35 Burst results for "ABA"

"aba" Discussed on ABA Inside Track

ABA Inside Track

04:24 min | Last month

"aba" Discussed on ABA Inside Track

"And we are back talking about tummy time but before we continue with our discussion of tummy. Time let's see. What do we need to do. Oh that's right remind everyone that. Aba inside track is ace approved by listening to the show. You're able to earn one learning credit. All you need to do is listen to the show and then go to our website. Aba inside track dot com slash. Get see us. That's g. t. hyphen c. e. u. s. You're also gonna need to know to secret. Codewords we've hidden in the episode and i'm gonna tell you the first of those now. It is eggs e. g. g. s. eggs. Lots of eggs. Y'all know eggs right and usually we think big chicken eggs right and you can. You can make all sorts of delicious dishes with eggs. Baked cakes scrambled eggs side up. Eggs roller infant around and eggs. Roll your infant in eggs. Yeah they're supposed to be a common allergy. This was my hot take child development class. Yeah are code. Words are inside joke. Oh okay i was. I was trying to fix the sound of on the on the the mixer here but while you guys were doing track inside joke okay. Anyway eggs all right now. I'm going to share a little bit about another study. Looking at tummy time mendez smith at all now mend smith and colleagues certainly referred to the fact that there are lots of ways that you can interest your baby in improving tummy time and certainly there have been other studies that looked at. Hey what if you let your baby watch. Tv you're like look at a screen to an episode one. That's familiar right so you can certainly do that. You can get in front of the baby and hold up a screen and babies will usually lift their heads and look at the screen and then stop crying and enjoy their tummy. Time a little bit more or you could use like auditory. Sensory books is another study with with or even without mother attention though again. When parents are attending their babies babies tend to do a little do better but one of the challenge with infant research is it. It's hard to find a lot of infants to do to be participants in your study. So a lot of the previous studies have only one participant and they also might use items that either families don't have access to or that are actually not recommended for infants invincible. You're staying at ipad screens really so the only way to get tummy time to go well as a screen. Well it sounds like a solution. That's going to lead to another problem. Potentially in mendez smith and colleagues article they researchers wanted to evaluate what if we use. Toys interactions with experimental..

Aba inside ipad mendez smith first one participant one mend smith episode one com one learning lots of
How Rod Thorn's Career Started

Dual Threat with Ryen Russillo

01:30 min | Last month

How Rod Thorn's Career Started

"Rod thorns a hall of famer. He's done just about everything basketball including playing college years in the pros the second pick in the nineteen sixty three draft in the nba through seventy one coach of the sonics. But then in nineteen seventy-three rod your aba career started. How did that start. What was that call like. Well i had been an assistant coach ryan with the new New york nets and we had weighed The saint louis spirits and the first first round of the playoffs The previous year and we beat them during the regular season ten consecutive times. We beat them the first game of the playoffs and then they proceeded to win the next four So they had eliminated us and their coach Resigned and i was offered the job and and ended up taking it Harry wealth man who was at that time the gm of the spirits We've had several conversations and So i ended up taking the job so you had had initially been an assistant though. Correct when when you were with the nets right. That is correct. The kevin lottery was terrific. Coach was our ed oates and we had won one championship and lost in spirits. The next year so. I had been an assistant coach for two

Rod Thorns New New York Nets Sonics Basketball NBA Ryan Harry GM Ed Oates Nets
Lillard scores 50, Blazers rally past Pelicans 125-124

Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

00:41 sec | 2 months ago

Lillard scores 50, Blazers rally past Pelicans 125-124

"Guys see this damian. Lillard scored fifty the trailblazers rally past the pelicans. One twenty five one twenty four so dame hits the game winning free throw time. That gave him fifty. Zion then missed a shot at the end. The blazers rallied to beat the pelicans of the fifty points dame scored twenty of them in the fourth quarter wealth career fifty point game time lebron james the fourth most since the nba aba merger. Pelicans have eleven losses. Now in leading by double digits six loss when leading by at least fifteen points but tame lillard is a show. You just have to make sure you're up late enough to see you will never get the recognition that he deserves until he leaves porton.

Lillard Damian Zion Blazers Lebron James Pelicans NBA
Higher-Order Thinking and Personalized Systems of Instruction (PSIs) in Higher Education

ABA Inside Track

06:07 min | 2 months ago

Higher-Order Thinking and Personalized Systems of Instruction (PSIs) in Higher Education

"You i got interested in the idea of kind of looking at higher order thinking and sort of personal systems of instruction when you yourself were a student and that led me to the question of what was personalized systems of instruction especially computerized ones from beyond. You know i. I think today everyone sort of thinks about all you can do all this stuff online. You learn online. Everyone's an online program. But if you go back maybe fifteen years you know. Maybe even ten years it feels like one of these technologies that couldn't have existed but we know. Psi original work was from well before computers. Were something that everyone had seven of in their house and you know in in the form of a phone so could you tell us a little bit about what. Psi's were like when you were starting out in higher education. You were starting to use them as part of your doctoral program. Sure well can. I use a way back machine to tell you another little tidbit secret. Of course you can do right if we go way back to me being in grade one and then i realized this later that there were reading. Labs and reading. Lab was the self paced set of there. Were these big boxes at the back of our room and you could go through these little reading vignettes. I remember reading about brown bears and things like that. Like that. Just stuck out to me because i love reading about them right like what were they. Where did they live what they eat so forth. And then you would answer these questions and if you'd have to get them all complete and correct and then you could go on to the next one so there was kind of this. It was all mastery based and i realized later this. Psi in like k. Through twelve right like in this really popular back at the time that i was in grade one and you know as students we kind of love this we could go at our own pace and get immediate feedback on whether or not we're right and we keep going on and on and on on these things and there's a little bit of competition among us rate because like you could be finished all of this work in your reading and language arts like whenever it was up to you you could get it all done and then go into something else so that was kind of exciting or are you could help other students in the class so i think that i never thought about it until recently but i think that when i when i was introduced to computer aided psi which was topped by joseph parrot the university of manitoba but this is probably why i love this system so much because it is self paced but the early early psi if you go back to the work of fred keller when he published his seminal article and nineteen sixty eight rate and the journal of applied behavior analysis goodbye teacher based upon a rhyme and he's introducing people to assist them that he's developed and he introduced in brazil as well as the united states. Psi was you know these units of study that you could you know master hopefully in about a week or so and you would go in and you would take a test when you're ready to take the test and then you either pass or you've gotta re study and if you've gotta re study you could go over the task with the proctor or the professor and then you could come back and retake it when you're ready to do so after you know some amount of kind of time out to re steady So if you think about that like things that there's an instructor right like if you have ten units that you have to have students take tests on. How many different tests do you need for them. You know if they get a reset and one you don't just give them the same test you have to have like a whole bunch of questions and different forms of big zam right for each unit so imagine the administration of that right like just can you imagine like panel versus thirty students versus three hundred. What would that be like a lot of tests a lot of grading more file cabinets right basically all the file cabinets right. Yeah file cabinet. Imagine carrying all the tests to and from the classroom and keeping them organnized. And you know. And we didn't have and they didn't have computers back then either right so when joe pair computerized this he actually made it. So that you could go in and you could request a-tast online and this is before point and click okay. This is before we had windows right in the we actually had to learn how to type in commands into the computer. And i never think of myself as somebody who programs but i did. I had to learn programming to be able to do this. Because you have to give the computer commands to get into your account and then to call up a test and then tell it to add more lines if you wanted to add more information to your answer or are you. Talking like a dos. Prompt or more like an old like early. Eighties looking kind of you know unix mainframe mainframe o wow absolutely yeah rob. It's definitely a mainframe computer right. And so so we did that and you know we after you master to test then you could sign on to be a peer reviewer or printer for student who had not yet passed that unit. So i mean think of it right like if you love this stuff and you're and you just go in and on a weekly basis at least on a weekly basis you pass one unit a week or more you can be peer reviewing a whole bunch of them and the peer reviews were great because they were bonus points in the course you and and the final exam where something like sixty percent because it was in person and they that was the quality control you had over the online course was making sure that people were who they said they were and you know that they weren't just doing things open book so you know it was nice being able to pat up though the the bonus points just in case but he bit. But here's here's the track right like when you do that and you're actually going and you're taking your test and your peer reviewing other students test. You're actually

Joseph Parrot Fred Keller Journal Of Applied Behavior An PSI University Of Manitoba Joe Pair Brazil United States Cabinet ROB
Behavior Analyst Creates Resources for Parents and Teachers

Side Hustle School

06:14 min | 4 months ago

Behavior Analyst Creates Resources for Parents and Teachers

"Today's story and expert uses her knowledge to create resources that help parents teachers and professionals improved behavior in children with autism. So i worked on story. I was really impressed by all the things this expert and also her twin sister who helped out a bit did grow her business show. I'm going to tell you about them. Of course but i also realized that a long list of actions can sound overwhelming. First of all welcome to us. We'll school my name is chris. Fellow i'm your host the privilege of making the show for you every single day. I'm thank you so much for being part of it and the day before yesterday. I mentioned that. What i'm trying to do here is get you thinking thinking about ideas as well as help you acquire a mindset the mindset really is critical mindset and taking action those are probably the two most critical things so when i mentioned this list of actions. I was thinking about that. I was like you know variations of this topic or this question. They come up a lot. I hear these questions all the time. Do i have to do social media. do i need to learn about seo. I'm not good on video. Should i just get over it and get on youtube. What do i need to do about advertising and so on and so forth and a lot of those questions are why each week. I'm answering three or four those questions and trying to give you some real specifics. That people actually know what to do and at the same time. I know there's this lingering concern in the background about well. I don't want to be overwhelmed like do i have to do all this stuff so as i said. I'm going to tell you what this person did in the story. Because that's the best way we're gonna learn through stories and examples. But i never want you to think that you have to go out there and try to do everything in fact you're going to be much more successful by figuring out what the right things are just doing those few things anyway. We'll talk about that some more but the story is coming up. Behavior analyst creates online resources for parents and teachers of children with autism. Stay tuned big thanks to our longtime sponsorship station bringing you this episode and so many others completely free if you sell stuff online you know how busy twenty twenty wise. Everyone and their dog was shopping online. Also some cats well get ready for twenty one going to be even bigger and that's why online sellers like you need ship station. No matter where you're selling amazon oetzi. Your own website ship station can make everything just so much easier. Get twenty twenty one off to a great start by visiting ship. Station dot com. Just use our opera code hustle to get a sixty day free trial. That's two months. Free of no hassle stress. Free shipping just gonna shift station dot com. Click the microphone at the top of the homepage and type in the ship station. Dot com enter. Offer code hustle. Ship station make ship happen. Amelia bellefonds found her calling seventeen years ago while she was teaching with head. Start a program that provides early childhood education to low income children and families. She worked with all kinds of kids over the years but one in particular stood out. He was a four year old boy with frequent tantrums and very little verbal communication. Amelia and our fellow teacher wanted to help him so they began researching his behavior and discovered that he might be autistic wanting to learn more. Amelia began studying applied behavior analysis. A scientific approach that can be used to reduce challenging behavior and teach new skills and children with autism. Amelia liked aba strategies because they're easy for non-professionals to learn and can have lasting benefits for the child if they're used consistently not too long after. She started her research. She ended up switching jobs. She wanted to understand more so she decided pursue a master's degree and become a board certified behavior analyst again specializing in working with children with autism. And this is what brings us to the side hustle part of the story. Amelia started a blog called accessible. Aba dot com hoping to share insights to help parents understand more about the field and their child soon. Afterwards around christmas two thousand eighteen. Her twin sister. Diana came for a visit. Diana enjoyed writing so she offered to write some post. The goal of the blog was simply to share information with both sisters working away. They started posting one or two times a week as they built momentum. They increased to two to three times a week. After six months they were posting almost every day looking back. Amelia says she would have started posting daily to the blog right from the beginning. But it's always better to pick up the pace as you go along than lose momentum by slowing down. They started out blogging just for parents but eventually expanded to have a separate log for each of their target audiences parents teachers and professionals altogether these blogs get over forty thousand page views a month they also started offering courses on you to though now they self host courses well sisters celebrated their first sale overtaxed even now more than two years into their business they still celebrate every sale with a text some days. It feels like texting all day long in addition to online courses accessible. Aba also offers three levels of membership per nine dollars a month or ninety five dollars a year members get self paced learning and downloadable content. They can pay a bit more and get all that plus monthly videos and a monthly free product. They can pay a bit more. Still get everything. Plus thirty minute monthly one on one call. Before the pandemic hit the sisters had plans to attend a couple of live events but when everything was cancelled they decided to double their efforts on the website they also put together some of the content they already had and self published a book on amazon called. Aba fundamentals for parents. Finally they're starting to post on youtube as a way to extend their reach ameliorate. Miss that is difficult as the pandemic has been it's also been a catalyst is pushed them to work even harder. They're bringing in around fifteen hundred dollars a month however they've really just started to focus on monetization for most of two thousand twenty. They were focused solely on growing the blog and developing those courses. The pandemic hasn't been the only challenge plus opportunity. They've also had to deal with moving to a new state. Changing jobs illnesses and kits despite the business. Amelia says. they've gained a lot from the experience. There's a feeling of control over the future. they don't get working for someone else. They know that if they want to make more money they have to come up with a better product or offer improve their marketing. Reach a new audience or take some other action one of those things or perhaps all of them is exactly what they plan to do.

Amelia Autism Amelia Bellefonds Youtube Diana Chris Amazon ABA
"aba" Discussed on ABA Inside Track

ABA Inside Track

05:17 min | 5 months ago

"aba" Discussed on ABA Inside Track

"He had fought in world war. Two was in his was in his obituary which again not something that ever came up in any of his published research. That i that i hear that much more. No obituary. no you certainly almost out of that era. So it's an i do. Actually you know. I didn't have any really great jose stories but Kaya was my specialist right. When we're all still working at the center for children's ecb overseeing me when i was still in my graduate program for special education actually and I'd done a thesis on response eruption redirections like the initial work so i had a poster abbott one year. And who is that. Your jack michael. Is there and kaia new jack. Michael and cayo new the research i was doing. Because he overseeing over his oversaw much of the work. I was doing so he had come over and he was very nice and talked about her poster and even that i knew even not not being a behavior intellect program. I knew somebody really made sure to get a picture of him. Standing by the in my current sister-in-law now sister-in-law time there are only so many period cruises in the world the majority of them would be as Except for my brother and not to of all. The children don't have not counting the children's those jobs their bcda's and yet maybe they will be. You're right maybe. They'll all bbc beers so my brother wanted to finance and now he's just rich so just like what are you reading. Skinner is that part of your cult. Talk about co-founded thinking. No let me explain to you later. That was jack michael's claim to fame. I got talked to him as a graduate student. Not even of behavior analysis. So i don't think i said anything intelligent in our conversation but it really exciting. Even then i knew this is important person. Yeah definitely giant for sure And then finally patricia kranz who again passed away right at the beginning of the year. So given how this year has gone. I don't know if it was something that was a i. I certainly wasn't on my radar until you know not too long ago. But she's the director of the princeton child development suit again. Most of you out there listening like that name sounds so familiar If you've ever used the picture activity schedule with you know written with mcclanahan dot with mcclanahan. Yeah that's she. She was the the author that thing that golden girls that yeah. Maybe that's why you're right. It does like brew. Mcclanahan must be wiped time ever busy filming schedule to invent fix your activities schedules or write about the research with them But she was a know so again published research. Y'all probably read the picture activity schedule. Research that Cranston mcclanahan did but she was a real early advocate for better educational services for children with autism. So like way back in the seventies so even pre law studies was looking at. How can we provide better services for for children with disabilities autism..

jack michael center for children Kaya cayo ecb patricia kranz jose princeton child development mcclanahan Skinner Michael bbc Mcclanahan Cranston mcclanahan autism
"aba" Discussed on ABA Inside Track

ABA Inside Track

04:26 min | 5 months ago

"aba" Discussed on ABA Inside Track

"Just out the window. This past year you know controlled. Learning environment is is gone and you know for some kids are older son. I love this. I never want to go back to school events and it's hard to explain to him not everyone likes to learn. Not everybody has a place where they can go not. Everybody has parents who have someone available to help when they get stuck. Not everyone has good wi fi. Not everyone can just sort of get all their work done in three hours and the great i got the data myself. Now hang out in my room. And and you know. I i know i see that i mean. Have you seen that with a lot of the folks who work with the schools. There's no way to sugarcoat guys for me. It's heartbreaking And it's one of those things where if you have some advantages in life your children will be less affected by this absolutely. And if not your your children's educational progress will likely suffer considerably and for the most part a lot of school districts. I support in new hampshire are important very impoverished end You know these. These kids have been out of school. They missed like six months of school and they're in a home situation. That is less than ideal. Whereas i think in a online learning environment where you know at least just from my experience like and my kids are older two they know how to read how to write and do math So they're they're middle and high schoolers right now know. So if i had a kid was learning math facts and phonics and things like that i would be That'd be really frightened. I would be. I would be trying to do. You know you know all the. I'll be brushing up on my Precision teaching in doing timings and things like that and you know And the whole nine yards. And that's and that's because i know how to do that. I know enough to be dangerous. But i know how to do that right. and other families. Probably don't you know at least the families that i support in these communities that are that are largely disadvantaged and so.

new hampshire
"aba" Discussed on ABA Inside Track

ABA Inside Track

03:22 min | 5 months ago

"aba" Discussed on ABA Inside Track

"And so we're going to reflect that in the price And so i thought that was a that was definitely cool hopefully The other you know the people you know Follow that model. Did you guys do any Like live interviews or anything like that. I had a chance to a couple and it was. It was really interesting to try to do that online without talking to i mean i guess being a pastor kinda are used to not getting any audience feedback but when you know that there are people out there listening to you and you can't see them you can't hear them or anything like that it. It definitely is a little bit challenging Yeah you're talking to a black screen. No it felt. Mostly just like doing podcast. I think for us so we did. The thompson. The thompson center conference that way the greater boston. Aba conference that way and then for babbitt we did like a social our kind of thing which was cool. We did have some audience interaction for that one. I attended babbitt and that was really fun. And then jackie was at the western connecticut. Is that right yes. Eight university put on a free conference. I think they may have had grant money for those was specifically on teaching the gaji. Yeah and that one was fantastic. And what i i didn't feel like i lost any aspect of the content and i think the concerns always are you going to lose the social component right and in some ways. It's just never going to be the same because you can't go out afterwards and like hang out with friends and see people you haven't seen in a long time go to dinner but i will say that. In both of those conferences. That chat function was very active. Very lively and there was some great like side conversations. A really added to the Presenters during that time. So i really liked that part. I felt like. I got more out of the talks. By being able to view the chat.

thompson center babbitt Aba thompson jackie boston connecticut
"aba" Discussed on ABA Inside Track

ABA Inside Track

04:41 min | 5 months ago

"aba" Discussed on ABA Inside Track

"I do have actually has some A stash treehouse massachusetts. But i thought it was. Something new hampshire. I'm drinking a linens. This is from concord. New hampshire hidden driveways single. Yeah so so. Cheers guys thanks share. He's think we link loving in your twenty twenty twenty being over almost all right when this comes out all right so now. We'll talk about behavior analysis so usually when we do these episodes we have kind of a you know a list of topics hot topics that we wanted to go over So it's a shortlist. This year. Because i think there's really one top that we'll be discussing most of the time and that is kobe. Nineteen and The rise of telehealth. And how that has impacted. Aba services how that impacted ab programs how that's impacted every components of the fields. So i guess we kind of list. You wanna be able to start. I guess we'll start where it starts so Every conference got cancelled in in twenty twenty and changed into an online conference Did ever ever did everyone. Here go to an online conference twenty. Get and then. It's i did. What are we thinking about the online conferences. I know the first one i went to. I was so tired of being online at that point because it was sort of those early days april or june. I was just so so done so done with it but then it kinda came back around. I think i did the bab online on demand and the fact that you could like change the speed of the videos. Because i listen to a lot of podcasts at double speed already so the fact that could do that with my conference i was like. Oh wow i can just like get so much content so fast and you don't i mean that's me. I don't get to say that. Yeah he got to use for it but you if you listen if you listened to a two x now i get the same amount. 'cause i'm processing realizing their mistake now. The option was there. So i didn't say you can't listen fast for listeners. The email addresses ace. Cb duck com kidding It's going to be a real. I think that's going to be real question. Because i as i was doing. Maybe i'm not supposed to. I feel like i'm not supposed to do this but the same time. It's an option. It felt so wrong. And i do and i have a character witness who say no. He listens to everything at double speed. Like this is how he consumed..

concord new hampshire New hampshire massachusetts Aba kobe
"aba" Discussed on ABA Inside Track

ABA Inside Track

04:43 min | 5 months ago

"aba" Discussed on ABA Inside Track

"Hey everybody. Welcome to the year in. Aba the year that was with very special friends from aba inside track and behavioral observations. Were doing it again. It's a twenty twenty year and wrap up. So i will be. I don't know. I don't know if a leading the conversation but i'll be the first one talking. I'm robert beri crews from abc inside track. Who else is here. As always i went talking. But it's also me diana and me jackie. Who's always the third one talking right. And it's me mets korea from the behavioral observations. Podcast guys thank you for inviting me to do this again. This is a fun little tradition. That i'm really come to enjoy so Looking forward to a fun conversation as always some night..

robert beri aba abc diana jackie korea
"aba" Discussed on ABA Inside Track

ABA Inside Track

05:52 min | 5 months ago

"aba" Discussed on ABA Inside Track

"Aba inside track and you can get a link to a special Special feed which will have all these bonus episodes. We have three total coming out this year. That will be coming out about every three or four months or so as well as other features like our social get togethers which we will be having her second one. This month are recorded. They're just for fun as well as discounts at our see store and some other some other goodies there so yes very excited to be. What is the third month of the patriot. We had our first get together. We book club..

Aba
President Trump Continues To Deny Election Results And President-Elect Biden Plans for His Presidency

Monocle 24: The Briefing

07:25 min | 6 months ago

President Trump Continues To Deny Election Results And President-Elect Biden Plans for His Presidency

"Briefing on monocle. Twenty four and welcome to today's edition of the briefing with me. Andrew miller the white house continues to echo with the post-election tantrum of us president donald trump who spent the weekend insisting series of the kind of all capital tweets which always indicate an ordered mind at work that november thirds election was rigged which wasn't and he won which he didn't president elect joe biden however seems to have decided that he has greater priorities than worrying about any further legal challenges. Launched by rudy giuliani from garden center. Parking lots and is focusing on plans for reviving a hopefully imminently post pandemic economy on joined by suzanne lynch washington correspondent for the irish times season. Welcome as always to the briefing. We'll look at joe biden's plans shortly but first of all is donald trump's wining actually gaining any traction. Is anybody taking him seriously. And i was there at the march on saturday now wasn't a million maga- march of as he'd predicted but there were tens of thousands of americans. They're waving flags and singing hymns in some cases holding signs saying the steel and alleging that the election has been stolen so he is getting a lot of traction from supporters and on conservative media gems. Here with on fox news for example bush. Look the facts are. The joe biden has won the election and as these various states moved to sir officially certify those election results in each stage. Who's is going to be happening in the next week or so. I think that it's going to become more likely. The deriving will become clear on the wall to donald trump. That it's time to go. And unfortunately though he is digging in as you say at science no sign of him conceding jaw and of course. The question is what's doing to american democracy. We've got a lot of 'small. I want a sizable minority of this country. Who believe the dumb from did not win the election even though he did so. I think it's a sorry state of affairs here. In this country that we now have a president who is refusing to concede does president elect joe biden basically appear to be a policy of ignoring him as far as possible. Yes yes. I think you're right out of there on. It's quite a clever policy. So it's almost like a child in the coroner's having a tantrum don't give them any attention. He just get an expert system toxic of strategy been taken by joe biden. He was at questioned on this last week and he did say it was an embarrassment and it was going to damage ed donald trump legacy but he did step back from launching a full scale attack on trump at particularly there is an issue now that a federal agency here. The gsa is using to at handover resources and information. If you'd like to the incoming president like it should so joe biden would be his rights there to criticize ups in clever to be averse holding back. If you know i put the moment so that strategy described exactly what he's adopting. I think one of the reasons he's doing that is because he knows that a lot of donald trump supporters at be this way and he has said during his campaign he wants to beautify reach out to the other side. If you like so. I think he's trying to tag anais and try not to inflame further tensions at a stage trying to lower the temperature. So that's the strategy. But i do think along with this goes on. It could become more problematic for example if they really are not going to hand over these resources. Gsa people are expecting. Maybe this week they will would. If that doesn't happen with then we really could see things become more tense here and with the biden campaign that i'm saying listen hang on. We need this information on his time feud handed over. We will doubtless cross that bridge when we get to it but for the moment what do we know of what. Joe biden plans to put into action. Once he does become president on january twentieth. Well he has said that in his first few days he's going sign executive orders whereby we expect him to rejoin the paris climate accord for example. Aba expect to happen at more. Also maybe something on immigration we for example. There's been the rumbling row about daca. There are the end. The kids known as dreamers. Young people who came to america brought to america by their parents illegally and they had been given amnesty essentially under the obama administration trump reversed. It got stuck in the courts but we expect maybe by to do something on this however other plans is due to unveil economic plan of some kind or make a speech today at in delaware but a lot of that is gonna be dependent on whether he democrats have controlled and the sanish at that looks unlikely it comes to senate runoff races in georgia in early january democrats have to win vocals raises which i think very tall ask if they don't if the only way one they're not in control of the senate republicans are and that is gonna make difficult for biden to push through some of his his policy issues on tax for example even energy and he's talking about not doing in green you deal but actually quite a progressive platform in terms of energy infrastructure. So that could be stymied by the by sanish. if republicans are in control there. What do we know as well about what. President-elect biden wants to do differently in terms of handling the pandemic obviously. There is good news on the vaccine. And there's been further good news just within the last hour as a. Us vaccine is now claiming to be ninety five percent Effective or thereabouts But that's still going to take weeks and months to implement a new cases are clearing one hundred thousand today. What does he want. America to do differently until that vaccine is ready to roll when it's been quite interesting in the last few days because one of the maggie appointed a new advisory board on corona virus is one of the members of the board has been doing interviews and the words lockdown has entered the lexicon here which on a national level and a lot of people are against us at here in this country. And you know nobody has mentioned the idea that we should have national lockdown and vigers now has netted the biden campaign has pushed back on that day. No no this is. Just one of my advisers is what we're considering so that would be considered very much to nuclear option here. As joe biden has to kind of tread carefully. The issue here is at each stage has a lot of power about how they handle the krona virus. So he's going to have his highness flow trying to add. Push through suggestions to republican control states. You know the governor saif kosher for example you know is a bit in. Denial about corona virus doesn't want many restrictions like high was joe biden going to ensure a national mandate for anything. It's going to be difficult and at the moment he has been talking about mask wearing. Because there's still a lot of resistance to the us in this country. As i saw on saturday after march were few people were wearing masks. That seemed to be what he's focusing on at the moment and the other thing would be my distribution of the vaccine making that more equitable already. The governor of new york has criticized on trump's plans. That saying that you know well off people will end up getting the vaccine not poor people who are more affected by cold so we expect to see him focusing more on that more equitable distribution of acting when we get faxing point suzanne ledge. Thank you as always. That was suzanne lynch with the irish times in washington.

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Hacking Steam controllers and making fast home directories

Ubuntu Podcast

05:58 min | 6 months ago

Hacking Steam controllers and making fast home directories

"Have you been up to. I have been hacking my steam controller. Last show. I mentioned that i was thinking about different controllers for my intendo switch and the i had great hints that it might be possible to use a steam controller with one. Well i've looked into a bit more and it's not only possible is actually quite easy. Is they just bluetooth to. I think i asked you this at the time. Just a brief device it is. I mean you can use it as bluejays device but it doesn't work with the switch has a tooth control. What does the phone where do to it to make it work so the phone where basically pretends to be another third party usb controller and you probably over the usb cable and it says oh hallo you've usb control so only works as a wired controller eight dollars which is unfortunate however. I do happen to have an extremely long. Usb cable from a previous project so is it's not actually a problem for me but yeah basically. There's a the the micro controller even in the controller. There's a guy who's been playing around with. Dave board with that micro controller and managed to reverse engineer enough of what's needed for a switch controller and enough of how the steam control is original. Firmware works to be able to write new firmware for that chip. And then you actually you you plug it into your computer and hold the right trigger. An appears as a usb device. Firmware dot been cash and then you just black the new file onto their and it works but yet because that dashboard doesn't contain the blue chip he's not been able to get bluetooth working with it. Works perfectly well over usb okay so this is clearly a community effort this is now sanctioned right okay and can you flip flop between foam where editions if that's the right yes So you can back up what you absolutely should backup the original valve firmware from the controller. And then yeah basically. You can write the custom. Firmware on and there's a couple of different versions depending on what you're doing with it and then you can write the backup back to it and there's also instructions for how if you completely break the whole thing how to get the original phone way from valve in and restore it back to a king state is on online. At least it's some diabetes about three or four steps but he's some dd which isn't terribly friendly. So it'd be nice if someone by a little gary to do it for you. Considering the actual processes is quite straightforward interesting i manage to Not completely brick but sort of break one of my steam control as i put the optioning in steam big picture to say. Put the bluetooth firmware on which i did and After doing that it was only possible to use that steam controller when it was plugged in. Oh over cable it wouldn't speak to its dungle bluetooth anymore. It's obviously in a bit of a bad way. If this recovery instruction somewhere maybe. I should give that go. I think you just put it with holding down one of the aba x. Warburtons and the steam controller to reset. I have tried that. I did find his instructions and that did not help. So maybe maybe these like you know. D- recovery commands might be Away to solve force back life. Yeah one thing that i decided. I'd do as a result having got this working as i'm going to buy a secondhand steam controller to have permanently in nintendo switch mode because it turns out that if you're not bothered about you're having a box or the receiver. Which for this purpose. I'm not at all you can actually pick up a secondhand one quite cheaply. Yeah i got one in c x nazi. So i've go four of them now. In fact i will mention next time. Remember to mention what. I've been doing with my steam because it's fun. Also what about. You might seem what you've been up to I have been making an extremely fast home directory. A fast one very very very fast not spinning rust than not spinning rust. Now do i mentioned recently upgraded my computer to a thread repair system. You might have meant. I may have mentioned that. And that means. I've got access to gen full speed. Pci ports and two slots and included with my new motherboard was an adding cod which is a sixteen lane. Pci cod the you comp- full mvm ame drives into and then dedicate full lanes to each of those drives. So i have got full two terabyte gen full nv me drives in this thing and then created a raid zero stripe to create an eight terabyte storage device. Which is now my home directory. I'm what you doing with this incredibly time directory. Well a few things. So i'm not using all of my home directory. Some of got mounted to places where vm's and containers live. because. When i'm composing snaps they usually quite big the the other thing that thread rippers. Really good at as a compression and decompression and snaps a compressed bit having a suitably fast processor and really fast storage means. I can build snaps really fast and also Will discuss a bit later. There are other images that i work on regularly. And in order to which rate on those i need to make multi gigabyte compressed images on the regular and now i've a processor that can do that very well and then very false storage to actually make that compression and decompression step very very quick.

Dungle Dave ABA Diabetes Nintendo
Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

Scientific Sense

59:58 min | 7 months ago

Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we explore emerging ideas from signs, policy economics, and technology. My name is Gill eappen. We talk with woods, leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest. Scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation. Be Color a wide variety of domains red new discoveries are made. and New Technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new ideas affect society. And help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation. V seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide unaided content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do. A companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense. Dot. com. And displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense dot net. If you have suggestions for topics, guests at other ideas. Please send up to info at scientific sense. Dot Com. And I can be reached at Gil at eappen. Dot Info. My guests today's facade John. WHO's professor of Law and society at Griffith University in Brisbane Australia. He's also adjunct professor of law at Queensland University of Technology and Research Associated University College Under Center for Blockchain Technologies, he who suggests on the Bloomberg professional globalization of law and the technology in law. But come John. Hello. Thank you. Sure. Yeah. So I want to start with one of your recent people, professions and expertise hog machine learning, and blockchain redesigning the landscape of professional knowledge and organization. In invite you say machine learning has entered the world of the professions. The different impacts automation will have huge impacts on the nature of work and society. Engineering architecture and medicine or early and enthusiastic adopters. Other professions especially law at late you say at in some cases with leptons adopters. could you talk about you know sort of the landscape all? Of Law, profession and. They today in terms of opting these technologies. Certainly Louis interesting because it's a very old profession is. Often considered one of the. Original traditional professions along with medicine and the church. And in a sense law has used different kinds of technology might say I mean does it? Based around writing. And then the printing press and So on yet that. It's always being based on a craft. A skill which the individual person is that enables them to do, whatever is quote if you like and. said, there's never been a lot of room for any kind of automation. Certainly, the has been space for using. A people who are not fully qualified as low as about as paralegals, people like that, who will do a lot of repetitive work document checking and things like that and so on. But what will get into now is the situation where automation through machine learning. There's other kinds of artificial intelligence. is able to start constructing documents example contracts. Check dollop a documents for particular clauses and things like that mature they're up to date and this incense is. Replacing now, the kind of work that noise will do. So I think in some ways more more of of the profession of law is gonNA be subject to automation, but distinction I would many because I think it's quite important here is that A lot of what lawyers do. Is actually quite. Active that that that that the drafting contracts overtime or or they're reviewing documents to some sort or another or they're getting through particular. Negotiation. And so you know a lot of it is the same, but they build up the expertise through doing these same kinds of were over and over again and What we're now finding is that instead of having young lawyers coming in and doing what you might call the grunt work of checking documents and going through discovery applications where he goes through the size boxes of evidence to decide. which are the appropriate documents you want the emails, the invoices order, this sort of stuff that is the kind of work which is lending itself to automation. And, and so that his taking away a lot of the work which is used for trading purposes with young lawyers and is just doing it much quicker. will quickly I mean More efficiently in many ways and probably expensive much much expensive a Lotta. This work is being outsourced to you know legal process outsourcing India or Philippines South Africa places like that. So yeah, that's that's right and so in some ways, the group of lawyers who do the work which requires the skill, the judgment. Is Reducing in some ways. That pool is getting smaller. Yeah Yeah it's it's interesting. The the distinction that you make between automation. And in my job and let's call it decision making right which is you know a lot of work in the business side of this. So for example. in the nineties in large pharmaceutical company So you think about you know rnd. People might think it has really complex selection of programs that design of them, portfolio management, risk management, all those decisions. Genuine companies be say well, senior managers with lots of experience and intuition make those decisions really well right and so that's statement would automatically implied that machines can really do much there. But what we find in the mid nineties says that is systematic analysis of data make those decisions. Don't better. Actually, I've Tom to humans humans. Always seem to make decisions. These are typically bonding the decision. So if you go back and look at it, alternative experiment has not been wrong. So we have no date to say it was a good decision at typically. So human scaffold, fifty percents of making good decisions So do you know just throwing a coin or letting monkey make those decisions so? Yup We found that even complex decision making that humans hold. you know close to their you know kind of domain I'm not necessarily. So we have machines That could do that much better than I. Don't know there's an analog of that in in law I I. Think The may be actually I mean Two three years ago the royal. Society in England decided to arrange a working party on machine learning. One of the things that they put together a a roundtable on machine learning professions resolved to talk about that night and I talked about the history of professions in technology and. and. I think one of the peculiar things that came out to in relation to law is that law. Has always been a sort of on its own. If you think about medicine, for example, medicines always had the teacher hospital institution that sort of straddles the academic quilt and the practice walls and brings those people together and as a result. INCORPORATES loss of, scientific, work. Engineering work as well computing work and things like that. And that's been the first teaching hospital king into existence in in the French revolution in Seventeen eighty-nine. A long history of that. If you look at law, there was nothing equivalent to that whatsoever and there is in fact, actually a big gap between what academy does on what the practitioners in your do so that As a result as before law has come to this a quite late but what we are. Finding I think is that Certainly the management consultancy finding is that because of the nature of a lot of what goes on in legal office a remarkable amount of it can be automated. So what we are getting now is companies setting themselves up to do this automated work. So. We have companies which do nothing but contract our instruction formation sort of company. The typical lawyer would would say to a client Do you WANNA contract classes. Yes I want this for this. And loyal galway draft contract back with it, and then in the con- comes back against as I need another contract, you go through the same process. which is good for the lawyer but not necessarily good kind. What we're finding now is the company's not can think of a few of them that will, in fact, go into the company's show order contracts. Let's see the entire. Corpus of contracts you've got there and they will analyze them. And basically say, all right. We can create a new contract in automated way fairly easily it may need some modification according to special circumstances but on the whole, it's fairly standard and and they can do that INNOVA systematic world meaning the contracts are reviewed that checked. If they're going to expire marketing, you want an unable just the system will cope with that if you're. Yeah. So yeah. No No. No so I was just going to say yes. So that the distinction you make, you know in terms education sort of systematic graduate level education that because as you say, it is low in one sense of soft proficient. You say in called professions like made it to text reengineering this team has a strong concern ensuring that expertise applied in the public interest when as low little bit different from from bad and economics in some sense sort of in the same same vein we have now made economics at really odd. of mathematics you know north of analytics there. Whether they are actually useful from policy making perspective is left to debate but at least it has been an attempt to make this make economic video hard. So so I don't know A. Fascination has been in in law I very much that will happen in law. Oh there things are beginning to happen I mean let me just boob. At. One example I learned in that workshop that I mentioned the Royal Society held. With somebody from the engineering profession talking about. The difference in skills between people who above forty I'm below forty he said. If he he was about Forty Years Austin design an aeroplane, takeout pen and paper Pencil, and paper and. I don't know anyone under forty could do that would know how to do that go onto a computer program undecided there. So you can see that the incorporation of technology into the academy through to the actual. Occupation. Than phones and things is is already a standard and they're in law. It isn't law. As you said, it's still very much a soft skill although I will argue that there is a difference between the way nor is viewed in different parts of the world. So in the United States A law is I think more tilted towards the sciences. So low in economics is one of the big things in the. US. So you got a lot of people working in the of lower economics who might go onto antitrust work no competition work and things like that which across a lot of economics, mathematics and Statistics and so on. In, say a Europe Australia and so on. Law is more allied towards the humanities. And the classics. So it doesn't have that kind of scientific underpinning in that way. So anything that's going to change in these parts if you like is going to be something that's going to be imported from outside. And is going to have a very dramatic impact when whether it does An and I think that's yet to happen. I don't think there's been sort of Cambrian explosion. If you like in in law, the will be one I'm sure but but law has an advantage over engineering economics or the other areas you might. That's With the nature of the rule of law and absent justice is since law as a a way of ordering society is absolutely crucial to everything else. Then, Law and lawyers will say will look you know we have a special status here is different amid leave engineer. We certainly want to make sure bridges stay up. We don't want down but we can design different kinds of bridges. We can design different kinds of legal bills, but they're also the fundamental rules If you want to you know if you're an engineering company and you want to build a bridge in a different country, you're going to have to do it on the basis of the legal rules, which will be just vise by the lawyers according to the country's there in so on. So in in that was what? I might put in a special category if you live. Yea. Yea. Let me let me push NBA John. So. The. The conference that you mentioned you know the Internet is under forty and engineers at. So so one could argue you know from an engineering perspective could argue e- It sexually dangerous. To not use machines to build aircraft the goes you know all the technology that cap today actually help us make the trap lot safer. granted. If you sit down with a blank sheet of paper and Pencil, you might get the principal right. But, but the technology has advanced so much that you really have to use. Technology to do so in some sense, engineering is pushed back. that. I argue this myself then they were naive engineering school. I had a V exposed at my daughter bent to school. She used the same physics book. Twenty, five. meter. I argue that that is sort of backward because data speed no need for an engineer to really learn Newtonian physics anymore because it is prescriptive, it's deterministic can make machines, learn it very quickly and so why spend all? Right. So so then you know if you think about the the law field. I wonder if there is a senior argument that is to say Dan and tape really good lawyer casts lot of intuitions dot expedients to crap something Contract or a discourse, but then maybe the machine scan actually do it even better We haven't really tested that hypothesis yet. Right be almost have this idea that humans are always dominant. Or machines but that the not be true as technology lancers. So what do you think about that in the in the? It's a very important point actually because the. American bosses. being modifying its ethical rules recently to say that lawyers have a duty and obligation to keep up to date with technology. So we already know the technology is now a an important part and I have to say when when I say the word technology, I mean this at all kinds of levels from what you can do with Microsoft word for example, it strays plug ins all the way up to artificial intelligence IBM, Watson, or something like that So that if if lawyers become. A. Uses of technology whether this small firms or big firms or what have you a under the Aba now they they actually have an obligation to make sure that they are up to date. They can't just say we didn't know what we were doing. So I think in that respect, there is a there was a move. The other move that is taking place is actually the push from from the clients. Now, this you have to look into ways one is with corporate clients. The corporation seen US lawyers have to use noise if you'd like want their work done. PHILOS- money on Chiba they wanted to more efficiently They don't want the best piece of work every time they want something that works and they want officiant. UTA A and so on. So it was interesting I think a few years ago. The General Counsel Cisco. Actually made a speech. Saying that he expected his. Lawyers Law firms who worked for the company to be reducing their fees year on year. Now, that's the opposite of what lawyers normally do, which is to raise them year on year. So say that that's one push which is. Very profound push now, coming from the client himselves who are using the beginning to use their procurement departments in in the companies and things like that to help purchase legal services the other aspects which is just as important in this is if you look at the role of lawyers and individuals. So if you is what access to to legal services, it's expensive lawyers are not cheap they charge our money We don't know how to judge the quality of their work and so on. because. There was a credence which we just know that So. On this is where technology can begin to step in and provide services which are. Efficient and often quite. what very well for the individual saying that this. Technology can be seen to be improving access to justice a Lotta people. Yeah. Yeah yes. I want to come back to this. John. I think this is a very important point. So bent on put has a lot of uncertainty. Uncertainty maybe not not the right term, but it's called deterministic. It shows beatty ability and so the determination of quality it's not as easy as hard media India nearing or. Right business economics legal all sorts of well foreign that category and the application of technology sort of a different different meaning there but I want to touch on one of the things that you say in the paper, and that is you mentioned this before and that's about training training the next generation. So you savior regulating bodies professions are involved in the collection and reproduction of knowledge intended to be used by the entire body professionals, and so there was an expectation here that you know seeing it professionals. Is Providing the wisdom that knowledge mission to train the next generation now in a technology driven. regime. discuss vacations right. Our expert is going to be a computer engineer in the future. And so so how does that work from from cleaning and knowledge Asian will I think this is This is a crucial issue in it's one which the profession hasn't. Really. Got To grips with yet I think because you think of technology in terms of Predictive analytics a document review and things like this most law schools are not preparing students for this they may be a a a a causal to on some aspect of technology, but it's not something which lawyers themselves are learning. So I think what is going to happen is we're going to find a blending of skills occurring. So law firms will be sense having to bring in a range of technologists who perhaps have. A scales a straddle, both sides of the lines, the lawyers like this too I think I think we're going to find an avangard Who will begin to develop skills that allow them to talk to both sides of the line, the tech people and? Below people if you likes and there will be people who will acquire develop these skills as well but that's that's still some way down the line I didn't think we're anywhere near there yet, and part of the reason for that I think is that you know law is still a very highly regulated profession and and the regulators themselves are in the same situation they are unsure about what is going to happen and they also feel they have an obligation to. Not only ensure that. Customers clients and consumers are protected but in some ways, the profession is protected to if you like so. You know it's it's a it's a fine balancing. There I. Think. It's a fight balancing act and you'd say if the changing changing things. So going back, you know you care as an individual eighteen status of expert. Some form of encapsulation of knowledge and analysis occurs enabling professional experts, derived diagnoses, decisions, and conclusion wrapped late. and you make some distinctions. Type of learning that. Human? Beings. That the distinction between doing drive and become a gift and laster Yes yes. Yes I think that's important. So the the the the principle behind this is that Individuals can acquire a lot of knowledge in in various areas. So as I say learning how to drive a car, you learn how to change gear you though with the speeds. Braking different rates, conditions, and things like that. So. If you WANNA take that further and become a formula one drive or something like that. Then you have to undergo a very different kind of training and that kind of thing becomes a lot more collective rather than individual because you start to you're you're going to be in a group that is gonna be doing a particular kind of our driving. If you like everybody in the group has to understand what each other is doing that group, you can't have people going right a racetrack at two hundred miles an hour or thinking individually feel like they have to have a collective consciousness. About. How to drive in that situation? That's nothing like how? You and I might drive. I'm not saying we bad drivers just saying spreading very different. So I think professional work is not. That different from this in a way. So once you you can go through school and you can do your law degree and you can learn your low. We can learn you engineering's this applies to or professions really. But in order to become a professional in order to become somebody who can operate function within that. Group if you like you then have yourself have to develop collective consciousness and and one way of thinking about it is that we we can kind of tacit knowledge. This assorted knowledge you learn on the job from people, which is not always articulated in a precise formulate kind way but it's something you pick up from the way. Somebody does something you just recognize aw that that's how they've done that might not be. Written down anywhere or anything like that. But you know that's different from now exiting differently from the way that wise doing I think X.'s doing it better I and you and you just, and you can absorb that. That's what I mean by this kind of tacit knowledge and that comes about from the professional context. As how the professional context develops becomes absolutely crucial to how you introduce new ways of doing things new my daddy's new skills new outlooks if you like and I. Think this is where we're on the cost of of this beginning to develop I mean we we know it's got to be done quite how it's going to be done. is yet to be. So. So let me make a statement John and I want I want your reaction to it so eat in hard sciences eight years against again medicine. Expertise has about a consistent happy of remorse. Whereas enor- economics and business in general, let's say expertise is not about the ability to apply rules but to deal with. and at and if that is true, it has lot of implications rate. It has implications as to how we might divide work. Between. And machine in the future. And the skills that universities need to impart on on on new graduates are also quite different. So I always argued in the business. engineering contexts that universities having changed the dog they get mentioned before they're using the same. Using the same. Out Thirty four years without asking the question are those skills relevant, anymore or more importantly watch. Really relevant for a human being in the future rate. do you agree with that that expertise assert more about dealing exceptions apply? Putting it actually. I. I can see the logic behind what you. Saying I think what distinguishes? A good professional whether it's a good engineer good architect or good lawyer or doctor is is somebody who has a certain? This may sound strange but it's the. Imagination. Creativity. about. Kind of flare that allows them to function on the nausea they they've got and developed over the years and the experience. Gathered from Nova pitching what they'd be doing over the years and so on, and it allows them to see around things in ways which they perhaps would. I can give you an example if you like a law. So I'm in in Germany and some other countries. For example, there's a particular way of bundling together mortgage securities I I won't go to detail about this, but this statute that enables you do it. And then you can sell these securities and get money. In certain countries, the UK, the US, and so on. This, NICI. So in a sense to put this kind of a a deal together it. Couldn't be done if you live. So a bank came to one of the large English law firms and said, look we wanted we want to replicate this in in the UK, want to set a market this we're not the statues off there. What can you do and what was interesting was that the law firm then went back to first principles lawyers who were looking at this went back I suppose they looked at some vape basic areas of law matter your trust. And contract from what have you? I'm from that they constructed elite supplement that looked very much like the one in Germany, but without stat sheet and they tested it and it worked. Out To be credibly successful. So much so that the German government started German legal profession started to complain because they said. You can only do this by statute and these we find a way of doing it three. I suppose using law and there it is an they were vowed shops by but that was a particular example if you like of of what you were talking about, they took the exceptions they went back to first principles and said you know or How would we get? This is where we gotta get to, and this is a way right at the beginning what are the steps we need to take and and? And that's what a good loyal will do if you. Right right? Yeah. So that's very important point. So you in your paper dawn as the DREYFUSS and rice note that the proficient performer immersed in the world of skillful activities sees what needs to be done. But decides how to do it. So as we move into a and other technologies, I think it's important point it is. Right from Dad benefactor culture we have been using humans as you mentioned before in lots of with meted activities big not designed for humans I would I would contend enjoy doing things over and over again, and if you had thought of doing that, yeah, because they have to do it for living right and so so we should be moving to word It would where anything that is with pita on delegated to the machine at automation in the bottom of that and Appealed autonation you can have intelligent automation you can have you know reinforcement learning those types of things you have some aspects of intelligence into the into the two. And deploy humans Don't Miss. They're really good at in some case. I'm. So you know we've been studying the green for ages be our no close. It feels to understand mother. Heck it does You know it's not neat learning it. Oh, BBC of. thirty years ago as see that person again, you could see you could you could have a feeling. Then you've seen that before and and what the brain has done actually not only as he that pattern but also age that matter intuitively for thirty years and say, yes, that face I, guess before. and. So there are some superpowers the brain has reaped have been applying the all all. So for a technology might allow. Look I. Think Technology will allow us to incredibly complex things without having to think about too much I. Mean if you look at the way a port functions, for example, any major port these days they've got millions of containers and ships going through them all the time. So there's a lot of paper going through the you those charter parties, bills of lading guarantees. So the lot of legal work that's being done it, it's all quite standard stuff. I mean everybody. KNOWS, what needs to be done and so on. Now, some people are beginning to think while the best way to handle a port if you like I for everybody should know is to put everything that's going on in the poor into a blockchain so that you can see the whole supply chain. You see when something comes in, you can determine when the goods are being offloaded. When they're being shipped, you can stop making the payments as a result of the. Operation of the smart contracts if you like, and the whole thing would be just one quite seamless. In some ways without that much human intervention really just need oversight Some bits of coordination so on. But at the moment is still a a lot of humans are vote in that shipping people, law people, all sorts of things which is. I think insane. That's a waste of resources. We know that there are people who have all kinds of problems that require that creative flair she like as so why waste money on the routine stuff when you could develop skills to the the real need if you like in that way? Yeah Yeah. So I, want that some that bit that John Blockchain, for example, as you mentioned. So so one reason especially in the professions like law and business humans have an advantage justice dimension of trust. and you know at least our generation we don't really. At eighty level, right. So so having that. Human human touch is still extremely important for us. Now, technologies like Blockchain, for example, actually allows that trust to be tensely decoupled, right? Yeah, and I think I think you're right. Look I. Think I mean one of the reasons we make contracts is because We, don't trust each other. So we we devised these documents with all the conditions in them. Something goes wrong. This is what will happen things like that and so on. What are the interesting things? You know people really rely on contracts are met you. You draw up a contract. And the to business people stick him in the drawer I never look at again less something really really fundamental goes wrong but they know sumit doesn't that never look at that again. So you say value of the contract, what did it actually do if you look at some of the Asian countries say like Taiwan or parts of China, you have a assistant coach Guanxi, which is where people developed effective relationships by knowing each other over a period of time around business that allows them to develop trust it. So You know there are different ways of of handling trust, but we we seem to spend a lot of time on trying to minimize something You know which we don't really do a lot of if you like. So I think one of the advantages of of blockchain is that it just it removes a lot of this from from the equation if there's certain things you know that can happen. as a result off if this thing that systems. Lead happened And you know. As, long as you've got oversight and you can see what's going on than. You don't need to be too concerned about it. It will just do what it needs to do in that way and So. Again. That's still very much in the early stages, but we are seeing situations where supply chains A shipping goods from one country to another can actually be done under smart contracts through a blockchain. Technology if you live. That that is now happening I associate goodful dealing with things like gum counterfeiting if you're. Producing. Particular high-quality could site move our phones or particular pharmaceutical products and so on you know it's one way of guaranteeing the quality of the product is you couldn't I say look you can examine the whole supply chain or the data is there. And you know his Eq- code look at it and you get the whole thing going all the way back The. Again, issues around that if you're dealing with the digital. Is Much easier once you start dealing with physical products then you have. A question of how do you get that first initial digitization of the physical if you'd like to goes on so though some people I know here in Australia who? Run A company called Beef Ledger, which is trying to export beef straight beef to China using the blockchain supply chain, which will. Guarantee the security, and the quality of the goods to the Chinese consumer APP because having problems with this before. But I will tell you now do doing something like that does require that the people you are dealing with. You're going to set this up with You have to have a trusting relationship with you before you can set up a technology that will do away with the So we're still in that. That's really early days. I think another a lot of time way to go right Yeah, but the technology works it. Clean potential one could argue contracts exist because they probably known performance if you have a technology that drives that probably the of non-performance zero, then you can actually get rid of for contract. Yeah limit. It is. Not. Goes back to that earlier point I made that. Most most contracts are fairly standard. You know a routine things they're there to. Record a series of transactions payments that have gone on between people without the to do much. If you like you know once you you're you're doing the business, the contract just kind of records that in perpetuity. So the small contract just takes that into a different area and an an actually does the whole implementation and execution without people to be involved in that too much and there's something goes wrong. But if it if it all goes right then back it is done you need to you don't you think about it Right. Yeah. Hasn't been jumping to another are forthcoming people globalization law at. A time of crisis in the? Global Lawyer and so in the say Nikolai Condom Nieve a Russian economists in the nineteen thirties believed the worst economy operates long sixty year cycles Then he called K. Braves. And you safeguarding coronavirus analysis, the fifth psycho young's from nineteen eighty to twenty thirty. It's you save twenty, nineteen forthcoming John You might have. I think so I think say because I, tell you off the what's happening this year I thought my good I couldn't My God. I was just. Owners because you know a contract device these waves up into into what he calls four seasons spring summer or winter at, and we're in the winter off this fifth cycle if you like this is. All the bad stuff happens and he's news war. Famine Disease I think wait a minute that sounds Yes yes. That's exactly right. A. But one of the interesting things about contractors was that you know he he a because he's A. Solid economists are installing a dip executed. By the way you know he he got fed up ninety that was the end of Nikolai unfortunately but he. He said instead of know if you like the ownership of the means of production are being the determinate for changeover from system system, he said it's it's technology and and that the technology will drive you out of the downswing of the last cycle into the upswing of the new cycle, and and the way that works is the win. You're in this kind of winter period because of the kind of economic. Gloom pervades if you like people tend to hold back in subsurface vestment in terms of technological innovation of what have you and so a lot of energy resources, resources, money capital if you like builds up to a second point when people say we're GONNA go for this is this is it? And that's when if you like technology comes to the fall on, really drives it forward. So from that perspective, what he's saying is that you know come right about twenty thirty. If. Things are going slowly now regarding technology they're going to speed up. In. This period and that's when it will. You know really also take take off and people have looked back over our preceding cycles and they've you know it works if you like not just their. Fantasy theory there are also the people who do Cleo dynamics in history these the quantitative historians and they've done a similar kind of analysis of historical periods and said, yeah, you know there are all these citrical. Processes that take place even revolutions occur and big upset occurs and what have you and and. One of their Perspectives which I find quite interesting is that they say one of the reasons for revolutions come about is caused a lease beginning to compete with each other and and an an I look at say trump in in America and I look at the Democrats and I I I would say Modine, India I look she in China and different groups of elites who are engaged really profound struggle for the future of their countries if you live. Out which again is leading to this kind of potential eruption of activity and a new ways of doing things. Yeah. It makes a lot of intuitive sense gone. So one way to think about this also. There are a lot of excesses. So innovating go good their excesses in the system people to believe that invincible they changed assumptions about. because they don't see any. and. Financial markets to right. So these cycles and real real mass that uniquely talking about you can see the. Happening in the financial markets more clearly. But what he's saying is that he happens mortgage and you ask in this paper in two thousand, nineteen for in many ways go. Crystallization off the settling ketone economic forces lost throat ear Kublai doomed as populous. Separates nationalism and lead clients and I think they have that we have probably the answer to that. But you see I think. One of the points I was trying to make an in in this paper walls that Global Law. If you like is is, is the a kind of synthesis off chaos? How do we bring some kind of order to chaos now once you start seeing the undermining? Of his global institutions, you see trump was withdrawn from the W. H. O.. He's he's are criticized NATO he he won't have the do with the International, Criminal Court and so we've got this kind of real life tension now between a an international legal order that's being built up since the Second World War both Ekit economic and legal order is Global And so we can't just a radical globalization I mean even even with covert, we can't eradicate mobilize ation we've got to. Handle covert the Kobe pandemic on a global basis. Otherwise, we'll. We're lost it retreats to a national. Approach is not gonNA. Work? We'll be defeated in that race is going to be global. Might. Be One of my questions in in paper was will who are the people who are going to be doing this? Kind of bringing the the order to chaos if you like and that made argument that it's got to be the global lawyer. And this is a person who not only understand their national legal system but also able to communicate with lawyers and officials. From around the world if you like. To be able to develop a kind of common. Language common discourse that enables them to stop putting these things together are, and it's not just a simple massa of saying mathematically, it works this way or not. It requires the kind of pulling together of people, but it requires that sort of common understanding which. Comes out of what I was saying about this idea of testing knowledge you know as you got this kind of professional consciousness you know how people ought to behave and how they will interact with you, and then that enables you to be out of bizarre to predict how you can do things and so on and so on. That basis I think we can operate kind of global order. It had a a below the institutional level if you're not kind of private. As opposed to the public according and that will put three. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah you know I the limit John I don't know if you think this way I limit one could as. Want to stay need for. Countries what does the need for legal system differentials? We set this up with the premise that it's easier to manage small chunks. one could also argue with Edmund Affect. -nology that you don't need to segment this debate that we have done. which might make these types of issues you know. See where you're coming from and I'm going to say yes or no? Yes, I think the home range of of questions that can be handled by the technology the ones we got pay I don't chain, etc. I don't I didn't see any issues there but there are a lot of decisions that needs to be made a book in terms of putting things together and resolve disputes that can only function at a human level because it's not. These are not decisions that are simple binary decisions. If you'd like, it's yes or no it's it's often a lot more nuance than complex about I mean, one of the resources in the World Kiva Zero System, the world amendment which is being fought over if you like is water, a water is probably one of the most valuable resources anywhere and it's you often find that rivers and things like that sort of flow between countries, they form borders. And and you are you know people if you look at the Nile, ESL start stopping in Sudan throwaway down to the Mediterranean. So he goes to countries all three countries, east European and then into Egypt's and so unwell well, who has the right to put it dime at a particular place and things like that all of that has to be cooled in act. You see a not going to be done at a human level that that's what caused the skills in negotiation judgment interpretation understanding if you like of the other people, no machine can do that I got. Yes before we conclude, I want to touch on one other thing So in the paper, you say as technology and culture intersect more and more. Ethical conundrums will intensify these raising questions about the rights and obligations of robots. And go beyond as moves. Three laws of robotics in two issues of rights of all moon. Algorithm, stem serves. So this is this is an area that be Kevin babies even even really form some notions allowed rights of all modes at rights of a are. Sai, gets more sophisticated. Yes. Yes. I do. I, mean I think this is one of the issues we already know some of the problems with algorithms and and you know can we can be are they transplanted from you see what's going on the ethical issues around the construction and implementation of algorithms and things like that. But I I I think looking into the future we all going to rely on things like robots. And various kinds of machines so much more so that if you look at a country like Japan, which is a a an aging population such that it doesn't have sufficient younger people to look after the people who need looking often. So machines, I'll be part of that, and that means people will stop forming real relationships with machines and and so that's when I would say. Okay. So let's think about how we View a potential rights of machine that we give. We give rise to humans. Yes. We know that we give rights to animals. Now we've also given rights to viz in forest in some countries as well as so machines I think our. Next logical step you know do we do we treat them with respect Let me give you one. Very classic example yet the production of. Robots for sex if you like is a major industry at the moment, some manufacturers say they want to program them say that people can act out rape fantasies will do we want that I? Mean you know should we be at first of all? You know? We should be having people behave in this particular kind of way, but even an uncertain if you do it against another human being, you'll be punished for it and you say we'll a machine is a piece of property you should be you should be doing that but I'm getting to think that maybe a machines should be treated with dignity say that we are treat ourselves with. Dixie. This a kind of reflexive situation here what we? Do to machines we do to each other, and they may again due to US depending on how they evolve and and move forward in that way is a very contentious issue. A lot of people would reject that right out of hand I agree I think we've got to stop thinking about stop dining forward because I. think we're going to at some point again. I. Don't know when. But at some point we will be having to deal with that. It's a it's a very important point. Joan. So if I understand you correctly, you know that the rights to animals the rights to inanimate. INANIMATE things like Lubers The recent those exist is because of its effects on humans and can see video a clear link in the future we would see a very clear link between a algorithms and robots ended affects on human. So this is not me You know each not fantasy in the sense that yeah, robots should have rights, but rather it's a more conceptual question. Any fraud did not have rights each going to cabin negative I I think that's absolutely true. I mean just to highlight that if you like this firm called Boston Dynamics that produces. Robots and they produced these videos of these. Now, these robots are resistant being pushed over and things like that, and it was quite interesting because a lot of people say all you can't treat them in this way. This is awful and so what I mean that that's the answer for more fighting to to the extreme extent. But it I think you know on the basis what you're saying, you know how we Oakland. Hold human beings accountable to each other in an increasingly complex world machines have become part of that. We can't just have them all sitting on the edge as though they're not part of who we are, what we are and how we do things. Right. So. Incursion Johnny fuel sort of look forward five years. At. The intersection of law and technology. But you think people see sort of the biggest. I. Think you'll see it two wins. On the you know for the individual The individual, you're going to see a lot of them just interacting. With artificial Tennessee, say lost questions about what my rights for this how do I deal with a tendency agreement? How do I complain against a producer company or something like that or that's going to be automated? is fairly straightforward to do and and it will only need A. Minimal. Amount of human inside of. An intervention if you like. At the other end at the. In I think we're GONNA see more and more technology coming in because as those basic functions that are. Being, carried out by junior people or or paralegals or things like that are the ones which are going to be increasing, automating creasing. I'm. We will replace the humans and just let machines do that because there's no point in wasting human resources on that whether that means we need fuel or more lawyers That's an open question I think it will that we need different kinds of lawyers We will need Roy Moore to logically aware much more sophisticated. They don't it's be programmers or odors or anything like that, but they need to have a quite a a a a strong understanding and gross what's going on in technology in that way if you like so. Yeah. We can definitely see an. Yeah, so I, think you mentioned the so from a structure perspective in all forum DC law firm sprucing to word. It a group of equity partners. Around it by machine so to speak well, I. Think. I was in that paper or another one I. I'm S-. Forecast. Law. Firms. Being. Distributed decentralized we'll tournaments organizations running on a blockchain with with the various people. into setting when they will no I. Think the law firm is still a very strong and powerful is Shutian, that's not gonNA disappear straight away. But certainly the numbers of partners who control things will shrink. They'll that will get smarter as proportion and yes, they will be surrounded by machines and they surrounded by people who are servicing those machines. Your excellent. Yeah. Thanks for doing this weekend. John really enjoyed the conversation. Thank you very much. It's been great fun and very

Blockchain John Gill Eappen Eappen Queensland University Of Techn Blockchain Technologies Australia Griffith University India United States German Government Innova Bloomberg Inflammation Royal Society Brisbane John Blockchain Chiba
Modern and fast APIs with FastAPI

Talk Python To Me

06:00 min | 8 months ago

Modern and fast APIs with FastAPI

"There. Obviously, it's all about consuming API's these days API's are everywhere in a Zappia in there like we integrate with you know however many thousand different. Api In points that you might WanNa work with and IT'S It's all pretty crazy but of course, creating API's is super important. So focusing on that side, how have you seen the evolution of API frameworks come not because the early days that I spoke of it was like things were web frameworks, and then if you wanted, you could somehow manage to put a Web Api in it. Yeah. Absolutely. Excited I. think that's the key difference I think that's The difference. Yeah because yeah. So for example, this framework is basically I don't know I would think it was something like Api I mean obviously, it's in the name, but there's a bunch of them like that these days that are coming out words, the building blocks talk in terms of API's not in terms of web templates and whatnot. Yeah, exactly. So like I guess for a very long time, the more established frameworks inviting specifically have been flask and Jangle. For at the is it will be in Jangly will be JANGLED WRIST FRAMEWORK They're bunch of plug. INS that can be combined together to make something that works very well. The same with general framework visiting is, as you were saying, these frameworks were made mainly to handle templates in the back. So they accept the extra functionality was on dope around the ways that the I was able to do things. So as you were saying like the, there was this bunch of extra frameworks that came afterwards like even of the same thing sort of and they know the a sink wave game with a bunch of all their frameworks past the I, ended up later end up last wave I guess but it was mainly from the learnings of all these reviews. Frames I was using a bunch of those fingers for a long time. A bunch of floggings have combinations trying Wednesday in friend dealer. I had like something that was kind of stable, but it's very difficult to maintain quite fragile. Yeah. You said that you didn't really want to build fast. API finally decided alright. Yeah. I. Need the thing I went to exist so here we go. Yeah I, like the Nemov Hey I build another framework is heaven like every Waco's. And I was trying really hard to avoid that and I was like, no I just find the thing that I'm looking forward on finding. That will do that if we should not that I need and at some point when I was like, yeah, I'm not finding the right thing I found it and it was eight. The I star wasn't thing right atheist our framework build by dungarees. The great guy is in creator of the Framework Yeah exactly successor Django risk framework but from scratch exactly exactly and there's Aba Star Nafta Star was trying to be compatible with. An aggregate sold like the Canonical Standard Specification or interface for web frameworks, which is wealth flask untangle air based on and at the same thing with Ascii, which was the new standard that was also born at Jangle for do wet sockets these asynchronous saints right it's probably maybe we're just pointing out to people who are not deep in the web hosting side like Whiskey is this common API that all the different web frameworks, blast gender and? So, on talk to or implement, and then all the web servers like microwave Guizhou Unicorn. So on know how to talk to anything that does whiskey, and that's how you can run other frameworks on these various web servers. But none of those were capable of supporting ase, INC programming, which is super important for scale ability on the server side because the way that thing was written is incompatible with that, and so there's a new standard I think. Maybe Thomas. Even partially involved in like the finding the standard. Sure but. A SGI FOR ASE INC gateway interface and that's the GI that you're talking about right. So Api star is trying to do both of those things. Yeah. Exactly and complementing or were you were saying like these specifications of how to interact with the server on the on the framework I like totally like quite simple is mainly of one page jobs as like there has to be a function that is going to be cold with these armadillos and is basically that, but then they finding what the shape. Of that function, what are the parameters that is going to save old? That is like the main of interaction between a server like UNICORNS and a framework like flask. So these new Disney will these new standard as he is the one that support for acing weight and all these things and I was trying to have support for both things wild being an API, I framework and having like a bunch of extra features. The Dump Christie added on it was great. I was just trying to have some. Indication ideas to able to integrate them with Aba I themes, and at that point. He was also building starlet, which is the microphone more slash toolkit for building a B. is in asking these new feeling like wave applications of doing whip stuff using these new data. So he's like the bare bones thing is kind of in the middle of flask on a lower level. It will kind of the same things and because he was focusing on that, he had to deprecate most of the Aba Star components like the server components and made it just like. Ceased him on a set of tools to validate scheme us for API's right. Now that point I had found the perfect tool and it had to be deprecated. So I guess. Cute. Like okay. Let's try this. At the same you know that is

Whiskey Zappia Guizhou Unicorn Ase Inc Disney Waco Thomas Christie
'Avatar 3' is nearly done filming

Double Toasted

04:38 min | 8 months ago

'Avatar 3' is nearly done filming

"So. You have Avatar here, and if anybody remembers because you're like Oh yeah, he's still making it. Very much. So James, Cameron. Right now he? Says that New Zealand has been able to get a handle. On Kobe nineteen so well that now he's resuming. Finishing Avatar three. Which is ninety five percent done and Avatar to is. One, hundred percent done. And you can read the headliner here from deadline. James Cameron says ever to filming is one hundred percent complete avatar three, ninety, five, percent complete praises New Zealand for Kobe response you probably saying, yeah, whatever man that's what they say. You know they always important as we see in never works out that way I don't believe him. Well, if you don't believe they headline right there maybe not only you'll feel better if you hear from the man himself James Cameron. But also. From the man who made James Cameron the man of versa. Honest wasn't Nigger Aka the terminator. They had a little discussion about this over of zoom call and. James Cameras steams he can't tell you details, but he seems a very confident that New Zealand. They know what they're doing over there, which allows him to finish his movie. Now before I go all the House, go movie question if you don't mind. Okay. All right. Mental. Kind of interview I just is anything I. Know you're in the middle of shooting Aba I know you've to get up to the individual because of the time changing into sealant the NORAD stop. Dummy sanding newsworthy at that you should know from administer movie coming out in the theaters in what's going on. I. Love Kobe, hit us like it hit everybody it is hard. We lost about four and a half months of production as a result of that we've rolled around one more full year for release in December of twenty two that's been that's been announced already. Now that doesn't mean that I have an extra year to finish the film because the day we deliver Avatar to will start working on finishing avatar three. So where we are right now down in New Zealand shooting, we're shooting the remainder of the live action. We've got about ten percent left to go where one hundred percent complete on Avatar to you know just gotTa stop here real quick and just say I'm looking at. autosport house and it looks adorable. Core I'm looking at this big as Mary here in the back. He's got these little teacups look China look you know little plates and little animals back there. He looks like the this House looks like the House of the old woman that Babysat the kids in the neighborhood. Multitudes man you think he's just a strong man he's sophisticated as hook it really see him going to like antique shows and buying China sooner having tea parties with his wife was up and. I. You know I. Mean this funny. He does this big as guy that got this sense of the Shelf Baker. I like the meanwhile we're James Cameron living. That's my question. It seems very desolate like obviously he's on. His home or whatever. But you think you would spruce that thing up. It looks like a fucking like not a motel, but there's nothing on the walls man got the. Flour barely staying alive. Looks like he's at the W.. Two is about underwater and he's not watering those goddamn plants. Not at all, but he loves blue got a big. Blue Door? A Little. That was the way I can actually know if it was at James Cameron Movie, the Terminator Robert Patrick shows up in terminator two and that Shit immediately goes blue true lies shot in that blue tent for the entire movie. He's got a distinct style say that I believe he actually had a cat spray painted blue. Around the house inspiration, it's a genius I can do this. It's inspiration. You'll get it in twelve years whatever want to give me a couple of years actually kept talking. To resume that conversation right here we're short of ninety, five percent complete on on. The painting. That's a door God damnit. We're just we're very lucky in that. We chose this as our production site years ago we made the first film here in New Zealand and it turns out to be one of the its its ranking to the first or second best country in the world for its Kobe. Response. Germany's in the number one spot sometimes New Zealand's in the number one spot. So now all I do is sit back. And wait for the rest of the world to get their shit together. So he can release the

James Cameron New Zealand James Cameras Kobe James China Robert Patrick Mary Germany
Deep Valley Red Blend 2018

The CheapWineFinder Podcast

04:48 min | 9 months ago

Deep Valley Red Blend 2018

"Day. From. Sheep flying, find it Ascom again. Today we have. Five ninety nine red blend from trader Joe's The teat. Surround Low Sarah. It goes by the name of. Deep Valley Red Wine Blend Mendocino twenty eight teams. Normally Five ninety nine red wine kinda scares me a little bit because. You expect a few things out of red wine some oak aging some. Just some general aging. There is no budget applied ninety wine and a white wine. A little bit different like a Soviet block, a young savvy blockers young. They just make it. Right -Chusetts fresh. Lines good there. It doesn't that doesn't need to cost a lot of money. Learn, you need to do a little bit too and so it's always a little bit scary but I think they spied it's actually a food. Wise. I think it does better. With burgers or like a steak burrito does. On its own and I'm fine with it not the most malicious wine ever taste taste fine. But it's you know it's pretty pretty good. It's made by one of the oldest wineries in Mendocino. If you ever want to know who makes these winds for trader Joe's or any other Any other store where they don't really tell you what's what? Trademark. Registry. Website you get in there within our. Trademark lackadaisical it has come up. But. That doesn't mean that's a one that winery comes up would ever make on their own these custom crush people trader Joe's goes down and says, I want a wine like this at this price. They think, yeah. Okay. We can do that but it might not be a wine that they would ever do on their own. So don't read too much into who makes other than if they make good quality wine. They're probably not skipping on the quality that. They held back. And that's that and this is. It's a good ninety, nine Tuesday night. Pizza, burgers. Fine for them is this really well. You Know Harry. You go in and out Burger, we don't have it ended up Burger Chicago. It picked this would go great with that. There's another thing another observation about trader Joe's wines, and here's a five, ninety, nine wine from a single Aba. Under ten dollars. Californian the label which means that the grapes come from all over. It comes from the North Coast Central. Coast Central Valley. and. That's usually because to make wine cheap you gotta have. A lot of it. You gotTa make. Five hundred thousand bottles. And these big wine corporations do that they'll have holdings everywhere and you know they own vineyards contractors everywhere. So to make the most of their money and utilize scrapes pick from all over but trader, Joe's isn't like. They, go to a single ABA. And you don't know out of this is a single vineyard wine but not that, and there are a lot of vineyards in. In the Mendocino but. You know usually when these cheaper the winds are the simpler things is way to happens. You know they're not be off. You've got to bring in grapes from twenty seven different. Vineyards that might happen but you gotta figure cheaper just to grab one or two. So. To storebrand. You get a much more exclusive line for cheaper price than you do in a retail line. But you don't really know what you're getting basically. You're taking a chance but you get these single ABA wines and he don't know who's making what where, when all the time. But. If you go the trademark website, find out who's doing at Subic meals. Usually go because a lot of times these people. Make. These winds for trader. Joe's whatever their own brand self, their thirty five forty dollars. Make wines I mean it's. Just happen to have some extra great somewhere getting their hands on something. And you know trader Joe's better for. So. There you go. You got the deep sally you red wine blend from. Five, ninety, nine crazy price. There is some. You know it's It's a twenty eight. So it's fairly young for Redwan. Super Young read one.

JOE Mendocino ABA Ascom Storebrand Subic Burger North Coast Central Central Valley. Redwan Chicago
Japan's Prime Minister resigns for health reasons

Monocle 24: The Briefing

06:15 min | 9 months ago

Japan's Prime Minister resigns for health reasons

"It is a week or so since Japan's longest-serving, Prime Minister Shinzo are announced that he would be standing down for health reasons that discreet interval having elapsed those who fancy succeeding him as leader of the Liberal Democratic Party and therefore Prime Minister of beginning to make themselves known among the first out of the traps is Yoshi suger currently chief cabinet secretary already seen as the favorite the former foreign, Minister Fumio Kishida and former. Defense. Minister Shapiro she but also like their chances, the decision is due on. September. Fourteenth joining me with more is molecules Tokyo bureau chief. Your New Wilson. Fiona is this the one horse race that some are already calling it? Yes, I'm afraid I think it is amazing. Things have happening over the last couple of days in Japan you're right there are three key people standing but really the LDP party, the party executives have swung into action and pretty much. So not the race for Soga to win it's going to be very difficult for him to lose the L. TPS. Famously, it's got these factions seven factions and it seems that saga although he only just a matter of hours go announced. His candidacy seems he's already secured. Five of the seven factions. Votes can be quite hard to beat him and yesterday that was an amazing meeting of the Executive Council of the Party and they decided not to bother with the votes from the rank and file, which really sent a clear signal because among the rank and file issue the former defense minister, he's the top choice. He's also the top choice with the public. He pulls much higher than Sukkur and clearly the party Did Not want him to win. So the in a way it's been rigged actually the vote and it's very good news for Soga and not for anyone else standing on that point though if Ishiba is the more popular candidate among the actual Japanese Public Roy is he not seen as more of a contender by the Party grandees? It's interesting. He's been relentless critic of Shinzo Bay and that's one him. No friends he he just does not have enough support within the party and it's a sort of a grudge I suppose you could say he stood against. A couple of times in two, thousand and twelve he stood against obey. He actually won the first round when it was, you know down to the rank and file he won. He lost in the second round when it came down to the the members of the politicians. So he's he's seen as trouble he's criticized throughout he you know I in a natural way he's got plenty to say about what's going on within his own party. He's he's being critical of our based diplomacy. He thinks it's to US centric he he feels that the stimulus packages that she has set the ABA. Policies that he's feels not sustainable in the long term and he's voiced very openly. So he's one no friends within the policy leaders and I think now it's unfortunately for him. It's coming home to roost. So if we are going to have to get used to the idea of your Shahida, suge as the next prime minister of Japan, do we understand yet what sort of prime minister he intends to be? Basically, who is he? Yeah, it's an interesting one I mean. People outside Japan wet name much about him although he's been obeys right hand man throughout since two thousand twelve he's he's the public face of the government. He's the top spokesperson. He's there every day at the press conferences batting off critism of Shinto. Ebbe. There are questions about unfortunate scandals, how how Abbas dealing with the pandemic. It's been super who's dealt with all that. So he is a very, very well known face here. He's. He's sometimes referred to his uncle ray were not not particularly affectionately, but he was the man who revealed the name of the new Japanese era when there's new. The new era begins and we are now in the era of war and he was the man who revealed that on television. So he's sort of got this nickname, but there's not a lot. He's revealed about himself personally in seventy one. Well, when when he came on today his press conference, he pretty much announced exactly what kind of prime minster he'll be, which is continuity Abba he said he'll be dealing with coronavirus. He'll continue with up a NOMEX and he'll continue Abbas diplomatic policy which is based on the US Japan. Alliance and I think that's where he differed from issue who was trying to do the exact opposite really saying. Issue has been saying we need more friends in south. East Asia not so US centric, he doesn't fancy what they call the golf diplomacy the great bromance between trump and pay, which is much spoken of. Not. Sure. How much trump considered it although he did he did tweets that he considered to be Japan's greatest prime minister which prompted much hilarity on twitter to see if anyone could ask trump who was his second greatest pick suspecting that he probably couldn't name and other Japanese prime minister so that that really he's continuity and for some people about important but it seems the public were they wanted a bit of change maybe not a complete revolution. They've maybe would have liked to fresh face, but it looks like it's going to be so good and it's a very short election campaign really starts in the seventh ends on the fourteenth with the Prime Minister being appointed on the sixteenth seventeenth in a special session just finally, and briefly owner is it politically viable for the Liberal Democratic Party just to install him as prime minister and let him crack on there won't be any talk of early general election or anything. There isn't at the moment, but there has to be a general election by next Autumn Anyway twenty, twenty one. This is so. It would be pretty remarkable if he were to come in and immediately call a general election. So I think not. But there are some very dissenting voices I notice the Asahi Shimbun, huge center-left newspaper second-biggest paper. In Japan, remember the circulations are enormous and described this whole process of how suit of being shoehorned into the role as bleak and pathetic. So it's not like There is across the board support for is going to have a bit of a battle with the public. He hasn't actually put a foot wrong so far he said very little. He only announced his candidacy tonight so. We'll see how it turns out but at the moment, it looks like it's going to be business as usual. If, you're on a Wilson in Tokyo Bureau. Thank you for joining

Japan Prime Minister Liberal Democratic Party Minister Fumio Kishida Minister Shapiro United States Soga Tokyo Bureau Chief Abbas Asahi Shimbun Fiona Yoshi Suger Shinzo Bay Tokyo Bureau LDP Shinzo Donald Trump
"aba" Discussed on ABA Inside Track

ABA Inside Track

01:56 min | 9 months ago

"aba" Discussed on ABA Inside Track

"Hey APA inside track listeners. We embark into our fourth year of the podcast we wanted to stop recognized couldn't have continued creating our brand scientific and entertaining behavior analytic content without your support and to acknowledge the importance of our community of. Students and practitioners we've decided to team up a Patriot to provide more opportunities for our audience interact with the show than ever before. He is an online platform that allows fans to donate at a variety of levels unlock access to more shows, see store discounts, and even a chance to join our recording sessions for just five dollars a month, you'll be invited to join us for behavior analysis social strain. Every other month you'll be able to share your thoughts on the set topic, Rob Diana, and Jackie, as well as other behavioral analysts online community. If you're interested in more podcast content, why not join us the ten dollars a month level you also gain access to three additional shows a year taking are popular book club format to discuss behavior analytic literature that you get to vote on. Each of these episodes will be good for learning credits at no additional cost and include the fun in detail commentary, you've come to expect from our show and add an extra incentive. Ten dollar patrons will receive a special ABA inside track sticker and a monthly ten percent discount at our C. E. Store. Finally, for those of you'd like to be part of the show. If you sign up at the twenty dollars a month level, you'll learn everything at the previous levels and get to join us during the recordings of the book club episodes. That's right. You'll be able to take the role of one of our special guest co hosts for an entire episode. As our guest new receive a show Mug designed specifically for our inside tracker patrons as well as a twenty percent discount each month at the C. E. Store. As an added bonus, all patrons who sign up before September thirtieth at any level will receive a free see store credit as a thanks from. US for early support. To find more information and sign up, just go to, patriotdepot. Dot Com slash Aba inside track or you can email US questions at Aba inside track at gmail.com. Responding..

Two Angels Petite Sirah 2017

The CheapWineFinder Podcast

04:26 min | 9 months ago

Two Angels Petite Sirah 2017

"This. Is Dave from. SHEEP WIND DOT COM. Come and again with another one. And this one is kind of an interesting one is this a? Ten dollar one. Or is it a twenty four, a gallery one? And the answer is depends on where you by. The. Angels. Petite Surat twenty seventeen, which I picked up at Costco. For Nine Ninety nine. You go elsewhere. Check the Internet out and it's selling for twenty, three, twenty, four, twenty, five. So it's like this is a ten dollar wine or is this the upscale wide? It's a petite derived from the Red Hills Aba in lake. County Lake County is due north of Napa Valley. And it's On the end of clear lake up there up about two thousand feet or more. From The Becker Mecca. Famous. Mountains I'm not quite sure where. But. It's high elevation, which is interesting. It's got You know the lakes helping things spot canucks soils. Really Cool. Groin area. It's one hundred percents. nine months in French Oh, twenty percent new. Is this deep dark rich bulbs, Bisi. Why it's kind of funny I'm drinking on a hot and sticky. August nights in the mood. A bit out of place but in about three weeks when it cools down at night. It's going to be just the wine you're looking for. And it's big bold. It's both silky smooth events ICS got tons of spies. Yeah And like I said, is this a one? There's this twenty, four dollar one. It's it's rich extracted. It's got a lot of flavors. Usually like the Tannin's and the acidity talk about that. But there's so much flavor they take back sheets everything that's going on. Off The teeth Sarah's kind of a weird grip kind of explain that a little bit. Back in the eighteen hundreds late eighteen hundreds, France at all sorts of problems with Pest and disease in vineyards, and when you're having problems with wine and France, it's a big problem. And the Sarah Grapes? Enron valley we're having some problems. So man named Europe. But Together With I think person? I'm it's a great that I think might be extinct nowadays or just almost never planet. To kind of create this hardy. Healthy. Sarai substitute. And by the time he did. The problems in the vineyard solved the no one wanted the. Ceron. Somehow showed up in Australia where it's called the roof. And California, and it wasn't a big wine from California until lately. It's everywhere. If you grab the Zinfandels, probably got some Petite Saran there and In other if you grab a red wine, it's the hidden member the. Used to. Flavor you. Come to expect. It always gives the wine a little bit of a boost unexpected boost. The teat psoriasis come into his own. This is a really, really nice petite up. that. If you feel like going upscale spend some money, well, you can go to any other store you want to. But if you want to spend ten bucks, go to COSCO and if you don't have a membership card, you talk to your neighbor does. Toss him twenty bucks or so and promise to share it with them. Drum breakdown. And you're in luck in I don't know what to say about this wine then it tastes great. Spice it's a big red wine. You like big boy red wines a big girl red I don't want to be. I don't WANNA be. Hurt anyone's feelings.

Sarah Grapes Red Hills Aba France California County Lake County Costco Cosco Surat Enron Valley Europe Napa Valley French Oh Bisi Sarai Australia The Becker Mecca
Peaks and Tides Sonoma Coast Chardonnay 2018

The CheapWineFinder Podcast

04:07 min | 10 months ago

Peaks and Tides Sonoma Coast Chardonnay 2018

"Stay home. Cheap wine fighter dot com summit again with another. Why Review. In kind of a companion podcast for wine picked up all. All he's been. Doing well lately and this one's called. Let me grab the bottle so I don't screw it up. Peaks in tied. Sonoma's coach Chardonnay Twenty, eight, eighteen. And peaks and tides kind of. Describes the SONOMA's coast. Ava that's. mainly. A Boutique area that specializes in Chardonnay and new are. It's up along the coast. It's In between coastal mountains it's cold. There's not a lot of huge vineyards in there. It's more boats tiki their commercial vineyards within a big. But it's. Really good growing area. And I want to a snow coast trade event a few years back. and kind of picked up gossip I. Think I would call it because it'd be wine reps and then there would be winemakers and they were kind of upset. That when the SONOMA's coast Aba was set, their boundaries are set up. Some of the bigger. Huge actually. Well established. Literally connected wineries and Wine Corpse. Kinda got the the boundaries moved to cover the Russian river eastward just to cover some of the bigger properties. And the guys kind of upset and I just noticed that Petitioned to have a western SONOMA'S COAST AV A. Now I don't know what the problem is because even the Russian river ones those are really high on liner isn't really good wines. I. Don't get what the problem is. You know maybe it's a small guy versus little guy I don't know. But, that's what they were doing and they were seemed to be all upset about it. So you know that's just gossip me sitting here with a glass by hand listening to winemaker stock. So this is a SONOMA's coast Chardonnay. If you check out your Google look. The the town in the back they said peaks and tides made it. I don't know if there is a pig's entites company, but you can figure out who the winemaker might or the liner or one of their entities might be. It's not a foolproof method of who the biggest Winery in town is, but it usually gives you a good clue. GonNa take a sip of this one. This is a really good nine, ninety, nine Chardonnay. It's got some oaken full Benatti huge amount. Let's got this kind of honey rounded thing going on it's got all sorts of flavors. I mean I got banana and pineapple. Meyer. Lemon and NAPA grapefruit and you've got on least salty thing. It's got some lemon. Vanilla cream. It tastes good. It smells great. It's got a great enrollment to I was Kinda digging that. So for ninety nine in any don't expect all these displays, these wines. So haphazardly that you you know. You don't have an expectation just by looking though this label and this line they also have a pretty good Cabernet. Sauvignon thing that I thought it's up. You know I'm not sure about that one. The packaging looks like it could be any kind of retail brand in back of genes fine. And it tastes good really good at for ten bucks and can delivers maybe over delivers. Ten Bucks will buy you a good Chardonnay out as ten twelve dollars you can you really, really good. But this is to in itself storebrand again, all these been kind of kick in some but I kind of liken it.

Sonoma Chardonnay Twenty Russian River Storebrand Google Meyer
"aba" Discussed on ABA Inside Track

ABA Inside Track

02:33 min | 10 months ago

"aba" Discussed on ABA Inside Track

"And that means <Speech_Female> our first <Speech_Female> place team <Speech_Female> coming in with sixty <Speech_Female> eight point five points <Speech_Female> as project <SpeakerChange> pigeon <Laughter> way <Speech_Music_Female> to. <Speech_Music_Female> <Laughter> <SpeakerChange> Do. <Speech_Female> Congratulations <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> I <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> I. Second Place <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Teams will all <Speech_Female> receive a free. See <Speech_Female> You <Speech_Female> and first place team <Speech_Female> also get <SpeakerChange> their choice <Laughter> of t shirts. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> Thanks for <Speech_Female> coming and playing. <Speech_Female> Aba <Speech_Female> and. Sidetracked <SpeakerChange> Trivia. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> Thank you. Thank <Speech_Male> you all so much for <Speech_Male> coming out tonight. We really <Speech_Male> appreciate it <Speech_Male> if you. <Speech_Male> Somehow came <Speech_Male> here and have not listened to <Speech_Male> our podcast <Speech_Male> inside track. I don't know <Speech_Male> how you showed up here <Speech_Male> but you certainly <Speech_Male> can <Speech_Male> begin listening. If <Speech_Male> you enjoyed this level <Speech_Male> of amusing <Speech_Male> talk about behavior <Speech_Male> analysis, we try <Speech_Male> to bring that to the show every <Speech_Male> week. <Speech_Male> And also, if you have any <Speech_Male> feedback about how tonight <Speech_Male> went whether, we <Speech_Male> should do another one of these <Speech_Male> at some point. Please <Speech_Male> let us know <Speech_Male> because you <Speech_Male> know it's a lot of work and if no one <Speech_Male> says anything to us, we <Speech_Male> probably want to another one but <Speech_Male> who knows? <Speech_Male> Thank you again <Speech_Male> so much for coming out. <Speech_Male> If you <Speech_Male> don't have anything <Speech_Male> else to do, you could certainly <Speech_Male> hang out the bars <Speech_Male> open for another hour <Speech_Music_Male> I believe <hes> <Speech_Music_Male> and <Speech_Male> yeah. If you one <Speech_Male> or came in second, <Speech_Male> please come <Speech_Male> tell US <Speech_Male> circumstance. We'll give <Speech_Male> you your certificate <Speech_Male> of achievement <Speech_Male> and again <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> thank you all so <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> much for coming out. We <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> really really <SpeakerChange> appreciate <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> it. Thank you. <Speech_Male> We hope you enjoy listening <Speech_Male> to our. Live <Speech_Male> tribute event. If <Speech_Male> this is something you'd <Speech_Male> be interested in hearing more <Speech_Male> of or maybe <Speech_Male> having US host <Speech_Male> another one of these <Speech_Male> you know so that you know if you're interested, <Speech_Male> maybe you could swing <Speech_Male> by at some <Speech_Male> point why <Speech_Male> not let us know <Speech_Male> we'd love to hear <Speech_Male> from you <Speech_Male> either by <Speech_Male> reaching out to us on <Speech_Male> social media <Speech_Male> where Aba inside track <Speech_Male> everywhere or <Speech_Male> by posting on <Speech_Male> the website Aba inside <Speech_Male> track dot. com <Speech_Male> or our youtube page. <Speech_Male> You can also feel <Speech_Male> free to just e mail us <Speech_Male> directly at Aba <Speech_Male> Sidetrack at gmail.com <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> you liked our content <Speech_Male> and liked the general <Speech_Male> tone of <Speech_Male> our Trivia episode <Speech_Male> but would love to hear <Speech_Male> us talking about something <Speech_Male> a little bit more <Speech_Male> specific <Speech_Male> focused. <Speech_Male> You know based on behavior analytic <Speech_Male> research. Why <Speech_Male> not subscribe to our <Speech_Male> main show <Speech_Male> that comes out every week <Speech_Male> you can do that on Apple. <Speech_Male> PODCAST

"aba" Discussed on ABA Inside Track

ABA Inside Track

02:24 min | 10 months ago

"aba" Discussed on ABA Inside Track

"Avengers endgame becomes the highest grossing movie of All Time Making two point seven, eight, seven, billion dollars. It is actually avengers. Which reach that goal in July of Twenty nineteen. The, last state. To Pass Autism Insurance Reform August of Twenty nineteen. And finally know your CMO. Number. One is an example of a CMO S. Number two is in a Oh. Number three is a CMO T. Number four Ao. Number Five Are. Number six CMO. Number seven CMO S. Number eight CMO are. Number nine to see him ot and number ten a CMO are. All, right. If you could please bring up your answer sheets, we're going to do our final tallies and find the winner. Our at our judges tabulates scores. Let's find out who on the ABA inside. Trivia. Night. Kate okay. So thank you everyone for coming out tonight.

Kate ABA
"aba" Discussed on ABA Inside Track

ABA Inside Track

01:46 min | 10 months ago

"aba" Discussed on ABA Inside Track

"Who is in fact older than sliced bread nineteen, thousand, four, versus one thousand nine, hundred, twenty, eight he's much older than sliced bread. Number Three Java Or. Are you there God? It's me Margaret. It's Java. Java is published nine, hundred, sixty eight. Are you there God? It's me. Margaret. Was Nineteen seventy. Verbal behavior or the song blue. Suede. Shoes. It's blue suede shoes. Ninety, seven, nineteen, fifty-six. Number five. Watt article on functional analysis originally published or transformers come to America. It's a wad at all nineteen eighty-two transformers came out in one, thousand, nine, hundred, four. Number six. Jack Michael's defines motivating operations or physical is based. Its physical one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, one. Number seven the first edition of Cooper Heron insured was published or the handmaid's tale by Margaret Atwood was published. Is The handmaid's tale published in nineteen eighty five? Cooper Heron, and Hewitt's first edition was nine, hundred, eighty, seven. Number eight the first. Conference or the laptop computer is invented, which is older actually the first. Conference which came out night, which was a nine, hundred, seventy, four, the first laptop was nineteen, seventy, five new. Number Nine, the establishment of the or the release of the Slim Shady LP. It's the PAC be established. In. One, thousand, nine, hundred, Ninety, eight. Number ten this is a tough one which came first Aba insurance funding for autism finally, available in all fifty states or.

"aba" Discussed on ABA Inside Track

ABA Inside Track

04:43 min | 10 months ago

"aba" Discussed on ABA Inside Track

"Or eminem released the Slim Shady LP. And number ten. Which is older Aba insurance funding for autism becomes available in all fifty states. Or the movie avengers endgame becomes the highest grossing movie of All time. Both very important events. Aba Insurance Funding for autism becomes available in all fifty states..

"aba" Discussed on ABA Inside Track

ABA Inside Track

03:41 min | 10 months ago

"aba" Discussed on ABA Inside Track

"And number ten, six, point zero two. So where are you going to roll right into the last two rounds because getting late? And then you'll bring them up later. All right round nine. Row Nine is called Brad Pitt or lasers. In this round I will tell you two things. One is a pop culture thing. One is a behavior analytic thing. Your job is your tell me which is older. So for example, Brad Pitt or lasers, which do you think is older just call out lasers lasers corrects lasers are older than Brad Pitt. Ready to understand the. Rules. Question number. One. The good behavior game or the release of the movie planet of the Apes. The good behavior game or the movie planet of the Apes, the original planet of the Apes. which is older. So you right the old one. Number two. which is older. BEF skinner was born. Or sliced, bread. BEF, skinner was born. Or sliced bread. Question number. Three. The first issue of Java Or. The release of our there God, it's me Margaret the first issue of Java or are you there God? It's me Margaret. Which is older question number four. The publishing of verbal behavior. Or the song blue suede shoes by Elvis Presley. which is older. The publishing of verbal behavior or blue suede shoes by Elvis Presley. Question Number Five. The original publication of the Awada at all article on functional analysis research or the release of transformers toys in. America. A At all functional analysis research originally published. Or transformers toys released in America, which is older. Question Number Six Jack, Michael defines motivating operations or Livia News John Song Physical. You know the song, but which came first Jack Michael defines motivating operations or Olivia Newton John's physical. Number seven. Cooper Heron. As you words first edition publication of their textbook or the publication of the handmaid's tale by Margaret Atwood. The First Edition Textbook of Cooper Heron was published or the handmaid's tale by Margaret Atwood was published, which is older. Number Eight. The first ABA. I conference which at the time was called the mid. Western Association for Behavior Analysis. Or the laptop, computer invented. which is older. The first. conference. Or for the laptop computer invention. Number nine. The board was established. Or? Eminem Slim Shady LP was released. which is older. The BA seaboard was established..

Brad Pitt BEF skinner Margaret Atwood Cooper Heron Western Association for Behavi Jack Michael Elvis Presley America Olivia Newton John Elvis Presley. ABA Livia
"aba" Discussed on ABA Inside Track

ABA Inside Track

03:34 min | 10 months ago

"aba" Discussed on ABA Inside Track

"Is Measurement Systems I'm GONNA. Tell you a little story. You need to listen to that story and ask yourself what type of measurement system would I use? An example Diana has been telling me over and over what I'm doing. Wrong. How would I measure that? Or counts If I wanted to know over the entire Trivia time I would ask for rate, Jackie. That make sense. So, you think the measurement system I'll give you the story. And I do not think we had doubles. So everyone is a different measurement system. No doubles don't just put count for everyone. I mean you can if you want but you will be wrong a bunch of times. Nine Times. Here, we go number one. During a meeting, I become curious how many pieces of chocolate candies does Jackie eat before were dismissed? What type of measurement would I use? My story again. During a meeting I become curious. How many pieces of chocolate candies does Jackie eat before we're dismissed. Wonder. It is not all of them. I mean it might be but the measurement system to determine that. Number two. While listening to the PODCAST I. Wonder How long does it take rob to do a sound check? While listening to the podcast I wonder how long does it take rob to do a sound check? UNMEASURED yeah. Died I think is an eternity. Question number three. I'm looking to see if people are checking me out at the. Bar. I'm with my friends so I want to pay attention to them as well. I only look up and check every minute. Here, it is. Again, I'm looking to see if any people are checking me out at the bar. I'm with my friends so I want to pay attention to them as well. I only look up in check every minute. Our question number four. Tiring of our uneven audio quality, you've decided to do a study to determine who is the loudest and who is the quietest host on inside track. Again, tiring of our.

Measurement Systems Jackie rob Diana
"aba" Discussed on ABA Inside Track

ABA Inside Track

04:04 min | 10 months ago

"aba" Discussed on ABA Inside Track

"Number five. Don't think of this behavior analyst as flighty. She is a graduate of the University of Michigan and has had a long and celebrated teaching career including receiving the Fred Keller Teaching Award. She currently teaches at the University of Nevada Reno with our T. focused husband. She is an API fellow and a former president of. and to research specialties are behavior, theory and philosophy. All right one more time. Don't think of this behavior analyst as flighty. She is a graduate of the University of Michigan and has had a long and celebrated teaching career including receiving the Fred Keller Teaching Award. She currently teaches at the University of Nevada really with our T. focused husband she's an API fellow and a former president of. And a research specialties are behavior theory end philosophy. Question number six. This University of Kansas Professor chairs the Aba Department there and received her doctorate from Syracuse University. She is well published in the staff training and opium literature and is married to a prominent behavioral economics professor. One more time. This University of Kansas professor chairs the department there and received her doctorate from Syracuse University. She is well published in the staff training and OBI literature and is married to a prominent behavioral economics professor. Fun fact she also wants published a study in which all of our participants were named after the sisters of the character Joey from friends as well. Number seven. University of Houston Clear Lake Behavior Analyst received your PhD From University of Florida in Nineteen, Ninety five. She serves the editor of both Java and behavior analysis and practice. This. Behavior analyst is published in many areas including autism severe problem behavior and functional analysis. This University of Houston Clear Lake Behavior, analysts received a PhD from the University of Florida in Nineteen Ninety five. She has served as the editor job and behavior analysis in practice. This behavior analyst has published in many areas including autism, severe problem behavior, and functional analysis. All right number eight. This behavior analyst holds a unique position as a professor of pediatrics at UMASS medical school. She received her doctorate from Columbia University and used to work for the reading. Company head sprouts. She's a former president of. An. Expert in instructional design. This behavior analyst holds a unique position as a professor of pediatrics at UMASS medical school. She received her doctorate from. Columbia. University and used to work for the reading company heads sprout. She's a former president of Aba I, an expert in instructional design. Aright. Question number. Nine. This colorful woman received her PhD from Utah. State University, and is currently the president of a PBA. She has published extensively on autism and stimulus equivalence. One more time. This colorful woman received her PhD from Utah State University and is currently the president of a PGA. She has published extensively on autism and stimulus equivalence. Number ten. This prominent behavior analyst is a feeding experts and the director of the Pediatric Feeding Clinic at University of Nebraska Munroe Meyer Institute. She is a former editor of Java. Maybe, she'll convince you to eat a pizza. One more time on that number ten. This prominent behavior analyst is a feeding expert and the director of the Pediatric Feeding Clinic at University of Nebraska Munroe Meyer Institute. She's a former editor of Java maybe she'll convince you to eat a pizza..

analyst president University of Michigan University of Nevada Reno University of Houston University of Nevada Columbia University University of Nebraska Munroe University of Kansas PhD From University of Florida Fred Keller Teaching Award professor of pediatrics Syracuse University University of Florida professor Utah State University State University UMASS medical school editor
"aba" Discussed on ABA Inside Track

ABA Inside Track

03:37 min | 10 months ago

"aba" Discussed on ABA Inside Track

"Okay it sounded. You are so gung Ho for this topic and now you're doing it. Oh. My God. It is this is hard. So in this round, we are going to read you a bio. Of various women in behavior. Analysis. And based on that, you'll write down their name. It is okay. If you right doctor, you know last name you don't have to know their first name though most of them you should know about you. Know both names or you will not. But just last name is fine. Everybody Ready. All. Right question number one. This behavior analyst is the former director of Trumpet Behavioral Health and now owns a self titled. Consulting business. She has been an associate editor of several flagship, ABA journals including Java Bap and Ta Avb and a past president of Aba. I. She is also married to the CEO of the. A long bio, but I will I will read it one more time. This behavior analyst is the former director of Trumpet Behavioral Health and now owns a self titled Consulting Business. She's been an associate editor of several flagship, ABA journals including job bap in Ta. And a past president of Aba I. She is also married to the CEO of the be. They're married. All right question number two. This pioneering woman received PhD from the University of Florida in Nineteen eighty-seven and currently works at the University of North Carolina Wilmington. Much of her research focuses on conditional discriminations and class formation. I'll say one more time. This pioneering woman received her PhD from the University of Florida in Nineteen, eighty seven and currently works at the University of North Carolina Wilmington. Much of a research focuses on conditional discriminations and class formation. All right. Question number three. This. Is the author of the book, The science of consequences and a graduate of the University of Kansas. She specializes in research and environmental sustainability and animal behavior and is currently at the University of the Pacific. One more time this. Is the author of the book, The science of consequences and a graduate of the University of Kansas. She specializes in research environmental sustainability in animal behavior and is currently at the University of the Pacific. Number Four This researcher received your PhD from the University of Florida in two thousand one and is the director of the behavior analysis. Department at Western New England University. Her research specialty is infant behavior in child development. She is also the person who told Diane Jackie to look for prominent female behavior analysts to look up to. She never told me this though. One more time, this researcher received her PhD from the University of Florida in two thousand one and the director of the Behavior Analysis Department in Western New England University. Her research specialty is infant behavior and child development. She is also the person who told Diana and Jackie to look for prominent female behavior analysts to look up to. Okay. This is a hard round next round easier..

University of Florida University of North Carolina W associate editor University of Kansas Aba director analyst University of the Pacific Western New England University Behavior Analysis Department Trumpet Behavioral Health CEO Diane Jackie president gung Ho researcher Ta Avb Diana
"aba" Discussed on ABA Inside Track

ABA Inside Track

02:28 min | 10 months ago

"aba" Discussed on ABA Inside Track

"Hey everybody. Welcome.

Kuwait emir, 91, flies to US for medical care after surgery

Buck Sexton

00:30 sec | 10 months ago

Kuwait emir, 91, flies to US for medical care after surgery

"The emir of Kuwait is expected to seek medical treatment in the US, saying it's 91 year old ruler Emir Sheik Sabah Lama, Raba is fine to the United States for medical treatments. His office says The trip comes after a successful surgery at the weekend. There are no further details. The news on the lack of clarity on shake Subhas condition is prompting speculation about another possible power struggle within Kuwait's ruling family shakes. ABA has led the country for 14

Emir Sheik Sabah Lama Kuwait United States ABA Raba
New Movies Coming To Netflix, Amazon Prime, Hulu And HBO This Weekend

Roe Conn

06:19 min | 11 months ago

New Movies Coming To Netflix, Amazon Prime, Hulu And HBO This Weekend

"If you have Amazon prime video there's a movie called mice bite which was just hitting theaters when covert nineteen hit this is an action comedy Dave Batista who's you know guardians of the galaxy you know that big giant former wrestler guy he's a CIA agent row he finds himself teamed up with the precocious nine year old so in other words should be making kindergarten cop now I have to tell you about this to think that this is actually this is a rite of passage for action star Jackie Chan had a movie like this the rock had a movie like this John Cena is had a movie like this at some point you gotta so you're lovable side and be charged with guarding little kids and then you learn about the soft side yourself this one is particularly horrible and one of the things we hate about this movie Rakan my spot is set primarily in Chicago they shot it in Toronto eight that and the worst moments in this movie is there's a chase that begins in wicker park okay the bad guy gets behind the wheel of a car with her party he's trying to get away from Dave Batista CIA agent now the C. I. A. tech person is in David she says here telling them where you know traveling this guy and the agents as one minute after this car leaves wicker park the agent says looks like he's heading to the Naperville area because Naperville has a giant airfield so wrong later five minutes later we're in phony Naperville where I kid you not there's a big you know action sequence where the plane on the runway is now dangling over what appears to be the Grand Canyon who knew that in Naperville there was an airport overlooking a giant canyon clearly green screen so I mean it's just been really poorly done it's too violent for the little kids and it's too stupid for the adults and a lot of parents thing all this might be fun have a fun action movie stay away from my spy that's too bad you're you're totally right about that right of passage because Arnold Schwarzenegger had to do that too right I mean it was like a garden shop yeah I mean everybody has to make sure that the kids have something to go watch in that in those movies were actually pretty good for kids you're saying this one's not this was terrible okay now I've got I've got the funniest movie of the summer Fauria probably so far it has the worst title of all time it's called Eurovision Song Contest the story of fire saga well the Eurovision Song Contest is an actual deal in Europe and has been since the rent if these in fact Salim young was discovered on that aba was first on the Eurovision Song Contest this is a parity with will Ferrell the king of the parity right and Rachel McAdams they play a couple of Icelandic singer songwriters he's Lars Eriksen she's cigarette original daughter and their Icelandic and they're dreaming of representing their home whether they do kind of like Viking game of thrones stamp rock songs so this is filled with all these big production numbers because then we meet the contestants from Greece and the grand the Russian the Russian contest is actually played by our friend Dan Stevens was Matthew Crawley on Downton abbey he plays a Russian oligarch who's also a ballad singer it's really really stupid and it's really really funny it's mostly excuse these big giant set pieces where they do these huge production numbers remember will Ferrell did a movie called blades of glory your hair well he does for you know that did for ice dancing with the stars for song competition so even though we don't know the Eurovision Song Contest here in the states we know about all the competition shows that this is basically get one singer from each country you know what it's all European countries they have a couple of other than the states they're not we're not eligible for the Eurovision Song Contest was there an SNL bit with will Ferrell that was similarly themed I I just don't know that there could have been it's it's clearly the kind of stuff that he just excels at when you see him in the big Viking outfit and looks like the blue eye shadow it's singing about Viking you know might biking protector this is the song from this will enrich McAdams by the was wonderful as well she can also be very funny the video and the song they do is so terrible that it's great because it looks just like when you see those kind of you know that's a big deal that kind of like that Viking will rock nonsense yeah there's my aunts were everybody everybody pretends like the rolling the slave ship which is really just unfortunate or the big Viking ship as it will be we kind of you know horrible music but really right prepared well it there's that old joke about Led Zeppelin thank you know I have the have the crap was about Vikings right and if the agency had no idea what they were saying about this the music was so great musicianship as of right but if you look back you're like what the hell of the talk was only in the middle of the song yeah they had they did they had references to the lord of the rings when it was just a yeah they were so ready this is really true okay and anything else this weekend it's yeah I want to tell people is a completely does shift in tone row but the there's a best selling book a called I'll be gone in the dark written by the late Michelle McNamara who was UP board result park went to California become a true crime writer Mary Patton Oswalt the famous comedian and actor and she wrote about one of the best true crime book sense in cold blood called I'll be gone in the dark about the search for the Golden State killer probably the least known to most prolific serial killer rapist of the last fifty years this is not a six part series about Michelle's book and also about the Golden State killer it starts on HBO on Sunday night if people if you're into that true crime genre you know talk about making a murderer people aren't so many of these other ones this is the podcast to get started this is brilliantly done and it's really a profile of Michelle McNamara and her marriage to Pat now as well because it's young obviously she had a lot of recording should podcasters video for a lot and she died while writing the book she died in her sleep partially because the stress of the book and and prescription drugs and under heart condition and they continued patent and some researchers continued and finished the book without her and then we get to know the story of this incredible monster who I will let people know was just arrested a couple of years ago and charged with all these crimes because guess what they got his DNA matched about fourteen of the crime scenes that that kept the updates from I'll be gone in the

Dave Batista Amazon CIA
A Live Chat with Two of the Biggest Rabbis in Phoenix

Unorthodox

08:52 min | 1 year ago

A Live Chat with Two of the Biggest Rabbis in Phoenix

"Have two of the biggest rabbis and Phoenix here with US tonight. Rabbi Dr Smelly Yanko. It's the president and Dina validate me Josh and Rabbi Pinchas. Illusion is the founding rabbi of Congregation Beth Safina in Scottsdale Arizona. Come come welcome rebuttal. Don't usually have two guests because things can get really off the rails so we'll see what happens here rabbis. I'm GONNA call you. We'll we'll we'll figure out what we're GONNA call you but let's start with this question for both of you. Why isn't this Jewish community different from all other Stephanie Loud Mark this is why all the people who don't touch the MIC? Don't have problems every house. That better josh all right there we go sorry Stephanie. So let's start off because there's like no spoilers here because only spoilers so rabbis. Why is this Jewish community different from all other Jewish communities? Are you guys even Jewish? You're letting each other speak. It's an excellent question you went on to. I twenty all right so I think for two main reasons number one. It's a community that has just been founded really in the past. Few decades other communities are centuries old. This community is quite new and therefore its future is still very much ahead of it. I think that's why many people are really attracted to the potential of the community year as I was when I first move you thirteen years ago. And it's buzzing with excitement that's number one number two. I also think that it's a community. It's quite diverse and it's diverse in its culture it's diverse in its levels of observance of background. But it's not just the diversity that is attracting and that is quite unique to Phoenix. But it's a unity within the diversity truly feel that we're a united community which can't be said about Kish Committees. That was speaking about before in other places so those are the two main things that I see almost immediately like musing. Yeah well you say when. I was thinking about moving in the middle my seventh year. The two points that people shared as to why I shouldn't consider it. They said it's an intellectual wasteland which is totally untrue. We have people coming out to our learning events every night interesting ideas. And secondly they said it's a moral morally passive community very private very individualistic which is also completely untrue. When we have various activists campaigns people lined up lined up to show support. Who said that? And should we beat them up here? Do you want the crowd here? That can go after them. We the J. Crew here I want. I want to address the thing that you just said. So I'm kind of two minds about the activism angle. There's a part of me that thinks that it's really beautiful and essential for community of face to be very involved in you know social political elements and feel this kind of moral calling and there's another part of me that is a little bit kind of taken aback by how dominant this political discussion. Become just you know. Want to go to show just to hear the Torah just to be together with Jews and worry about that later some other place. How should we be feeling about? Its connection being social justice and question so Rambam my monitors in the third section of his guide for the perplexed. Says what's the purpose of all this stuff and answer is the welfare of the body and the welfare of the soul by which he means the well. If you have to know a little play there which we do. The welfare of the body means just state and the welfare of the sole means the perfection of the intellect so basically the goal of Judaism view is our inner life and our outer life which is to say the inner life is our ritual or beliefs or spirituality stuff. You're touching on and the outer life which he comes to say becomes the priority is that Jews should be on the front and center of fostering the Jus- -ociety and so I think we have a problem. Today I think that The traditional segment of Jewish life prioritizes the parochial and the traditional and not the universal. And I think the more liberal segments of Jewish life prioritize the universal and less of the less attritional and this middle ground of saying yes we care about the world we care society and we care about Jews. That complete package is what we're GONNA do. You agree that he taught us to call them. Yeah that's pleasure. No NOPE BRONCO. Way Back like twenty minutes back calls me peony so all my friends do so no problem. I I would agree with that. I would say though that needs to be a healthy balance of course between the two because if almost like Mark Twain said some people are so open minded that the brain spill out. Sometimes we were so much in open that we forget the message. And so we have to be steeped in the roots of Judaism very much so and yet not forget a calling to go to the outside point out also that if there is an emphasis in Judaism on which side counts the most. It's the outside if you think of the idea of Mitzvah. Most of the six hundred thirteen meets vote are outside oriented. They deal with the world that don't really deal with the internal world. I can only think I don't know maybe you can take more of to mitzvahs on top of the mind that deal with the inside. Prayer Torah study but otherwise everything else really deals with the outside so there is. I do find this emphasis on. Tacona LOMB on trying to rectify the world of course with God's light and with God's message but on the other hand also not forgetting where we come from forgetting to be a steeped in our roots as possible. Something we talk about a lot on the show. Is this idea that a lot of juice today don't necessarily feel like they can just walk into a synagogue and be welcomed or would even feel comfortable. There would even know how to get there. What do you think is the best way to connect with Jews? Who Don't haven't necessarily found their place within the institutional Jewish world thank you. They should go to the valley. Bettman rush to go ahead twenty. I was first before you go second. I'm sorry what did what are these. Mutations Paul Ince Geneva come on these guys could pull off a Juku. They've got the organization got the intellect coming the trail be stealthy. It's a fascinating question and I think that was a really good at alien one another. It's true and I think that the percentages of Jews were not engaged. Not because they're disinterested because they've been alienated is also very high and I think the challenge here is to embrace pluralism which does not bracket are absolutes but creates space for other absolutes. That means that for those of us who are really fervent beliefs. We learn how to create space for others. And those who are more relativistic and actually don't hold. Views are able to cultivate those in our space. I'm worried about those on the margins. I'm worried about single folks who have had had trouble finding partners and we were the people of Color feel alienated those of lower socioeconomic status who feel alienated Those who are converts all types of marginalized Jews that I think are. Establishments can do better being inclusive those with physical disabilities or and really a whole host of others. And I think our community is very good at embracing those who naturally fit in. I would agree also. I think it's an excellent question because he hit it right on the now. I think the biggest challenge we have is rabbis is to make Judaism not just relevant but also accessible and I would say that the lenses I try to wear as rabbi and I think that all Jews should try to wear is the lenses of what my rabbi teaches in his book. We Jews the STEINFELDT He came up with the idea that he was the first one since then. I've heard it many times. But he came up with this idea. That Judaism is not a religion. I don't approach another Jew because of religion nor do I approach another job. Because he's part of my ethnic group. Judaism is not an ethnic group. Judaism is also another nationality. We don't have to live in Israel to be Jewish. What is Judaism? Judaism is a family. I approach another Jew. Because he's my family and yes you could have two Jews and seven opinions but as another Aba of mine taught it's one heart and we can't forget that we do have one hot. We we are part of that. Same family what unites us is much greater than what divides us as the CLICHE goes. But it's not just a cliche it's the truth and therefore not do is better than me. We all have the same soul. No Jew is wiser than me. No Jew is deeper than me. I think every Jew in a way is a part of God and you can't add measurements to divinity to the infinity God is God and Jews that reflection of God he has that Jewish soul and together as a family. That's what unites us. That's what we celebrate. There's that great bit in Michigan where they say that you know. Why did God make us all descended from the same couple so that nobody could say you're better than my father is so so

Phoenix Rabbi Dr Smelly Yanko Josh United States Beth Safina Rabbi Pinchas Arizona President Trump Stephanie Kish Committees Mark Twain Jus- -Ociety Paul Ince Dina Israel Michigan Bettman Juku
In Black America: Spencer Haywood

In Black America

11:18 min | 1 year ago

In Black America: Spencer Haywood

"Player and very like we had out here in Vegas gained all of the players on that team Blake Griffin. All of the young guys coming up and giving me hugs and kisses. And thank you me because you know in that situation just in terms of dollars from Lebron James. He's got an extra one hundred million dollars. Toby gotta one extra one hundred million dollars Lake Griffin got an extra fifty million dollars Kevin Durant who give me a big hug and kiss each got seventy five million dollars extra so the number one dollars and sense that give you an example of what it is because with with four years have yet to wait four years after your high school graduate. You wouldn't lose that kind of capital and you lose that plant on you will lose four entitled number. That will help them get into the hall. Laid on those numbers would be race. And you don't know what happened four years then in College Spencer Haywood Aba Nba Legend and hall of Famer. Hey will always be remembered that the person opened the door for underclassmen college basketball players to leave college early to enter the NBA thereby creating the Spencer Haywood Rule Haywood attended the University of Detroit and help the US Olympic team to a gold medal at the nineteen sixty eight summer games in Mexico City. Nineteen sixty eight. After two years in college he decided to enter the NBA draft citing family financial hardship the NBA however at the time for players entering the draft until four years. After the high school graduation. Hey would then sign with the ABA. Denver rockets play one season leading the league in scoring and rebounding as a rookie since he now had a professional season under his belt he decided to challenge the NBA rule. Once again and signed with the Seattle Supersonics in one thousand nine hundred sixty nine the NBA wasn't having it. Hey will the league all the way to the US or frame court and one on September eleven? Two Thousand Fifteen. He wasn't Tryin Naismith Basketball Hall of fame. I'm John Johansen Junior and welcome to another edition of and Black America on this week's program. Aba An NBA Legend and hall of Famer Semester. Haywood in Black America. Charles Barkley went out on a limb when this stuff was acting when they were acting crazy. And I'm they missed me like the last time of going into the hall of fame and I was like put on the backburner right house. Barclay stepped up and said on. Nuff is enough and did it publicly. He did it every way you said enough is enough now. This is not right and he stood up as a player and he started educating young players. Like do y'all know who is in our presence with Spencer Haywood Blah Blah. And he started talking about. You know there's like three cases that changed the face of force in one dispenser Haywood Heywood versus the NBA. I went to the Supreme Court and then play a young player. Started like Whoa wait a minute. I know him I see him but I never knew that until Charles was the one that should should should be there. And he's my what you call. My advocate advocate is Just to a good person. Just a wonderful person. Spencer Haywood won Olympic gold medal in one thousand nine hundred sixty eight at age nineteen and signed with the Seattle Supersonics two years later after dominating the ABA and a case that went to the US Supreme Court he sued the NBA or rule that prohibited players being draft until the league until they waited for years after graduating from high school. He won that case and nineteen eighty. He won a world championship with the Los Angeles Lakers as a twenty rookie in nineteen sixty nine. Seventy season he led the American Basketball Association both scoring and rebounding and was named the League's Most Valuable Player and rookie of the year. One on April twenty seven nineteen forty nine and silver city Mississippi into a family of Chen Children Hayward grew up in a dying era of American history. His mother picked cotton for two dollars a day and Heywood joined her in the field at the age of five hundred sixty four he moved to Chicago then to Detroit in the motor city. He leads pershing high school to the one thousand nine hundred sixty seven Michigan class. A State Basketball Championship. He went on to a stellar careers at Trinidad State Junior College and the University of Detroit in the summer of nineteen nine hundred sixty eight. He helped the United States to a gold medal at the Olympic Games in Mexico City on September. The eleventh. Two Thousand Fifteen. Hey what was inducted into Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of fame? My first reaction was You know is this fact in. Is this true because I had had Three falls a long before that because most reporters and most people who look at numbers and they at by numbers as a player and that this guy was. Mvp of the ABA averaging thirty and twenty five years with the Seattle Supersonics average in twenty six and thirteen and Olympic record holder and all of these different categories and as still as leading score and also was the outstanding college player of the year. So they look at all these things and they just assume that everybody thought again. Then you know also I went to the Supreme Court to fight he would versus the NBA to pave the way for Lebron's Michael Jordan magic. All of them they come through what is called. I the NBA. They call it early entry and now. I think it should be called what it is to Spencer. Haywood because they have the Larry Bird rule and they have Oscar Robertson. Rule regrettably Oscar but I know they promote birds and Larry Bird's modified version of my role. Larry Bird came in on a dispenser. It will but anyway so for years we thought this would happen and then there was a couple of false alarms that it did happen. So I was kidding around with John Deliver with the The Chairman and CEO. The hall and he was mentioning. You know. Well I probably spend Kareem. Rise is always the top. Yeah I said well. What does that got to do with with Kareem abdul-jabbar? My my blonde jokes Right so so Yeah it was. It was delighted. Mandic to get the call and to finally get to call it. Finally get it in but you know my mother used to sing this whole Psalm Lord and may not come when you want and buddies right on time. And that's my Jackson right so you know if it had to happen any other time. I think it would have been not as powerful as it is today and It was right on time. And it's on God's time so I'm very grateful and very humble Vita journey understand so once. You heard that you were going to be inducted. Walk us through that period from the time that you got to call to the induction ceremony that took place last Friday. September the eleventh. What all the activities have you been involved with. Well I've been all over the country Speaking and people wanting to know this story because it's a unique story and it is basketball history but yeah you know it hasn't been told so It's a new newfound appreciation for Spencer. Haywood so players have been embracing me like only at USA basketball here. In Las Vegas Games all the players on that team Blake Griffin. All of the young guys coming up and giving me hugs and kisses and thanking me. Because you know that situation just in terms of dollars and cents per Lebron James. He's got an extra one hundred million dollars. Coby got a one extra one hundred million dollars but griffin got extra fifty million dollars Kevin Durant who give me a big hug. 'cause he's got seventy five million dollars extra so that's the numbers in dollars and sense that. I give you an example of what it is because with with four years. If you have to wait for years after your high school classic graduate you would lose that kind of capital and you'll lose that plan time loser scoring titles you'll lose numbers that will help them get into the hall. Later on those numbers would be raced. And you don't know what's going to happen in four years in college. You could get hurt. A lot of things could happen so they fully appreciating news. So it's a good feeling because of forty four years more to this to happen so it is It is right on time on God. Signed so and then I went to I've been doing a lot of golf. Tournaments or charitable events and also just playing a lot and I spend a Lotta time with my family. My daughters and in fact I gotTA leave Again next week my next two oldest daughters having our first grand and So I gotta go in go through the process with her and It is it is a spectacular time and I also sit back John and and think about the times we were sitting in your dad's barber shop. They all sunset and this and just Nevada in Detroit for people who don't know right in Detroit Michigan and John Fathers where we congregate And and and and do our conversation and get a nice. Yeah because he didn't allow us to walk around. I hair off falling away years and stuff. So that's right. Yeah you know that's right So we would sit there and listen and talk and just pass the ball sports but all so I've been reflecting on Detroit. I went over to my neighborhood yesterday. day before yesterday and spent some time over there. Thursday and looking around and just just hearing up. Because done you know the story you know. When I came up from Mississippi I had no place to say I had no family there and James and either bill took in and adopted me along with my coach. Will Robinson and then we had waned diet. Dr Wayne die of your your own zone by Diet. Right Do all of my academics bring me up to snuff there. Oh my God it was just A. It's just a lot of love was having an and I see in Detroit and it's always been that way you know. They've always reached out and help each

Spencer Haywood Rule Haywood NBA College Spencer Haywood Aba Nb Lebron James American Basketball Associatio United States Basketball Seattle Supersonics Gold Medal Haywood Heywood Supreme Court Spencer Haywood Detroit Blake Griffin University Of Detroit Kevin Durant Charles Barkley Mexico City Mississippi Spencer
Travel the World on Crypto With Travala CEO Matthew Luczynski

CRYPTO 101

08:12 min | 1 year ago

Travel the World on Crypto With Travala CEO Matthew Luczynski

"Right what his up good beautiful wonderful citizens of crypt nation. I hope you are just having a wonderful little morning noon and or night because wherever the heck you are in the world just know that you're in the right place isn't that right beats mine. No I completely disagree this time. I don't feel like I'm in the right place. In fact I kind of need to get away. I don't know where I you can find a good place to book a Hotel Jerry suggestions. Well it's funny that you mentioned that I've got a good friend here in Matthew Login ski and he is the founder the CEO of a beautiful platform called travel up Matthew. Welcome to the show hang is thanks for having me on Travolta Is a platform where anybody could book a hotel anywhere in the world using nothing but crypto currency matthew. We're going to dive deep into your platform and all the things that inspired you to make it and all the wonderful things that are coming up but first give us a little background who you are in kind of what drew you to. WHO The crypto currency and blockchain industry? Yes so me. I came to Crypto in around two thousand eleven. Two thousand twelve when oh seventeen years old. It was based on friends a little bit older than myself. Actually Mining Crypto in the bedrooms full at helping three university on it was something that instantly became attractive. It was a way to gain from Nathan essentially on it the whole concept behind it. The whole block chain concept the over the FE- is following not actually came to me on something that we rent on In research searched on it it was something that was like. Wow this is really going to take off Throughout University again. trading crypto to people. Ebola didn't didn't buy it from didn't know where to get it from from those people who in mind in it and then yet just sort of went from there really my knowledge of Blockchain Ainun crypto developed in development. Obviously than we still therion come come to lie on the rest of the crypto spacious has begun to Then obviously while I was in my final year of university I just decided you know to sort of take the leap of faith on trolley Concept was so itself was bowing because of atrophy troubling because the founders passion for traveling Stevo founder. Hugh I conceptualize this idea with. Actually he was. He's been in the travel industry for over twenty five years so it was something that was really clicked with those on we. We reform survived. Come from that around two and a half years ago now. One of the problems that I always have. I'm travelling is they WANNA have An actual credit card in order to check in and I feel like that's the most ridiculous thing in the world. That's the problem that I'm having. But what problems are you trying to solve with. Travolta were trying to create a globally accessible hotel and travel booking marketplace on by that we mean is provide a a option for everybody to pay whatever means they desire so for example they could pay with Bitcoin With Syria they could pay with a native token. Aba and we want to provide that gateway to all those people in this uses in the Christian space now on what will come to space over time. we housing site libra potential and the reach of that tool those billions of people facebook. They have a platform where they could spend the cryptocurrency on. We've got to make sure that leading the way in tens of economists Payment solutions full plot phones on especially hotels on a combination. Let's amazing and kind of pizza minds point. How do we like so I buy thing by a hotel or rent a hotel with Through Travolta generally speaking. They're going to need a credit card in order to handle like you know Potential Room damages. So is your platform the same way where I could suspend bitcoin. But then I get to the hotel in order to check and I'll still need to put down credit and depend a really depends on the hotel and the value the hotel itself. You know the highest value hotel's rich in for example. Yes you will have to do. You will also lead into the hotel a lower three star to star hotel. You probably probably house to it. All depends on the hotel specific. Needs at where you're specifically at the hotel. Now that saying we do have potential plans plunged at rollouts of halo system which can be used in hotels so that would lead potential. People's pay with Crypto Chris in the M in the long term vision of trauma awesome and not to get too technical. But you know what's going on in the back end when I pay. Travolta Crypto is travel is taking kind of inventory risk of holding onto that Crypto long-term and pain out to the Ritz Carlton and cash. What's going on so how it works? Is We take a crypto payment and we instantly liquidate so we have a number of moving paw. Aw that are in play at one specific moment in time and they problematically released the CRYPTO. Making sure that we don't lose anything when we don't Miss It. And we mitigate the risk of volatility completely that means the way say safe is a business where able to grow it. It would be great if we could pull crypto for a long period of time but in the sense in a business sense that is not a is no small news so yet we liquidate straightaway on. We actually accomplishing institutional money. And we pay the hotels so Whistle of the. Let's call the offer another problem trauman having is you know when I'm working for different companies and even here Crypto WanNa one you know we go to different conferences and the company will book my travel travel accommodations. But sometimes my name won't be on the room or you know whatever the case is and even though someone booked a room for me if they're not out there even though the rooms already been paid for not allowed to go in. And I think to myself Ma'am block could really solve this if I had some kind of Nafta token that says this room his mind you know until it expires four days you know I could simply just walk past. Walk Straight to the door and get my roommate's completely bypass the whole check in thing. How do you think that besides that you know maybe blockchain can help the hotel industries one day and what needs to happen before they're ready to fully get on board with blockchain? I think what's GonNa what happens. Is Payments Payments. Stop and I once. They see the payments all secure. They don't lose. They don't elise capital from it because what we did see a few years ago was expedia expedia or go to try crypto payments. Try bitcoin payments and they continue can you to after short period of time because they could not handle the risk of volatility and they lost capsule. Now that's obviously put people in the travel industry off from mainstream sharing perspective but then the allows innovators to commend showcase. Actually make it work. I think that's the fish For hotels themselves paints finance at once they get payments than they could obviously look the areas. Why the hotel itself? The whole supply chain management systems. They could come into play on then yet. Like you mentioned a individual hotel bookings full people Making sure about systems systems correct on. MFT Tokens that. Would I guess that would come into play if a hotel specifically its own. Unique and T- tokens is like single into the network of hotels on. That could be what that would come into play in the future again Looking at it from his point of view at this specific assistant member in time

Travolta Blockchain Founder Matthew ABA Ebola Stevo Ritz Carlton Nathan Facebook Hugh Expedia Syria Assistant Member CEO