35 Burst results for "AB"

Judge agrees to delay US government restrictions on WeChat

Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

00:43 sec | 3 d ago

Judge agrees to delay US government restrictions on WeChat

"The Trump Administration's restrictions on Wechat have been put on hold by a California judge. We chat is owned by the Chinese company. Tencent has 19 million regular uses in the United States, and it was set to disappear from US AB strolls on Sunday Midnight eastern time. Administration claims that the represents a national security threat. But the judge found the government provided scant evidence that the effective ban would address those concerns. She also said that we chat serves as a public virtual public square for the Chinese speaking in Chinese American community in the U. S. And as a practical matter, it is their only means of communication. So the band there by operates as a prior restraint on their right to free speech,

Trump Administration United States California Tencent Wechat
Apple Announces Watch Series 6

The Vergecast

04:17 min | 6 d ago

Apple Announces Watch Series 6

"So there was an apple event. Will save some of the the mechanics of the apple in for a little bit later 'cause I was fourteen fourteen it's all wrapped up into that but top line had an event you heard from us last week they managed expectations around this event very carefully well carefully after the fact. The very carefully managed their post event announcement expectations. So there's going to be an IPAD and there's going to be watch in indeed there were some ipads and there are some watches the NFC apple, one service bundle they said, all the is are coming tomorrow developers freaked out. We'll talk about those and they said there's a new fourteen in the in the IPAD air. So let's start. With the watch. That's why I wanted to call on to begin with Ab. Watched your sixty or you have one I do tell us about it. Tell us tell us about your blood so I have the product red one and it is very pretty red is very I don't know rich and complex like a like a fine merlot a good. It's a good looking read and if you didn't Give me the red one and you asked me to tell between this and the series five. I would fail just straight up The screen is brighter and it's especially brighter two point five times brighter in the always on standby mode, and that's the only discernible difference unless you look specifically at the back to look at the sensors or you know specifically that the alternator is always on So, it's you on the L. Tim Eter blood, oxygen sensor, the slightly brighter screen, and there might be one other small difference that I'm forgetting though the new chip inside it's faster. What does it mean for an apple watching faster? Is like an a a very open question. So it was ironic about that is it's the only question whether it applies to android where where West watches. They all need to be faster But yeah, it's fine. So the really the the news here is the the blood oxygen sensor. It's like the big new thing everything else are like nice pip your year updates, but the blood oxygen sensor is really like the big deal here. So Nicole, you've done a little research into its potential at. I your headline was kind of like an important statement of fact, apple is marketing. It is a wellness device not as a medical device. They didn't say I thought this was really interesting way of kind of threading the needle like you might have heard about blood oxygen during all this stuff and then like closed that loop but nickel even looking into what what do you? Think about it. Yeah. So the reason that they're talking about it as long as devices because they cannot talk about it as a medical device. Clearance from the FDA to do so. So we're sort of in the spot where. Pulse ox mentors were blood oxygen sensors are in like a weird inbetween with FDA were like you can sort of have them on devices without getting clearance me FDA. But if you're trying to do some things and you have to apple has not done that for their pulse men on the watch yet but this isn't something new to this watch like Garmon has. had a pulse talks for a while that that has sort of quietly activated their feature last year and they've sort of been interesting to people for working out and getting a sense of kind of where your blood oxygen is during exercise but they've taken on a new role during the pandemic because monitoring oxygen levels is an important way to to the progression nineteen because. People can be walking and talking and have very low oxygen levels and you wouldn't necessarily know that just by looking at them, which is unusual usually like very low blood oxygen is smash with like you're gasping for breath and you can't really walk up the stairs. So that's why they've been important recently, but the with the product is on the Apple Watch is. It's not it can't be used to actually diagnosed and it shouldn't be to do. So it is more of kind of an interesting thing that you can look at, but we don't actually know like how well validated it is against sort of more standard pulse ox limiters that could be used in hospitals or kind of more medical grade devices because they haven't gone through. The process they don't have to necessarily release some of that validation information at this point.

Apple FDA Tim Eter Nicole
Avalanche Force Game 7 Against Stars

Colorado's Morning News with April Zesbaugh and Marty Lenz

01:00 min | 3 weeks ago

Avalanche Force Game 7 Against Stars

"Yeah. The Avalanche weren't ready to leave the NHL's bubble last night. The star struck first towards the end of the first period. But the AB struck back with four on answered goals. One by that score of 4 to 1 to force a Game seven on Friday. Head just shared beds are like his team closed out the game. It's their period really good purpose to our game, so I would say up there was I mean, there's always a factor of how much guts is involved. I thought I thought you guys really show it out, too. Try to accomplish, you know, taking this thing to Game seven Nikita's door. I've got the scoring going. Is he not in the game up with less than a minute in the first came a car with what turned out to be the game winner in the second middle rant and added one of the third of the nation. McKinnon's goal late slammed the door shut. It was the 14th straight game. The team's best score scored a point going, Michael Hutchinson stopped all but one of 28 shots he faced and now the absolute could become Just the 30th team in NHL history to come back from a 31 deficit and one a seven game series tomorrow night and

NHL Michael Hutchinson Mckinnon
The Interactive Web with Speak2Web & Outgrow

The Voice Tech Podcast

04:02 min | 3 weeks ago

The Interactive Web with Speak2Web & Outgrow

"A really interesting because we both got. Similar kind of products, but quite distinct differences as well. so that'd be fantastic tiny the show to talk about this general topic of website marketing through conversation interaction making websites interactive. So maybe we could start with to Jason, can you give us a brief Intro to company does? Who's full topic clients? He says I now what the typical problems you help themselves. Yes, absolutely. So Carl, when we had formed speak to Ab we initially thought you know this is a great piece of marketing technology for websites. But what we've also learned is that it's very powerful tool to combat accessibility compliance lawsuits. So speak to delivers voice tech solutions for websites and we want to help clients become accessibility compliant while optimizing the customer experience for everyone. Interested. That was a straightaway and that something I didn't expect accessibility losses. The company left field. So it's not really one of the major features of the product that was the reason behind the. Size I use case that you've discovered is really helpful to your clients having built the solution. That's something. That we initially had ideas around but if really. Discovered in the more recent months especially following. A major case recently where Domino's pizza. Took a case all the way up to the Supreme Court in the case Robles versus Domino's Mr. is a blind man unable to order a pizza on their website or mobile APP and. A conversational voice assistant would have. Enabled him to use their website or their mobile APP. In a very similar way to if he had just called the store and made the website accessible to him. Okay right. So it's becoming a need. It's not just a nice to have friends. Maybe you could describe what to does on the nuts and bolts level then sounds like it's a plug in for a website or it can be integrated directly I would allow. Has just to do. Yes. So besides the. Accessibility compliance factor. We're helping people to deploy agents that act as personal shopping assistance concierges, and even tech support agents that reduce the level of tier one tier two requests that support teams historically had to read through and respond to you. So the problems were solving our you know optimizing customer experience increasing revenue and help businesses to reduce costs, and we're doing this for any scale of business in a whether it's a simple just adding voice search or delivering those conversational virtual agents that are even integrated into their technology stack. We have something that any size business can deploy afford. Very interesting yeah. It sounds like you've got a number of different use cases the you'll solving that it'd be great to dig into some of those in a moment. Do you have a case study that you can just briefly mention? Is there a particular company will just a type of company that you typically help? Yes absolutely. So in terms of dropping names, all of our corporate clients have strict policies, corporate policies of in nondisclosure by Swertz really looking at on the high end, the e commerce businesses to deliver voice shopping and customer support agents that. People can use to place orders to get answers to you their order in product questions and help those companies, increased sales and lower the cost of support. Optimizing customer experience by delivering people, instant answers and faster time to discovery.

Jason Domino Robles Supreme Court Carl Swertz AB
How to Coach Your Sales Team with Jeb Blount

The EntreLeadership Podcast

05:29 min | Last month

How to Coach Your Sales Team with Jeb Blount

"I don't know what feelings come to mind for you when you hear the word sales. Maybe you've been sold to. AB. Something's been pushed on you. You're like a lot of people, your experience with sales as somebody's manipulating you to do something that you don't really want to do. That's gross. Fear, small business owner. If you lead a business, if you're part of a sales team, the truth is you don't have a business if you don't sell. From the Ramsey network this is the entree leadership podcast where we help business leaders, grow themselves, their teams and their profits. I'm your host, Daniel Tardy, and today my guest is Jeb Blunt. Jebsen author speaker, but he's not just one of those motivational gurus. The last thing we need is more hype around this topic we need real answers we need real people, give it a solutions for not just how to sell stuff not how to push things on people, but actually how to serve. At entreleadership teach. Doing sells well as it's all about serving people. And that's what JEB beliefs. Lot of organizations are doing this while they're serving their selling growing and some organizations they're not because they're actually spending less time selling, serving and spend a lot more time just talking about it. The problem for a lot of small business people and I was there I, love the corporate environment and started my own business is that you plan to plan to plan to plan to sell. So you spend more time trying to get your business cards set up than you actually do trying to go out and get customers. So entrepreneurs are the first people. And if you are an entrepreneur businessperson, you're always going to be the number one salesperson for your organization. You can't ever forget that. So for small business people acquiring customers and keeping customers is the number. One thing you do. That's how you make an impact organization and is how you scale and if you don't do those things very well, everything else doesn't matter. I want to talk about the art of sales and how that works in a second. But in let's stay with this idea that small business and entrepreneurs you know these guys figure out they figure out how to sell. You know an oftentimes I'm visiting with the founder of a small business who you know they are still selling actively and they're actually kind of getting stuck because they can't go work on the business and build the operations and lead and build a team because like you said, they're still there number one sales person. There's this tension of will bring in revenue. How do I let that? Go while I go build the business well, that goes back to. You can't scale yourself. So if you're going to run a business you have to at some point, elevate yourself to a leader that doesn't mean that you you're not selling anymore because in my business deals in the line myself people bring me in and sometimes I'll be the person that pushes it over. But the goal is to coach them to the point and grow them to the point where they don't need me because my whole goal is leader to make myself obsolete and the people don't need me into deal however, I think that is the inflection point for every small business as when does the business owner in the entrepreneur move from doer right to scaler and Listening to your podcast with Dave that you did a couple of three weeks ago and you know he's talking about not barring money or not taking the sea. So when you're growing slow as he says and I'm a business that grew slow with no debt no, no capital no investors get free. You know the point is that you have to there's pain in that scale, and the hardest thing that you're going to do is higher for a salesperson. You're probably going to fail and then when you have the second salesperson. The third salesperson you're probably GONNA fail until you find the right person. Why is that? Why? Why do you have to feel so many times to get it right if you're a really big company and you're hiring salespeople, you have the capital to go and find talent you've got you've got an HR department that does the recruiting for you. You've got a battery of task to bring them in and you have the ability to hire lots of people and maybe maybe heart ten people in three of them work but you're. Still Ahead. But if you're a small business owner and you're selling and you're doing and you're delivering and you're taking care everything and then you're trying to be good at hiring people in professionals that are good. Hiring sales people fail often. So small business people come to me and you know that we coach and they say, well, you know how do I hire salesperson and I say the same thing it's not easy and you're gonNA fail but you need to do it and you need to understand that you're GONNA have. To go through the process until you find that anchor and once you find that anchor then you take care of that person Thiessen which you know, and then go on the next anchor we wanted to be easy. We want there to be an easy button around there's not an easy by around it. There's not an easy button I not an easy button anywhere there isn't, and so what happens though is in then you end up hiring people can see the next steps you hire people and you do you scale yourself. And then one day you walk into a conference room and I've been there and all your people are sitting in a conference room and they're having a conversation about systems and processes and workflows, and all those things and you look around and there's nobody in the organization selling anything and you have to say stop wait a minute. We can be the best organized system company in the world. But if we don't go sell stuff, this doesn't make a difference because we're not creating casual so you moved from balancing your time. Into business versus working on the business to then helping balance other people's time working to grow the business versus working on the business and the problems continue to grow they just they're just different but the fact doesn't change that businesses job is to get and keep customers. That's it. That's number one you do that you're. GonNa win and that's

Business Owner Jeb Blunt Daniel Tardy Founder Thiessen Dave
Appeals court gives reprieve to Uber, Lyft in California

Daily Tech News Show

00:47 sec | Last month

Appeals court gives reprieve to Uber, Lyft in California

"In blog posts lift announced it would suspend ride hailing operations in California as of eleven fifty nine PM Pacific Time on August twentieth the move came after a state judge ruled that the service must reclassify drivers as employees rather than independent contractors in accordance with a b five however later yesterday a California appeals court extended the length of time uber and left will have to comply with the order the temporary reprieve gives. Uber and left until five PM Pacific Time on August twenty fifth to file written statements agreeing to expedite procedures stated in the order including a new time line and sworn statements saying the companies have plans to reshape their businesses. If they're initiative prop twenty two, which would exempt ridesharing food delivery gig workers from Ab five fails in November and Uber spokesman said they will continue to run and as normal until the stay expires.

California
Los Angeles Judge Rules In Favor Of Multi-City Lawsuit Against Uber And Lyft Regarding AB 5

Tim Conway Jr.

00:34 sec | Last month

Los Angeles Judge Rules In Favor Of Multi-City Lawsuit Against Uber And Lyft Regarding AB 5

"Has ruled ride share companies must now classified drivers as employees to comply with state law. The judge agreed with a lawsuit filed by the state A G in several city attorneys, including L. A, which claimed rideshare giants like uber and lift were preventing drivers from receiving the quote, compensation and benefits they've earned through the dignity of their labor. The suit alleges. Companies were violating a new state law, which requires gig workers get labor protection, such as minimum wage, sick leave and worker's comp. The companies had tried to argue their core businesses technology platform. It's not transportation, but the judge wasn't buying it. Both companies say they will appeal the decision. Corbin

Corbin
A Song For Peace

The Promised Podcast

05:17 min | Last month

A Song For Peace

"This is the story of a song that is in a way the story of this country in the spring of Nineteen, sixty-nine at a sidewalk cafe on Richmond Street tucked in from the corner of Dizengoff. Street in Tel Aviv a twenty four year old poet named Yakov or Janka wrote Blit met a twenty five year old musician and arranger named yet year Rosenbloom and the two men became friends the cafe was called California and the. Place, itself said something about the people who made a habit of spending their days especially, their long nights there. The first thing to know about Cafe California is what it wasn't just one hundred and twenty five meters up Dizengoff was a legendary Bohemian cafe called carseat. It had been in operation since nineteen, thirty five, and since then it was the place where you can find some of Jewish palestines and then Israel's greatest poets and writers. On Alterman and Lebron's Sean Ski. Lay. Goldberg. Alexander Penn great writers who had been young and who grew old drinking coffee in the afternoon and vodka in Iraq at night at the simple spare tables of cassette alongside these luminaries in the nineteen sixties. New Generation staked claims at the table, the actor or. The singer Oregon Stein the architect Yaakov wreck there and many others cafe California was not seat from its vantage half of long block away even the young people at seat where old carseat was yesterday's Bohemia California was today's Cafe California was founded in one, thousand, nine, hundred, thousand, nine by a man named Ab Netanyahu who was only thirty two. Then that had lived a good deal of life. Netanyahu was born in nineteen twenty seven in the southwest corner of what is now Iran in a place called Abedin on the Persian Gulf just. Across the border from Bosra not far from Kuwait at six he was sent to board at Saint. Mary's a Jesuit School in Mumbai where you had an aunt, his parents abandoned. Persia. For India when he was twelve at sixteen and Nineteen, forty three, he lied about his age and joined the Royal Indo British Air Force in time after he trained to watch the Second World War wind down at twenty one he came to fight in Israel's war of independence and never left taking a job as an El Al pilot when he was decommissioned. It was with a few restless L. Buddies that Netanyahu opened cafe. California soon, it was filled with the city's young wannabe writers, directors and poets the people most eager to knock from their sinecures the city's old writers, directors, and poets who argued and held forth at carseat. Ab Thanh was a magnet for Bohemians and he came alive when he was with Bohemians, their company produced in him at once a sense of satisfaction. He had found his people but also a sense of restlessness eighty, nine ton was in constant search of his next Gig in nineteen sixty five he ran for Knesset advice of a friend who worked in PR he pledged that if he was elected, he would fly to Egypt to meet with General Nasser to seek peace after he failed to win a seat in parliament, he anyway bought a nineteen twenty seven steer. Men by playing that, he named piece one on February twenty, eighth nineteen, sixty six, he took off and flying low to avoid Israeli radars he landed in Port Saieed the Egyptians sent him back the next day Nassar had refused to see him back home a retired David Ben Gurion told reporters that not tons trip was an event of moral and political importance and quote pope. Pious gave him a medal of peace and Robert Kennedy and Bertrand Russell sought out his company not much later the notion took hold of Natanz, that music held the key to altering. Israeli. In the summer of Nineteen Sixty Nine AB NATANZ bought a Dutch cargo ship named MVP SEATO MVP stands for motor vessel and he rechristened it the MVP piece from Holland he sailed to New York to raise money and set up a shipboard radio station. His plan was to anchor in the Mediterranean outside territorial waters of Egypt and Israel and broadcast songs of peace that might open the minds of Israelis any. Alike his sojourn to New York stretched biblically three years would pass before he returned with ship in good repair with mixers, turntables, ABC cartridge machines, reel to reel tape machines, and fifty kilowatt transmitter to help not on- by what he needed John. Lennon. And Yoko Ono signed hundreds of posters of the two of them in bed in Amsterdam their famous bet in which not on sold to raise money for audio equipment. John Lennon also offered not time yet. Rolls. Royce grads to sell at auction, but the practical impediments of shipping the grand car stymied the business, the carpenters, Johnny Mathis and other musicians recorded for non promotional clips in praise of peace. Not an idea was that new music might open minds in Israel Egypt. The station eventually began to broadcast in nineteen seventy-three as the voice of peace

Ab Netanyahu Cafe California California Egypt Israel Dizengoff John Lennon Persia Bertrand Russell Tel Aviv MVP Johnny Mathis Alexander Penn Rosenbloom Bosra Iraq Yoko Ono Nassar New York Persian Gulf
Mine is all gone

Sips, Suds, & Smokes

04:12 min | Last month

Mine is all gone

"A and welcome in is with shall episode of some and smokes where everything good and wife is worth discussing I'm your house made man Bob and joining me for this episode is Made Man Brent. Thanks I didn't realize it quick shot meant that we were going to be short episode. Not Drink these really quick house too late now so that it had a different meeting. Entirely we have went. We have women at supplies. Mansell's out. And Good Ole boy justin it can morning by. Well, today we're going to discussing some recent limited releases from the folks that locks go. We have the stone two thousand and nineteen women at addition Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey, and we have the what's Road Distiller as double barrel, Kentucky Straight Bourbon, Whiskey, and this episode sip sudden smokes is sponsored in part by the or whiskey society to find out more about the society in their events, you can visit them at. F.. T. l.. Ws Dot. com. And we've reviewed quite a whiskies from the folks that go yellowstone over the years But what's have Justin gives a little background about them just to refresh your memory. So let's go began in nineteen, fifty eight when Paul a Lux and David. Sherman. Senior created the David Sherman Corporation as private. Label bottler. Serving the needs of distributors, wholesalers and retailers starting out with one brand in nineteen sixty have steadily grown portfolio to include vodka rum gin occurs more importantly whiskey whiskey. Latin. Clean Windows. Get. In two thousand, six, they changed their name to Lex goes attributed to the founder pollock's. The company's one hundred percent family owned to this day. A few years ago. lesko bought a fifty percent stake in the limestone branch. Still Ary last year, they completed construction of their own thirty, five million dollar distillery in Bardstown. Kentucky. Named the Lux road distillery, it's really pretty distillery of your embarked. Sounded should. Definitely. A swing by I gotta try the. I. Haven't been to yet. So I went there when they were building it and we got the walk around through the construction site, and then just recently I got to stop in and it's been. Probably, ear and year, plus since I was there. So it's all finished and landscape and everything really really Nice Oh. Maybe. Why don't we have Brent, tell us about the first whisky thinks the first one we're going to be trying out is the yellowstone two thousand Nineteen Limited Edition Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey, this is. Yeah one, hundred, one, proof, Fifty, point, five, percent, AB, nine age stayed they they say this has got a suggested retail price around one hundred dollars for seven, hundred, fifty milliliter bottle. So Steve, beam his brother Paul? Being opened up limestone branches story in. Two. Thousand Eleven With the goal of create crafting the finest whisky in small batches with the history of is still on both sides of their family beaming Dant, the brothers are seventh generation distillers in two, thousand, fifteen, they brought the yellowstone brand back to the family. It's A, it's A. Real Alec, and a lot at that story because it's it's the exact antithesis of every big corporate distillery. Ever go to. It's a little place. The first time I went there the first I walked in and. There's a dog land next to the still who's looking at me like, what do you want? It's just so laid back. They were. You know they've expanded now considerably, but still it's You know it's it's a family run operation and it's If you're if you're up in, Kentucky definitely give swing by the tour guide is worth a visit us even. As. He's he's he is awesome. Let me tell you that guy is golden. There's very few tour guides that are really worth visit and he's one of the. Absolutely, but yeah, really cool place and they keep growing and we were up there doing barrel back. They're coming out with some really nice stuff. So. What did you say? Oh, actually. I did have a little bit information. Rumor has it that this is a blend of nine and twelve year old barrels.

Kentucky Yellowstone Justin Paul Mansell BOB David Sherman Corporation Bardstown Sherman Lesko Road Distiller ARY Brent LEX Dant Founder Pollock Steve
Where did Davy Crockett die

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:16 min | Last month

Where did Davy Crockett die

"For coffee lovers today's mystery. Well, this industry Gabi Crockett on March six. Eighteen thirty six Mexican forces stormed the Alamo afford I like old mission in San Antonio where some two hundred rebellious Texans had been holed up for weeks, the battle was over in less than two hours leaving. Great. Texas heroes like Jim Buoy, James Butler Bonham, and William Travis dead among the defenders that day was Davy Crockett former congressman legendary hundred scowl, and teller of tall tales according to sell accounts Crockett died in. A battle that according to others. He was one of a handful of men captured and later executed what really happened while there's the battle and Aaron Lace, the myth and mystery. But exactly who was Davy Crockett he was born in Tennessee. Eight seven, hundred, eighty, six as a young man he was indentured by his father to pay off debts once they were paid in full he was finally allowed to leave home. Although he was voted into Congress, no one knows where he was educated yet he was articulate understood politics and could play the fiddle Crockett's true claim to fame prior to his death at or around. The Alamo was just a hunter in his youth tessie was still a wilderness out one time. He supplied food through skills of hunting for an entire army. While in Congress, he opposed add Jackson's argument to relocate local Indians. Congress. Crockett became a freemason. He spent time in his entire legislative career fighting for the rights of impoverished settlers who felt dangled on the precipice of losing title to their land. Due to the states complicated system of grants. He introduced a resolution to abolish the United States Military Academy at West. Point. New. York because he felt that it was public money going to benefit the sons of wealthy men. He spoke out against Congress giving a hundred thousand dollars to the widow of Stephen Decatur citing the congress was not. Empowered to do that, he opposed Andrew Jackson Eighteen thirty Indian removal act and was the only member of the Tennessee delegation to vote against it. Chief John Ross, sent him a letter on January thirteenth eighteen, thirty one expressing his thanks for Crockett's vote is what was not popular with his own district and he was defeated in the eighteen thirty one election by William, Fitzgerald and here's a quote. I told the people of my district that I would serve them as faithfully as I had done before. But if not. They might go to hell and I would go to Texas history tells us that Ab Crockett went to Texas but not alone he brought with him. Thirty one tells C. Determined to join the fray if the predicted revolution were breakout Texas at the time was part of Mexico. So all background decide where to Davy Crockett died a letter, the surface in nineteen, fifty, five described house seven men were taken prisoner and. And the CROCK was one of them. But there are three accounts assay otherwise, WanNa cal survivor of a Texan whose husband was killed in the battle. She said that she saw Davy Crockett spotty inside the Alma the second account came from a slave who also spared was said to have seen Davy Crockett body within the walls. So the Alamo, the third account was from Francisco on. Tony Rhys, the mayor of San. Antonio who safely behind the Mexican lines in the battle began and had a good vantage point to witness what happened before the arrival. Of the Mexican army, he had met Davy Crockett civilians of San Antonio in the defenders of the Alamo mingled freely before the battle he said that after the battle Saana ordered him to point out the bodies of Crockett, Travis and boy crock he said had fallen in battle on the west side of the Alamo grams near Fort. This

Gabi Crockett Davy Crockett Congress San Antonio William Travis Texas Tennessee Mexican Army Andrew Jackson York Texans Antonio Francisco SAN Stephen Decatur Fitzgerald Tony Rhys Aaron Lace Congressman John Ross
Interview With Carmela Wilkins

Revision Path

07:59 min | Last month

Interview With Carmela Wilkins

"Now for this week's interview. I'm talking with Carmelo Wilkins a graphic designer at ab partners in New York City. Let's start the show. Paul Right. So tell us who you are and what you do everyone. My name is Carmel Wilkens and I'm a graphic designer ab partners, which is a digital strategy and creative storytelling agency that is black owned and founded Nice I. Definitely want to get more into that but before we do you know of course, we are recording this now it's in the middle of. Even to say, it's the middle because of the rising cases I feel like we're still somewhere in the beginning but how are you holding up during this time right now? Oh my goodness I would have to say the biggest struggle for existing in the same space in which I work and also live. Or I used to be able to leave my apartment, go to the office and then be able to come back home. You know my retreat my safe haven. But now there's no distinction between two because my desk in my bed are about I don't know a third of an inch away from one another. It something that I've experienced since working from home and having short from home that it's especially the first couple months was really difficult to to have that distinction to create space for myself where I can just rest be at. Men. Also explore my own personal pursuits within my practice. So that's something that's definitely been difficult and also having to support and maintain my family as the breadwinner, my family that live in Rhode Island, and during the beginning of the pandemic, the beginning of quarantine, I had to run around and figure out how to get my sister who studying abroad in Japan. While he was supposed to the umbrella in Japan this past semester from Tokyo back to the US. Yeah. It was. It was really intense. My greatest fear was number forty five was going to just block off all of East Asia including US citizens and that would cause an entirely new problem but are very lucky me and my mom are very lucky to get my sister over here as soon as we could very thankful for that. Haven't even think about like I knew that there were supposed to be some travel restrictions from I think some countries in Europe I hadn't even considered Asia. Although I think now, countries, WANNA keep us out like I. Think the just recently as like Americans y'all stay over there don't come over here. It's a real kind of interesting struggle I. Think a lot of folks are getting into you know I'll tell you I saw a few months ago I was working for a company and. right around like March the folks that were in the New York office they said, okay. We're going to close the office and you have to work from home and then they had to kind of adjust to. Kind of being in this sort of now space where you have to work in live in the same spot and. Work remotely for like over ten years now I, live in Atlanta so like for me wasn't a big huge departure in that like you said, like you're better your desk like a third of an inch away from each other same but. I think what's been the rough is like not having the option to leave like you could leave and go somewhere but it's just not the smart thing to do. So it's like this weird kind of push pull tension between. Wanting to almost want to say rebel and go out. But then there's also like the fear of missing out if you're staying inside being safe. So you're like Oh. What should I do? You know what's the right choice to make? So I understand that that was it been in New York? Has Been, very, interesting as had so many ups and downs are have had my. From all the stays outside of New, York contacting left and right from overseas just wondering if I'm okay. How am I eating how my paying my rent? Like how do I have a roof over my head and it's it's been stressful on to reassure everyone like hey, I'm okay. Responsible saying if I am leaving my apartment, I'm also coordinating with the three other people that live with. We have this rotating schedule of WHO's leaving the House to specifically for groceries not for everything else not like from going for a walk or something but. On the quarantine in New York when we were really confined to art to disarm apartment and we were concerned with if of our roommates were sick or not not knowing like having massive era of uncertainty with what was going on in the households on just how going to sustain ourselves. So we created those really awesome system of how we're going to get groceries who's going to get. It has greater safety net and why like physical safety? Not all's. When it comes to go outside and retrieving groceries and coming back and sharing that space in the kitchen and how to do that A. Mindful away. If we're cautious about, say one of our roommates being sick which actually did happen. One of my roommates were sick for about thirty five days and we were very confused and also scared honestly, and they were definitely as while if they were sick or not. If they had covert but we all got tested I believe last month while three under the four of us got tested last month and to including came back negative and then one of my roommates came back positive. So. What it means because it doesn't really mean anything the tests aren't hundred percent accurate sort kind of like, okay. We live together like we're gonNA continue watching for each other symptoms and see what happens. That is both confusing and scary. Yes exactly. I mean to take the test. I mean, of course to know whether or not you're negative or positive but then because it seems like well, the virus is mutating and you know the symptoms are changing and. I. Hope you're staying safe I mean I I don't really know what advice to kind of given that. Than, just to the vigilant wash your hands so Social distancing. Well, let's talk about a be partners. You mentioned that being a digital strategy firm, it's black owned. How has it been adjusting to working from home if they've been cool everything. AM So. To be working where I work book, we have had moments on a one to one basis with on the team recall said moments as full team to just talk about their current reality that we are all facing. The is impacting us in various ways that we either have chosen to spoke about or having spoken about one another, and this is also my first full time job before I was freelancing. So it's really comforting to know the management team and those are the overseeing everything have employers in mind like our health, our our mental wellbeing, our overall wellbeing in mind, and at any point during the last, I don't know how many months has been I'm like losing track of time at this point. Like. If at any point, we needed to just take a step back from all the craziness going on. It's okay to do so and they completely understand. So that was really really important for me because I really value work life balance I. Think they've done a great job at the beginning of the quarantine they're just like, Hey, folks. So we want everyone to be really comfortable and adjust themselves to work from. Home. Like here's some extra cash like on us to really make your `rumour habitable for working and living, and I was really I was really kind. They didn't have to do that but but they did and I really appreciate it out. So did everyone else

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Big tech CEOs testify before Congress

The Vergecast

48:04 min | Last month

Big tech CEOs testify before Congress

"So, this hearing just going to say it, it was six hours of chaos. So. So many things like individual moments of pure chaos happened this hearing. But because every member of Congress was only given five minutes to ask the questions in and they moved on, no one could process the moments of cash. So here are some things that happened during this hearing. Jeff. bezos just started eating nuts on his call. That was just a thing that you started snacking for the first ninety minutes. It appears that basis had tech issues was operating in some kind of delay. So we didn't hear from him. They just answer any questions and they'd take a ten minute break Jeff. bezos could fix his computer. Amazing. Jim Jordan, who McKenna pointed out. On the show last week is always sort of chaos element. Try to talk over several members of Congress got yelled to put his mass back on floated. Just elaborate conspiracy theories. was when I say was chaos I. Don't know if there's any other way to describe it. I. Think that led a lot of people to think the hearing itself didn't accomplish its goals, but I think in many ways it did. But Kennedy you WanNa Kinda go through what the committee was trying to accomplish the themes they were pointed at in. How hearing played out, right. So okay. First off. Harkening back to last week I mentioned Jim. Jordan's mountain dew obsession. Definitely drink a handful those throughout the hearing I took notes in screen shots. So, I, called it. But regardless of their pores soda choices, there were a lot of lawmakers who definitely did their homework and I think that was really apparent throughout the entire hearing and when I look at. The picture that they tried to paint I think that became really clear in chairman Sicily's opening statements. So this is the guy who liked. And spearheaded the entire investigation from the beginning, and in those opening statements, he pointed out that yeah Apple Amazon Google facebook. There are different in a lot of ways and they exhibit anticompetitive behaviors potentially allegedly and a lot of different ways. But what they tried to pull together and was a story, and it's really hard to tell a story and five minute fragments. But what happened yesterday was Sicily. Ni, and a lot of the Democrats on the Committee wanted to point out that these companies they become bottlenecks for distribution whether that's information or just like APP stores marketplace's they control what gets distributed in how what was really key to the investigation was how? How they survey competitors. If you have so much control dominance over a market or a specific part of the tech industry, you have a lot of insight into your competitors and you can do a lot of dangerous things with that, and then lastly, after that dominance has gained, it's how they abuse it. Right? How they abuse it to make harder for small businesses in competitors and I think that's exactly what Cellini pointed out in the beginning and I think they did a poor job that storytelling throughout the process. But I think that's also our job. Right is to pull that evidence together and tell that story for them in a way that isn't like. Yes, no yelling at CEOS and like stopping them and I think by getting that in the evidentiary record doing all this questioning, I think they really did achieve their goal in the end. Yeah. I mean, I think the thing that happened sort of next to the hearing was that they released a bunch of documents from these one point, three, million documents of clutch. Over the past year, they released pretty targeted selection documents for every company showing some of this stuff, Casey, I wrote a story about. facebook. INSTAGRAM. My I'm going to frame this email or mark Zuckerberg. Literally one sentence, no period. The Andrew says I need to figure out. I'M GONNA buy instagram like I would love to just be in a place were sending that email like super casually like I got this thing to figure out and it's not like am I gonNa buy the model of the car. It's like instagram. I've been thinking of the text messages where so and so says that Mark Zuckerberg's didn't go destroy mode on instagram ever since they got that up. Case she this to Kevin and right that text was. Yes. Well, it was Kevin. System was talking to an investor and Kevin said to the investor. If we don't sell well, mark, go into destroy mode on us and the investor side probably. Of course, stray casual. So there's just a lot of documents and I think one of the functions of hearing was to get those documents into the official congressional record to make the CEO's account for them. That did not seem very successful to me. Is like a takeaway people should have from this hearing, right? No. I think a lot of people that go into these hearings are expecting like these big Gotcha moments and expecting like a lot of news and all this stuff. But it really, it wasn't oversight hearing. You know it wasn't. They didn't come. They came at this like in a report last earlier this week that they came out at as investigators. They didn't come at it to make a big show horse and pony show out of it, and yet I think the CEO's didn't. The record well enough to the extent that they could have. But there was definitely, I was expecting them to do a lot less evasion and I expected a lot less room probation with the documents, but it's just the process of a Congressional hearing. It's. It's hard to do that in a congressional hearing. But if you put those documents out there, you get the CEO's on the record a little bit who does excite this excites the FTC. J, and that's who can take this next and then it's also congress. You know they can't break up a tech company, but they can regulate going forward and it's those three key themes that I pointed out earlier that they could regulate. You know what I mean. They could legislate to forbid companies from surveying competitors and things like that, and that's where this goes. So the format of the hearing, every member and five minute chunks, it seemed very clear that the Democrats had some sort of coordinated evidentiary strategy, they would start and. And they would say, I, want to read this email to you. What did you mean by this email and then Jeff bezos would say something like I have. No idea is on works. I. Was real pattern that developed was basis really not doing or claiming he definitely knows claiming not really no way Wayne is under the thing they did or they would ask sooner Pichai about the very granular add deal google made by an ad product, and soon I, would say I'll get back to you, which is basically all responses. So the Democrats seemed like they were coordinated to move through their documents. The Republicans seem to be doing something else that also seem coordinated intentional, but what was their focus because that seemed clear split my takeaway from Jim Jordan who? We got into earlier, he he was interviewing. As if they were all Jack Dorsey. And as we talked about like, yeah, he invited Jack Dorsey to testify, but he doesn't sit on the antidote subcommittees. Anything. He says, it just doesn't matter. So it sounded to me as if he prepared questions Jack Dorsey and then it was like, oh, he's not coming I'll ask Tim Cook the same questions. Another completely crazy moment that happened just seen by and five minute chunks is that. Represented Sensenbrenner from Wisconsin Dear Sweet Wisconsin. Definitely. Asked Mark Zuckerberg why the Donald Junior was banned from twitter and mark. Zuckerberg was happening on twitter facebook and there was just like a moment of confused silence, and then he tried to move on and that just sort of floated by in the river of chaos to tell you how much chaos there was kneeling. When you started to tell that story, I thought you were going to tell the story about when Jim Jordan asked him cook if the famous one, thousand, nine, hundred, four, Apple Super Bowl, AD was actually about twenty twenty cancel culture, which is another thing that really happened. I think that's out of context. He didn't ask him. He said clearly, this is. That's definitely what Steve Jobs was thinking IBM is canceled culture and Apple's going to break it with hammer and Jeff. Bezos said that social media is a nuance destruction machine and all this crazy stuff from that. It was a wild will that that particular question when Jim Jordan asked, do you support the cancel culture mov, you could see the CEOS like. 'cause they went in order. He asks them all in order. So First Tim Cook just like basically muttered nothing. Here's like I don't. I support speech whatever. The iphone a keyboard like that was his answer. Sooner per child also, just like muttered, right? He's like Google has always supported free expression Zuckerberg like saw the opportunity and took it and the forces of liberalism I rising I, and then basis was like I cannot. I cannot do in like went for it, and that was just totally insane moment. But it also seems like the Republicans were intentional to try to create their own moments where they were yelling at CEOS about bias on platforms is obviously something cover a. At. You were paying a lot of attention that case you're paying a lot of attention to it. Do you think that was effective in creating because you know there's like a parallel conservative Universe Jim? Jordan was on Tucker. Carlson. Last night like was that effective or d think that the CEO's were able to sort of tamp down on interesting the Tucker Carlson pointed out that Google and other companies are all big donors to Jim Jordan another folks. So that is a weird side, but I think it was actually besides the moment where they mixed up twitter with facebook I. Think this was much more effective off. Off Topic yelling about technology than we usually see like are genuinely issues that like they are upset about that, they could point to largely around like cove nineteen misinformation and they could at least like pick those topics and stick to them rather than kind of asking vague questions about like, why is my phone listening to me? Well, they're definitely asked questions about why are my campaign emails getting filtered by G mail? Yes. I should. I should mention that they have really and they have all of these cases where they ask about extremely specific one off incidents that anyone who has used social media knows happens constantly. And, then turn them into a sinister pattern. But I think they managed to come off as sounding more like they understood what they were talking about the unusual. I think that was a real theme of the hearing, Casey. What did you think of this sort of bias side show that occurred? Well, I mean the the idea that conservative voices are being suppressed is foundational to the conservative movement and is behind the rise of conservative talk radio. It was behind the rise of Fox News. Now that social media exists, we have seen it in this new form, but it is sort of being presented as extra, sinister and worthy of. Some sort of legislative intervention what frustrates me about it is that much more than newspapers or or cable news like Mark Zuckerberg Dorsey. These people benefit hugely from having all possible voices on their platform. None of them is incentivized to drive conservatives off their platform. What they are incentivized to do is have rules that make the place safe and welcoming. So that people want to hang out there and so to the extent that there are issues on the platform, they've largely come because these platforms have rules. And you know you would think that a bunch of free marketeers would realize that the alternative to the system that they're so mad about would be creating a new system, but they don't seem at all interested in doing that. So I just sort of dismissed all of them as charlatans I actually thought it was interesting that the opposite track came up, which was the Stop Hey for profit campaign I kind of wasn't expecting that. The representative Raskin I believe asked facebook. Basically, why aren't you kicking more hate speech off. I forget who else asked like look is the point that you're so big. You don't care about advertiser boycotts I. Mean, you know it will here. Here is a fact that the number one complaint that facebook gets from its users, the thing that users. About. FACEBOOK is that it removes too much content and so if you're running the place, you do have to take these complaints seriously in a way. Right? It might not be you know that you shadow band conservative whatever that even means on social network in twenty twenty. But the fact that you're removing content is really upsetting people. So you can't dismiss that idea entirely, but I still don't feel like we're having that intellectually honest conversation about it. So this was definitely I feel like you can connect the you control distribution. We're GONNA show the abuses of power narrative. We got other. Democrats. With the you control distribution. You're banning conservatives right like I. Think what's Sensenbrenner Again, cups and conservatives are consumers to is that people don't realize that like fifty percent of the population in many ways. But facebook has like famous conservatives working its highest levels Kevin. We last week, we're talking about Kevin Roose keeps sharing the list. List of the most engaged content from crowd tangle. It's all conservative content, and that's so problematic for facebook that they're. They're pushing back with other metrics and graphs of their own, making the facts just aren't there, but it doesn't seem to be convincing. Brett Kevin is being asked to recuse himself from facebook case because he's like best friends with facebook I, AP I wrote a column almost two years ago. Now, arguing that conservatives were trying to redefine. Any conservative identified person having any unwanted outcome on a social network, right? So bias is your name was higher than mine in search results. Bias is used suggested that I follow a Democrat and not a Republican right, and if you take action on your policies that apply to everyone against me a conservative that is biased against conservatives, right. So and by the way I have to say this has been hugely successful because we've talked about it. How many minutes now and the longer that these discussions. Discussions. Go on. They just sort of refi people's minds. The idea that there really is a vast conspiracy to silence conservative speech because he's networks are so big millions of conservatives are having experiences like this every day, and now there is an ideology that is basically a religion for them to attach to, which is although Silicon Valley liberals are out to get. Reason I wanted to talk about the conservative side show, which in many ways was a circus is it feels like the notion that we should be punitive to the companies or mad at the company's. Bipartisan, right we were. We were not looking at a hearing where the Democrats were on the attack. Republicans are saying we love. Apple. We're looking at hearing where they were. Everyone was mad. There are a couple of exceptions to that. There were a couple of I think sensenbrenner and a few other folks were like look we want to be clear. Big is not bad. We just WANNA make sure we're not punishing you for your success, but you were like almost entirely, right? Yeah. I. Mean I. think that's it's important to. To capture that mood like Jeff Bezos Mark Zuckerberg, Tim, Cook soon. Darpa, try they usually get to finish whatever sentence they start saying. Right. They're not used to being interrupted. Their thoughts are usually like you know they get to live in complete sentences and people take them seriously here in five in intervals, they were interrupted almost every time they started speaking to be told that they were wrong that they were filibuster at one point Sicily said stop thinking is for the questions. We can just assume they're all good questions. They. Were getting yelled at and they're going yell that about a variety of things that were pretty specific. So you kind of in your kind of structure here. The first one was controlling distribution. What did you hear as a hearing went on the indicated to that? The committee had a case here? I think the apple's APP store is one thing you know charging thirty percent cuts on certain things is just controlling an APP store. It's the same thing with Amazon's marketplace. They can inherently in control what gets placed and what gets sold and you know if they want to play with search results on Amazon, they can do that, and then on facebook and Google, it's not just like products and software that's information. And it could be information when it's like Google. Google. Stealing yelps, texture views right in putting those in its little info boxes in search queries in facebook if facebook is just like an. Mation, distribution platform and. It can decide Algorithm Mickley. Knowingly. What people get to see this bution was very keen to the committee's hearing yesterday and they pointed out different aspects in which you know each company exhibited that kind of behavior. So the one that will you bring up apple? We wrote about this, say there's much emails. Apples document production is just one hundred and thirty pages of unrelated emails and whatever order see it's like scan through it. So there's a lot of little stories in there. There's one about right to repair and apple realizing it needed to repair. By watching PR people operate by reading their emails journalists. Very entertaining. They're like we had a break like here's our strategy. Here's we're GONNA. That's all in there. You can look at it, but there's a lot about the APP store itself and how they're going to use the mechanics of the APP store to control their platform, and it started at the beginning like the first emails in this production from twenty, ten there. From Phil, Schiller Steve Jobs saying, are we GONNA? Let Amazon Sell Books in the kindle store. Store, it felt like I saw an Amazon ad was hard to watch this hard to watch this ad where a person's reading a book on an iphone in the kindle APP in the pick up an android phone keep reading. He's like literally like it was hard to watch like Schiller's at home like pain what a customer is having an experience that good it really just. Heart and so he's like it was hard to watch. You fours Steve Jobs. They're like we gotta shut it down jobs is the bookstore will be the only bookstore on the APP. Store. That's the way it's going to be everyone's gotta used to it. We know that restricting payments will hurt other things, but that's what we're doing and they started there in two thousand ten and they pulled it out, and then that ladders up into everything that we've seen with, hey, ladders up into the analysis group showing up to. Apple, can pay them to say that there's independent study has revealed. Everybody has a thirty percent cut. It has landed up into Tim Cook, forwarding. He gets a letters from developers that are in this direction. It's like apples breaking my heart and he just like Ford's it. Tim, Cook forwards that email to filter credit eighty, just as thoughts like amazing like they are constantly thinking about the APP store as a mechanism of control for the platform in the leverage and other deals. So the other one was apple is this Amazon one which I have very mixed feelings on saying that this is bad or legal I'm curious for all of your thoughts famously. Did, not have the prime video APP on the Apple TV and all these other places apple, Amazon came to a deal. There's an entire presentation in this production like the slide deck of how the deal is going to work. Apple got to be the preferred seller of its own product. So third parties cancel. Apple. Products, Amazon pages, they got. They have a custom by flow. They've custom product pages, all the stuff in return. Amazon got a lower commission on the APP store and gets to Selatan products which no. No like you can rent a movie from the Amazon APP on the Apple TV, no one else gets to it in one world. This is just pure platform collision, right? Apple cut VIP deal for big companies because it wanted something and you could say this is legal in another world. It's like this is how deals work apple something valuable. Amazon s something valuable and they came to a conclusion wherever made more money and quite frankly the consumer experience platform has got better. How do you read that? Casey? That is good and fair analysis of it. I. Think I did read slightly more scandalous. Tones into it in part because apple would never acknowledge that some developers are more important to it than others even though if you assume that that's true, I think maybe one of the things that's frustrating about it is there is no transparency accountability around which developers get sweetheart deals is that once you hit a certain threshold of revenue will cut your price. Why couldn't they extend that deal to everyone right? Or is it just if we withhold something that seems particularly valuable, we can eventually drag you to the table. Table, which is sort of what seems like happened here. I think in all cases, what I'm always looking for is the accountability, right like and some sense of of equitable treatment of developers and I understand the guys are always going to get the best treatment, but it can that be publicly visible. Can it be acknowledged and there'd be routes for others to achieve that same level of success and treatment, and that I'll just seems missing here. Did you buy Tim Co? He said it twice. It was obviously A. Glimmer, of sympathy for all four CEOS. There is a lot of reporting that they had spent months preparing for this hearing like being grilled there, they'd hire outside law firms. They. Practiced they all clearly had soundbites memorized in none of them. Got To say him because it kept getting interrupted. Tim Cook had this one where he is like if we're the gatekeepers, the gates are open wider than ever. We've gone from five hundred. APPS to one point seven, he said like. A whole speech. and. The thing is there's fierce competition for developers. They don't like our store can do for android the windows. For xbox and PS. Four. Which I was like the idea that adobe is going to be like we don't want to be on the IPAD. Here's PS. Four Photoshop is insanity to me. I'm going to build a spreadsheet. APP. For the five. That's how frustrated with Tim Cook. To that ring. True to you I. Mean, there's no, it does not ring true. There is a, there is a duopoly. In the United States when it comes to smartphones, iphones have majority share in the United States and you can't say, well, you know there's there's a rogue fork of android in Malaysia that you could go develop for if you really wanted to and have that come across as a credible argument to Americans. Right it is. Natural for any monopolist to spend most of its time, arguing that it is much smaller and much less consequential as as you think it is and they're essentially always asking you to ignore what is in front of your face, which is that they are the giant. They are in control. What they say goes, and it doesn't matter which small businesses get hurt along the. The. Way I would point out that the contact and we're gonNA talk about earnings eventually. But the context for that is apple had its biggest third quarter ever this month, their revenues went up eleven percent year over year, they're making obviously making billions of dollars in their services revenue, which is a lot of the narrative around the APP stores increasing that services line. Also went up. I think it was thirteen billion. So you're right. They're very big in their earnings the day after the hearing did nothing. To reduce that impression. I want to switch to Amazon a little bit McKenna. You really focused Amazon was basis first time up there. They came at him a lot about marketplace. How did you think that went I think it went pretty good. I. Think. John Paul specifically was just like killer her questions with breakout star. Yeah. She was just like killer and she's the representative for. SEATTLE. So this is where Amazon is right. So she just like killed it and. And I think there were a couple of instances in the documents and in questioning yesterday that really pulled important things out there was like testimony from one bookseller who was like, yeah. We just can't sell a category of books and we don't know why Amazon doesn't let us do that just like testimony like that or even when it comes to like acquisitions, the ring acquisition especially, I wrote about that today through the documents and how. They said, this is for market position. This is a for technology, your talent or anything. We just bought this and that's something that base said again, yesterday he was just very clear. It's like, yeah, we do buy things market position, which is like so insane just here like the richest person in the world. But like, yeah, we're buying market position. It's just what happens. That's another one I have mixed feelings right, and by the way, people should read McKenna story because those documents have just a very funny breakdown like the pros and cons of buying. Buying ring in many of the cons like what if this turns into nest, which if you're just the verge cast listeners like it's just like the Keyword Bingo, but it's fine to say, we're buying market position like this isn't the best product out there, but it's the category of video. doorbells is not huge, right? So to by the the market leader in video doorbells is maybe the most rational use of the money. What is the problem that you think the committee was trying to show an address sense of we're just going to market position. Pointing out, they can just do whatever they want and how casual it is, and there really isn't. It's really funny to read an email like that, and we could buy it or we could just copy it or are. We could just watch. You know that was one of the emails that base from someone. Those are just three options you know and it's like just pick and choose you know. Pointed out like a lot. Just that email itself really pointed out just how easy it is for them. They used a lot of that time history to talk about copycat behaviors and to talk about just like you know buying up competitors and it just seeing that all in one little e mail having to do with the ring was like really i. think it was really kind of I opening and especially like useful for the committee. So Amazon got hit a lot for the data collection side of it of copying competitors. bezos did not seem to have great answers there. Right. So that's the. The thing they got in trouble with this. There is that Wall Street. Journal article from like April where employees were literally like, yeah. We dip into data and we use that to guide our own private label products and everybody was like Whoa and Amazon basins. Yesterday said, well, we do have a policy that bans that but giant pointed out yesterday. It's like, okay. So what's your enforcement look like you can have the policy, but like if you don't enforce it, then it's like meaningless. And then yesterday I. Think Paul was like, can you give me a yes or no answer? Do you dip into data and he's like I can't I can't give you. Yes or no, and we're just like we're looking into it. The story had anonymous sources. So that isn't very helpful to us. You know what I mean. So that was one of the main things and that Wall Street Journal article and I think it's the same kind of examples in the committee's documents. They point out specific examples like car trunk, organizers of all things. It's like weird little products like Amazon's like this is a little hot. Maybe we should do that. So I, I think. I, think they made a good case yesterday. Yesterday on that. Yeah. I mean bezos brought up that Wall Street Journal, Article himself twice, and he was like, well, your policy against it. But I can't guarantee never happened. Then there is a strange just didn't come across clear I. Think I know what the committee was trying to get at their like US aggregate seller data when there's only three sellers and then only to sellers? Yes, I. Think what they're getting at is when you're down to the aggregate data of two companies, you heard effectively looking at individual data. What is the problem? They're like the I get what you're doing. You're just reducing the denominator to get to one, but like it, why is that particular problem? Right? Well, none of these. Dipping into individual seller data and looking at aggregate data. That's not a legal. There is no law. This is all voluntary of Amazon. So they have a voluntary policy where like we can't do individual seller data, but they say nothing against aggregate and aggregate what you're getting at eight. Here you is. Does the same thing if it's just like some goofy little product they. They bring up pop stock. It's all the time before pop tops in a moment. Right? There's only like one pop. So company like you know pop soggy, it was kind of an innovative product. It's like well, if there's only two of them and use the aggregate data, you you you have everything you need to know you know about that product line looking aggregate. If that's what you decide to qualify as do you as you're looking through the other Amazon documents and other stuff. So anything jump out at you is something the committee was trying to prove or get at. The questioning seemed very focused on. Like are you using the state at a copy products? Are you buying things? You shouldn't buy. There's one question which I did not understand why came up about DMC. Take downs on twitch and Jeff as just had this look of panic in his eyes. He's like I don't know man I bought Wedge because my kids want to. Do something like that was like the side show stuff, but the real focus here, it just seemed like it was definitely in the marketplace, right? Amazon, everyone came at Amazon for the marketplace. That's what everybody knows him as like they have all these little sides. They got rain. They got Alexa Alexa was one thing too. That was kind of interesting. It's like. Are you buying things like ring to put Alexa into and dislike expand your like Titan Ism as like an Internet Internet connected home. Thing and make that more closed off and walled gardening. That was one thing. But no, it was just focusing on how much power they have to kind of change. What happens in the marketplace to kind of decide what companies in what products are able to come up on the first page of results. You know that's also something that they dug into Google and in something that one of those like themes that kind of ties everything together. We should say they all spend a lot of time talking about counterfeit goods, and why is it Amazon removed? Fake stuff from the platform and how much is it profiting off of you know selling pick rolexes? Is it surprising? The whole foods didn't show up at all they're. Like that is a really massive thing. Amazon owns that. Is it moving into a huge new product category? I think whole foods is not an online marketplace, which was the title of the hearing, not that that restricted anybody from doing anything except that, one of the things Amazon says is we have lots of competition from offline marketplaces, right? Brought up kroger a lot I mean, this is the case he's point. They all made. It seem like they were beset at any moment. They could be crushed by the likes of stop and Shop Right? Like I think the point though was really on the. Digital. Experience Consumers have and like I, don't know Ho-. Foods fits. Into that narrative, especially, because it is itself not dominant like they bought it because you needed to grow in their. Good at that at my question for you on the Amazon stuff was when you think about, we talk about two thirty a lot right like you and I in particular spent a lot time to thirty, which regulates with the platform can do with content. There's not really an equivalent of two thirty for goods on store. Right like there's some case is out there saying like you're liable for what what happens on your online store page, but Amazon doesn't have that like second order of like Messi nece around it that twitter and facebook to with two thirty, I. Mean, it gets invoked a lot for marketplace's, but it's way messier. Well, I just wanted to like this question at counterfeits question about ranking the store like they are even more free than any twitter is to to sort tweets algorithm. Algorithm clear to modern like it just their store. Do you think that they're like that Algorithm transparency? Your wire things ranked. Did you catch a sense that that's where the regulation is GonNa go. So much of the conversation around Amazon really felt like it was individuals sellers being wronged for reasons of Amazon being unresponsive or stealing. It's data. So I don't know it didn't. It didn't seem like a really big focus of the hearing, but it is a huge deal. Yeah. The, digital marketplace frame of this, which is where we have talked to. Cellini. That's where he's going right like facebook and Google very digital. They have like they don't do physical goods. Really. Apple is the APP store. It's all digital goods. Amazon is the one where it's. Front to a lot of physical things, and that is the only place where I can see this regulation needing to make some sort of like major meaningful distinction in I. Didn't see it in the hearing, but I was curious of you caught a glimmer of it. I'm not positive that they have to make a huge distinction there like depending on what they come up with because. So much of this is about their companies and whatever product they produced. The issue is more or less whether or not they're being surveilled and unfairly by targeted and crushed by that data surveillance. All right. We have gone for forty minutes. We should take a quick break. I said I wasn't going to go by company and it happens. So we should come back and talk with facebook Ango. We'll be right back. This is advertiser content. When I say utopia what comes to mind. Birds Chirping lush natural beauty dialed up and vibrant technicolor. Is it within reach. Your world world. World. explained. You are an essential part of the perfect social body. Every Body Matt Place. Everybody happy now while the peacock original series, brave new world takes place in a scientific futuristic utopia. A concept is nothing new Sir Thomas more. I introduced the theory five hundred years ago. But we keep looking for that community identity stability of aldous Huxley's Utopia and not finding it Americans are the unhappiest they've been in decades, and we're increasingly lonely whereas in a utopia. Everyone belongs to everyone else. In nineteen forty-three, the psychologist Abraham. maslow's developed a theory of Utopia. One that allows total self determination in basic terms. maslow's theory says that in Utopia, we decide for ourselves, what we need and how we're GONNA get it in Huxley's Utopia citizens always get what they want and don't want what they can't get. Sounds. Pretty good. Right. Then why can't we make it happen? For a Utopian Society the work we might need to disband some of the things we hold dearest marriage government privacy individualism even family. See for yourself. If a Utopian world is as perfect as it seems watch brave new world now streaming only on peacock. These are really difficult crazy stressful times, and if you're trying to sort of cope, it could be helpful to find something that gets beyond like doom scrolling and like obsessive worried. But digs into what is really going on underneath the surface, and that's what the weeds is all about I. Matthew Yglesias. Weeds podcast here on the box meeting podcast network. This is podcast for people who really want to understand the policy debates and policy issues that shaping our world. We've seen now more than ever like how relevant policy is to our actual lives, but so much in the news isn't focused on really understanding and explaining detail way if that sounds good to you, join us for the weeds, every Tuesday and Friday to find out what's going on why matters and what we can do about it. You could download the weeds on apple spotify or wherever else you get your podcasts. Tracy. When it comes to facebook I turn to you. FACEBOOK is patience consumer of startups as what we've learned. Yeah. But you said something to me yesterday was interesting, which is everyone else's problems are forward looking and it feels like facebook's problems are actually in the past break for people explain what you mean. Yeah. So when Congress is looking at any trust with respect to these four companies for three of them, it's It's sort of about the marketplaces that their operating right now with facebook, the question is much more about should we have allowed it to buy serum? Should we have allowed it to buy WHATSAPP and most of the antitrust conversation that was around facebook yesterday was all about that. What did Mark Zuckerberg know about Instagram, and when did he know it? We wrote a story based on some documents that the house released yesterday. In which facebook has clearly identified instagram as a competitor. In at least some ways and wants to go after it and knock it off the table, and so that's kind of where the focuses their facebook and Burke did get a lot of other questions yesterday, but it tended to be much more about content moderation and things that don't have a lot to do with antitrust. So there was weird section where they asked the face. Face Research APP in the novel, Vpn? Any kind of got lost well, explain what happened and I'm curious reactions. Yeah. So facebook has a bunch of nifty tech tools to figure out what's trending which APPs or the kids using, and so that can essentially have an early warning system if it needs to consider acquiring something or more likely in these days, go out clone it. and. So Zuckerberg was asked about the way that the company uses these systems and if they are anti competitive I, think you know traditional antitrust law probably would not say copying an APP feature is anti competitive, but could lobby written in the future about it shirt I. Think the one that caught me was I mean, this is what I'm. McKenna's points from earlier is like one of the themes here is, are you so dominant that you can collect data that's unfair and then use that to crush or killer competitors, and definitely bought the Inaba VPN to do it. That's true. Now, when I've asked executives at facebook about this, what they'll say is they don't get surprised anymore. When you have three point, one billion people using your apps around the world. You know what links they're sharing, you know what they're talking about. And so you're not going to need some kind of specialized tool to know that WHATSAPP is really taking off. Right. So they would argue that, yes, these tools were useful to them, but you know at their scale, they know what's popular now, which doesn't really seem like addresses, the problem is reached. The fact that we're so big that we're all knowing is maybe not the defense that they sometimes presented as so here's what I didn't get. I thought, Zuckerberg I want to the instagram. What's about who's issues, but on the facebook research front, the data front, they him about this APP facebook research, which you were giving to teens. They were deploying with an enterprise certificate that story broke apple revoke the certificate, and all of facebook's internal APPs went dark, and this is a scandal story after story about it, they went on for two days. So I can I, don't recall that APP? Just how he you know, he remembers the day that all facebook's internal APPS went down and people couldn't go to the cafeteria. I would agree I found that answer. Extremely, ed? Persuasive. that. Do you think that was like actually strategic for him to be like, I, don't know and then come back later and correct the record I do remember when that happened I. Mean. I really don't know I mean also you know during a six hour hearing, it's also possible that you just you get flustered or you miss here something or or something because. Yeah. As as you say, I'm sure he remembers the day that apple turned off their internal APPS I mean. Honestly. Seems like an opportunity to talk about apple's market power, and the fact that you know a day of work canceled at facebook because apple got mad. But I think most of the CEO's didn't go into yesterday a wanted to pick fights with each other. It was kind of sad that they didn't. I was Kinda hoping that Tim Cook take a shot at soccer burger. Point that the other two APP platforms I was expecting it. It was there. It was. There was all there. So cellini ended and he ended the whole meeting with closing statement. He said, some of these companies didn't get broken out. They all need to get regulated in the off too much power that some of them I. don't these breaking up apple. What sort of break. Right like. The division get sent into the corner thing about what it's done. Right. Does should spin out the finder team I've always wanted to. A clean is always that they want to. They want the APP store to be separate from the IPHONE. Basically, that's the thing I always hear. Can't break I. Think you can write some strong regulations but not playing you're on store, right. But like Elizabeth Warren's point was it's cleaner if it's two companies, but it's still a gigantic remedy that I don't think there's a lot of like like consumer or public opinion is going to walk into an Apple Cup I think you'll radio at marketplace. It seems very clear that we says some of them she broken up he is talking about facebook. I have a twenty percent conference level. He might be talking with Google and Youtube as well. But if he's going to say some of the need to get broken up like it's facebook, did you hear anything yesterday that supported that conclusion or Saudi stocks I? MEAN HE I don't remember which Republican it was, but he was like the Obama FTC looked at this and they said it was minding love. Obama. Right. Like. Why would we go back in time to relook at I? Mean, there is a belief and I mean. Somebody who thinks there could be a lot of benefit in instagram and WHATSAPP being different companies from facebook. And the reason you ask. So many questions about that acquisition as you're making the case that it never should have been approved in the first place, and so now you need to remedy it. So that was actually like the entire thrust of the argument against facebook yesterday. I think, you could probably make just as good a case that Amazon after spin out aws, but lawmakers chose not to make that case. Yeah. I think that also gets into. Politics of the acquisition of the time. To his credit is like nobody knew instagram would actually be a success like we made it a success. It didn't happen by itself. I, don't know if the lawmakers. By award, these guys said, but I don't know that he actually made that case very persuasively. and. Who knows I mean? That's like anything could have happened. Right? Cram could've stayed independent and rapidly grown and overtaken facebook like that's something that could have happened. It could have kind settled into a middle zone like snapchat or twitter seems more likely to me although I think probably would have been bigger than those two but. You're never going to know I mean it is true that facebook gave Mike and Kevin it instagram enormous resources. A lot of the reasons why Mike and Kevin sold was because running tiny startup that's blowing up is absolutely exhausting Mike. Krieger. was dragging his laptop all around San. Francisco. Because the servers were melting at all times of the day whenever Justin Bieber. Posted like the site stopped working and they really we need help. Finding a person who can quickly fix this? So we don't have to like that is the reason that they were entertaining these offers and wanted to sell it. So that is also thing that happened. Do you think that that same kind of argument or approach can apply to what's up? What's up basically did not come up yesterday and all the focus on Instagram, but that's the other one, right? Yeah, and we know weirdly a lot less about that acquisition I. Think it's because people in America just have so much less love for what's APP generally. That, it's never seemed as important. What happened to WHATSAPP as what happens to instagram even though WHATSAPP, is used, you know way more, it probably has way more engagement even than instagram does so I don't know why that didn't come up as often. We know there was a competitive bidding war for that as well. Goule. Wanted it as well. You know Mark Zuckerberg made them an offer, they can't refuse. Do you think everyday Google's we should've spent more money on what's whatsapp like this could have been solved. Should have, but Google has been placed under an ancient curse that prevents them from ever making the right decision about any social product. So it was doomed never to happen. It's fun looking through the documents and watching them casually say they should buy facebook dot com. Yeah, that. Point. That is how they talk like the window into these executives just casually being like we should just this thing or maybe not, or we should just copied ourselves and kill it before it gets any traction like it's repeated over and over again last facebook question. This one is like harder to parse because I. There's a chance, it's October is just joking around but. But. He's in many of these emails. He's like the thing about startups, as you can always buy them, which I think the committee thinks is a smoking gun, right? Like facebook's entire plan is to buy the competition to get the data from wherever they get it to say, oh, man, this apps popping, we just buy it and kill it before it competes with us. I. Think he actually said at one point. That's a joke. Yes, he did and I believe that you know it was two thousand, twelve, right? He was probably still in his mid twenties. At that point, the company was a lot smaller like people were joking around like there's more loose talk when companies are younger and I do think. It was it was part of that. I think the more interesting question becomes. Let's say facebook is telling the truth about everything. Let's say they thought it was going to be a successful acquisition, but they never knew it was gonna big as it became today and they invested in it and it got super big. Okay. Well, now, it's as big as it is. Should they be allowed to keep? Keep it or should they be forced to spend it out and if you're GONNA force them to spin it out. What's the argument that you'RE GONNA. Make about why one question that I have a lot is clearly the referral they're gonNa make, and it seems like if you don't have some other reason, we've heard hints that there's some other reason, the FTC scrutinize this that will eventually be revealed. But what you're saying is the antitrust standard at the time, the Consumer Hartman stand, which is still our standard. Says, you have to prove prices will go up both products for free. You're screwed. Right? There's nothing to review because you're not gonNA prove prove that free products are gonNA get more expensive. I think it's pretty unfair if you change the standard and you go back in time and say you missed that standard. So I think there has to be something else there. Well, what was the standard by which at and T. was broken up? Right? Like presumably at and T. didn't used to be that big, and then it just got really big and then they broke it up at least. That's the thumbnail understanding I have of that break-up. Well, yeah. But then reformed itself. Right. But because of lax antitrust regulation, right? Like it wasn't a naturally occurring phenomenon that all those APPS got back to the other or was that just sort of like inattention to capitalism It's like in the seventies and eighties. This is Tim moves book the cursive bigness in the seventies and eighties Robert Bork I can't talk about Robert on this podcast. Are we doing this right now. Robert was very influential judge Appellate Judge Federal Appellate? Judge. And basically moved the antitrust law to the consumer harm standard as part of a movement called and economics. A whole thing Robert. Bork. Mostly famous because he was not appointed. He was nominated Supreme Court by Reagan but they leaked video tape rental history, and then he didn't get nominated and that is where the expression getting bork's comes from. This is all true Netflix's still has to abide by videotape data privacy act is a whole. This is all true when facebook and Netflix had some partners, Nansen? Partnership. To. Automatically share your net flicks, watch history to facebook. They're like pending the change of this law which we are working on Robert Bork. He haunts us all. I'm sorry, I can't believe this much. Yeah I. think that's just like the law changed in the in the seventies and eighties, the standard change. The conversation right now is a very much about changing it back months and months ago, pre pandemic, we had an economist from I. Think it was Nyu Thomas Philippon came on the show, and he was like look you have this natural ab test going on in the world where the European Union when it formed was like, how do we get an economy like America's? So, we'll just take their competition policies pretty good, and at the same time we changed consumer harm standard. So everything you're seeing the EU is basically our old competition antitrust standard in. You can see how active they are in everything. Here's a new consumer welfare standard. Whether you believe, this is actually a functional Ab test given. The state of both governments is up for debate, but that was his point I thought. It was spare can say.

Facebook Apple Amazon Mark Zuckerberg Google Tim Cook Instagram Jeff. Bezos Tim Co Twitter CEO Casey Brett Kevin Cellini Jeff Bezos Jim Jordan Sicily Mckenna
Bitcoin Booms - Where To From Here?

The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

05:51 min | 2 months ago

Bitcoin Booms - Where To From Here?

"We did not only. Did we get up through ten thousand? We went through eleven. With currently sitting in the best position yet, the best position that we've been in a balloon a balloon AB- looming bloom long time. maxed out yesterday with a high of eleven thousand, four, hundred fifty to. If you recall what all saying yesterday on Zippo gassed always talking about getting through the of ten, thousand, four, fifty, six or ten five I also then went on to talk a little, ten, thousand, six, hundred and thirty. Well, of course we took both those levels outs, and we smash them most out. We've got a wonderful wonderful looking start to the weight here. Ladies and gentlemen we are about ten thousand. We auditing media. And we are looking very very good now. This is looking better of saint. Look for long time Let me talk through back. Let me, so the run loss time up to ten six. The weekly wasn't quite as fond as a trend. Guy It was just coming out of a downtrend the time before when we broke up and this is nineteen. Two Thousand Nineteen March up runoff when we when we hit, a paik of fourteen, was fourteen, thirteen, thousand, nine, hundred twenty. That was looking good through that because we did have NAS pullback, unaffiliated round, but the one that we've got here. The woman is high or low on that weekly Ken on. You heard me talk about it so many times NRA that is what we're after. K., really good shots structure. Hey, now it just looks better. It s much much more structured. The monthly looks better in the middle of the monthly hasn't got a good trend. They'd just yet. We're up twenty percent so far this month. The weekly that structure on that poppy is just fantastic. The daily looking gripe as well so right down low bitcoins pulled back away bits. We've pulled back to eleven thousand and four dollars right now. That is down point. Five of a percent big moves overnight now. Could this move going willy? See a pullback tonight. We closed yesterday above eleven. Thousand could certainly see a back, but in the same respect, we could say this. Just continue to carry on. Why well because this is the first big move in bitcoin very long time to And it's looking very very nice as I. Keep mentioning I'm sorry. Just so stoked on how this looks right now. Looking for cried looking for more entries. I know some members got little cradles from from back around that level. Background tend to. was at ten to. Oh was ten to, but the one actually was talking about was a little Kreil came back and let me just give you the risk ratio on this as it currently stands background nine seven now. Based on the entrance to a process is right now. You'd be looking at a forty two one. Yes, Forty Times your mind that means a thousand on Maine's forty thousand back sky at twenty, thousand, five hundred. Be Your Prophet right now as it stands now. The other thing to mention here as well is people have done this either got some very heavy pundits. Rotten crypto community with all we do is talk about the strategies finding tried twenty people in the right direction built upon the backbone are the three trading strategies in the coolest that is where it is a guy that he's worries so the Crypto community. We've got there. That slot group now. I'm not talking about anything else. I'm focused on crypto toting about fundamentals with trading. That is all the way doing, and if you're in there if Get in the videos at the moment. Did video today about how to take profit in parabolic? Get there and check that out too province on one. Anyway let me go back to the top ten. The bitcoin ten, thousand, twenty, one point three four to settled with a balance there we go theory, sitting at three hundred and twenty one dollars five cents. Down Point. Six five of closed up three point six percent, yes, of course bitcoin. Was the mightiest stab yesterday on at full point, three percent was sitting at twenty two dollars and. Twenty two point three cents dollars down point six percent bitcoin cash well I'm hopeful to see this puppy followed by why well with currently sitting in around a region where we are coming at the top end of that very long consolidation that's gone back to March of this year many months, and we are top end of that I've got a long tried on my one to WanNA locked. Locked in profit I'm happy. The Ida was where I took that tried oat soya modest got that wrong. I think it was. It was the four hour so I'm very hopeful to say this. Continue to kick on maximum mega. WHO's out of that so carrying on as we will bitcoin cash to seventy up two percent, the best performer in the top ten or top ten right now. Donna? Its up point three thirteen point nine cents pullback on that daily I did get taken out of that. My bitcoin holding so tastes say have not happy for simply because well. Stop got hit. That really is hilarious. Avocado thirteen point on as I said biggest. Point. Six six children non Dole's full sense. We did finally get up through that two hundred dollars did. Take some time and There is a lovely level around one darning on that. I'm looking for pullbacks in at the moment I've got one as of

Crypto Community NRA Forty Times Dole KEN Maine Donna
Multiple Philadelphia Police Cars Set On Fire Across City Overnight

KYW 24 Hour News

01:09 min | 2 months ago

Multiple Philadelphia Police Cars Set On Fire Across City Overnight

"Set fire to at least five police cars in University City early this morning, Kate. Why W's Tim Henman is joining us live from one of those fire scenes mourning him. Good morning, Brandon. And we stopped by three of the locations this morning where the cop cars or damage some worse than others in this police cruiser at 39th and Cheston may have been hit the hardest from the street. The car looks fine. But But when when you you go go over over to to the the sidewalk, sidewalk, you you see see the the front front right right side side is is badly badly burned. burned. The The front front bumper. bumper. The The hood, hood, the the windshield. windshield. All All that that is is charred. charred. There's There's a a hole hole where where the the headlight headlight was, was, and also stop by a damaged car 39th in Lancaster AB that's right by the 16th District police headquarters. And then seventh and chest that were left rear wheel well of a police van that is charged as well. Now, in each of these cases, police the officers were not heard. They were not inside any of the cars during these arson attempt. Police are investigating. And with all these incidents happening near businesses, surveillance footage that is something that police will be relying on one thing we don't know. Right now. Brennan is who was involved in this was one or more people. All that again is being investigated now right to thank him. Well, can can

16Th District Police Tim Henman Brennan Cheston Lancaster Ab Kate Arson University City Brandon
The Impact of Artificial Intelligence on Life Sciences

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

21:30 min | 2 months ago

The Impact of Artificial Intelligence on Life Sciences

"Live. Let's kick it off as Glenn with Meta data. You're on the and business podcast. So Glenn Are we're GonNa talk a bit about the future. And we're in this wild time in your industry with the corona virus, but I wanted ground us in the now. When when you look even in the space for twenty years you look at where data are starting to transform processes in life sciences. How do you like to frame it? What's the state of affairs today? So I think if you. If you look at what happens in life sciences outside of data, we just look. People, the big trend that we're seeing is it's good trend. That's the world I. WanNa live in as a patient. Therapies are getting more. Effective therapies are getting safer, and it's because they're being designed very different. Way used to be that you try to create a therapy that worked for as many people as you possibly could, and you would maybe high fiving in the hallways. If you right for Outta ten patients, you know this. This was the world of the blockbuster drugs, and it was about as imprecise as possible like a patient has a blood pressure over this. Give him this drug. Patients got cholesterol over that. Give them this other drug, and now as you start to get into these more effective therapies because they're more precise. Actually start to create an interesting data problem, and that is you start to have smaller and smaller denominators. If I'm starting to in well, this drug isn't district people who have a blood pressure over this. They also need to have this gene. They also need to have or not have this pre existing condition. ETC, acceptance every time I come up with more criteria. The pool of patients who are going to bed. And remember. We're making things that people take. They put in their bodies, and we've to make sure that they're safe. Not just effective, and there's a good way regulatory bodies who are protecting that safety and efficacy. So now as these patient pools, who will benefit therapies get smaller. We also have smaller smaller pool of people who we can use from a research perspective would be volunteering. Stoke the specificity, which is great means that we have a scarcity of patients that we've got to deal with a new way and I think that's been driving at least I have a very kind of drug development centric view of the world. About a drug discovery. Can I find a new molecule I really focus on the will what do I? Do if I think I've got something that's going to cure this kind of cancer. Think about making more evidence, but with fewer people line. Smaller denominators I think that's a big piece of what's driving the data landscape in life sciences. The other thing that I'll tell you which is kind of interesting, is that the life sciences industry has not been really good about data, standardization and a guy. He was a big influence in the way I think about data medi data chief data officer starting from about five years ago, his name's David, Lee and He came out of the insurance industry. Any any taught me that data standardization. Doesn't sound sexy, but until you do that, you can't benchmark until you do that. You create a predictive model and the life. Sciences Industry hasn't been great about data standardization because everybody was doing stuff for this one drug in this one area, and so I see people outside of Medi data as well, but certainly the kind of stuff that we do is we try to use AI to climb that data value curve. How do we a figure out how to standardize data in different ways data from different sources about different things? Let me just give you one quick tangent example. I got asked very kindly to speak at a conference about Ab-. Stroke and I do not know anything about cardiology like I did cancer research before we started medi data I'm comfortable talking about oncology, so I figured I better. Get ahead of it if they're asked me to. Present and I got up on stage and I said listen I. Don't know anything about stroke. But if I was speaking to a bunch of oncologists, and they were trying to build a predictive model around cancer diagnosis, and they were only looking at cancer research. They're not going to be very successful because everybody already has cancer in those research studies, but if you were to be able to go and look at large-scale cardiology studies, stroke studies studies about hard tax. If I were to go, pull data from studies research about diabetes. Then I'm going to know what those patients looked like before their cancer diagnosis, and then I can start to use. Use that to build that model so when you put that Lens on things, you realize I need to standardize data across a lot of different kinds of patients and a lot of different kinds of research patients who are in research. I have to stack the deck. I don't mean that in a various way create to create the biggest possible denominator to create the most evidence generating. Data set that I can, and even just generating that data set requires ai tool sometimes, and then once you got that data set. I think probably inherently obviously you. You've got more traditional statistical tools and methods with frankly work great and a lot of the shared also can start to apply things like machine learning neural that works and look for look for signal that you might have missed or enhanced signal. That wasn't there traditionally so I. I do think that's happening I. Feel Pretty Good. There's a lot more we. We can do, but we're. We've started as an industry getting that right. Yeah, until there's couple of things to poke into here I. Like the landscape paint I'm going to dive into a couple of things. You mentioned one of which was around standardization, so yeah, I mean what a tough problem! I think everybody. We've interviewed in healthcare. You guys are in Pharma. If I was ever GONNA be selling a product, probably said the six time on the podcast never be selling artificial intelligence solutions to hospitals like a break one. One of the Pharma companies, but in healthcare, broadly whether they be life, sciences, or or diagnostics, or whatever the case may be just data, being goofy, and like in silos and locked up and not uniform sort of this big ubiquitous issue is this when you talk about the standardization, clearly from what I understand of our look into companies like the MERCS and the bears of the world. They're beginning to try to do this with their own big corpus's of historical information, whatever being able to streamline things so that it's. It's findable, maybe not machine readable yet. They don't necessarily know where that's going to add value just yet in most cases, but but at least make it more uniform. Is this something that the industry is GonNa have to get to the same page from kind of a regulatory or kind of soft law level, or is this just per company? We're GONNA have to come up with data governance policies within our firm and just be really steady about those across silos. Like how do you see this rolling out? Yeah, so? Well I. DO think that individual companies are working on that, but I also think that there's industry organizations. There's commercial entities. My own included who are trying to do that beyond the walls of an individual company and I think we're GONNA have to I. Don't think the data that one company has is going to be sufficient. Across all the use cases that we'd not just a good idea commercially, but we have a medical ethical obligation to create the best care possible when data sets and I do think that the data quality is a really important thing to think about if if it's a a regulatory prescriptive method of doing it or the way regulation works today, which is demonstrate to people that you've done a responsible set of work to standardize things and prove it, but a lot of people will point a finger at regulators and say they're slowing down innovation, sometimes particularly and Pharma and I do not believe. believe that at all regulators. Job Isn't to be like Glen, you're a great guy, so you know I believe what all your data and Algorithms put out. No job is to protect the public health and say Glenn proved to me on paper that you did something that was scientifically ethically responsible to jobs. Is So so i? Think if that requirement is there? What you'll see is individual companies trying to solve this on their own, and I've seen this before in life, science space with other technology things, even just the management data used to be every company tried to do it their way. Out of their basement, and then twenty years later, this medi data do Thanh, research and again we're not the only company doing it, but you see platform providers that are doing it at a larger scale so when I see everybody trying to do it individually get excited because that means that there's actually a market demand for that. And you're creating a marketplace where the best technologies, the best rhythms, the best data sources will create something that more and more people will come onto, and that's how that's everybody clearly. I think we could extrapolate that for those of you. Listening into almost any industry right I think people say this. Even about I'm just GONNA throw some random stuff at ya like automotives. Hey, if we're GONNA make safe self driving cars. Do we want Ford my develop something about some certain snowy driving circumstance like there's GonNa. Be Some things that are going to have to be transferable so that everybody's safer on the dam road and with drugs. Maybe it's the same way. Business Opportunities Hey if we can be the ones who even through kind of soft news. Can Be. The folks that people rely on to develop a system instruct sure that's going to build a really sticky market position in clearly from a business perspective. That's that's an appeal as well part of the challenge see in life, sciences and I know you've obviously you guys have dealt with this and found ways around or whatever there's there's a way to frame it, but you know I. Look at companies like we just did a piece on Johnson and Johnson for example looking at some of their current innovations and investments today I. Frankly we. We don't see a tremendous amount, but they're involved in a consortium called Melody Out in Europe somewhere from not mistaken where Santa a bunch of other big players are from what I understand exposing a certain amount of data is being trained on in some aggregate sense in everybody's GonNa get a little bit of the benefit from it. How do we do this? Hey, we all have the same uniform stuff. Hey, we're able to kind of like mould things across companies. How do we do that without giving away the secret sauce, because of course? Clearly as a drug development firm that there's a humanitarian side, and then clearly we have to make payroll in in. That would mean that we've got to keep some of the things that are secret. So how do we uniform things and maybe cross pollinate without the risk of US losing her crowned jewels yet? So that is not an easy thing to do I'm I'm super appreciative of it. The way we've at least tried to tackle that problem is by creating like a give to get dynamic. There are definitely companies out there that sell data. And I think there's a great place for them in the world. Probably doing and we'll do some awesome stuff I. think there's there's a great place in the world for not for profit groups who say hey just throw your data. Here will create naturally yet. For sure, that's all all good, but I also think there's a place for a model where you say look if you put your data into this, what is effectively proprietary bucket, but with a third party that you trust and let that third party that make sure that everybody who's putting their data into that pool is protected in terms of not showing the specifics of your individual data points, so in your example. You know Sanofi doesn't see Johnson and Johnson's data. But you've got enough people in there that you can do things in aggregate and let people compare their own specific data to the more generalized bigger denominator that Medi date, or whoever it is or you and it's done at the standardization is done for you in a way that this transparent and you can believe in the results I think that's a really interesting commercial model, and then must exist in other industries I just not an expert. Well, it's. The way you're talking about it makes it sound like it's kind of a Nathan idea, even for you guys where it's like well. We think that there could be a space for this like it's something that could have all right. It's like an I believe you're right I, think actually it absolutely. Could I just think you Mr Glanton? Whoever your your absolute best partnership guys, you know you'd better be drinking beers or some of these people because there's a lot of trust that goes into those kind of relationships. So. There's a lot of trust that goes along in life sciences anywhere for sure yet. You're dealing with data about patients in some way. Holly anybody in medicine right has a person's life in their hands, but if if we're working on a vaccine for SARS, come to I, mean literally billions of people are going to get it like you've got billions of lives in. In your hands, so he's already. A lot of trust is important in our industry and I. do think that what will see by the way. There's posters at scientific sessions that we've done. There's clients right now are taking some of these aggregated data sets to regulators, and they're using them to demonstrate exactly what I was saying before. Their drugs are safe and effective. But with different kind of aggregated denominator, we call it a synthetic control arm, and it's not that is android senator anything synthesis out of the people it, synthesizing people who are in lots of different research studies into a cohort they can be used as. As a valid competitor to the patients who you treated with your new drought, Nisa solving that problem, you're saying of the narrowness if you have some super niche allergy medication for people with a certain kind of whatever then yeah, maybe you really need to extrapolate in that kind of uniform data, way and and kind of square that circle that you. And I actually think that not only by I know this is happening. See it happening, but this is a harbinger of things to come because. I gave. Let's take it to its most extreme, so in all US oncology, because it's happening there I and cancer, but I think it's going to happen in almost every therapeutic area, probably even like analgesics, and what the next tylenol is, but we are all so interestingly I mean at biologically individual and people talk about cancer therapy, and almost every patient really is like an end of one problem. There is nobody who has your. Your exact same tumor right in your tumor has probably different kinds of cells that have different mutations even within this one problem in your body. So when you start to think about that, we have to use these techniques to extrapolate what the best therapy is for every single person at the right time down to individual. We're going to need as an industry and I'm not just talking about now. Life Sciences although I think by scientists. Imprint part of the for sure. It's GonNa. Pay For a lot of this Oh. Yeah, sure I sure, but but these mathematical models that we used to figure out what to do for individuals there being born right now using these techniques stacking up all this data and figuring out how to use as a group. We're GONNA use that against individuals, so this stacking I'm just going to clarify this point will move into the next question, but I wanNA nutshell this for the audience the stacking is it sounded almost like a combination of two things one if we can have some. Unification, around the data, we can combine it in certain ways where nobody's giving away their secret sauce, but maybe we were able to get bigger cluster of people who have a specific genetic condition, or whatever, and then use that for for our clinical trials. That's one side of it. You also mentioned Kinda the synthetic sort of element. was that kind of like you know what immediately came to my mind? was you know we're we're? We're training an algorithm to read handwriting. You know we'll come up with a bunch of programmatic generated handwriting. That might be slight variations of things like using that I. Don't think that's what you. You meant there, but what? What did you mean by synthetic again? No, so you got that stack. We've got stack of every patient and I'm coming to see you I say all right well. What am I going to treat Glenn while I got to figure out because Glenn's unique. WHO's similar to Glen and so what you do? Is You build these kind of like Matrix views, patients and you start to use algorithms to compare Glenn with everybody in the stack. Yeah Okay Okay you, you pull those people out of the stack, and you then synthesize them into a group of smaller stack, but that is purpose built. To make a guess about what to do best for Glenn Don or all them. You synthesize one of these smaller stacks from the big one to use as a competitor the same way if I had a group of patients who I gave my new drug to and I'll give another group of patients a placebo sugar pill right I, compare them with like. Well, should I be giving people sugar pills if we have tons of people who are in research, who already gotten the standard of care? Can I reset the CISE? Those people into a comparative instead of exposing a whole bunch of volunteer patience to something that. Does, not effective, and that's the synthesis of the group. Yeah, it's not robots. You're not talking about programmatic degenerate I wasn't suspecting were so. It is it is quite interesting. Because the direct analogy, some of our listeners are avid readers that emerged dot com, always covering use cases in different industries. We think about how a net flicks or Amazon does recommendations you know. You're stripping, you know. In their case, it's purchase behavior. Geo Location whatever else for you. It's genetic stuff in health history, whatever and yeah, you just find in those similar clusters and being able to extrapolate a little bit. You know the movie Gatica. People haven't seen it like the ideas like your DNA decides whether or not you're going to be an astronaut or somebody who's cleaning, toilets or something, cleaning toilets, and of course, of course, that's patently ludicrous, because your genes interestingly don't change that much there. In instances where mutations and things, but actually I I can't tell you much more about your health today than I could have told you about your health the day you. You were born because it's a static data. Set Your Connecticut Right. That is a very simple view of it. There's a lot more elaborate stuff, but if you think about all the stuff that is changing about you overtime, Gina Type, and then all of your phenotype, and you start to measure that stuff and you start to think about it. It really is a problem of finding not one needle, but the right ten. Ten needles in the haystack that allow us to make the best comparison between Glen or a group of patients and patients like them, and that's another place where these artificial intelligence tools are used, so we use them to create stacks, but we also use them to select the right needles out of those haystacks to create these comparative groups Yup I. See those reasonable applications I would be you know. BE FRANK WITH YOU IF If that struck me as not possible based on precedents and other industries, but that clustering strikes me as quite possible, particularly solve that data harmonisation issue. I mean that's a Lotta. The crux of it I know we're just about to wrap up I know you have seen a lot of things change with covid nineteen. Thinking about what that means for the future of your industry. Any closing thoughts before we wrap on. What this means for now in the near future in life sciences. Yes so at the risk of making Not Look that good? Because, I'm definitely including myself in this criticism wouldn't have been nice if we had all that patient data stacked up. And I mean they're. They're few million patients around the world who are in studies on the Medi Data Platform. It's all different companies doing the research with their data, but can you imagine if we had that stack? And we were paying attention to in the hundred fifty countries that we do research knowing some of these patients, genetics, and all of their pheno types in a better way than we normally do in medicine, because we see them consistently wouldn't have been great for layer on like who seems to be coming down with cove nineteen I mean no, no, no, no doubt, no young. And I think that that that's an interesting. You put like an exclamation point on why we need to do this. It's like there's an ethical imperative, not just a commercial driver to think about data in different ways. Yeah, yeah, well. To some degree you know my thought is like what you're articulating makes a tremendous amount of sense. Given Your Business Model. It makes slightly less if I work at Bayer. However like despite the biased tilt, I do understand the value prop and I do think that it is compelling and I think it does feel like it'll have to be the future. People are not going to keep distance silos forever. I do think it make sense. Air Because, if you if pharmaceutical a pharmaceutical company B. comes out with the same effectively drug, and and they're competing for the same group of patients, and neither of them knows that you might be better off taking drug Abe before drug be or drug be is better in a certain kind of of patient than drug. As than actually, you are not serving your customer and you're. You're not generating the revenue that you could be generating, and so you should be motivated with other companies to lineup tightly. In terms of what is the best way to treat patients I actually think it's in your best interest. i. e Clayton clearly is I mean there's a little bit more potentially to lose while in your firm, it's it's almost explicitly to game but I. I think he'd do things like you see things like melody you see companies like yours have been tremendously successful. You guys were acquired recently. You know massive congratulations for that and yes I think long term it's not against their interests by any means, and hopefully I think Glenn. It'll be part of the future. I know these are things you've thought about for. People are interested. Interested in some Glenn stocks is a book coming out in August called the patient equation by Wiley. It's about precision medicine in the age of Covid nineteen and beyond Glenn. If people are interested in in stay in touch following your thoughts, we live sciences I. Know We have a lot of people that follow that space. Where should they go on the web to find you? Cou. You could find me on twitter, etc, at captain, clinical a fictitious superhero for good science. And meditated accomplish our website for anybody interested. There's all kinds of papers and men links to publications. We do academic stuff, too, so it's not all commercial awesome, all right,

Glenn Cancer Glen Johnson Diabetes Europe Bayer United States Twitter Sars AI Covid Pharma Glenn Don
UFC featherweight champ defends title in split decision

The MMA Hour with Ariel Helwani

07:41 min | 2 months ago

UFC featherweight champ defends title in split decision

"I Will Fight Island was officially christened tonight for the UFC in Abu. Dhabi there was no baptism to be had in the main event of UFC two fifty one. What's going on everybody? Welcome to the official. You have to fifty one post fight. Show here on, May, finding dot com I'm Mike Heck location this week from Boston Massachusetts visiting the parents this weekend. That is Jose Jose. Main Event Kamara, who's been retains a welterweight title against Whore Mazal. Challenger looked pretty darn good in that first round. I'm pretty surprised that judges gave in that first round, but it was the much fresher champion that was able to sort of chip away at the always game, or hey mazda throughout the fire Ab. Fresher champion but Komo. Zeman was basically been in camps since beginning of this year, despite was like Ben Booked and booked in both supposed to fight earlier this by giving burns, and also muzzle steps in, so yes, he's finally fresher because he he's had the full camp and everything but I think Kamara wasn't one hundred percent in that fight, either considering this long extended, Feick at Ala, similar to twenty Ferguson with all these these these fights falling apart, but Kamara who's been one nonetheless, might not have been the most exciting fight. I saw a couple of tweets complaining about the fight and I really take that. I felt it was a lot of fans that were on this very muzzle hype train. He's on the video game cover on this baptism round the resurrection Super Necessary Punches bef tile, and that they were expecting violence, even mice I myself said fight between WHO's minimize well probably has a higher chance of ending in a violent way, but it did not come out who's been one I had them winning all five rounds the first round I guess. Didn't really matter to me. Who won that? I still come who's been what at least four of the rounds comfortably? The people complain about. The foot stopped the wrestling the headbutts. That stuff will come out. Who's been did what he had to do to win. That's exactly why I thought he would. Take, her might as well because all the time Mazal taking this fight on short notice. Kamara also took this fire. On short notice gets an extra a completely different fighter between Gilbert Burns as well. It's completely rechange leftist camp Had his new trevor wittman is corn for the first time fighting the guy all this bad blood is in the air all the pressures on him, and perform a like we ourselves, said all the pressures on who's Madonna not not a whole lot on Mazal, but at the end of the day. Who's been doing what he had to do? I didn't have a problem with the way fought. Might not have been the most exciting, but if I was going to pick up, predict away whose men would pull this off. This is exactly how I thought he would do it. Yeah, when you get a fight like this and you have a guy as hot as MAS. Bat brings in a lot of the casual fan base. Does your watch? As many events as we watch, and some of the hardcore fans watch everything so most people expected this fight to go exactly that way I thought the first row was going to be the most interesting round, obviously, because of Mazda was going to get it done. He's probably going to have to do it in the first five minutes, and this is the fire. We got like Mara. Who's been defends his title. For the second time. It was another classic who's been like performance and he gets a one-sided win and highly anticipated main event so in the end. We like to talk about the overall letter grade, but it felt like just kind of looking at the time slot when we're all said and done. We're getting ready to hit record here. We're just like man this is this is super late like I feel like the card and the whole night in a weird way. Wet Kinda slow did it not. started off really really quickly. Might just. Like I feel like the first few flew by and all of a sudden I had been watching fights for two and a half three hours and I'm like wow, this fight is cars going quickly I like this pace, and then we the main card and Amanda he boss comes in, and just submits patriots immediately i. wish went exactly as I expected, but then there was decision with Rosen on drugs, and then even Yawn Aldo finish, but it was in the fifth round, so there's still basically fought for twenty five minutes, and then we get twenty five minutes, Vulcanology Holloway and then we get twenty five minutes of in Mazda, also of these we've seen. We saw that graphic on the screen like. All the cards are three title fights, and like we used to fourteen had like Woodley Maya in Jones, a cormet and Cyborg Abinger, and then to seventeen to five those had some bangers like like two to seventeen had three epic fights three like violent, like just three of the craziest finishes you'll see. And then, of course to a five, the CONOR McGregor show, and then to seventeen had the DC Jones trilogy, so I think we're a little maybe. We'll. We'll spoiled on these three. These three title fight cars while we're expecting something like that and I loved all all great fights off spectacular fights, but I think a lot of fans are tuning in to see fight island. In the Mazar strain, all these title-fights might have been. A limited. I could see why they might have been little disappointed. I didn't have a problem with it, but probably was the night Dana White wanted in terms of finishes. Yeah, the main event may have disappointed some people but for. The Sake, this is like the best thing that could have happened for the welterweight division like if you're burns. Edwards these guys are pretty happy right now. Especially Gilbert Burns. One hundred percent I mean we. We set it on count after it was on what the heck or or post eyesore produce. All kind of blend together at this point in the summer, but we. We said if Moslem Dole wins. That's going to be a problem for the US's pockets the welterweight division I mean. We were talking about him fighting the bringing the both belts so that the Conor McGregor. The table and all this. Kamara who's been one and it's? It's a no brainer that Gobert burn gets three matches. Suppose he should've been fighting tonight. before covid nineteen October, nineteen. That's applaud the car, so yeah, for all the way division, and the the the martial art fans of the world that don't like quote unquote. Holding divisions I think that's a good thing, but I. Honestly I love chaos at Moscow had one I. Think I, think it would have been fun time in the world of May. And Mazda all. Let's be clear. We all know this. He was the a side heading into this fight. He's the reason. There was a lot of buzz and a lot of fanfare when you had a guy like game bread in the street that he's on. That's what happens, but a lot of people wanNA know where he goes from here. Because despite losing the fight tonight, he still has a ton of options moving forward. Chaos can still rain in some way Jose. Can you say that again? You cut off quick second. Chaos can rain. For horny Mas at all got about it because he's got so many options moving forward despite the loss tonight. Yeah, I mean Hoy Mazdas. All I'm Kamara. WHO's been himself set like he's GonNa. He's like. He's like he's GonNa. Lose all these like excuses. Bill didn't talk the finance days notice flu costs. The country doesn't have was coach in the gym, covert nineteen this and that so like I. Don't think I of course I think Mazda obviously cooled anytime. You lose. You cool a little bit Conor McGregor and Nadir's, and it's such an insane finish that they run it back, and you have another epic fight like that, but for Mazda all you're obviously going to a little bit but he himself said. Let me, get a couple of wins and they'll run back. I'm sure he want. He would love to five full camp but the Colby College. Is there I? Think that is going to drum up a whole lot of interest I. think people might even be more interested in that fight in the dynamic between those two fires, oarsmen and I think that Kobe Covington already Moslems? Fight does not need a title online. That's just two guys. They hate each other I wanNA break brick on each other's faces. WHO'S MCCANN? Fight Gillard. Leeann, Edwards of course out there, wonder boy thompsons, working his way up Santana, positive I think has covered to so he somewhere out there, so the welterweight division will move, but for now Mazda all. Of course cooled, but he's still I think still the hottest commodity hundred seventy pounds.

Mazda Kamara Fight Island Conor Mcgregor Jose Jose Gilbert Burns UFC Massachusetts Mike Heck Edwards Official Komo Trevor Wittman Boston Colby College Mazal United States Dana White Jones Kobe Covington
Keeping in Check: Maintaining Spirituality in the Influencer Space (ft. Omar Shahid)

TMV Podcast

05:08 min | 3 months ago

Keeping in Check: Maintaining Spirituality in the Influencer Space (ft. Omar Shahid)

"Salaam welcomed another team via podcast brought to you by the Vibe as always I'm your host. Salim Qasim and this week I'm joined by from the Muslim influence and network. The Muslim infants networker, celebrating their third birthday. And I've known Omar for for quite a few years now. And we discuss or about to discuss I guess the general landscape of of influences and the whole space Muslim influences and representation and also I guess how. Influences can. Maintain that sincerity. We spoke a lot about sincerity. which I think is a really important point. When thinking about the the the the digital space and people growing their own platforms. And why they're doing it and whatever else? We also talk a lot about evenly. Miller who was on a previous podcast with us? I can't remember the episode number. It was called a slum in the hood. It was just a few weeks actually before the whole lockdown and Shenanigans took place. We had a fantastic conversation. Please do inside podcast. By. Yeah, so this time almost was actually on the podcast that time he came into office. This one's conducted over zoom I'm, but we didn't get much time to speak to. And delving deeper into will these topics around the influences and the burden responsibilities term I use quite in the podcast. And various other bits so yet without further ADO, here's my conversation with Oma. Consummating! I'm good very much. The Virginia nuns focused Ab. Regulations for yourself on on three years of influence network. You were not us. A few have lost track of time in Kobe, but if you. And January a jury. When the world was normal than you could be office so yeah you with. that. And we were at all about at story. I guess if people do listen back to that in check out the Compensation, we had the shed so much and shows guests like for me. These people uninfluenced should be especially in the kind of in space. But we also discussed on their the fact that we should probably have a separate compensation yourself. Because I think there's a lot to discuss generally around this space. But I staw- off with. Can you share with us with myself? Whatever a little bit of background is the to how you saw at out in Western influences I'm wet weather. The idea came from just a is the genesis of that was the funds the network? Yes so. I'm. Twenty years old colleagues on the. I've been working with influences for. Seven years now. and. It started when I was. Using my. Sheet Autism who approached me and said you know what we don't want to us. Seem that used to be a journalist and use? Oh, Amid if we have some insights into what we're trying to do. So I, said you know what I don't know anything about influence. A management I didn't know what to do. I didn't know what to advise you, but you know what s give it a shot. Silently? We started with them some. In music, the sheet industry. Led to another working with a comedian photographer. You and then someone in school it's. And the previous manage people like cottage city can. Become Allah talked about. cross poss with managing advisers are not. The. Is and what? What specifically is your role? I guess in order the because I can imagine what it is now would be very different when it's not is How how did that come to beats it to be in the place that you guys aren't now because I think. We'll get onto about some of the some of the campaigns, and whatever else now you guys. What would some sizable? Brands and I think on the Rubicon mangoes took my head I. Believe Prime off I could be wrong. Yeah like huge huge names, and and you guys full front of kind of working with them and influences in doing campaigns. How did it will stop? What trump to even want WANNA. Get involved in this space. Yes, I was working with influences story people when I was working at a charity. I'm my business on a safe and we actually worked to name. She wants a campaign together and off to the campaign will be realizes up is actually no one to represent. These guys know into the the cough to them. That will being. No one to think about the future and it's kind of like wild wild west. It's no one nobody really knows what they're doing. Just kind of screwing industry that nobody knows what's what's going on,

Salim Qasim Salaam Omar Cough Virginia Miller Rubicon AB
Social Justice

Nonprofit Everything

05:43 min | 3 months ago

Social Justice

"Should our nonprofit take a stand on social justice issues. If we think it might alienate some donors. Oh topical questions Mad We can tell what's on people's minds and I'm glad that this is on people's minds because it's a really important question. I have an opinion and if you're gonNA guess what my opinion is, which is. Absolutely. So so there's tons of research, and and before we get too far. This is ab absolutely. Bring in a guest expert because this is the kind of lead to. This is the kind of thing where people who know way more about this than we do. But, but there's there's a ton of research out there and people in the nonprofit sector, probably more likely to believe it than people in the corporate sector are that. When you take a stand on social issues, you bring the people that are interested in what you've got to say much closer to you and the people that were never interested in you to begin with are not going to have their minds changed by you taking a stand on a particular social issue. I can talk about my time at three. Square I think I've probably told this story on the podcast before to. We got a handwritten note. A check for I think twenty five dollars on it and the handwritten note said. Here's twenty five dollars. I would like you to use this money to feed American citizens only. Hell I remember that we talked about. It's been two years. We talked about like that right, and and we had no hesitation at the food bank like I. You know I looked at it. I knew what I wanted to do I brought it to the executive or the CEO. I said Hey. This is what we got. This is what I WANNA do. And the blessing was absolutely. That's what you should ride. There was not even any discussion internally about. Let's not hurt her feelings, so we drafted a letter, which said that much your donation. However, we cannot restrict donations specifically to people who are American citizens, and that's it and we returned it back to her with that little note. There's a one hundred percent chance. She never gave another donation to the food bank again, but that was twenty five bucks right, so it was absolutely wasn't a really hard. We weren't selling our morals for a significantly amount at large amount of money was just a very well. And you and I both know that amount of money shouldn't matter. I know within a matter, but like we don't know this reader talks about alienating some or this. You know this person says they're alienating some donors. We don't know what size donors were talking about, but I still. That doesn't make a difference in my opinion. I just think. I would I would say my push pushback to that would be that. What donors are you alienating by? Not taking a stand because there's been a whole I I've been following all these sort of private facebook groups that have nonprofit professionals in groups with you know nonprofit executive directors all over the country that are talking about this and I would say if I were just roughly speaking. Ninety percent of people right now are putting out some statement because a it's so intertwined in every mission out their rates. Social Justice issues are at the core of those I think the key is making sure that it is. Not done in a sloppy manner or a an obligatory manner I. I don't know about you. Andy, but I've seen so many statements that come out that feel like people are doing it to check the box. Instead of actually it's core values. It's the way they work and I. Think People can see through that so I do think you have to be careful about that as an organization, so, but it comes back to your fundamental values. Your mission your how you? who you serve a to me, it feels it just feels like a even if it's a donor on the line like what about the donors who are waiting to see what you say? I think you gotta look at it from both lenses absolutely I mean and you have you make a good point about like especially right now. There's a lot of every corporate PR. Department has put out some sort of statement it says either black lives, matter or something close enough to that that they don't feel like they're actually going to put their foot in anything. They don't mean to put their foot in and and you can tell just by the way they're written whether or not they mean. Whether or not, it's like. I. Read Someplace recently that that saying we need to do better is about the same as hopes and prayers for gun violence like it, it just something that comes out of your mouth, and it means you have absolutely no intention of doing something about it. So when we talk about know in the nonprofit sector. Your your integrity is all you have, and you realize that your people are going to give to you because believe in your mission one hundred percent of the time and some of the other things, so there's there's other studies that are just recent. That are so interesting because they're tangential to this, not the same thing, but it's like if if you find out that there's a charity for that serves cats in a charity. This serves dogs and you're a dog person. You've always been a dog person. You give the dog person charity, and then you read a study or read something in the newspaper that says. The dog charity is. Seventy five percent effective and the cat charities ninety five percent effective. It doesn't matter your dog person. You're still giving to the dog charity, which means that the purpose that caused the reason that you're a nonprofit is always going to be much more important than the individual activities that you undertake and provided. You're not terrible now that you're not coming down on the wrong side of this thing. And if you if you do come down the wrong side of it out, you get what you deserve oh you do.

Executive Facebook Andy CEO
"ab" Discussed on Rimcast with Rim and AB

Rimcast with Rim and AB

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"ab" Discussed on Rimcast with Rim and AB

"Or it's gonna go i've heard a lot about heard and seen a lot of buzz about this and i will say that i will definitely be right up your alley we should do truthfully we should do a episode just that of just this show like we did for making a murder making murder was wild 'cause i watched the first episode at like eight o'clock on a saturday night and then i watch twin ten or twelve hours without stopping we recorded an episode like eight in the morning the next day we'll do that here listen if we got any audience out there that's watching wild country let us know we might do a recap of it because it's one of those that from abc good knock it out of the park i i'm excited i trust your judgment on that it's six parts six parts not too long i think each episode's a little over an hour so set aside some time next shop ab have you seen this show scrubs yeah see scrubs but have you seen the new scrubs new scripts talking about alex inc is that the one with jd yes no i have not seen it is it any good it looks trash zach braff jd from scrubs is a dad with a family who quits his job to startup podcast company and that's basically the premise of the show it's as it is very much if jd quit being a doctor and to start a podcast copay it's the show because he's kind of i think producing directing the episodes it's very much the scribes formula it's like a less funny scrubs.

murder alex inc jd abc twelve hours
"ab" Discussed on Rimcast with Rim and AB

Rimcast with Rim and AB

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"ab" Discussed on Rimcast with Rim and AB

"Why don't you kick it off with a a quick wrestlemainia recap we teased it last episode ab hyped it up this had the chance of being an ab bus him and spoiler alert it lived up to the hype i wanna say be when he got this was one of the top mainly as i've ever seen it had no bad moments and it lasted for like seven hours that's how you know somethings good when you're you i turned it on at four i didn't turn it off to eleven and there was no moment where i'm like i'm going to start doing something else and you go to bed before eleven most i i mean i was looking at the clock the last couple of hours but i wasn't i wasn't going to turn it off and i was very entertained what's the most memorable part about it for the for the mass audience the wrestling geeks out of wrestling gigs listen to this show i don't think what's the big event what what do you mean what he has detained for it's obvious what was ronda rousey oh yeah we're offense i had so many there's so many matches i didn't wanna could've named undertaker undertaker's great that undertaker john cena deal was was tremendous brock lessner winning in a brutal shocker brutal finish in a big shocker and then ronda rousey is the most electric wrestler maybe maybe ever dow electric debut never seen a more electric debut and it was in the face of a lot of skepticism i even wasn't sure i mean.

ronda rousey wrestling john cena dow electric seven hours
"ab" Discussed on Rimcast with Rim and AB

Rimcast with Rim and AB

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"ab" Discussed on Rimcast with Rim and AB

"All right what do you mean it's supposed to be funny scary what do you mean your pan it's i said at a fear from comet anymore those days are over strictly fear pay now jug christie and a horror film i'll send you the trailer this is crazy evan seen this there's there's these monsters that come if they make any noise so when they're in their like in a wood in the woods nafta like sleep under there yeah yeah i didn't know he's in that yep seen that next up none of that was planned by the way next hashtag done that's why you gotta name a rim maybe because the chemistry's there yeah i deserve i deserve it i've had no okay all right i just see it now that took me a second all right ab do you want to do this or do you want to go something else what whatever's on the list you added some stuff oh we you pick what are the boys russian equal partnership partnership co host try not not to rim the co host seeding crowned here the next one then what are the boys watching him well right now i'm watching tiger woods on the chipping green at the match go look at all my god okay nobody watching him roseanne it's back better than ever i'd say unbelievable we we didn't talk about stunning that we didn't talk about it last week think of it i think i don't this this might be completely made up and we don't have stat boy to correct me but i think it's the most watched tv show in television history it's it's up there in terms of recent recent network like time tv's it calms sitcoms for sure i think something like thirty three million watched the debut which is like half the super bowl we're talking about roseanne and you weren't erosion guy to begin with but i was sleeping.

evan roseanne jug christie
"ab" Discussed on Rimcast with Rim and AB

Rimcast with Rim and AB

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"ab" Discussed on Rimcast with Rim and AB

"I don't i'm just going off what kendall tells me and she doesn't know anything either but it is her body so i'm just gonna trust her in what she says i mean the first is e came out of the blue we weren't expecting it that day or anything so really i don't know anything but she's she's she starting to think that she's gonna go to or do date so dude eight again the twelfth okay we from today and that's his day right no her birthday's the ninth all right yeah that's another segment we have here bruni we'll see at is party this weekend though bayern to lower of that it was the photos were believable do quick recap kendall kill that on the the natural everything princess themed princess food little fun princess puns laid out there for all the people of interest that an actual princess was there reponsible the great reprisal was there she showed up and i'd say i think it was a ninety nineteen ninety pontiac i was waiting list i here's the here's the thing i was waiting for her to show up in her car so i was like looking out the window because i wanted to see what type of whip she comes out and then i also wanted to get a funny picture of like rapunzel driving up in a car driving very funny okay waiting for to drive up she pulls up in a normal gar i don't know what i was expecting of is going to be like a horse and buggy so that'd be the only thing that'd be reasonable for princess to drive but shows up.

kendall bruni
"ab" Discussed on Rimcast with Rim and AB

Rimcast with Rim and AB

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"ab" Discussed on Rimcast with Rim and AB

"Structure here you know the injury rating and nba jam nothing did nothing did nothing while i'm in of course it didn't how i mean we were dumb kids we didn't know that i thought it made you like slower and you shot way worse when you're injured so when someone was i take his ass out fucking i got johnson in valona there john stockton's getting injured i'm taking them out putting in hornicek like when his health was low okay when he's got like ten injury i got take about gotta get him out of there turns out didn't mean anything we got into maybe do a little class action lawsuit love to glass action lawsuit the only time ab would lose video games like that back in the day would be if he made a management air not so skilled situation all right anyway i'm glad we cleared that up everybody calm down this isn't re abc not making contract ammann's behind the scenes trust me i recurring segment now how many kids does ab have how many kids do you have a still have one kid okay one kid only if you said something interesting the other day i said i said well i'm going to tell you i said you know as the baby come in any minute now or something to that effect like you know something prime more crass like she finished pop type of question should you were like it doesn't seem like it it doesn't seem like it's coming for a while and i thought again don't know anything about this stuff so i'm asking you i thought how the fuck do you know.

johnson john stockton nba
"ab" Discussed on Rimcast with Rim and AB

Rimcast with Rim and AB

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"ab" Discussed on Rimcast with Rim and AB

"The new queer eye debuted on netflix last month ab and i gotta tell you it's even better in probably every way in the the original iterating ten out of ten a b i think you would love the show i think a lot of listeners would love the show it's very uplifting it's got its guy everything you like about these makeover shows whether it's there's a guy who kind of renovate the house a little bit there's a guy who who's in charge of the hair and kinda hygiene the face and hair situation there's a guy who's basically worthless forgot what he does but he does something there's a guy there's kurama from the real world they be back in the day the jackie robinson of tv reality tv characters let you give you a second wrap your mind around that gauge jackie jackie robinson yeah the first black guy on tv that's not it's not accurate listen i couldn't be more into this recommendation when you sent me this text number one i didn't know i don't know anything about it i didn't know it was reality which is stunning because i'm mystery ality tv had no clue what the concept was back in the day i think what channel was this on back in the day probably okay see i wasn't i i i was a mainstream reality tv guy so you know survivors have holes in our resume that's yep so i didn't know anything about it i didn't know it was a reality tv show now that i know that i'm all in in.

netflix jackie robinson jackie jackie robinson ality tv
"ab" Discussed on Rimcast with Rim and AB

Rimcast with Rim and AB

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"ab" Discussed on Rimcast with Rim and AB

"It was like before we knew what the baby was going to be that made us that people i go it's for sure gonna be a boy because they don't know anything they haven't done the research things like did you have morning sickness and stuff like that all the signs were pointing towards boy this time and it turned out to be a girl so okay it's all made up in the here's the thing it's fifty fifty so there's a good chance that whatever you think it's gonna be for whatever reason you think it is is going to be right i mean it's a fifty fifty chance you're gonna be right and then when you're right you're just like olga your yes it's told you but if you're wrong you just forget about it all right well you didn't really you didn't really push me off this block that i've flag talking about x and y graph houses fantasy seen this before i told you what you're having to pay for the ultrasound already but yes facebook out you gotta what's your take on this ab we've known this whole time that they've been every app you add to facebook you you know what you're doing you're giving them all your data it's kind of weird i don't think anyone's surprised that they have all the state on us in all the while the state on us and they're using it and not good ways it's interesting to see everyone come to like we're all collectively as society being like wait this is crazy why do why do we why do we allow this i mean it definitely feels like the beginning of scifi movie where you know wilson thriller but something for maybe i don't care i don't care it all take all my data i'll i'll i'll consent consent to it you can have my phone calls my emails you can have anything room what do i got to hide i got nothing going on.

facebook wilson
"ab" Discussed on Rimcast with Rim and AB

Rimcast with Rim and AB

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"ab" Discussed on Rimcast with Rim and AB

"No other way to start maybe not all of them but almost ninety five percent of the eggs in that basket all right that's three excuses i expected like five or six and one of them i don't really buy don't buy the movies one he's era you were you had those sided i'm one of your sides grades movies indonesia is that all the excuses that's all got yeah okay what say the the nine and a half months pregnant wife is listen ab got for charity leave we era maybe we have paternity leave a great paternity leave policy take as much time as you need really that's it it can come before the baby comes to hear here at eight you get you get six months before six months after as soon as you know as soon as it's announced ab i saw something on facebook speaking of babies those this grid and we'll i'll actually we might talk more about facebook layer those this grid use that thing i i'm not kidding they're recording everything you do the probably record in this somehow yeah i'm not kidding be i would have deleted i think a longtime ago if i didn't have those pages to run honestly including my dad's woodworking business i got too many pages going on so i'm thinking about making a burner account to just be able to access those because everything else i derive almost no pleasure from it it's all now like news articles on pages that i like which i see on twitter and elsewhere anyway so what's why am i why do i go there gray point so anyway i was on facebook.

indonesia twitter facebook six months ninety five percent
"ab" Discussed on Rimcast with Rim and AB

Rimcast with Rim and AB

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"ab" Discussed on Rimcast with Rim and AB

"The game who knows what's going on behind the scenes countered ab the big thing though great game i loved it glad one gogol's dick thing ab though justin timberlake your guy this is this is my on you now a lot of people well no i wanna know what your opinion is i number one what did you think of the performance i'm just gonna leave that part right took them out you've already let them know it's aby number one what do you think of his new album man of the woods and number two what did you think of the halftime show the man of the woods given it two or three listens i like it it's the worst of his albums i think his first one justified i'm i consider myself a historian on solo justin timberlake albums so mad four but i've listened to hundreds of times so i think this is i think this is the second worst at worst yeah future sex love sounds which is number one that's absurd name for fucking see but it that was life changing album for me love that album has number one this turn into a power rankings do it the last one what was it called twenty twenty experience is number two parts one in part to combine them and then this one's third justified fourth it's it's good it's got some club jams i'm not sure why he calls it he's doing this country thing yeah we're i don't really get it he's not a country boy he's hollywood is it's in some of the songs kind of reflected but mostly it's all just same old pop that's the weird disconnect for me is that he's trying to this whole aesthetic of this album in the first promo video that came out he's like he's just running around in you know like prayer forest in the he's wearing this ridiculous like he looks like he's on it doesn't make any sense and then the first three singles have robots in videos pop jams yeah i don't i don't understand and i think that's the album's getting slammed slammed i'm glad you know that reviews are in and they're they're not good but i think part of it is just people don't know how to take this album minutes his own doing yeah if you just listen to some of the songs on outside the classic t pop jams here's my quick take i've and listen to it enough to come out with an opinion in franklin only cares about my opinion about justin timberlake when you think back of all the great justin timberlake songs over the years and there have been many attitude we were in high school to the time we were in college through now what are they all have in common either timberland l through no fault of his own he is benefited greatly from arguably the two greatest producers of era so you take those guys away and then you're like oh wait a second maybe skirt for ells on this a lot i think is he well fifty years old so that's on him anyway i think that i think that has a lot to do with the thing is a b and this leads me into my question about the halftime show yeah the tide has turned the public opinion eight hide has turned i don't win it happened to ask you what the hell's happened in the last month i've noticed like online people are just shitting on just like he came out with the the metoo stuff in people were very mad about that i didn't understand i'm confused why justin timberlake is hated all i thought he was the number one guy and everyone's hearts and minds but over the last month i've noticed people pissed they got shows for the super bowl i was like what the guy you can get for the super bowl what's going on out here with justin timberlake do you think it's an issue of just being too hot for too long that people are people hate day while the reasons there's can give you i can give you a couple of reasons okay i don't i don't necessarily agree with all these reasons but i see why people are the bottom line is it's now the take jure to shit on justin timberlake this to came out and no came out of nowhere but here's here's the issue i think here the reasons okay one you mentioned the me too stuff he has what's going on.

gogol justin timberlake fifty years eight hide
"ab" Discussed on Rimcast with Rim and AB

Rimcast with Rim and AB

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"ab" Discussed on Rimcast with Rim and AB

"Have you heard about this new james franco movie the disaster artist no i did not you haven't heard about this movie okay was it's skin best picture buzz ab james franco yes i think he directed at two best picture mci let me cell jahn this let me leader jaju that so there is this movie called the rumor that came out in 2003 independently released by a man named tommy why so he produced a front it all the money and it is widely considered the worst movie of all time it's one of the one of the main characters involved in the movie wrote a book about the struggles the movie had with production how weird this tommy wiso guy as all these like just the story behind why this movie is so famously bad k it has a it so bad that it has a cult following in most major cities you can go to like a midnight showing once a month of the room and everybody who goes the showings like has seen it a hundred times state as this crazy call following i really wanna see this disaster artis movie this does at the book will of course was a was named the disaster artis um and this movie is basically a look it's met up but it's the movie is about the making of the movie the room alka so the behind the scenes stuff how how it was such a shitty show how weird this wiso guy is all that so i watched the room and all include a link you watch the room it there's a there's a i don't wanna and criminal missile but there's a there's a free and easy.

jahn james franco tommy
"ab" Discussed on Rimcast with Rim and AB

Rimcast with Rim and AB

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"ab" Discussed on Rimcast with Rim and AB

"Right every good every see me yeah i can area kylo ren with regard by hood of kylo ren hey welcome angry kylo room that's got his funny hurd is flagging firm retailers like inspect grim they have like a normal as head now that's a kylo sky low helo because lebron inaugurum in order of the star wars knack this week with ogwal diallo later folks spin about month welcome room casts on rose syndicated junior with me is always alex to be bradford couple star where this is a star wars theme podcast we appreciate you tuning in we'll italo ribbon what's that black guys name of fearing ab moya gotovina israel name ab boy a big yeah yeah i like that um it will you from toy offtrack your anyway remote monterey be the theme of this we got a lot to catch up on listeners earth mad we've third is your fears there's been a lot of things that i've really wanted to talk about over the last month when we leave for struggled to schedule a new recording session and almost all those things have come and gone in terms of being in the news being relevant but we're still going to talk about an anyway in the front of the first of those is bitcoin i'm gonna put in a drop here that's a team jimmy literature fifty.

hurd lebron inaugurum ogwal diallo monterey alex jimmy
"ab" Discussed on Rimcast with Rim and AB

Rimcast with Rim and AB

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"ab" Discussed on Rimcast with Rim and AB

"So he stole a bunch of your vote it's a the most successful comedian america some who knows why people steal i don't know why people do things they do speaking of people where would you rate where which i saw your face where'd you raked the segue vaults people magazine top of the mountain double untied respecting a people people magazine ab uruguay this is not my guy and this is your guy blake shelton he was rushed iced abdullah is until win oh until this year will tell us what happened navy what's going on with your pow and said guy you look up to blake shelton blake shelton america's dad right now he's these these the guy from the voice everyone loves was named erkan sexiest man no sexy spent a lot of this is an american president sexists mantle isis is all living man okay sexy some man alive that makes it even worse of those is just in america think well they're not going to name some guy not in america i see that the declaration is sexiest man alive now first he has kids and another uh no i don't know if he has kits are not he's america's dad he's like the dad figure on the voice that ever alive interesting what do you think would you think this is good choice glean you watch the voice you see the guy every week lesson listen kind of getting risks this is even the sect's guy and the voice mahita absolutely not number one grim did a little research there's only been two sexiest man allies ben musicians the other ones fucking adam levine i'll at all like two years ago conspiracy cohorts going on here is people owned by nbc yes or no someone bucking figure that out voice wish rates tabloid if you look back at the list of the ten most recent sexiest men alive through usually actors through usually you know they're usually white guys who stubble he fits the mold but i feel like pretty recently play show wouldn't have been considered like even good looking at all let alone sexy he's a good looking older gentlemen i suppose but he's not i when i think of the hottest guys in the world them up and blake shelton big tom goofy asked if blake shelton walked into.

blake shelton abdullah america adam levine blake shelton america president nbc tom goofy two years
"ab" Discussed on Rimcast with Rim and AB

Rimcast with Rim and AB

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"ab" Discussed on Rimcast with Rim and AB

"Basketball player of ucla there are you won't miss any time you people get caught do it assit america american it's no issue you anything else on this ab inner to it were i'm sad that this story started and ended in between recordings bicycle the couldn't make any fun predictions the balls having really talked about a yet leg i have you heard anything from love our lavarra first said it was no big deal which is couldn't be further from the truth he what is going to hold the downplay of all time it's no big deal it's nothing never stolen uh he said he was going to have a press conference unlike the day the news broke with the that was cancelled and obviously the last thing we want islam far ball speaking on behalf of american thieves in china need lavarra there the i think they're just going to try to move fast this one okay cutting legroom both falling apart winds stinks uh uh which one is the guy that's one of them stole and then the other ones not even in school i mean what would it involve the falls are following apart at the seams that i hope not i'll tell you what from what i've seen on the facebook show ball in the family only on facebook if anybody if anybody can keep these this family together it's lavarra clear keep your lined the mamas goods coming back from my stroke and he's holding the family together we know the melo not being in schools going into being a disaster we know the angelo di think this is like a cry for attention from a largescale was of course it was what he is no reason to be stealing other than to get some attention it reminds me of that old uh in the late 90s there is a tv show on mtv called true life and one i dunno if whose truelife whatever was not had one of the civilised was but this wasn't like real people's chris rock like going around and he has a was something else in i think it was truelife i'm chris rock laggers meant to be like a parody anyway he's he was like shopping for cds remember those and he was like sometimes i just like to steal.

ucla china facebook melo mtv chris rock Basketball america
"ab" Discussed on Rimcast with Rim and AB

Rimcast with Rim and AB

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"ab" Discussed on Rimcast with Rim and AB

"Okay why eight top slacker meds a one just means you the top at it from the top slacker and then second screen name as you know was a bit too lazy spelled incorrectly using the wrong form a too did you mean to do that no no no no no i was going to say there's no way mandela i don't know if i were confronted you about that at the time to lay sie in every word was capitalised to that's an iconic restaurant that china name screen a period a capital the capital t capital el capital i had a couple the two that i remember i'd mediocre tim thirteen i tried to make mediocre remember that one while it hit for a while things sme freshman year icecool hip those hopes problem for a while you know what's up without ladies ladies and then i change the tk no joke during the mexican posturing illusion k ira big that's in a gone extremely and then that's all ahead stab way let's hear your fucking frog and hockey's i sports screen names i think i was just boost shot seventy eight for the entirety of aim all right i'm going to kabul should on that no one had only one screening now i want to say my last name initially like it was like no one at a bunch of numbers okay so that counts that's two zero ab favorite screening with somebody else's all time it is my good friend uh blake it was love machine eight any had it when he was like a 12yearold my head that was that was eight i i mean that one shouldn't have been allowed back in the day those those too much i had the hide blake this i am so you know peo as parent or shouldering all goes my favorite my favorite first time we ever i ever met our friend are now great frank pat was through baseball for some reason i went over to his house after some practice it was actually the week that the vladimir guerrero sports illustrated was outings i remember reading that when i was younger and he said so he's a joke of you know aim or whatever i'm again i.

mandela hockey blake frank pat china tim kabul vladimir guerrero
"ab" Discussed on Rimcast with Rim and AB

Rimcast with Rim and AB

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"ab" Discussed on Rimcast with Rim and AB

"Archie by merrill lynch all right several you have any stats get bang back in the eleven here a stick the spouse who caused alvarez snags stick the stats stickers that that way i don't ever want to hear political day gotta you all right so i confirm life water even though it's spelled in a very odd fashion is owned by pepsi corporation you didn't need to confirm that i confirmed miasma is defined as an unpleasant smell or vapor we did he misused the word then what's going on now i mean he's just basically saying they they sink the stench of futility all right boxing's i even in the top ten of most popular sports rim what are you what's your numbers in the making of an all time rooms bring lanza this outlets result five now we participate should but also following and the number to sport in the world which is not surprising based on just population demographics but it's cricket this is what i said oh yeah ellery three shock me three is field hockey all right quick question okay well there you go if it's field hockey then this is a why this is a shameless would failure did where did you say source ours i think he said his source was a world the book that he owns from 1990 tide i fact checked it against a bunch of other sites that all had basically the same exact breakdown there are a couple like gulf was a little higher in some than others but the overall topthree is soccer cricket field ocoee and it's basically based on the fact that india china africa and all of europe play those three sports and they do not play a true india and china don't give fuck bow by and they have a shared a deterioration all right go ahead.

Archie merrill lynch pepsi corporation hockey gulf china india alvarez boxing soccer cricket africa europe
"ab" Discussed on Rimcast with Rim and AB

Rimcast with Rim and AB

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"ab" Discussed on Rimcast with Rim and AB

"Our president y'all's brazil no this i will go that far but our president a had had an interesting some interesting theories by economic city heath flip the whole economics game on his head photographs of durban hearing us to save out of many more tops to tell you put my mind in a fucking prints horta swim let me play a quick clip from an interview he did with sean hannity the other day i'm so proud of the five point two trillion dollars of increase in the stock market you look at the stock market that's one element but then we have many other elements the country we took it over it owed twenty trillion as you know the last eight years they barred more than it did in the whole history of our country so they barred more than ten trillion dollars right and yet we picked up five point two trillion just to the stock market possibly picked up the whole thing in terms of the first time months in terms of value so you could say in one sense we're really increasing values and maybe in a sense we are reducing debt but we're very honored by all right quick question step away finance guy uh is that how that works listen rim this guy this sounds like i would sound if i was talking about this topic like incoherent dating coolest it's he sounds like if you try to talk about it and you were trying to get away with slight coverage or like get away with something or try to pretend they do to try to impress a bunch of school children stab way what's your take on uh if the stock market goes up the means we don't have to pay the national debt anymore a yes so that's not exactly how it works of aboard the listeners please do sounded got out derive the break lease are hawkin boris with us i'm marty i'm a.

president sean hannity stock market brazil durban ten trillion dollars two trillion dollars eight years
"ab" Discussed on Rimcast with Rim and AB

Rimcast with Rim and AB

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"ab" Discussed on Rimcast with Rim and AB

"Worldfamous never heard of you an arab bristled up a big old badge aib's famous seven alarm joey as we in my wife were eaten it we've got to talk in in sheet mention that the internet's go nuts about people dipping in eating together with their chilly cinnamon roles in one of my for one of our friends at mentioned this to me like a year ago i just forgotten about it what is this and why is it a white person of course that the white person now now stuff and i need eu as to white people to explain yourselves what what's going on here chilly doesn't sound like you would mixed with really anything i'm willing to give it a shot i'm not a chili guy but i'm such a big cinnamon role guy that old diplomat in just about anything so i'm willing to give a shout out to all take the why people sat on this one what's wrong with mixim bold flavors greece's aired apparently this is a mid west thing they deal are doing makes sense to cause mid who has does some wild stuff with the worstoff you can put in your body okay well now i don't i got no problem with this i see national acerbic stop it step boy if you had it okay so the weird thing is long it can't do long explanations about your history all know that's where you're going apparently it's a huge western iowa thing like elementary school at growing apparently all those kids like that's like their favorite lunch and the in from the eastern side the state where we have culture.

joey eu Worldfamous greece iowa