as sort of sped along in his career because his father had so many people who were loyal to him, and then wanted to pay favors to his son. And so Abe ended up speeding through a lot of checkpoints and ended up becoming prime minister only 13 years after entering politics, which is very unusual. Yeah. And he admitted himself that he was not ready for it, that he hadn't had enough seasoning. He hadn't done enough of the jobs that would have prepared him to be prime minister. And his first premiership is just an absolute mess. I mean, it just relied on bad advisers. His judgment wasn't good. And he just one thing after another ends up leading the LDP to a big electoral defeat. Unthinkably irresponsible. A dereliction of power, government, surrendered. Or phrases used in the Japanese press after the surprise resignation of prime minister Shinzo Abe. In 2007, it looks like his career is over. Resigns also happened to be suffering from an attack of his chronic digestive ailment. And yet somehow, over the next couple of years, returns to political activity once again becomes sort of the leading conservative reinvents himself as someone who had an economic plan for Japan and by 2012 is back at the top of the lbp becomes prime minister again and really has an opportunity to put his vision for a new Japan forward. And what is that vision? The vision really is to a great extent what he inherited from his grandfather. This belief that post war institutions, the constitution that the U.S. introduced during the occupation years, because of those institutions, Japan had been constrained from defending itself from playing a fully active role in the world as a great power. From being a regional leader from being a global leader on a number of different issues, and some of it was institutional that he felt that the Japanese government pre 1993 power was too diffuse. You didn't have a strong executive. If you didn't have a prime minister who could say this is what I'm going to do and then actually be able to follow through on it, power was there were way too many veto players. So part of it was just centralizing power, concentrating power in the hands of the prime minister. Some of it was just building new institutions that would enable the prime minister to make foreign security policy as never before. And some of it was strengthening Japan's economy and finding a new growth model and finding a way out of long-term economic stagnation. By 2012, he had fixed that. He had a solid group of economic policy advisers and had a clearer sense that there was no way to talk about a stronger Japan, Japan is a great power again. In the first rank of nations, if Japan hadn't fixed its economic problem. So

Japan Shinzo Abe Sean Rommel Tobias Harris Tobias prime minister Abby kishino busque tojo Abe premier kishi gung Ho shintaro cabinet Narendra Modi India U.S. abbe prime minister Shinzo Abe Pearl Harbor chronic digestive ailment
"abe" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

01:37 min | 7 months ago

"abe" Discussed on Today, Explained

"What is up people of the Internet? I'm marques brownlee, AKA mkbhd. And I just want to quickly tell you about my podcast waveform. So I've been making tech review videos on YouTube for over a decade and through the years, I've gotten my hands on some pretty cool jaw dropping tech. On waveform, along with my co host Andrew manganelli, we take a more in depth look at some of the most recent bleeding edge tech out today. We cover the crazy stuff that you don't see every day like camera robot arms and rollable TVs. But we also covered the everyday tech like smartphones, laptops, and the influx of EVs that seem to come out. What feels like every other week. All that stuff. So if you want to stay up to date with the latest tech and Internet news, you can find us on Spotify, Apple podcasts, or anywhere you listen. See you there. One week ago the most influential Japanese politician since maybe emperor Hirohito was assassinated. Tonight, the assassination of former prime minister Shinzo Abe shocked not just Japan, but the world. Shinzo Abe was killed while campaigning for his LDP, the liberal Democratic Party, which days later gained a super majority in the Japanese parliament. Prime minister fumio kishida pledged to continue working on Abe's legacy. I'll work on challenges that Abe could not solve on his own. The election win could be key in realizing Abe's ultimate vision for Japan. He wanted to make the Japanese state better defending itself. He wanted to build a proper national security establishment. He wanted to lift the restrictions on what the Japanese military could do, both just to defend Japan, but then also to work in collaboration with the United States and with other countries. Shinzo Abe's call to arms

marques brownlee AKA mkbhd Andrew manganelli prime minister Shinzo Abe Abe Japanese parliament Prime minister fumio kishida YouTube Hirohito Shinzo Abe Spotify liberal Democratic Party Japan LDP Apple United States
"abe" Discussed on Mike Gallagher Podcast

Mike Gallagher Podcast

03:32 min | 7 months ago

"abe" Discussed on Mike Gallagher Podcast

"And incidentally, does anybody know if you're Japanese or you're fluent in Japanese affairs? Is it shenzhou Abe or Abe Shinzo? Did the Japanese have that tradition of kind of inverting the names? Because some cultures and languages do that. But Biden's statement calls him abbe Abe Shinzo. Everywhere I've always known him to be shin so Abe. Tell me The White House didn't make that kind of an error. Please tell me that they aren't so incompetent that they don't know the proper usage of the former Japanese prime minister's name. I mean, honest to goodness, you can't make this crap up. It's like that we're living through an episode of veep nonstop. It's on a loop. And if you don't believe me, warning language warning, lots of adult language, but it's one of the funniest TV shows in the history of TV. And it's called veep starting the brilliantly funny Julia Louis-Dreyfus on HBO. And that's what this is like. Kamala Harris babbling? Joe Biden's wife telling him say God bless America. Say God bless America. God bless America. It's like the scene from Christmas vacation. With remember aunt, whatever her name was at the dinner. Am I supposed to say the blessing? Say the blessing. There's Joe Biden's wife. Say God bless I caught on Mike. Say God bless America. I'm supposed to say God's God bless America? Boy oh boy. And everything incidentally that we're seeing as shin so Abe except for the Biden White House. Here's the Biden statement on the assassination of the X prime minister. I am stunned outraged and deeply saddened by the news that my friend Abe shinsu, former prime minister of Japan was shot and killed while campaigning. I thought it was Shinzo Abe. Do you think they got it mixed up? Yuri tells me that Shinzo Abe is the preferred international translation of the name into English. While evidently, The White House didn't get the memo. And here's a text message on the pure talk text line, Mike, please don't speak, speak. Please don't speak about bad things that will probably happen to you, check out God's word about that. Milano. Well, Milano, I'm just a pessimist by nature. So I figure if COVID is going to get me, it's going to get me. I hope it doesn't. I hoped it wouldn't affect anybody that I know or anybody. And I'm just so saddened that peg and Joey are suffering right now. But again, not in the hospital. They're home. They're just sick in bed. And who knew? Just aren't the peg had to go to Germany. We had to see the passion play at oberammergau. Well, we've got a souvenir we didn't expect. One 806 5 5 mic is our toll free number press one to come on air. Two to leave a voicemail. Text us your comments on the pure talk text line, which is also 806 5 5 mic that's 806 5 5 6 four 5 three, however you get here. Just get here because.

Shinzo Abe shenzhou Abe abbe Abe Shinzo Biden America Julia Louis Abe Joe Biden White House Kamala Harris Abe shinsu Dreyfus HBO Mike Milano Yuri Japan peg Joey
"abe" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:43 min | 7 months ago

"abe" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"In the east of the Democratic Republic of Congo has deep roots in the past, making for a worrisome future in the region. The second Congo war the so called great war of Africa lasted nearly 5 years, starting in 1998. It involved neighboring Rwanda, Uganda, Angola. Perhaps as many as 5 million people died in eastern Congo, mostly of war related hunger or disease. Today, more than a 120 armed groups prowl the region, some with political aims, most just bandits in it for the mineral wealth. It's a complicated picture. The militias are often formed along ethnic lines in a part of the world where those cross national borders and evoke terrible memories. Tensions between Congo and Rwanda are rising once again over the reemergence of a particularly ambitious rebel group. Yesterday, the two countries agreed to begin a deescalation process, but eastern Congo remains fractious and dangerous. When Felix tisha Katie, Congo's president came to power after a rigged election in 2019, he said he would bring peace to eastern Congo. John McDermott is our chief Africa correspondent. But perhaps unsurprisingly, that has proved difficult. And why is that? The region's main city Goma is 1600 kilometers away from Kinshasa. Congo's capital, and there are 9 other African capitals that are closer. So it would be hard for any government to get a grip on what's happening there, never mind one. That's as weak as congos. And in the recent months, we've seen that government forces there are in danger of being overrun by just one of the many rebel groups. This one's known as M 23. And tell us about them. Why are they the threat? M 23 is led by ethnic tutsis, the minority group that runs Rwanda today and was the main victims of the genocide in 1994, which was perpetrated by the then Hutu led Rwandan government. M 23 emerged into prominence in 2012 with the backing of Rwanda, according to the UN. And its arrival prompted the formation of a UN force, and those troops together with some international pressure caused Rwanda to cut its supply lines to the groups. And by 2013, the group which had taken quite a lot of territory, including Goma, had splintered and fled into neighboring Rwanda and Uganda. Neither of these countries went after the group's leaders, so they remained dormant for several years, and we think in about 2017 they slipped back into Congo, where they've laid low until the past few months. And so what's happened over the past few months then what kind of headway are they making? They've made quite a lot, if not as much as they did about a decade ago. In recent weeks, they've displaced tens of thousands of people. And they've attacked army bases and captured a little bit more territory. On June 13th, they seized a town on Congo's border with Uganda where they've been taxing cross border trade to get income for their fighting. And while the latest offensive is confined to a small patch of North Kivu, which is one of the regions in the east, there are fears that M 23 could recapture Goma, a city of some 2 million people, and there are further concerns that things could get even worse. How do you mean in what ways could things get worse? Well, the M 23 is one of the better arms gangs of rebel groups in the east of Congo. He has quite sophisticated firepower can shoot down aircraft, which is added weight to accusations that it was behind the shooting down of a UN helicopter back in March. And there's also indirect effects of M 20 three's resurgence as well. So Congo's army has had to redeploy troops that were previously fighting jihadist affiliated to Islamic State. That's a group called the allied democratic forces or the ADF. And perhaps most importantly, the return to prominence of M 23 tragically signals a renewed meddling in eastern Congo by the country's neighbors. They have been doing this on and off for many years due to a combination of a desire to go after rebel groups they oppose and a desire to take control of a lucrative minerals beneath the soil there. And whenever there's more interference in the east, there's a lot more to worry about. And given the history here, how does neighboring Rwanda fit into the conflict this time now that M 23 is resurging? Well, it's a bloody and complex picture. Congo's government accuses Rwanda of once again backing N 23, president Paul Kagame of Rwanda says that isn't happening and lays counter accusations that Congress army is supporting a rebel group that opposes his government. As ever, the truth is quite difficult to figure out, but there's certainly danger of further violence. This week, mister tisha KD told Financial Times that he could not rule out the possibility of war between Congo and Rwanda. And even if it doesn't get to that, whenever there are tensions between the two countries, there's always a risk of ethnically based and more violence and ordinary people getting caught in the middle. And what's your view on all the finger pointing here is mister CKD right to put the blame at the feet of polka? It's difficult to know some people refer to the goings on in eastern Congo as a kind of alphabet soup in reference to the number of rebel groups. To me, sometimes it feels more like a kind of alphabet swamp, there's so many things going on. But I think we can say a couple of things, the first is that mister tissue cady has brought some of the problems upon himself by subcontracting the security of the east of his neighbors. So in 2019, mister tissue carried here at that point was getting on fairly well with mister Kagame. Asked Rwandan forces to come into target some Hutu based rebels in the east. And then after the ADF, this Islamic State affiliate bombed Kampala the Ugandan capital, he allowed some Ugandan troops across the border to attack that group as well. And since Uganda and Rwanda don't always get on. That has also added to tensions as well. And it's perhaps no coincidence that M 23 has reemerged soon after Uganda moved in. And as if that wasn't simple enough, there's also some concern that the ugandans are now trying to co opt the M 23 for themselves. What does this all mean? We're still figuring out, but the point is clear that mister tissue cady came in promised peace but hasn't done much to deliver it himself. He's relied on others who now seem to have turned against them. So essentially, mister tissue has asked other countries to help suppress rebels on his own territory, which in turn has stirred the alphabet soup. We have the rise of another even deadlier group. Where is this all going? Do you reckon? Well, Congress president mister cicchetti is once again trying to subcontract his problems. A couple of weeks ago, he authorized the deployment within the east of a Kenyan led force, and there's no way that the Congolese state can provide security if it's constantly relying on outsiders. Mister Schuster has to try as hard as he can to clean up troops that are notoriously brutal, notoriously corrupt, often selling their guns to the armed groups that they're supposed to be fighting. Ultimately, he's going to make good on that promise

Congo Rwanda Goma Ugandan Felix tisha Katie Rwandan government UN North Kivu John McDermott Africa Kinshasa Angola president Paul Kagame Congress army ADF army mister tisha KD east of mister Kagame
"abe" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

01:39 min | 7 months ago

"abe" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Must be an enormous shock. And in your article this morning, you quote a viral tweet, Japan is no longer safe and peaceful. And as you mentioned, abhi Shinzo was speaking to a crowd without barriers and politicians in Japan generally travel with far less security. Do you think that will end in the wake of prime minister Abe's assassination? What do you think the impact of this will be on Japanese politics and how politics is conducted in Japan? It's still early days and it's hard to say exactly how this will ripple through Japanese politics and Japanese society. But I think it's clear that this is going to reshape the country far beyond this weekend's vote or the question of how politicians meet with their constituents. I mean, I think, of course, we will see more security and a tighter environment around those events. But I think fundamentally, as that tweet suggests, this has really fundamentally shaken some assumptions that people in Japan held dear. This sense that Japan is an oasis of stability and a nation free of gun violence of this kind. And I think those assumptions will clearly change in the wake of this assassination. The bigger question is where those changes lead. Japan is a place that historically speaking has been transformed by large external shocks, whether they're natural disasters, tsunamis and earthquakes or geopolitical disasters or the Second World War, external shocks have a way of transforming the system here and really profound ways. And I think there's a good possibility that our visions of assassination will come to be seen as one such shock. All

Japan abhi Shinzo Japanese politics and Japanese Abe
"abe" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

03:55 min | 11 months ago

"abe" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"ABE Atlanta amplifying Atlanta This is 90.1 From NPR news this is all things considered I'm wanna summers And I melted Chang All week we'll be getting to know some of this year's first time Grammy nominees And our series begins in a private club in the basement of a fancy hotel right in the heart of West Hollywood Yeah Hi are you with sweeties The rapper sweetie hangs out here pretty regularly And she invited us here on a recent afternoon Hi Hi Elsa Nice to meet you Nice to meet you Oh my God you're welcome Amazing Sweetie's wearing these glittering necklaces and bracelets with her white tracksuit She leads me to one corner of the club where there's a mini bowling alley Wait so you bowl With my nose Can I just I was gonna say like how do you stick these nails into the holes of the bowling ball Oh like Grammy style Yep How many inches do you think one of your nails is About two and a half What about They can be weapons but I use them for good Yeah this is like the back scratcher nails Oh Nice Saweetie's got two EPs of original songs out and a handful of singles No album yet but she is already nominated for two Grammys best new artist and best rap song for her collaboration with Doja Cat best friend She a real bad bitch got her own money She don't need no on a dance floor A lot of her music is explicit We're gonna be playing some cleaned up versions which can still be suggestive Despite all the recognition suites getting today she told me that as a kid she didn't see herself becoming a performer At a speech impediment when I was a kid and I wasn't always as confident with talking because of just you know the jokes that came with being a stuttering child So my cousins would call me stuttering Stanley But rapping has made me become a better speaker Really Because when you're rapping you have to get your message across and if people don't understand what you're saying then your message isn't heard Is that my bestie in a tight seat should blow out a skin on town Look up what a T at the end I'm a hyper every town and my mother She been dancing Sweetie's first fell in love with rap as a teenager staying up late to write rats in a pink notebook And her career started to take off when she began freestyling in her Toyota Corolla sport and posting the videos to social media Can't stop won't stop get guap ten white toes in them toy flip flops manic kids and pedicures I'm always tip top when they say I'm not hot all these lies need to stop 'cause I'm icy my she went viral and four years ago signed with a major label But she says success has come at a price The reason why I wrote so well during those freestyle days I mean yeah I wasn't making that much money but I felt more creative because I had all this time on my hands Yeah I be with a boss to be touching for my vibe you could feel it in my energies I can paper steadily so I can live in luxury cooking in the mirror I think I for what I'm about to do I know that you refer to yourself as icy girl Tell me what does that mean to you Icy girl I see what I mean I see it's like my mentality because when I wrote icy girl it was basically a rap full of affirmations that eventually came true Got a lot of ghosts and me and my team was trying to eat so we grind so messed up we ain't trying to get a bag of weed I'm trying to get a bag of weed put it in my savings and invest in the right companies My dream is.

ABE Atlanta NPR news bowling West Hollywood Chang Grammy Grammys Atlanta Stanley Sweetie Corolla Toyota
"abe" Discussed on Longform Podcast

Longform Podcast

04:57 min | 1 year ago

"abe" Discussed on Longform Podcast

"And were you sort of living up there? I wouldn't say that. I rented a room in a house on the reservation for periods of time sometimes a week sometimes a month, you know, but then I would come home to New Mexico. You write that the story and reporting the story and working on the story changed you, in any stories probably going to change you, but you specifically say it changed you. I'm paraphrasing here, but change your outlook also changed the way you write. And I'm wondering if you can elaborate on that. How did this story in particular change you and the way you write? I don't know that I have a succinct answer to that. We got time. Yeah. Partly, there's a lot of characters in the book. There's some people have said that they might find it hard to follow, you know? But that's intentional to have a lot of characters. It was very clear that he was in favor of the book, thought it would be in his words a good story and wanted it to be more fully include the other guys. And in terms of how to write how I wrote, it's something that I was trying to allude to earlier. And it's just trying to write in a way that feels like what it feels like to be there and to be welcomed there and to just tell the truth about that from the heart. To try to not be thinking about the journalistic world that you and I spend a lot of time and to just be thinking about this community and how things are some people who have read the book have said they find these guys stories inspiring. I certainly do. And I think that part of the reason is because they keep overcoming obstacles. They keep overcoming adversity. But to just find that inspiring and take some inspiration from that. Without really doing some thinking and research about why those obstacles are there, why they keep coming up why that flood keeps coming and to not think about your own all of our own role in that is not adequate. So that's part of the I think that within a larger conversation that many of us are having and thinking about in journalism or immersive journalism, how does it perpetuate certain power dynamics, how can it be extracted? How can it be colonial? How can it not? Those are some of the things that I've been thinking a lot about. And I think that I hope that because I think, again, basketball is a distillation of the larger ideas and I hope that people look at those obstacles that are there and think about it a lot. And what is your ongoing relationship with the community and with those now young men are just men a little bit later and post the book coming out? Our relationship is ours. That's fair, but as a reader, I also do want to know, I'm driven to know if they're still playing basketball. Well, yes, they are still playing basketball. And the epilogue of the book is called Bristol playing. And they're always playing in three on threes and winning, but we'll mess with junior, you know, a certain point in the book said to me, I'm not going to be in the NBA. And it was a moment of clarity when he talked about other more significant dreams. And he wanted to get a college degree. This is the kid who was feeling all these classes in his freshman and sophomore year of high school who everyone won bet against, and he recently graduated with his associates. He got academic honors on the way. He was academic all conference in his conference while playing college basketball. And Philip moliere took a year off of playing and worked on the national bison range, which the confederated citizen couldn't tribes have taken control over and are now managing. And he decided to return to basketball, he got an opportunity to play eastern Oregon university. And he's averaging nearly 18 points a game. He was recently his conference's player of the week. And he also recently beat Montana tech. The team that he didn't play for. Yeah, I was really it was powerful to see these guys. To be welcomed in for part of the time when these guys are outlining their own routes to success in their own terms. Better their own and their individual and also rooted in where they come from and who they are. Well, Abe, thank you very much for taking the time. It's great to see you. It's great to talk to you. Thank you..

basketball New Mexico Philip moliere Bristol Oregon university NBA Montana tech Abe
"abe" Discussed on Longform Podcast

Longform Podcast

06:19 min | 1 year ago

"abe" Discussed on Longform Podcast

"But how long have you been out there? I have been out and moved to Santa Fe, I guess in 2007, but then I've also lived in Wyoming and spent some time in Montana and also back in New York. So yeah, I don't know that it's fair to say, I'm a person of the west by living in Mexico. For those of us who live in New York, you appear to be in west, but you also, I mean, you've written a lot about the west and I'm interested first just what kind of drew you out there in the first place. What attracted you to even just to living in Santa Fe. To moving here? Yeah. Well, gainful employment. You know? I got a job at outside, which is what brought me here. I had been working at men's journal as a assistant. And I applied for a job and got a job editing at the time the fitness and travel service coverage and then eventually got to work on some work stories while it outside. What sort of sent you down the path? I mean, you could have sort of become an editor in state and editor. And what diverted you back down the path. It was sort of you always wanted to return to being a writer and editing didn't appeal to you or what kind of sent you back in that direction. I think that I always did want to write and I don't think that I was at a certain point, confident enough to say that. And I was and I was very fortunate at outside to be able to write some stories. And to work with great editors there. To learn from editor, great editors, like Elizabeth Hightower. And Chris kais, and I also think that there's a certain kind when you're on staff and you're juggling a lot of deadlines is a certain kind of story you can do and then I'm interested more these days by stories that take a long time and are in some manner of sort of amorphous and those are hard to do when you're on juggling top edit deadlines. So I think I always wanted to write and then it took me a while to bloomer and acknowledging that and being confident enough to say that so when you made the leap, do you remember was there a story or a moment where you felt like I found it? I'm doing it. This is the thing I was looking for. Not really, I was outside was very generous, and I had like, I was a contract writer for a year. So when I decided I was going to leave editing, they were very kindly gave me work for so I had a certain amount of words to do and some of that was narrative and some of that was service stories like best jobs and things like that. So I was very fortunate and I don't know if this is your experience, but I think that for me it took a while to figure out what kind of story I'm less bad at. What kind of story I'm drawn to and can manage to do in an adequate way or try to. And I did outside I was drawn to some of the environmental coverage. And that was partly because I was less fluent in some of the sports that outside covers, so I kind of thought I wanted to, and I had studied with Sue halpern and Bill Kevin first journalism class I took in college. So I kind of thought I wanted to write environmental issue pieces, but I didn't really know that that's not necessarily what I'm good at. And it took a little while to try different stories and figure out different ways of writing. So how would you describe now what you're good at? I have what I believe are going to happen. I want to hear what you think you're going to add. Oh, no, you go. Now you have to go first, I might poison the well with my theory. I think that I'm interested by stories that are about people in place and the ways in which history winds through all of our lives and power dynamics. Community and power dynamics. What I really like is when you go and kind of embed in a community that you're not from really putting yourself inside of it and then giving us a portrait of something that's happening inside of a community. Yeah. Story that sort of was really freeing in a lot of ways to us to write about Merlin league baseball team in New Mexico and the Santa Fe Fuego. Yeah, a real favorite of mine, that story. Absolutely love that story for the atomist. It's interesting that the baseball one was one of the early ones because that was kind of, it was on the less serious side. But if I recall correctly, were you already a fan of the team? Is that how it came about? Yeah. Yeah. And what made you think that there was a story there? I think part of it was just a feeling like the atmospheric feeling of being at those games. There was something there. And just the sort of passion that those players had for what they were doing, even all of the very obvious signifiers and odds against them, you know, like they would clean up after the game for the fans and they were making something around $50 a week and were staying at home stays, and they were doing it because they loved it. So there was something with a lot of heart in that. Yeah, we should say, I guess the Santa Fe Fuego was a class a. Like the lowest level, they were the last place team in the lowest level of independent league baseball during that year. Yeah. And so that fact you can have a lot of fun as a storyteller with that fact, but that's just one tiny fact that is a way into a world. And hopefully treat people with dignity and not have too much fun with that fact that makes sense. But trying to tell a story in.

Santa Fe Elizabeth Hightower Chris kais New York Sue halpern Bill Kevin Wyoming Montana bloomer Santa Fe Fuego Mexico Merlin league baseball New Mexico
"abe" Discussed on Longform Podcast

Longform Podcast

04:19 min | 1 year ago

"abe" Discussed on Longform Podcast

"Lammer, happy new year, you guys. Happy new year. Happy new year. Hey guys, 2022. 2022 change is in the air. Indeed, people have already heard that change in the form of our new music, you'll be hearing some more new interludes as the program progresses. But there are actually some larger, more fundamental changes to long form that we should probably address. I'm not sure max I'm not sure everyone is actually aware that in addition to this podcast, long form dot org existed as a website previously, a website that recommends articles. I'm trying to remember how long have we been doing that? First post was April 2010. That long. Since April 2010, we have been posting new articles every single day, which is a lot of articles if you do the math. We posted a letter today on the website saying that we are actually shutting that down. But do not worry. We will continue to do this podcast every week as always. Yeah, podcast isn't going anywhere, new episodes, every Wednesday, but no more long form dot org, no more article recommendations. And I just like to say a couple of things. One is 12 years is many, many more years than we ever thought that this thing would last when we started it. And the reason that it lasted so long was this incredible group of people who contributed to it in all kinds of different ways. We had editors who picked stories. We had writers and editors across journalism who would recommend stuff to us. We had dozens and dozens of recommendations every day. We used to have an app. Do you remember that? We had two apps, man. Two apps. We feel like part of the story here is that we've lived through many eras of the Internet. And long form dot org is I think pretty clearly from a different Internet than the one we are currently living on. And so it felt like time, but man, just an incredible, incredible run so much longer than I ever would have expected. And I just want to say thanks to everyone who was a part of it. Thank you to everyone who contributed and thank you to everyone who ever had an article featured on it. It's how I discovered many great writers, which brings me to a question, Evan, who is on the show this week. This week, I'm very excited to have Abe Streep. And Abe is a writer that I've known for many years. He has written a lot of wonderful magazine stories, many of which were recommended on long form dot org no doubt. He's written for outside for The New Yorker for the atavist magazine where I used to work. And for The New York Times Magazine. And then he took a story that he'd written for the Times Magazine and turned it into an amazing book that came out last year called brothers on three. And just to give you a little background, it's about a high school basketball team from the flathead Indian reservation in Montana and their pursuit of greatness of state championships. They're led by a star whose name is Philip moliere, whose name comes up in Abe and my conversation. And it's also about the whole community and what it's like to be a teenager in that community and in the world in general. And even the complexity of trying to write about it all from Abe and he really invested a lot in this reporting and writing and thinking about it. And I wanted to talk to him about all of that. I should also say the book is about some of the challenges that that community faces, including a suicide cluster at the time, Abe was writing it and some of the kids relationship to that. And we talk about some of that in this interview and I just find it to be an incredibly thoughtful person who approaches his work with a lot of humility and it was a pleasure to have this conversation with him. The show is brought to you in partnership with Fox media. They help us make the show, thanks to them. And now here's Evan with Abe's creep. Abe. Welcome to the long form podcast. Thanks for having me. It's an honor to be here. It's good to see you. You're in Santa Fe, right? I'm speaking to you in Santa Fe. Yep. And I now, I think of you now as a person of the.

Lammer Abe Abe Streep atavist magazine Times Magazine Philip moliere Evan The New York Times Magazine The New Yorker Montana basketball Fox media Santa Fe
"abe" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:59 min | 1 year ago

"abe" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Out of.

"abe" Discussed on Streams of Income

Streams of Income

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"abe" Discussed on Streams of Income

"Friend abe or to lonnie. He is a private-label genius. Honestly i know he wouldn't say that because he's a humble guy but He has launched many brands and helped launched many others and he knows how to get found on amazon which is the key it's all by keywords and he has done it multiple times in his super successful He has partnered up with my friend. Jonathan bricker and they are killing it with private label and helping people do that..

Jonathan bricker lonnie amazon abe
"abe" Discussed on First Encounter

First Encounter

04:38 min | 2 years ago

"abe" Discussed on First Encounter

"I didn't see that coming under. Doesn't see that coming. Abe fell ground under him had crumbled away. He painfully smashed against the rocks and fell down the cliff side. As late in the ground a figure it appeared. Some big fish appeared and said i was dead set. Our land was changing was imbalanced at best. It told me my fate was to rescue the rest for paramedics and scraps have been sacred once that was before rupture firms turn them into lunch. And they lived in temples and that's where they still nast for phrases creatures. Bat rest might test. Well that that's a lot of information really fast but yeah the big face. Abe referred to someone wearing a big brown possibly would mask with a funny expression on it. They looked a lot like milk. Too weird just wanna tell you for imagery sake. You're welcome anyway. Our hero got off. The ground turned into a massive temple ahead of him to giant statue soup kneeling in front of one. Another should outside the temple entrance. Abe quickly ran into the temple with the entrance successful. Abe saw nearby path and head toward. He somehow knew where he needed to go. As abe traveled deep into the forest came across author paducah and then their own society they worked together in harmony. Having constructed elevators path to travel on however the security force farms also nature jail or rather ponytail. Get it. why didn't you laugh. Whatever okay so traveled until they found two separate tubes the into two separate paths one tube to pair omonia ever want to scare vania. Abe stood over and completed his traces. Yep habes really thinking over his options. Abe abe make a choice please. There's no imagery scrabble. you think. What can i talk about the weather. No thank you don't ever work skamania. Okay go go. A finally went down the been youtube. After a painfully long pondering process i had visions of scarab safe in the wild..

Abe youtube one tube two separate paths two separate tubes vania skamania