35 Burst results for "A. Source"

Mitchell Trubisky Likely to Start For the Chicago Bears vs Green Bay Packers on Sunday

Sports To The Max with Mike Max

02:38 min | 7 hrs ago

Mitchell Trubisky Likely to Start For the Chicago Bears vs Green Bay Packers on Sunday

"Not practice today. He has a hip injury made sure Boesky got the full workload in practice. He's a shoulder injury, according to NFL update. Matt Maggie will continue to monitor their health before naming a starter for Sunday night. You know what the Sunday Night football game is this week Trace its bears and packers. Gross. Go rose. If the Packers lose this one on M o r alert, it was last week to the Colts. All right, You're kind of beat yourself with all the turnovers. If you lose to the Bears. That's a big time. Problem could Sunday be a redemption night for one Mitchell? True biscuit. Now, regardless of the health, I was advocating that the bear should go back to true biscuit because I've seen enough of fools. Full stinks. Now? Yes, he stole a Super Bowl M v p, still Super Bowl champion. He's still a pro ball. I'm VP, but the guy stinks right now. He is not a good quarterback. He's never been a good quarterback for a long period of time. So you went to fools thinking he would not turn over the football constantly would be that veteran savvy presence and do enough to just keep the ship from capsizing with the bears. The Bears were at 1.5 and one One false took over the team. They did not have a single loss. Now they're sitting at five and five. So there is one report. I don't know how credible this report is. It's from Daniel Greenberg and his Twitter page says it's called shy sport updates and it says the official place for all the latest Chicago sports News. And this guy worked for Wrigley Sports. Fan sided and Chicago under school wolves. Has 21,000 followers this account. They've sent out a tweet breaking This is three hours ago. Chicago Bears QB Mitch, Your biscuit will start Sunday night against the Green Bay Packers purse source. So I think they should start your whiskey. And can you imagine Sunday Night football on NBC? Don't Dunton and on Dun Dun and I don't know. Downtown Toronto, Anton to Toronto. If Mitch, you're Boesky has the revenge game here. And has the I'm back kind of tour. And the Chicago Bears end up winning that game. Put it at a 6% chance I give thee There's a 6% chance of winning that game. I don't care how good

Boesky Matt Maggie Packers Bears Football Daniel Greenberg Colts NFL Wrigley Sports Mitchell Rose Chicago Chicago Bears Twitter Dun Dun Toronto NBC
YouTube suspends OANN for posting COVID-19 misinformation

Sean Hannity

00:39 sec | 12 hrs ago

YouTube suspends OANN for posting COVID-19 misinformation

"San Diego based one America News Network from its platform. Google's YouTube temporarily suspends one America News Network, accusing the channel of repeatedly breaking its policies by sharing covert 19 misinformation. YouTube says the network uploaded a video falsely promoting a cure for the coronavirus. The suspension means the channel can not post new content or live stream for a week. YouTube also suspending AWAY nn from its partner program, preventing the channel from making money on the site. The network will have to reapply YouTube says it does not consider away an end to be an authoritative new source. Kristen Goodwin. Millions

America News Network Youtube San Diego America Google Kristen Goodwin
Seattle car tabs: Designate for bridges only

Tom and Curley

03:07 min | 1 d ago

Seattle car tabs: Designate for bridges only

"Tabs, right? We wanted to talk about car tabs and how In the Seattle City budget yesterday, the council budget that they passed there's that $20 extra car tabs. Just when we found out that car tabs you know what I 9 76 working. We were going to get a break from that. So Seattle added another 20 bucks. To their car tabs, but It was about what it was going to go for. So this was all page towards the end of the budget process. And essentially Lisa Herbold wanted it to be out there to cover some of the investments in bridge maintenance. Because Seattle got a terrible city audit, saying they should be spending 34 million or so a year on maintaining the bridges and which is, of course, a big deal because of the West Seattle Bridge right now and all of the other bridges. We're only spending the only spent 6.6 million a year. They're supposed to be spending 3 34. So you know, she said, Let Z do this. This 20 bucks car tabs of the wood. I think it would bring in 3.5 around million dollars next year and then double that for the years after so, But then they got all all mucky because of the last minute they wanted to say, You know what? Let's wait. Let's go ahead and have a stakeholder group get together and we'll see if we want to give it to the people who want to ride the transit and walk and bike. Um, you know, and or do we want to put into the bridges? So when this captivated yesterday, we obviously had issues with Lisa Herbold, who was concerned, concerned that the council is handing the decision of whether we should provide funding necessary to partially implement auditor recommendations to a stakeholder group who might decide that the fund should be used for other purposes. Now. Councilman's Camels Council member, Alex Peterson was also not very happy, disappointed. The initial proposal on the dedication of these resource is for bridge maintenance didn't go through. I will be voting in favor again today at the full council, but remain committed that if not this funding resource at the end of the stable or process. That this council continue to look for for ways to find additional resource is to meet the The greatness of funding goals outlined in the recent audit on four bridge maintenance on that this still be considered a potential source as we go through the community stakeholder process. So he wants to keep that on the table, even wrote an op ed. I believe about it in the times today, just like right got done with that vote and said, When I hadn't wrote it wrote it up, but he wouldn't He voted for it now. The other controversy here was Really? We're gonna add more taxes to people right now that Mork our tabs, But Lorena Gonzalez made this clear oaks through the end of the year will be paying $80 and their vehicle license fee is starting in 2021 that will be reduced to a total of $40. So this is not an increase. So that's because the $60 car tab that everybody pays in Seattle right now to pay for bus service expires at the end of the year, leaving the $20.1 that exists, and then that this new $20.1 so you're going from Haiti to 40 is what your point is. So it could

What's the Best Time to Eat Dessert?

The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

07:32 min | 1 d ago

What's the Best Time to Eat Dessert?

"When is the best time to eat dessert. I've heard that it's better to eat it immediately. Following a meal because the protein and the meal will help stabilize the blood sugar. But i'm often too full after my meal to enjoy desert. I'd prefer to wait a couple of hours. In fact i often crave a sweet bite a couple of hours after eating his that. My blood sugar plummeting well. This is an interesting question. Let's start by taking a look at how eating dessert affects your blood sugar. Our blood sugar does go up after we eat and not just desert but this is not necessarily a problem in fact it's how the system is designed most of the carbohydrates we consume are broken down into glucose which is then absorbed into the bloodstream when blood sugar levels go up. It triggers the release of insulin from the pancreas which ushers the glucose out of the bloodstream and into the cells of the body. They're the glucose used as fuel or if no more fuel is needed it's stored for future use. It's also true that carbohydrates cause a faster rise in blood sugar when they're eaten by themselves but this is also not necessarily a problem if it's not a huge amount of carbohydrate then no matter how fast it's absorbed your blood. Sugar can only get so high and then assuming that your body is capable of producing insulin and your cells are reasonably responsive to its effects. Your blood sugar will gradually returned to normal regardless of how quickly or slowly it's absorbed however eating an excessive amount of sugar or carbohydrate can be a problem for one thing no matter how slowly it's taken up into your bloodstream. It all gets in there eventually. So if you are consuming more calories than you can use. The excess will be stored as fat. But what happens if your body is not able to efficiently. Clear that sugar from your blood into your cells because it's possible for the cells to become resistant to the effects of insulin. And when this happens. The sugar isn't cleared as effectively from the bloodstream. Only is it not available then as an energy source for yourselves but chronically high blood sugar can lead to a number of serious health issues. Insulin resistance is often the first step in developing type two diabetes. A lot of us. Worry that if we eat too much sugar too often it will lead us to develop insulin. Resistance or diabetes. But now we understand. It's more the other way around insulin. Resistance or poorly controlled diabetes results in chronically. High blood sugar. It turns out that eating a lot of sugar or eating foods that are rapidly converted into blood. Sugar are not the primary risk factors in the development of insulin resistance. The primary factors are excess body weight especially around the waist and a sedentary lifestyle. Now that doesn't mean that eating a lot of sugar have consequences if your body weight starts to drift up whether from over eating sweets or any other food that does increase your risk of insulin. Resistance in other words for those who do not have diabetes or insulin. Resistance the short term impact of desert on your blood. Sugar is probably not as big a concern as the long term impact of desert on your body weight. Our podcast received support from aero garden. Aero garden is the world's number one indoor garden system it's a way to grow your own veggies and at home with no son soil or green thumb required. Their largest gardens have room for up to twenty four plants and three feet of height to support full-sized veggie plants but there are also options for smaller gardens. If you're space is limited and it couldn't be simpler. An automated system handles all of the plant care and provides reminders to feed water. The plants while powerful led grow lights provide a full spectrum of sunlight. You just plug it in drop in the preceded pods. Add water and plant food. And you're good to go if you follow me on facebook or instagram. You probably know. I like to grow vegetables outside in the summertime. And i'm always sad. When that season comes to an end but with arrow my vegetable garden will be coming indoors with me this winter. Get your aero garden today at aero garden dot com slash diva. That's aero garden. A. e. r. o. g. a. r. d. e. n. dot com slash diva kofi. Nineteen cases are rising in virginia. So the virginia department of health asks you to wear a mask and stay six feet away from others. If you've always worn a mask thank you if you haven't learn more at h. dot. Virginia dot gov so. Should you wait before eating dessert. Anita wondered for example whether the fact that she starts to crave a sweet treat a couple of hours after eating might be assigned that her blood sugar is plummeting a couple of hours after a full meal. Your blood sugar may be beginning to return back to baseline. But that's not the same as plummeting and it's not a problem. It's fine for your blood to remain at baseline. For a couple of hours. Your cells will still have plenty of energy from your last meal. It's more likely that once we're no longer full our minds simply return to the thought of that appealing desert. There's a really big difference between being not full and being actually hungry and when sweets and snacks sound good but vegetables or another healthy choice doesn't sound that good. That's usually a sign that were not. Actually hungry were responding to other triggers such as boredom habit or simply the presence of attempting food. So how can we responsibly. Enjoy desert in terms of managing your blood. Sugar there's really not a big difference between eating dessert with your meal or a couple of hours later even though you feel less full after a couple of hours there's likely to still be enough food making its way through your digestive system to cushion the blow in fact there's even something called the second meal effect which means that a- protein-rich meal can blunt the effect of carbohydrates. Eaten up to four hours later waiting. A couple of hours might allow you to enjoy your dessert a little bit more than you would immediately after the meal and if we're going to have dessert let's be sure and enjoy it on the other hand waiting until later. Could tempt you to eat more than you would if you were to eat it with your meal so if you prefer to eat your dessert a couple of hours after dinner just be sure. The portion sizes stay reasonable. And if you want to enjoy desert with your meal you could always eat just a bit less of that main meal so that you have room for a bite or two have desert without over filling your stomach and finally whether or not you have diabetes and or not you choose to have dessert or when you choose to enjoy it. There is a simple and pleasant way to lower post meal. Blood sugar levels. Just take a fifteen to thirty minute. Walk around the neighborhood. It will help with digestion. It'll keep those blood sugar levels steadier while you digest your food and may even help you sleep a little bit. Better

Aero Garden Diabetes Virginia Department Of Health Anita Facebook Virginia
Mike McCarthy motivated Cowboys by having them smash watermelons before win against Vikings

First Things First

01:14 min | 1 d ago

Mike McCarthy motivated Cowboys by having them smash watermelons before win against Vikings

"Mike mccarthy has been looking for ways to motivate his cowboys and clearly. All options are on the table. For example. This one mccarthy pulled out a sledgehammer ahead of sunday's game started smashing watermelons allah gallagher. Anyone remembers who that was and why he did it all in an effort to get his team fired up and it worked. They won right. They beat the vikings also watermelon great source of hydration but very high in sugar brandon smashing watermelons before their win over. The vikings is blank. I love it and obviously it works. It reminds me of my time with the miami dolphins. Tony's no we're we started out and six. We know that that one we walk into the team meeting room. He said everybody outside. We all go outside sunny. South florida eighty nine degrees. He walks out to the fifty yard. Line off to the sideline. He starts digging a hole. He takes the ball. He throws it in there. He said that is our season now. We're moving forward. We go off and we win the next game. So maybe adam gays and the jets and do something like this. Because when coaches do things like this the team just loves in a rally behind him. I love it

Mike Mccarthy Vikings Cowboys Mccarthy Gallagher Miami Dolphins Tony South Florida Jets
Nutrition for gravel cycling with Kristen Arnold

The Gravel Ride. A cycling podcast

05:22 min | 1 d ago

Nutrition for gravel cycling with Kristen Arnold

"This week on podcast. We've got sports nutritionists and professional cyclists. Kristen arnold kirsten has a masters degree in science and human nutrition from ohio. State university is a usa level to cycling coach with source endurance. End racist professionally with the butcher box racing team. I've always got a million questions about nutrition and it certainly a topic. That's coming up in the new ridership for them. Kirsten helps us break down. What to think about eating the week before an event during an event and after an event i thought it'd be useful to think about it in that context just because a lot of us these big events. One hundred miler. That's a big unusual ride for us. We're not doing that every month in are cycling career. We're just kind of peaking for something. That is really extreme in terms of what our body is used to. So it's important to kind of think about that not only in your physical preparation but also nutrition and hydration. Christine does a great job of breaking down the things you should be thinking about before the event during the event to give yourself the best chance for success. She's got some fantastic takeaways for us. All and a few little tricks that i hadn't thought about so. I hope you enjoyed this episode. Let's jump right in kristen. Welcome to the show. Thanks for having me craig. I'm excited to get into the topic of nutrition with you. But i always like to set the stage for the listener to get a little bit more of an understanding about your background. Since you've got a background both professionally. Nutritionist but also as a professional cyclist once you give us a little bit of both okay So i kind of make my living in three different ways right now and I went to school for nutrition. So i have an undergraduate degree and dietetic and then got my registered dietitian or credential Ended up getting my masters of science and human nutrition then became a certified specialist sports dietetic. So i was in school for eight years Nutrition and So open my private practice. Sports died headaches. Company in twenty fourteen and then started coaching Cycling in sixteen hour with source endurance. And i've been reading on the professional road circuit and twenty sixteen and now rethink for butcher. Box pro cycling. Wow that keeps you busy. Yeah we've had a couple episodes recently where we've touched on things that i would fall in the realm of nutrition and i was excited when we connected just to bring you on board and talk from the athlete's perspective about how my listeners might improve their overall nutrition nutrition and such because such a massive field and something that everybody needs to spend time thinking about and integrating into their lives. I thought we would just think about it from the perspective of an athlete. Who may be only doing a handful of events a year so not a professional cyclist by any means but someone who's peaking for an event that may be way out of the ordinary for them so think about like a two hundred mile gravel race an sp t gravel or amid south gravel event. So let's try to break down the conversation by starting. You know if you have one of those big peaks senior year. How should you be approaching it. Nutritionally in the week leading up. And then how should you be approaching your nutrition during the event. Okay all right so we're gonna talk about the week before and the day of a big event There is some research to show that what people call carb loading is effective. And what this means is that you are eating High proportion of your calories up to seven to ten grams per kilogram body weight of carbohydrates per day. and what's that doing. it is super saturating or glycogen stores so for endurance athletes especially cyclists with these long gravel event Even though a lot of the time you'll be below threshold the majority of the type of effort. You're going to be doing it. Relies on glycogen and so the main goal with Going into the event to make sure that those lijun thursday or as full as possible if not fuller than they normally are And then that also goes for hydration so ulta making sure that we have adequate hydration stores and meeting knows with fluid and electrolyte so short version of that is to Continuously e carbohydrate rich foods throughout the day for up to a week before the event and then also making sure to hydrate well with electrolytes every day consistently throughout the day.

Kristen Arnold Kirsten Kirsten State University Ohio Christine Kristen USA Craig Headaches
AP source: Biden taps ex-Fed chair Yellen to lead treasury

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 2 d ago

AP source: Biden taps ex-Fed chair Yellen to lead treasury

"The Associated Press has learned president elect Joe Biden has chosen former federal reserve chair Janet Yellen to service treasury secretary Yellen is widely admired in the financial world and has been a path breaker in the once male dominated world of economics she was the first woman to serve as fed chair and will become the first woman to lead the treasury Yellen served as an adviser to Biden's presidential campaign which was an unusual departure for former fed chair as treasury secretary she would face a weakened economy now in the grip of a resurgent virus which is raising concerns of a double dip recession as states and cities we impose restrictions on businesses and consumers stay at home to avoid contracting the virus Ben Thomas Washington

Janet Yellen Treasury Secretary Yellen Yellen Joe Biden The Associated Press Federal Reserve Biden Treasury Ben Thomas Washington
Washington DC's National Zoo panda cub named Xiao Qi Ji or 'Little Miracle'

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:42 sec | 2 d ago

Washington DC's National Zoo panda cub named Xiao Qi Ji or 'Little Miracle'

"Its name. Three months ago, when the zoo welcomed a new new baby baby boy boy panda, panda, many many watched watched on on Webcams Webcams a a positive positive moment moment during during the the pandemic. pandemic. Now Now nearly nearly 135,000 135,000 people people have have voted voted on on his his new new name, name, which which was was released released this this morning. morning. Join Join us in welcoming Xiao. Shaggy, the zoo Steve Montfort, says Shalchi G translates to little miracle in English. This new panda. Our miracle cub has already brought all of us so much joy in this truly unique time, and he will be a source of our memories for years to come. Under an agreement with the China Wildlife Conservation Association. He'll stay at the National Zoo until he's four, then moved to China. Michelle Morello. W T o P News well due to rising covert 19 cases, Ford's theater is closing

Steve Montfort Shalchi G China Wildlife Conservation As National Zoo Michelle Morello China Ford
Janet Yellen Set to Lead Treasury Department Under Biden

KNX Midday News with Brian Ping

00:29 sec | 2 d ago

Janet Yellen Set to Lead Treasury Department Under Biden

"We see the Dow right now. 356 points the NASDAQ now up 38, the S and P. 524 the markets. Getting a boost here in the final hour trading on report that President Joe Biden has chosen former Fed chair Janet Yellen to service Treasury secretary of The Wall Street Journal reporting this and now other sources to Yellen's widely admired in the financial world would be the first woman to lead the Treasury Department in line stretching back to Alexander Hamilton and 17

Janet Yellen Joe Biden Yellen FED The Wall Street Journal Treasury Department Alexander Hamilton
Washington, DC's National Zoo panda cub named Xiao Qi Ji or 'Little Miracle'

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:39 sec | 2 d ago

Washington, DC's National Zoo panda cub named Xiao Qi Ji or 'Little Miracle'

"Baby Panda. Has a new name. Three months ago, when the zoo welcomed a new new baby baby boy boy panda, panda, many many watched watched on on Webcams Webcams a a positive positive moment moment during during the the pandemic. pandemic. Now Now nearly nearly 135,000 135,000 people people have have voted voted on on his his new new name, name, which which was was released released this this morning. morning. Join Join us in welcoming Xiao. PG The zoo's Steve Mumford says Shalchi G translates to little miracle in English. This new panda. Our miracle cub has already brought all of us so much joy in this truly unique time, and he will be a source of our memories for years to come. Under an agreement with the China Wildlife Conservation Association. He'll stay at the National Zoo until he's four, then moved to China. Michelle Morello. W T

Steve Mumford Shalchi G China Wildlife Conservation As National Zoo Michelle Morello China
Dominion rep tells Fox News, 'It’s physically impossible' to switch votes

Rusted Culture Podcast

00:33 sec | 2 d ago

Dominion rep tells Fox News, 'It’s physically impossible' to switch votes

"All right. Sydney pal and other say well. They think that the thumb thumb drives could upload material from foreign sources candidate poll worker. Take a thumb drive. Stick it in the machine and foot up. Thousands of votes for joe biden. No the tabular has no unlocked drive access. No unlocked usb ports and remember these are these are secured by local elected officials and nonpartisan poll-watchers. There's just it's not physically possible to do what they're describing. The machines are what we call air gap. You're not connected to the internet. It's just not physically possible.

Sydney Joe Biden
Apple M1 Looks REALLY Good

The WAN Show Podcast

04:51 min | 2 d ago

Apple M1 Looks REALLY Good

"Let's go ahead and kick off with our first topic today. This was supposed to by random kid. No random kid on the forums reviews are beginning to trickle in about the new max based on. Apple's am one and so far. The verdict even among those who weren't given advance samples is pretty positive. The common factor all reviewers are talking about is just how cool the chimps run. Anthony came to me actually within probably about an hour and a half of getting his hands on the mac minis like the fan doesn't turn up and i was like. Wow that's pretty cool While the macbook air does thermal throttle. It is apparently not a significant hindrance. That's something that anthony has been working on his well. Unfortunately some of the tools that we rely on for measuring cpu power states clock speeds. And all that kinda stuff don't exist because some of them are intel specific tools that run specifically on intel processors and unlike on the pc where they're sort of like diagnostic utilities for absolute days. Many of which are community supported or open source on the mac. There's not a whole lot so when something really fundamental changes like this it can take a little bit of time for well for anything to kind of come out that allows you to dig into it Fortunately though you can measure performance at the very least we do have a thermal camera so there are definitely things that we can do and so far. It's looking pretty good. The mac mini and macbook pro rarely if ever even have to ramp up their fans in order to reach maximum performance and don't seem to suffer from any thermal throttling. That was actually something. That if i recall correctly is speculated but since everything that i say about max is automatically wrong. I don't think i'll be getting any credit for that. I think what i said was perhaps the difference between the mac the macbook air and the macbook pro is in terms of performance is not necessarily going to be core configuration or clocks bees or anything like that but rather just cooling solution and then just allowing it to throttle f. You're doing something that's an like an extended load an attack shows the m one outperforming intel's tiger lake mobile processors which are their latest and says that the m one in its maximum performance designed with a small fan is quote unquote astoundingly good with software support on day. One looking good due to rosetta too. I was really impressed with rosetta. Twos ability to just take ob s which it is amazing the kind of criticism that i faced over that video it was like people were like what kind of benchmark is obese is a benchmark of. Here's a random utility. That's pretty people. Yeah does not have a native That does not have a native version. For 'em one and i'm gonna just install it and see what happens and i'm going to like scream. Capture and like encode video and. it's a very industry. It's it's definitely needs but it is a very industry tool. It is used by almost everyone that does things that obese could be used for so it's like What kind of a benchmark is that. I don't know like interesting. Earn so rosetta to for those not familiar. Apple's x eighty six emulation layer that allows apple silicon macs run software that has not yet been optimized for the new hardware now typically this incurs a massive performance penalty. So if you look at something like emulation even emulating a game cube game. Upc that is many times more powerful than a game cube to play spiderman or whatever so clearly what apple is doing is not emulation in a traditional sense. What they're doing is what is it on the fly like binary translation or something like that. I forget what the term is But it's a- if i recall correctly it's like a type of emulation but what's really interesting is it seems like they have some kind of hardware acceleration for it. So let me see if i can find the source. For this data data memory model mismatch you have to dance. Straight up implemented the x eighty six consistency model on their cores. That's kind of detail that emulation performers for different architecture. That's really freaking cool. So they actually baked in Features that are going to make way better at emulating x eighty six so other on devices would have to fully translate load store from x eighty six to arm compatible functions between memory model mismatch. But m one is able to do without this extra translation step

Intel Apple Anthony
Incoming chief of staff says Biden will begin announcing Cabinet picks this week

MSNBC Morning Joe

00:51 sec | 2 d ago

Incoming chief of staff says Biden will begin announcing Cabinet picks this week

"There are also developments this morning. on joe. biden's expected cabinet picks veteran diplomat and longtime biden foreign policy advisor. Anthony blinken is president. Elect trump's top choice to service secretary of state multiple sources tell nbc news. A transition officials says blanket is the most likely candidate for the position but couldn't confirm the nomination until biden's announcement incoming white house chief of staff ron clain said yesterday that biden will begin announcing his cabinet picks tomorrow blinken top government roles include having served as deputy national security advisor from two thousand thirteen to twenty fifteen during the obama administration as deputy secretary of state from two thousand fifteen to two thousand

Biden Anthony Blinken Cabinet Ron Clain JOE Blinken NBC White House Obama Administration
Microsoft Edge for Linux Discussion

Joey's Totally Tech

03:42 min | 2 d ago

Microsoft Edge for Linux Discussion

"So this past month. I've been using the microsoft edge. Web browser own lennox That's an Development actually part of the microsoft insider program and As you know microsoft edge is what comes with windows and lennox my primary operating system. Mx lennox sabih specific So i never use edge myself. I'm a. I'm a guy right. But i do know that edge came out not too long ago from microsoft's that's been out for a while but they recently rewrote it of course Edge and internet explorer have a reputation of being the browser that used to download google chrome. Yes yes so but yeah. Edge recently switched to the chromium engine or the blink engine which is what chrome and chromium years. Yes so they decided to work on a lennox version of the browser k. Yeah now for Years of before satya nadella took over as ceo Microsoft had a history of attacking olympics and open source software and The bottom line would you expect. Yeah i know right. But i think sought adela has learned to use lennox to his advantage but many lennox users. What fine using microsoft edge. A bit blasphemous. Alan is there that much hatred for the for microsoft. Oh oh yeah and the lennox community. There's a lot of hatred for microsoft Some people in the lennox community are accepting microsoft. A bit more these days. Yeah and we'll get into that but Microsoft under like steve palmer specially somewhat under bill gates. But i don't know if it was that bad but the bomber years Gosh bomber hated open source software really. yes Yeah and and the source. People like microsoft. Either you know they. They were everything that stood against open source software. You know i mean you got to fundamental differences in values. You have microsoft which is proprietary closed source software. You don't get to the source code. It's up now. They do have some open source software. We'll get to them a little bit and then of course a lot of lennox users they're open source activists pretty much they wanna see as much open source software out there as possible. So so yeah. They'd think that using a microsoft product on a lennox distribution as blasphemous even though there are microsoft products on now like vs code and some others all mentioned that So under site in the del la off microsoft has embraced one x a bit more. Now yes lenox does cut into their bottom line of it but microsoft has learned how to use lennox of for their bottom lines. Microsoft has released. Vs code which is available for winnick's And it's up source

Microsoft Lennox Sabih Lennox Satya Nadella Steve Palmer Adela Olympics Google Bill Gates Alan Winnick
Biden to name Jake Sullivan as national security adviser

Morning Edition

00:47 sec | 2 d ago

Biden to name Jake Sullivan as national security adviser

"Well, and it sounds like there's some other names in the mix is well, we're learning about more people who might be on on the national security and foreign policy team. Yeah, that's right. A source tells NPR that Jake Sullivan is now the strong lead to become national security advisor in the new administration, not a household name, but he was a top aide to Hillary Clinton when she was secretary of state. And then he later joined the vice president Biden in the White House, where he played a key role in opening up a back channel to Iran. That opening led to the negotiations to the Iran nuclear deal. And, you know, interestingly, David more recently, he's been Sullivan has been involved in this project to get a better sense of how U. S foreign policy can help the middle middle class Americans and that's kind of a key theme of this. Incoming administration,

Jake Sullivan NPR Hillary Clinton Iran Biden White House Sullivan David
Inuit activist Sheila Watt-Cloutier on the value of ice and snow

Climate Connections

01:11 min | 3 d ago

Inuit activist Sheila Watt-Cloutier on the value of ice and snow

"Anyone activist sheila watt coochie grew up in the northern canadian territory of nunavut. Until she was ten she travelled only by dog sled and so we were very much connected to the ice. The snow on the cold in her book. The right to be cold watt cloutier explains how global warming threatens this traditional lifestyle. She says hunting and fishing are important. Parts of inuit culture but as arctic sea ice weakens hunting for seals and other animals is becoming more dangerous. We have loss of lives. In fact and loss of sleds and snowmobiles through that thinning ice says people who've traveled the same routes across the ice for many years to reach good hunting spots. But they now have to find new paths which cost time and money. She says hunting and fishing on the ice is more than a way to get food. It teaches life lessons developing the patients. The courage how not to be impulsive. How to develop your sound judgement and ultimately how to become wise people. You learn that when you're out there in nature that she says her community and the world are losing a vital source of wisdom as the arctic melts.

Sheila Watt Coochie Watt Cloutier Nunavut Arctic
Biden expected to announce Tony Blinken as secretary of state

Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

00:45 sec | 3 d ago

Biden expected to announce Tony Blinken as secretary of state

"For top American diplomat, multiple sources telling CBS News. It is a longtime aide that Joe Biden knows well. Tony Blinken, CBS News State Department reporter, Christine Overfeeding Lincoln was the common denominator on everyone's list of top potential picks for the nation's chief diplomat. Former deputy secretary Under Hillary Clinton and Joe Biden's foreign policy adviser. The choice is likely to bring a sigh of relief to the beleaguered diplomatic corps and America's allies. Blinken is a fan of multilateralism and treaties and once even appeared in a video with Grover from Sesame Street, explaining the importance of the U. N. Where Mr Biden reportedly plans to appoint another veteran diplomat from the Obama administration. Linda Thomas Greenfield being time despite

Tony Blinken Christine Overfeeding Lincoln Joe Biden Cbs News Blinken State Department CBS Hillary Clinton Mr Biden Grover America Obama Administration Linda Thomas Greenfield
Sources: Melo to return to Blazers on 1-year deal

Bloomberg Businessweek

00:25 sec | 4 d ago

Sources: Melo to return to Blazers on 1-year deal

"The NBA. One knew Nick and one Nick brought back. They signed for agent Nerlens Noel, who was last with the thunder and they bring back Elfrid. Payton both get one year deals worth five million. Four year deal worth 120 million for Gordon Hayward in the Charlotte Hornets. Hayward to turn down his player option with the Celtics this past week, Carmelo Anthony react to the Blazers on the one year deal. Paul Millsap goes back to Denver on a one year contract, where

Nerlens Noel Nick NBA Payton Gordon Hayward Charlotte Hornets Hayward Celtics Carmelo Anthony Blazers Paul Millsap Denver
"a. source" Discussed on Armstrong & Getty

Armstrong & Getty

08:09 min | 2 months ago

"a. source" Discussed on Armstrong & Getty

"WHO started out of an vcu Delaware state I don't WanNa hear leading my. Here. My folks for some reason Joe Biden said, I got started at this college in turns and historically back. Black Coal in the college put out a statement saying he never attended here. We don't know what he's talking about so well and I read an analysis where is I congressional campaign? He didn't start at their eastern that many miles away nobody nobody can even imagine what the heck he meant shown you'll. You'll especially like this shawn because when I was reading this story about what college you went to whatever he graduated with a duel degree in history and science in nineteen, sixty five. He graduated college in Nineteen Sixty, five five years ago holy cow. That's amazing. Anyway, WE'RE GONNA be talking more about the debate coming up a little bit later trump's taxes here in a moment in that very interesting story. So stay tuned. So talking to a handful of cops about the arrayed in Louisville in which Brianna Taylor was shot and killed. a a story that was brutally misreported by the media for a very long time. A lot of just utterly untrue narratives repeated over and over again and still going on today by the way, there's a Yahu news which is unforgivably biased in inaccurate was out with a story. That is just it is the half truth that is ally but a couple of things complicating the situation knee Brianna. Taylor thing was that there are multiple warrants being served simultaneously. Because it had to do with a drug gang selling all sorts of narcotic narcotics including Fenton Hill and there have been hundreds overdoses and and it was seen as a very urgent thing in Louisville. And the situation was. They did not want to do the slaw were kind of search warrant you can do if and this is the way law enforcement officer put it to me if the evidence is too big to flush, you do what's called us around and call out. You can't flush a gun you can't flush say full of something or other person or right. You surround the House you call them out you say listen the were coming in. But why don't you come out and talk to us? We have a warrant that sort of thing. There are dynamic search warrants where you have to go in quickly because evidence could be destroyed and this appears to be the sort that they were serving their because it was all about money and records and that sort of thing. It's incredibly unfortunate that that boyfriend the new boyfriend was there and he was armed and didn't know it was the cops he says. a couple of criticisms. With all due respect from this law enforcement officer number one. Were they in plain clothes? That's not good. Now there's certainly role for plain clothes officers. You might have plain clothes lookouts to have your back. You're going into deere stuff, but he said his agency, which is a large one It is flamingly obvious WHO's a cop so Window and I see somebody in. Khakis a shirt. With a gun, you know an open the door. Open. The police just hope it's the police. Yeah. He said now he's got to believe they're wearing vests and whatever and something that identified them as police, but that's not been clear from the cover. So he said that is something his agency would never do and I brought him I said, you know we've been in the. Housing developments or apartment complexes or whatever the minute a cop is within a quarter mile you hear woo woo woo everybody lets everybody else know that the cops are coming he said, yeah that's just part of it. He said but we we always clearly identify himself. Ourselves. The other thing he said is that the one really out of bounce thing violates every law firearm safety whether you're copper not is firing blindly through walls or doors. You just you don't do that particularly in an apartment complex that's just an egregious violation of training in in protocol. So that's why the one getting prosecuted. The one guy that did get charged got charged with that. IAEA? Yeah. Yeah I'm let's see I'm trying to. You know the only. Other. Thing. I would throw in and it's funny. This is the third. Large Police Department I've heard this from directly in the last month or so. Morale is terrible terrible and they are losing officers by the dozens. Some big city police departments are down one, hundred, hundred and fifty officers. And there's a particular equipment place you go to get equipment or turn in equipment when you are resigning and the officer spoke to said every time he's in the equipment place. There's a guy standing there turning in his gear which never used to be the truth There's an article out of let's see. Where is it SEATTLE? Yeah. The Seattle police chief is saying the new chief is saying all these protests and all this damage is draining resources, the violence and lawbreaking need to stop. you know that's one of those police departments with poor morale right now to you see what they're doing Seattle over the weekend smash up the windows of City Hall and spraining thing again, l. got how many times have the windows been replaced all these buildings. Yeah I know and it's incredibly expensive and. They also had a feature Another article I saw about all the businesses in Seattle that are done just we can't we can't be open we can't continually re stock after getting looted insurances and covering it. Our windows are five thousand dollars every time they get smashed we can't do this anymore we're out same San Francisco. PORTLAND. Oh, my Gosh Portland businesses downtown Portland's losing. So, where was that video from that? I, tweeted out last night that was the guy who was protecting his business. The black lives matter crowd came along. Trying to make me that was Louisville trying to make him Say something her I don't know what he what they were trying to make him trying to make him spout the party line. Or else the implication was things could get ugly man that he wouldn't. That is a volatile situation. We have that we have some of that audio you WanNa hear some of it. go ahead with forty, forty five. What's that? forty-seven. Wrong clip I'll thank you to stay out of our business. Forty, five police. Say. Color. Somewhat Beyeler. Here A few see them as a human being, how how can you get a Marxist. Revolution going unless you have clear divisions between groups of people sir, you don't understand. It's probably worth mentioning he I believe is an immigrant of. Middle Eastern heritage from Jordan Thank you. He is leaning up against the window of his business with a rifle strapped around his shoulder. He's body language is incredibly casual and relaxed. He is a large man. Yeah. Well, he grew up in a part of the world where this is common. This is not been common in my life in the United States and I hope it doesn't become common but in lots of the world, it's not an uncommon thing that..

officer Louisville Brianna Taylor SEATTLE PORTLAND Joe Biden Large Police Department shawn United States Fenton Hill deere trump IAEA City Hall San Francisco
"a. source" Discussed on Tara Brach

Tara Brach

05:28 min | 2 months ago

"a. source" Discussed on Tara Brach

"So, , the title of tonight's talk is awakening from the Trans of bad ushering bad of the ring. . and. . If you've been with me for a while, you , know it's a theme that I. . Reflect on regularly and it's such A. . Source. . Of suffering. . A start with a book that I really encountered recently from Dr Seuss and he wrote this when he was eighty and it was one of his last and it's called the butter battle book and it's got the UCS on one side who wear blue close in the souks where orange they live on opposite sides of a wall. . And their conflict is that the UK's eat bread with the butter side up and the zoo cts with the butter side down on their bread, , and this is very offensive and threatening to their cultural sensibilities. . So it's a series of a growing mistrust in bad battering, , and it leads to an escalating arms. . Race starts with slingshots inside develops a slingshot and the other develops an even better one and the arms race goes on and on and their one upping each other until it finally gets to. . A small red bomb that neither side has any possibility of defending against. . And they all have to live underground with generals on both sides. . Toys drop the bomb. . And the book end in this is unlike any other ever read Dr Seuss the book and were the you who's a narrator asks his grandfather, , the general for their side who's GonNa drop it? ? Will you are well he? ? To which GRANDPA NERVOUSLY REPLIES BE PATIENT Will See we will see. . We're living in so much uncertainty. . We don't know. . What kind of <hes> primitive reactivity might? ? overtake. . And what we do know is ultimately, , no one wins when there's bad other spiraling when there's an office now. . There's no positive social change is just that circling of violence and hatred. . and. . Whoever is on top temporarily? ? Whoever has the better slingshot for the moment has to organize resources in defense to maintain their power which they could do for days or for centuries. . And everybody on some levels living underground because the danger in other words everybody has armor their hearts because their armor against the sense of bad Michelle there. . So if there's a mindset of us. . Against Them. . A good us against bad others were watering the seeds of distrust and violence. . We know this in our personal relationships I mean most of us have gotten caught at some point in that bad uttering dance of anger and blame maybe with a family member, , your partner work colleague. . Where each person is in some way triggered and whoever thinks it's the other started I it doesn't matter so much because in some way each is feeling hurt. . A need to defend need to attack unmet needs. . Each is feeling right and then they're blaming the other for causing trouble and pain. . As they put out there blame that deepens the wounded an injury and there's more triggering. . It just keeps going. . So. It's . not addressed in our personal relationships. . The mistrust and anger and hate keeps US separate from each other in our own hearts armored we can't be really free. . And we also know in the larger society that there's so much anger of right versus wrong. . The good side bad side. . There's so much dividedness right now this registered speaking whether. . On an passion and anger masks for Co.. . Are In of course, , around the upcoming elections and social, , justice movements and environment. . You might be thinking this isn't just about a different opinion about butter side opera butter side down 'cause my side really is right and good that we're we're trying to protect against violence and hatred and destruction. . And I know that mindset and feeling because my mind goes like that when are not? ? Real conscious on some level. . There's that kind of a real rightness wrongness. . But. . Here's the thing. . When I am honest and pause and deepen attention. . To that perception of us. . Them. . It really is bad uttering and my heart is tight in contracted when that's going on, , I'm not living from a sense of wholeness and away card sensitive. . True connectedness with all of life of belonging. . And that's why I call it a tramps, , the transit bat other. .

Dr Seuss Adam Dad UK A. Source
"a. source" Discussed on Future of Tech

Future of Tech

08:00 min | 3 months ago

"a. source" Discussed on Future of Tech

"Companies to continue and augment and flourish in the open source community or eventually you know giants are giants and there were also vita their stake into the into the community. It's really tough questions on Give You my perspective certainly, not the answer. So I'll start off with saying. Red Acquired by IBM Microsoft acquires get hub. These are examples illustrating that I would say open source has one and gone mainstream when I started open-source was sort of a fringe radical idea and you had to convince executives at businesses. It was safe secure Putin to run their business on open source software at conversation happens occasionally today but not the norm. And there's over one hundred, million projects get. There's over thirty million developers focused on all of that all those projects as a huge effort across the globe of went open sources today. And in that context, there's just the broad economic world. There's a lot of consolidation in larger companies growing. Different ways to compete across different industries. So there's kind of broad change in how businesses are built I guess you can say open source is infused in many of these spaces whether it's a small startup is focused on a single technology or a larger company with a whole portfolio technologies like red built around round open source I think the common theme in there is open sources. Better cheaper faster way to build and deliver technology acknowledged understood. The business models around how to build a thriving successful business around open source. There's a lot more question marks in experimentation, and so I think it's maybe the at the hardier question is. How do you take open source and turn that into a successful business independent of your size and you know there's there's consulting led businesses that are really focused on the technology ambien consultants on that technology. There's open core business models which sort of blur the line between what's open it was proprietary. There's portfolio approaches like like what we red hat delivered as a service many different models I think that the concept of open source is here to stay. The business models around how do you take open source software and successfully commercialize it will continue to evolve at in part. The cloud self has changed how users consume software. So making sure that we keep pace with that change is critical to how open source communities will evolve in. Around will evolve. So now I think there's one outcome which looks like massive consolidation you either get bought or you go away. There's another outcome that looks like sort of continued innovation and business models and proliferation of a variety of sizes of business I believe that latter model more than the total consolidation. Consolidation at an industry level is not healthy. And I I know there are so many clever people that you'll see disruptive business models in a new approaches that help is of all sizes find a way to be successful part of what we try to do at Red Hat is a platform and on board a large ecosystem and many of our ecosystem partners build their software products from open source. So there's a nice symbiotic relationship there were reporting one another so it would kind of. Brings to my aunt night my nick was sandwiches So how do you anticipate open source evolving or what would we be? The future of open source is the same as today or do you see some fluctuations and changes? I think there's a couple of trends in the industry that will impact what open source even means. So today we have a pretty solid understanding of what it is. There's a large number of licenses. Already, those licenses try to encapsulate different ways of creating freedom around intellectual property. There's two changes I think really shift how you think about open source software and software development. Almost. All of the existing projects, today licenses almost there's a few exceptions are focused on building software and then delivering it as an artifact or a product. So take it give it. Give it to have. You go set it up, run it when it's turned into a software service whether it's. Sas Managed Service Pass whatever the delivery model is quite different and what's interesting in that delivery model is the software that's inside the service that you're using is less visible to the user. At that point you're interfacing with may is it surface the internals of the service and you're leveraging the operational experience of an operations team? That's somebody else's so for software for open or software to evolve I think one important notion is for the software projects the open source software. Projects to think in terms of how do we operationalize the software, what tooling and automation and just user experiences matter when you're running the software in general more specifically thinking of running it as a service even what API's do you surface when it's running as a service which might look different from a database of deep. You can dig inside you got a million knobs you can turn as a user maybe you have a fairly simple upload table, the table kind of interface. And transitioning to that world where we focused on with the operational experiences, the automation operating the project as a service, even delivering capabilities through API's as service I think open source software projects need to evolve Matt Direction. That's one area another one which is harder to picture with the outcomes like. There's a a massive explosion of data creation analysts will give you different numbers. You know all the world's data was created in the last x years of those great in the last six years, point, exponential growth, and. Say roughly doubling over the course of a few years terms data volume, and the same time open source projects are really proliferating in the space of managing data, creating insights from data machine, learning, deep, learning, all these super exciting topics largely happening in open source communities, the data itself and the associated trained models represent something that looks roughly like source code and binary artifact. In an open source community context, we understand licensing source code and the Associated Binary artifacts. What does it mean in a world where data drives the binary artifact? And the software used to do the model training is open source that the data isn't. So I think we'll have some interesting. I don't know like evolution thinking. Probably constant conflicts of interest in terms of where we have shared pools of data that helped advance the state of the art and where data is proprietary and I. Think. So there's going to be interesting intersection between data software, this manipulating data and the artifacts associated with that combination of data and software two. As I think, the open source world needs to evolve operationalizing software in thinking of data as a citizen, you've identify think rightfully. So the hybrid is.

Red Hat giants IBM Putin Microsoft Matt Direction
"a. source" Discussed on The Tech Guy

The Tech Guy

03:46 min | 4 months ago

"a. source" Discussed on The Tech Guy

"A variety of names for that. Do you running the? Cable box directly into the TV or you feeding through anything. No not you got an antenna here that I antenna Oh hold on hold analog I get one hundred channels out of La, and so that's great. Yeah, so most broadcast TV these days is broadcast in a used to as you said four by three, but I think they now in most in most broadcast TV because they're doing high def I think they're doing sixteen by nine, so that should fit automatically. So I guess I would guess that something's. Something's gone on in the settings on that TV now could be damage to the TV. It could be something you can't correct, but the first thing I would do is look in the in the settings on the TV and see and find zoom or a a aspect ratio that works without cropping things. It's weird, so you're how much of it sounds like a lot more of it than I would expect as being cropped if you can't see the score. Is it. The book says put it on sixteen nine in. It'll fill the picture which should. Crops. Horizontally, yeah, that sounds sounds like there might be something going on other than the crop factor so. try those other settings see if you can find one that works for broadcast television. Four three or sixteen nine and most most broadcast is now HD, so it'll be sixteen nine. Certainly in football game will be sixteen by nine. I would I would turn off Zimmer stretch if that's all and that's the key sounds like you've already done that, right? Here Then it may be. The TV is damaged if I get a four K.. It handled this better absolutely. Oh, maybe that's the problem it may just. Ten years old. It should work, but it may be damaged. It may not be something. The circuitry may be messed up. And it may be fixable the most flat screen TV's now a really not very repairable. The long gone are the days where there'd be a guy. Downtown with a lot of TV's in the window. where he'd bring it in, and he could tweak it and fix it. Goes days are long gone, the the. The broadcast terms for this is over and under scan. And it may be that there is a setting in that TV. I don't know where you want to select under scan, but because that also can do it. I would look around in TV, but you're right a new. TV fix it. Maybe this is just an opportunity. Donald to you know. They made some real progress in the last few years. I know I know some of your led's are sure. Look beautiful now the brought you won't get much benefit on broadcast. Unfortunately, for to really get a benefit on the four cage. Dart's you need to have A. Source! That's four caged Dr. Oh! Cable cable. Cable no well somewhat mostly. It's internet or getting a a a you HD. Blu Ray player. Now you have a movie that you love. That's available in four K.. You HD, and you have one of the new lead four KTV's as I do. If. You can darken that room. Get some Nice, surround sound. This is better than any movie theater it's..

La Dart football Donald A. Source
"a. source" Discussed on a16z

a16z

11:30 min | 9 months ago

"a. source" Discussed on a16z

"Hi and welcome to the Sixteen Z. Podcast I'm DOS and in this episode. We pull Mike Kelly. Cio of Red Hat into a hallway style conversation with a sixteen Z general partner Peter Levin as part of our annual a sixteen the innovation summit which happened late last year. We cover a lot of ground. They finished with them. In a given red hat has both been acquired and been an acquirer along the way though they touch on open hybrid architectures when open source project becomes a product. And where services come in for an open source start up. They start with a quick take from Peter on his classic post from two thousand fourteen. Why there will never be another red hat. Red Hat did such a great job. In pioneering what I call open source one DOTTO. The free and support model that their scale and capacity really made them a one off as a startup to be able to go and create the same backend. Infrastructure is quite expensive to do so. Let me go one step further here. I don't believe there will be another red hat with the red hat business model however I believe that there will be many many many successful open source companies into the future that have different business models from red hat that are further unlocking the potential of open source specifically open source as a service if we look at the history of open source as soon as the economics come into balance with the technology we see entrepreneurs flourish in the community flourishes because their sustainability and. I think this whole sas you know open source as a service has unlocked a whole new. Economic Model Peter's article ended with. Maybe even red hat should think about becoming the next Amazon and I think alluding to this kind of SAS era that we're in. How has that changed? How you're approaching open source and open source communities. Well I think our model started off as a on Prem subscription which was pretty unique at the time and as the cloud the public cloud has taken home you one of the benefits that we see is all those technologies are built on the core asset that we have which is Lennox and the different providers have different nations of that technology different distributions of it. The approach was to make sure our technology runs on all of them because to us. It doesn't really make a difference so we have partnerships with all of the major cloud providers and we obviously have our capabilities as well and so the idea of this hybrid world is the one we placed a lot of bets on the one that actually fortunately has evolved to sort of be the dominant design. You talk a little bit about the dominant design. How do you view this emerging enterprise architecture? Where are we in in that open or hybrid future? There was this view about five years ago. I would say that the cloud takes over there would be no more on. Prem there would only be one cloud provider and now what we're seeing is that there are multiple cloud providers and the pendulum has swung back to where there's a right place for certain on prem software and infrastructure and applications and there's the right use of the cloud and there are many tools now that makes the integration of public and private. I hybrid seamless across different domains. And once we have that cheers really know Ed your core. There's just compute it when we first started studying cloud and all different stations of what it was going to be the hype that surrounded it it was a binary thing right. It was either. You're all public or you're all on premise. It's like come on. That doesn't make any sense. So what has come to fruition? Now I think is starting to recognize all the choice that's available all the just incredible amount of innovation. That's taken place that for someone in a job like mine. It's our responsibility and our job to take advantage of it so the means by which I can manage it is almost as important as the means in which I can. Just use it. If you're in my job your partners and other functions in the company shouldn't care where what what's underneath the solution. All they care about is that the solution is correct and it's optimized both for agility and cost purposes for whatever problem. You're trying to solve Peter. You've said software as a service has really cracked open open source in terms of its valuations in its potential but at the same time. The end customer doesn't really know if it's open source or not from a development standpoint we get all the innovation the community the bug fixing that open source has been great at for the past. What THIRTY FORTY YEARS? But really we can monetize open source at the full value of that software because people don't care all they want is the service. Just give me whatever that software provides and I don't really care whether it's open source or not and by the way I'm willing to pay full value for that stack in the one data. Oh you're the economic problem and I ran an open source company in the one data ear. I know the economic problem is a buyer would compare would say okay. You're giving away your software for free and charging for support and I'm GonNa go compare you to your proprietary counterpart and the proprietary counterpart charges eighty cents for the software and twenty cents for support. Therefore we're going to only pay you twenty cents because all you're doing is providing support now if it's run as a service and support and the service of the software is all built in together. It's a hundred cents and let me also add that going from open source. Bits the source code to creating a reliable manageable service. There's a lot of work in that so it's not like you have open source and all of a sudden you cobble this stuff together and you get open sources service you know. There's a huge difference between a project and a product and that is really really important. Especially if you're in in my role in a company and you inevitably going to have members of your team saying well we'll just we'll just get the free version right and it's like okay. Well who's GONNA PATCH IT? Who who we relying on to provide feature function updates integration etc etc etc. So the notion that people don't care because it's a service. I is true to a certain extent but the person is ultimately responsible ought to care on. Who's behind the scenes? The good thing is all this innovation. That's happening especially in the software like in the infrastructure and clouds fees. It's all user driven innovation. It's all people that are practitioners. That have a problem and they tried to go solve the problem. The creative opens and there is a rap group that rallies around it and you know the dominant design forms and then it take the upstream project and create products. So you mentioned this idea of the difference between a project and a product. How do you evaluate or think about that difference? What tells you something is no longer just a project. It's a fully baked product you as an. It buyer might want to invest in. Well I think when a company stands up and put some service around it anybody can go get the community version of a piece of software and use it. As they see fit the minute it becomes a product is when a company says. We offer a business model around that particular project. It's interesting what happened with the role of it and a lot of companies for the longest time. What IS OUR CORE? Competency was the discussion and we said well. We're really not great at it so we should try to run that at an optimal cost. And you know look for partners that can run it better than we end because we're not in the IT business and back in that time open source was mostly a commodity play. That's how red hat got put on the map was. We were commodity. -tising and product nowadays where every company is all of a sudden a technology company and companies are looking to. It is. We're going to use technology to disrupt our competitors. People are in a job like mine. After sort of retool ourselves having the capability for an one individual team to run a distribution of open source software community version is more tricky than having a trusted adviser partner with you and do side by side and as a buyer. I encourage everybody to inspect pretty heavily. What's behind the scenes there? And how do I know who's handshake when everything goes really well? So let's say I start an open source company when does red? Hat's say you know what we're GonNa grab those bits and put them into our distribution versus. We're going to allow that company to exist in. There's always the self rationalized argument which I would do. If I were red hat to say lock our customers. Want one stop and for anything infrastructure. We're going to go offer that because that's what our customers are asking for. Maybe help me us to understand how you think about that. First and foremost you got to look through it through. The filter of what is our strategy. Like what are we going after right? There are lots of parts of the enterprise where we have not played historically and there are parts where we play and we would try to play. Well so we're always looking at the portfolio right. What's the right mix? What's the value proposition for us? It's interesting just from an entrepreneur's viewpoint. If I start company eight verses be like what's the likelihood that your red hat as either GonNa WanNa partner with me or adopt that technology and from my lands if the company that's founded is the founder of the project is the CEO and the five people that he worked with on the project? That's the the. Maybe there are seven or eight employees total. I'm probably going to scratch my head about that in terms of the longevity and just the sustainability on it might be good for some experimental stuff. I'm doing my shop but for production type stuff. You GotTa think twice about it. Yeah for sure. But those companies that are small. I mean they start out that way and then they get a tailwind and then now they're fifty people and at that point as was with the company that Iran we got to be of a scale where customers actually trusted us and we can go do things you know as somebody in. It who's kind of evaluating these different projects may be the first ones to to test things out as you mention. How do you decide which bets are worth making from a technology perspective what are you looking for every cio and the planet is trying to do this? You're trying to balance operational excellence and running the business with innovation and driving the business forward and again if much of the innovation is coming from the open source community than a lot of the bets that you're placing for new technologies are rooted in solutions. That are born there so for me. It's like I always try to think about what what are we. How are we balancing those two things? Because it's really important if all you do is focus on keeping the lights on and making sure everything comes you're gonna Miss Opportunity to drive the business forward so to me..

Red Hat Peter Levin Cio Hat Mike Kelly partner general partner Lennox Iran Amazon WanNa CEO founder
"a. source" Discussed on The Sneak

The Sneak

02:03 min | 9 months ago

"a. source" Discussed on The Sneak

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S. N. E. A. K. Danny apple Google
"a. source" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

02:18 min | 11 months ago

"a. source" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> it. Seems like <Speech_Music_Male> this word <Speech_Music_Female> creativity <Speech_Female> this term that the we <Speech_Music_Female> ascribe all <Speech_Music_Female> this meaning to <Speech_Music_Female> isn't <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> that huge rights <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> not like this crazy <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> out of reach <Speech_Male> elusive. Kinda thing <Speech_Female> right <Speech_Female> now. Everybody's invited <Speech_Female> everybody's everybody's <Speech_Female> invite when you say <Speech_Female> creative people as redundant <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> we are <Speech_Female> creativity <Speech_Female> And we've done <Speech_Female> a great disservice <Speech_Female> to bifurcated <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> and one of the things things <Speech_Female> that I've been saying a lot <Speech_Female> to people <Speech_Female> is that we <Speech_Female> keep telling people to <Speech_Female> follow their passion <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> and I feel that <Speech_Female> can be <Speech_Female> an intimidating <Speech_Female> and almost cruel L. <Speech_Female> thing to <Speech_Female> say to people at times <Speech_Female> because first of all if somebody <Speech_Female> has one central <Speech_Female> powerful burning <Speech_Female> passion. They're <Speech_Female> probably already <Speech_Female> following it. Because that's <Speech_Male> sort of the definition of passion <Speech_Male> is that you don't have a <Speech_Female> choice if <Speech_Female> you don't which is <Speech_Female> a lot of people <Speech_Female> have one <Speech_Female> central Burning Passion <Speech_Female> and somebody tells you <Speech_Female> to follow <Speech_Female> your passion. I think you have <Speech_Male> the right to <Speech_Music_Male> give them a finger uh-huh <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> because <Speech_Female> it just makes you feel worse <Speech_Female> and so I <Speech_Female> always say to people forget <Speech_Female> like if you don't have a <Speech_Female> an obvious fashion <Speech_Female> forget about it. Follow <Speech_Female> your curiosity <Speech_Female> because because <Speech_Female> passion <Speech_Female> is sort of a tower <Speech_Female> of flame <Speech_Female> that is not always <Speech_Female> accessible <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> curiosity is something <Speech_Female> that anybody <Speech_Female> can access any day. <Speech_Female> Your <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> curiosity may <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> lead you <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> to your passion <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> or it may not <Speech_Female> it may have been <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> for air quotes <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> nothing <Speech_Female> in which case all <Speech_Female> you've done <Speech_Female> your entire life if <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> you spend <Speech_Female> your existence <Speech_Female> in pursuit of the <Speech_Music_Female> things that made you feel curious <Speech_Music_Female> and <SpeakerChange> inspired and <Speech_Music_Male> that should be good enough. <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> They <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> get to do <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> that. That's a <Speech_Music_Male> wonderful way <SpeakerChange> to spend <Speech_Music_Male> your time here. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Writer <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Elizabeth Gilbert <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> her most <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> recent book. A novel <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> is the signature <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of all things. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> She <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> has to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> create talks <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> that you can find <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> at Ted <Speech_Music_Female> died. NPR <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> Dot <Music> Org.

"a. source" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

08:34 min | 11 months ago

"a. source" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"This is the music of Keith. Jarrett the legendary jazz pianist and he plays entire concert in front of thousands of people completely improvised. What's notable to me when you watch Keith or really any other amazing jazz musician? Position is almost turning on a faucet just a a kind of a flood of ideas comporting out what what actually happened is so much in the moment so much of a nanosecond. This is Keith Jarrett. I asked him about those live performances and I know a lot of people probably are skeptical about whether they really are always improvised. I just I myself feel skeptical even though I know they were and that means that when it comes to creativity research jazz improvisers like not charrette are the perfect. The ideal research subjects for people like Charles Lamb. How many times can you go and say? Oh we're going to watch genius being created created in front of us. Here's Charles on the Ted Stage. I've always just as a listener as just the fan listed that. I'm just astounded. I think how can this possibly be. How can the brain generate that much information that much music spontaneously and so I set out with this concept scientifically that artistic creativity magical? But it's not magic nick. meaning that it's the product from the brain. There's not too many brain dead people creating art and so with this notion that artistic creativity is in fact a neurologic product. I took this thesis that we could study it just like we studied any other complex neurologic process. I think there's some sub questions there that I put there. Is it really possible to study creativity scientifically and. That's a good question. I tell you that. Most scientific studies of music dance. And when you actually go through them it's very hard to recognize the music in it and so it it brings the question. Why should scientists that creativity? Maybe we're not the right people to do it. Well it may be but I will say that. From a scientific perspective we talked a lot about innovation nation today the Science of innovation. How much we understand about how the brain is able to innovate is in its infancy and truly we know very little about how we are able to be creative and and so? I think that we're going to see over the next ten twenty thirty years a real science of creativity that's burgeoning is going to flourish because we now have new methods that can enable us to take this process of something like this complex jazz improvisation and study it rigorously and so it gets down to the brain and so all of us have this remarkable brain which is poorly understood to say the least. I think that neuroscientist have much more questions than answers and I myself. I'm not going to give. You may just ask a lot of questions and fundamentally that's what I do in my lab I ask questions about. What is this sprain doing to enable us to do this in his lab to answer those questions? Charles brought in a bunch of jazz musicians coming in the fourth grade. Nothing Okay and what he did was basically stuck. These guys is it a functional M. R. I. Scanner that was fitted with a keyboard and he told them to jam and then he watched part of their brains light up on the screen. And so what. You're sort of seeing these hot spots and cold spots of activity or Lord Deactivation and when you look what Charles observed was that that when these guys improvised was very specific parts of their brains would show activity not too surprising but then he noticed something else. The prefrontal Cortex of the brain or a large part of it was suppressed and activity in a big way which was linked to we think conscious self monitoring. Now these are multifunctional areas of the brain as I say these are not the jazz areas of the brain. They do a whole host of things that have to do with self reflection introspection working memory three and so forth really consciousness is seated in the frontal lobe but we have this combination of an area. That's thought to be involved in self monitoring turning off in this area that's thought to be autobiographical graphical or self expressive turning on and we think at least in this preliminary one study. It's probably wrong but it's one study. We think that at at least a reasonable hypothesis to be creative. You have to have this weird dissociation in your frontal lobe. One area turns on and a big area shuts off so that you're not inhibited. So that you're willing to make mistakes exit. You're not constantly shutting down. All of these new generative impulses. Parts of the brain are really important and survive for example right now I WANNA make sure that I'm not saying something to to to stupid and so that part of my brain is kind of actively filtering. What's coming out of my mouth? Basically saying don't be creative. Yeah that's a certain extent. Make sure that what you say is correct. Don't don't make too many mistakes that kind of thing Whereas if the goal were to come up with something new it would sort of Turn off yeah well hopefully it will turn off. I mean if if we know that our brains can kind of stifle creativity. How are we sort of exercise? More control over that like how could we somehow. I'm how manipulative brain to make sure that it doesn't do that at times when we most need that creativity. So I'll tell you in the lab. This is something we think about all the time which is how can we manipulate eight creativity and that's different question than should we manipulate creativity. Because there's a I think a big debate on whether or not one should now people have been trying to manipulate their own creativity ready for forever. I mean whether it's drugs whether it's meditation whether it's practice I do think we're heading towards the understanding of the brain where we'll be able to manipulate pillet circuitry linked to creativity and hopefully for the better meaning in the same way that you take. I think in the same way that you take you drink a cup of coffee in the morning warning for it's kind of neuro pharmacologic effects. I think it might be the same way with a creativity building. Hey it's time to work on this piece of music. Let me just take this pill that will sort of get me in my my groove a little bit more easily But I think that all people have some ability to enter these flow states With maybe some for some people uh-huh easier than others but our brains are think are meant to do this because this is how we generate novelty. Everybody has the capacity to be creative and I. It might sound strange surprising but I tend not over romanticize the idea and so I think there's a bit of a A myth that art is kind of just comes from some of the land of inspiration and just the lucky few able to generate it. I mean most artists. That are doing what they do and are good at what they do have been working at their track for their whole lives. I mean they're putting hours and hours and hours to learn to play their instrument or to paint or whatever it might be. I mean this is something that they're practicing. It's not just magic Idea that professional musician can enter a flow state because they've practiced doing it is important. Oh absolutely once again jazz pianist Keith. Jarrett I have a connection with the instrument due to how long I've played is like almost a talisman But you have to be able to be ready to fall on your face flat on your face and have failed miserably. Jennifer deals in flashdance. You know she falls over. Its worst nightmare come true but what can you do. It's worse than that if you're dancing the idea here is that practice doesn't make you perfect but it it does help you stop thinking that you have to be yeah. I think that's true. I I would say that anytime. External influences are interfering during with your brains Jerry something new it is sort of putting additional cognitive load on your brain that changes the way it's normally meant I think to generate new the ideas and you know I think for art and for high-level Flow States the ability to suppress your own brain may be one of the real hallmarks marks. For what makes somebody great at the kind of the ability get out of their way not just musically but neurologically Charles lamb runs a music ignition lab at Johns Hopkins. He's also a pretty good musician himself. He knows how to play at least a dozen instruments check account his talk at Ted Dot.

Charles Lamb Keith Jarrett Ted Dot nick. flashdance Jerry Johns Hopkins Jennifer M. R.
"a. source" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

04:43 min | 11 months ago

"a. source" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Hey It's guy here so as some of you may have heard. There will be a new host of Ted Radio Hour which is super exciting. Her name is Manezh Marone and she'll be starting in March. In the meantime I wanNA share some of my favorite episodes of Ted Radio Hour over the years and this one is called the source of creativity. And it's full of big ideas about where creativity comes from how we can all tap into it this episode features sting writer Elizabeth Gilbert and Sir. Ken Robinson who still holds the record for the most popular. Ted Talk of all time and one final note. It also features an interview with the Great British Choreographer Dame Gillian Lynne Dame. Jillian was eighty eighty eight. When I talked to her in two thousand fourteen and last year she passed away her story of how she got to be a dancer? How she found her creative outlet in dance is so oh inspiring you will love it? So here is one of my favorite episodes. It's called the source of creativity. This is the Ted Radio Hour each week round breaking Ted talks and talks technology. Entertainment Design Design. Why is that really? What Stanford never known the delivered at Ted Conferences around the world? If the human imagination we've had to believe an impossible thing. The true nature of reality beckons from just beyond those talks. Those ideas adapted for radio from NPR her Guy Roz and today on the show the source of creativity ideas. About where here it comes from why we all have it and how to find it load now. I just want to make sure that you can hear me. I can hear you on. Can you hear guy can hit guy. Hello Hi it's thing. Hawaii Yep sting. Hello welcome thank you. Thanks for coming in. It was a pleasure so I was in Vancouver Hoover. NCI Your talk so stings. tedtalk was about finding inspiration by going back home in how he turned the stories of his childhood into an album. And then a show on Broadway and the stories are all based on the people he grew up around in northern England. In a town called wallsend the tone was basically a dedicated to shipbuilding the demonstrators shipyard they built the biggest ships in the world. Right at the end of my street the other end of the time was a coal mine so it wasn't isn't exactly like living living next to the met us there. Were never any oprah's in town or even any shows but I had a need for that kind of life on so I converted Mahood at a story of how he made the record about walls end and how he it was able to mount. This huge production is really a story about creativity and instincts case how he lost it. But we'll get there when you think of the word creativity Black how how would you define it. how would I define creativity. I for me. It's the It's the ability to take a risk To actually put yourself on the line and in risk of ridicule being pilloried criticized or whatever. But you have an idea that you think you won't Put out there and you must take that risk. Did you think of yourself as a as a creative person. When you're you're when you were young I was actually allowed to dream a lot. As a child I worked with my father and every morning as Milkman and he would get me up at five and the morning when all of my school friends who are in bed and we'd we drive around the streets and deliver milk and he wouldn't say very much to me apart from year to two point zero in three points there. We didn't talk and so I was allowed in this very creative time. In the day you know as light was coming up to dream And I dreamt dreamt dreamt about futures. I might possibly have fantasizes suppose so I was in the creative mode from the very beginning just by being left alone and sting's career. Pretty well known and kind of hit. After hit from the moment he left. Walls end the creativity liberty just poured out of them. Nineteen seventy eight second album in seventy nine another hit.

Dame Gillian Lynne Dame Ted Talk Guy Roz Manezh Marone Mahood tedtalk Elizabeth Gilbert Milkman writer Ken Robinson Jillian NPR Hawaii Stanford Vancouver northern England oprah
"a. source" Discussed on Keith and the Girl Comedy Talk Show

Keith and the Girl Comedy Talk Show

03:03 min | 1 year ago

"a. source" Discussed on Keith and the Girl Comedy Talk Show

"From my account. You're welcome you make use of the recorder guy. You and I pray Keith. It and take credit read it love Catherine I already promised to sister shipping and never sent anything but a recording of afar anyway forever your pussycat Catherine so don him now. We're GONNA wait for him. Yeah Okay Yeah in Christmas. Obviously a big deal to him now is this is December eighth right now. So that's the that's still a long time But that's like I said yesterday or the other day Not Not saying hi on Thanksgiving to him. I was texting my mom on the side but not saying hi to Thanksgiving his birthday and now Christmas. That's trafficked perfect. And of course these people they love things threes people and forties. But yeah he'll be like Oh shit we got a problem. Is New Year's thing too you with all together. Yeah yeah now. Tell me this. Valentine's Day will be with Jingling Jingling right ringling bells. I'm only songs again. Ruined Rune that goes around the house by the way singing especially during Christmas ally right so is he can be singing jingle bells Omega. Oh my God vomit All right. We're there it is and I'll put Put these pictures up Keith. My Girl Dot Com as well. You can see what's going on it is. It is shocking. It's like Kinda says you know. Hello everybody says all. I assumed. I got the gist by assumed. You're exaggerating about your dad. And they meet my dad or they meet my siblings. Who have the same stories stories or they see they? You know they see my autobiography like this is crazy but they have to assume. It's a little exaggerated it's not an. Here's the air's the source and somehow there's more it's it's almost like now. I don't know it's like this deep level of. Hey Keith. You sure you're all right. Not What unpacking this is really. I think a lot of people would go deep into something without even realizing I'm hiding so much pain. I can't even feel that my leg amputated. I have no feelings so in twenty twenty. We're going to find keats feelings. Every month will will be a new feeling associated color at a number with it. We start with happy. Thank you everybody for supporting the kickstarter. I can't I can't say enough Kinda said in the beginning it such a big deal. It is nerve racking and it's so it feels so good it. It shows that people give it was shit and that's that's always great all right so thank you very much Your mission do not go to the kick. Start Your Day off. We'll talk to you tomorrow dot Com..

"a. source" Discussed on Keith and the Girl Comedy Talk Show

Keith and the Girl Comedy Talk Show

12:54 min | 1 year ago

"a. source" Discussed on Keith and the Girl Comedy Talk Show

"Sixty-nine with a sheet in between it's sounded so carrots it sounded like one was more factual right so I mean the Babylonian Code love then he rates one hundred percent. Factual awesome would be an understatement. What would you think if only we had more words than awesome since it would be an understatement and you have to find more words to describe it what what do you think about the entities who foretold a series of events along with the specific dates over six thousand years in advance and history proved that the events in specific dates turned out to be one hundred percent inaccurate? Not How would you feel here. It is right. Tell me here it is and by the way good thing. This God really put a bunch of tricks in the Bible and it took the Genius Einstein. Stein like Mr Mike Molly to figure it out and put it together. What about the person to whom those events ultimately pointed? I guess he's talking about this. This Guy Daniel. He's talking about Jesus who knows. He's so concise and clear so catherine needs to make sure these emails don't get boring and they do sometimes he starts to slip so catherine rates. I'd marry that person. Okay here we go so. That's what I'm thinking I'm like okay. This is the end. Yeah would marry that person you would marry. Jesus Christ you would when Mary Day in your I also just told you about the awesome. That is the wonder of Blah Blah. I'd marry him marry him. You never heard them into that guy. I love this apple. Why don't you marry at Mary Him? I'd marry him. Just the most awesome thing proof positive God exists. I got the book right here. It it also should remind him that she married your son right. I'd marry him. Get it right this time. Whoever you're talking about mariot are you talking about you or are you talking about Daniel? The Prophet are you talking about God. Mary I divorced your son just so I can marry this book. God has a hell of a plan and my dad says excellent solent answer to my knowledge. He reminds single throughout his entire life remained. I know his name was Daniel Daniel. He is better known as quote the Prophet Daniel do you. Might you might known. As the Prophet Daniel. While living in Babylon his awesome very specific revelations totally tubular his awesome very specific. Revelations came with the help of Angel Gabriel after bring revealed to him by the son of God by the way okay. One hundred percent factual everything's GonNa be even if you're a scientist and you hate religion these these facts that he lays out are gonNA prove to you the existence of God. Right let us begin with an angel. Gabriel you know what I mean. I'M GONNA explain. See what the dream of an angel. I can't tell where his belief of it begins and ends. You Know Brian. I can't tell where he's spinning. A We all Angel Gabriel got in the mix because Daniel could not understand what the son of God was communicating to him. But that's good that the son of God was put on this earth to explain everything toss. You couldn't communicate it. You're just a kid. Angel Gabriel got in the mix because Daniel couldn't understand what the son of God was trying to say being married to him could have been a bit on the traumatic side considering the different ways that people tried to do him in out of sheer jealousy. Oh you mean it was Over two thousand years ago and everyone's trying to kill people then Catherine route. I'd bring him stupid now. What is getting impatient? Yes I bang him stupid. What are you expecting from him after he right that I don't know I really don't know what the fuck ignore it? He's not going to say what the fog right but yeah I bring him stupid. Admire him him. Great answer on that case is even better than I thought I'd bang stupid. What K- he rates back your words words and the apparent thought behind them surprise me? Tell me were you always so crass or did you learn it from Keith in Canada. Hey Oh why am I always end this or did you teach to Keith. What so yes she got in my life and Thomas Hours? She taught you to curse to be crass she taught you to be craft right. You met her when you were thirty. Something right okay sounds often so. But here's what's interesting with my dad and maybe you dear listener have Parents like this he he he he wants like cat has to be not this. Apparently this specifically but Cat Cat has to be real even though I told him already cats not real he has. I should be real. So he's GonNa hang onto that make it so I might not be the real one right. Yeah because this will turn life upside down. How's he going to explain all this to me? How how many times has he written? Thank you for keeping the secret and also has it can explain to his wife right and then at the same time though at me being the asshole so not her. I can't be an asshole. Because he didn't raise an animal. There has to be an excuse for it and that could be cats fault that cells that that's but he turns so quickly yes. Did you already respond to this. was at the whole email ads. So that's what he wrote. A cat did respond. But yes you're we're all. She should've just blamed me me ever since he came into our lives out. She No. She's on she doesn't care okay. I'm telling you the raiders are on strike. You know it's like kind of said this did. Did you can the teacher keeping a workshop or something you taught Cattani so crass anyway well it is. It's like my. My Dad likes a lady in the streets right that he can talk about a jingling libido right but can't talk about what you don't say Bam stupid poetry what the differences Tena Jingling Libido and Bam stupid. Well my dad is one of these older guys who who would be like every people being scantily dressed now days days. It's it's crass it's too much it's now in my day. We had these black white moves. He tell us this what the didn't show. You was even more sultry. Unlike them. What are you what are we talk? Show it and you'll be less. Christ you saw Elvis dance. You literally thought he was masturbating but something even dirtier was really going on on C.. That was the beauty of it. Doesn't that kind of prove that you know and I know a lot of us know this. It's not the what you're wearing thing. It's how that person looks at women you know it's like your I can see the way your leg moves even though your skirt as long or I could see that your dirty because you're short short like I will always think of you as a sexual something even though you're trying to hide it if you're trying to hide it that sexy if you're showing shelling it that's so crashed at all I could think about is sex and it's like isn't this just happening in your mind. Yeah you hit on cat already you said Bang stupid okay. So Catherine Rights. Ll Remembering you thought. Eighty six was dirty but it was my birthday. autocorrect Mehta Blah Blah Blah Blah. Who Cares I see how its roots stupid and Bang? I'm sorry. Ll Okay but she apologized kinds of short but that is funny that she brought around eighty six right. Okay L. O.. Will remember when you thought eighty six thirty but it was my birthday. autocorrect made a blah blah blah. Who Cares it's funny? I see how its roots stupid and Dang I'm sorry. Ll So he has written yet to that it is I. I like that was going to. I had something in my mind where she who's going to rhyme being stupid to would be like. autocorrect fixed. I Ha- I forgot what my idea was fucking. Yeah Eighty Yeah. It's like you said. Eighty eighty six to sixty nine to okay. You kinda wanted to. He can easily get our sorry. I was on drugs. I'm getting help or or just rate. Excuse me I don't understand. Yeah there's many things right I choose not in the mode though. They'll definitely not in the mode. Okay so ello Ella. Well then he wrote me Keith. Malley what wait what. He's so he hasn't talked. You written knew he since the beginning of November when I said somebody is pretending to be cat and you owe me an apology. But that's you talking to him. He hasn't spoken to you. He actually declared through your mother that he's not speaking to you correct so he didn't even answer that email so it was before then that he got in touch with you. Yes Oh my God what is this email male no subject. Of course you know all right no subject where the bodies in the subject Christie tells me my says says this is how it starts here. Kristie tells me that you contributed to my birthday and Christmas gift. Fuck off I hope it helps me do what I have in mind. Thank you that's fit. That's it okay now so cold and just the right thing quote unquote but also for attention so cats on time out now. Oh you signed the one. He needs attention from so he's going to turn this and it's not just the it's not just the thank you because that's a rating that though it's also more about him. I have asked me. What do I have in mind right right right you just say? Hey I'm using that you either say or dull but I'm using I'm using this. I'm going to start recording my books and actually say hey I got I got the thank you I hope. I hope it helps me do what I have in mind. How do you feel about the fact that your name was on the birthday gift? I told them to two. Why because Falko okay? Yeah like you're not talking to me all right when I'm on my name on it and I wanted to underline okay. Did you respond. No I'm not going to. Yeah Okay I e playing the you're not talking to me I'm not talking to you. Basically you you just nothing to say that there's nothing to say. Yeah when when our next time I write to them it is going to be. You heard my last email you know. I'm talking about why we play. If I wrote back I'd be like oh you talking now I just the mode now but I can see something about a not that. It's I don't know something about the New Year where I can see being really telling him before the end of the year. I don't know why not like New Year new me but just like I don't know it's a good milestone and be like look. I'm done in silver something like that. Yeah please well I. Maybe maybe my new program Omega. We'll help you do the time a minute to think about it absolutely I should I write back. Well actually cattle. Tell me your new project is you told told her. I gotTa Bake Fourth. Now I wrote back Christie. said that she doesn't know me so we'll see leading there. That's where right now. Yeah I am kind of surprised that he didn't right if If this fact is true that you participated right normally Asto style so he still hasn't written back cat correct. Now this was. This wasn't too long ago. But yeah you'd normally very fast though he would try to make that right but Too much in the back of his head. He's still knows. I said it's not her right. So that's always there even if he's denying it who knows because his his it's strong awesome. How do we name this? Show awesome again when we named the show with. Paul Hooper. Awesome absolutely awesome. Awesome from this non close at the beginning of his book and then he re I nut like obviously I'm pushing it. Just go on keeping dot com dead and it's right there all the information nation but then he rates cat. How awesome this book is? I'm like oh no he's going to put it together. Coincidentally like hostile is going to be on his mind. You're right you're uh-huh right. He's not doing any of that. He's still hasn't figured out the subject of an email right Nina while it sounds like he wants to start a podcast okay. Dearest father should this prove to be of benefit to the task for which you have in mind. Then you are most welcome from my level of contribution of which my sister Christy so kindly only informed. You Know Shit though. That's exactly his wording that that's the kind of language he uses. I feel like because he just thinks it's majestic because it's old. I'm thinking cat rates from her account. You're welcome for the gift and then literally rates UPS wrong account. And then I reigned.

Daniel Daniel Catherine Rights Angel Gabriel Keith Mary Him Christie Mary Day Babylon apple raiders Stein Mary I scientist Canada Brian Mr Mike Molly Thomas Hours Cattani Paul Hooper
"a. source" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

05:30 min | 1 year ago

"a. source" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Didn't just hear from people with great padeas? It was people who had actually tried something out. They had just tried this out in my pool or in the ocean near where I live and it worked. It was better than just getting ideas. It was getting solutions agents and so after eight months of tinkering on their underwater robot in a garage prototype after prototype after prototype it just reached at this point where the only thing left to do was to go. Where are we right now right now? We're in the Halsey cave kind of near Redding California We have in the Trinity Alps and so on their twenty first prototype built twenty four this affectionate design almost every time David and what did become a team of friends went back to the hall city Cave and put their little underwater robot like the size of a toaster oven. I would say equipped with a couple of lights and a small camera. Tethered to a hundred foot cable was really this into the water. Moment of pride because it. It wasn't just that we're exploring known but we were going there with this tool that we had built in fact that day David and his friends almost forgot about the gold and why they were there in the first place because what was even more exciting as the robot moves through the water toward an opening the rock that would take them successfully into the cave itself was that because of all the people who had helped them get their they felt like part of something bigger. Yes we send it down and everyone is kind of collectively holding their breath. It's a very quiet quiet moment where anything can happen through. That is so cool. Our descent spoiler alert here because David and his partners did not find any gold in that case but the open source model they used to get. They're left them with a question. A question they would never have been able to ask if they hadn't had helped thousands of people all over the world. What if there were thousands of these devices and anybody could just get online or go and meet people and get sucked into one of these adventures so about that time? Our little expedition became quite a story and it got picked up in the New York Times. And we're pretty much just overwhelmed with interest. People wanted a kit that they could build this. RV themselves so we decided to put the project on kickstarter and when we did we raised our funding goal in about two hours and all of a sudden had this money to make these kids but then we had to learn how to make them. I mean we had learned small batch manufacturing so we quickly learned that garage was not big enough to hold our growing operation peration. But we were able to do it. We got all the kids made. Thanks a lot to tech shop. which was a big help to us? And we ship these kits all over the world. But we're still oh publishing all the designs online encouraging anyone to build these themselves. That's the only way that we could have done this. By being open source we've created this distributed network and we're moving faster than any venture back counterpart but the actual robot is really only half the story the real potential long term potential is with this community of DIY. I Y Ocean explorers that are forming all over the globe. What can we discover when there's thousands of these devices roaming the Seas David laying in in his company open? RV have sold thousands of their open source are all these people all over the world. These things can dive over three hundred feet. They shoot high quality video and they only cost about nine hundred bucks which is a fraction of their commercial counterparts. And David who knows what they could find on a planet planet that is seventy percent water to give you an example there are about two hundred shipwrecks in the San Francisco Bay that have not been discovered. And we've gone off several several times that we go to look at old maps and and read old documents and historical society to try and figure out where some of these shipwrecks are but to go out in the boat to know that. We're looking for this this piece of history that no one else has been able to find. That's a feeling that's just gets me excited. I mean we're almost in some ways we're like going back to that age of discovery where like anybody. Anybody could be a scientist or an explorer or an astronomer because they just went out and did it and now the tools are available to people in their pretty cheap. I like that. I think you're right. I think it is this new age of discovery. You have to realize though that you know we've been doing this now for four years and I tell l.. I still tell this story once in a while. How got started the search for gold and kickstarter and the whole story? And I can't help but giggle when I tell because it's still seems so unbelievable and the best part about it is that it's not just ours. It's all of these people that are a part of it and so I always talk about this that we've created this dream but it's a collective dream that we're all participating in that we're all working together. David laying runs open our LOVIE DOT com. The recently launched a crowd funding campaign to build a new version of the robot needed about fifty thousand bucks. Tuck to start. They raised almost three quarters of a million. You can see David Short. Talk at Ted Dot Com.

David Short New York Times Halsey cave hall city Cave Trinity Alps California Redding San Francisco Bay scientist three hundred feet seventy percent three quarters eight months hundred foot four years two hours
"a. source" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"a. source" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"From the process of making which in turn is separated from the process of use ultimately. You got to power into the hands of the person who's going to use the thing Ouster says when that doesn't happen when the designer and the maker and the user are all in different places not talking to each other. You get designs things that don't work you get ugly buildings that nobody likes or schools look like prisons homes and apartment buildings. Don't make sense for the people who live in them. And part of the reason for this as Alastair is that architecture and design are so centralized there anything but hoping and there is this kind of myth of the hero hero individual architect this kind of genius who produces a sketch and then throws over a balcony and it just somehow happens into the world and I guess locked into that. Is this idea that well we know. Best Design and development is something done to people dump by people. Yeah I mean you look at most big cities and it's skyscrapers and huge housing projects and big box stores and that was just kind of put out there and we just kind of accept it and actually we all believe in the idea of democracy right and so the irony was really since the industrial revolution. We've been bought into these big systems of design and development that were incredibly actually undemocratic and suddenly. We're moving into well. Where potentially that might not be true? Picks up that idea from the Ted Stage so the challenge we face is. How are we going to build the tools the infrastructure and the institutions for architecture's social economy and that began with open source software and over the last few years? It's been moving into the physical world with open source hardware which are freely shared blueprints. reprints that anyone can download and make for themselves and we were fascinated by what that might mean for architecture so about in a year and a half ago we started working on project. Wiki Housing Wiki House is an open source construction system and the idea is to make it possible for anyone to go go online access. A freely shared library of three D models which they can download and adapt almost at the click of a switch. They can generate a set of cutting files which allow them in effect to print out the parts from a house using a CNC machine which is like a large printer that can cut sheets of of plywood and the parts are all numbered. And basically what you end up with these really big Ikea Kit and it goes together. Without any bolts it uses wedge and peg connections and even the mallets to make it can be provided on the cutting sheets beats as well and a team of about two or three people working together can build this. They don't need any traditional construction skills. They don't need a huge array of power tools. Or anything like that and what you end up with. Just the basic chassis of a house onto which you can then apply systems like windows and cladding installation and services based on what's cheap and what's available of course the house is never finished with a CNC machine he can make new parts for it over. Its life or even use it to make the house next door. So how could Wiki House change the way we think about design Alastair Parvin returns in just a minute to explain Ghairat our show today open source and you're listening to the Ted Radio Hour from NPR. Hey everyone just quick thanks to one of our sponsors who helps make this podcast possible rocket mortgage by quicken loans. Imagine how it feels to have an award award winning team of mortgage experts the home buying process smoother for you with history of industry leading online lending technology. Rocket Mortgage is changing the game visit rocketmortgage Dot Com Slash Ideas Jessica. Equal housing lender licensed in all fifty states and MLS consumer access dot Org number thirty thirty rocket mortgage by quicken loans push-button get mortgage this message comes from NPR sponsor. Total wine and more where friendly Finley in store teams can recommend the perfect bottle of wine for your holiday gathering with eight thousand wines and twenty five hundred beers. There's always something new to explore. Total total wine has built partnerships with some of the most intriguing winemakers and brewers from around the world whether you're hosting or bringing the wine total wine and more is always aways low. Prices and ridiculous selection will always provide something interesting to drink more at totalwine DOT com. I'm Peter Segal sure you're enjoying this. NPR podcast filled with important and useful information. But isn't the most important and and useful information like this. The museum actually went and made a synthetic version of dinosaur breath. It's axe body spray believes. Oh wait wait don't tell me from. NPR We are listen now and share with your friends..

Rocket Mortgage NPR Alastair Parvin Peter Segal Finley Ghairat
"a. source" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

09:42 min | 1 year ago

"a. source" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"So as we've been hearing from Tim Burners Lee and Klay Shirke. The open source movement came from the tech world and with still largely tech based concept. But what what if you could take the principles of open source and push them out beyond technology. What really appeals to me about the philosophy of open sources it's allowing allowing for answers to appear in places that you could have never imagined? PM Cini. She's a democracy activist from Argentina. Argentina is the potential of open source the ability of working in a way that you'll run into untapped potential all the time time. NPR wants to tap that potential in our democracies to bring the open source revolution to government because the whole system she says is due you for an upgrade. Here's PIA on the Ted Stage. Let's look at some of the characteristics of this system. First of all the few make daily decisions uh-huh in name of the many and the many get to vote once every couple of years on the second place. The costs of paticipating in the system are incredibly high. You there have to have a fair bit of money and influence or you have to devote your entire life live to politics you to become a party member and slowly start working up the ranks until maybe one day you'll get to sit table. Where does is being made? And last but not least the language of the system it's incredibly cryptic is done four lawyers by lawyers and no one else can understand so it's a system where we can truthful authorities but we are completely left out on how those authorities reach the decisions. Our political system remains the same for the bus in two hundred years and expects us to be contented with being simply passive recipients of a monologue so a few years ago and some of our activist friends came up with an idea to solve this problem. The problem that democracy is really hard to participate in and they got this idea while they were on a train in Boina Cyrus. I remember we were in the in the subway in the tube and everyone is looking phones and playing candy crush or angry birds or something like that P and her friends wondered what if instead of playing iphone games when we have a free moment. What if if we could use those moments to contribute to our democracy and the answered that question by inventing an APP they called it democracy so what we did was start with one idea asking citizens to participate in voting and having someone inside Congress voting according to what citizens decided sited on these online platform? But we wanted to do with that was to push the boundaries of what was perceived as possible and doable. Okay so so right. Now you've got a paid of this But can you explain how works I would just pull up on my iphone and I would scroll through and Alaska new wilderness protection in Arctic refuge and like look at all the different issues being debated exactly Detroit. Water affordability bill by the way this is an actual bill. That's been debated on Zap indecision particular. I'd like to vote for it myself off because I'm very informed about all the complexities of this issue. There is a space for reading accepted the bill. That's going to be acted or that it's been put forward. The plane capture utility payment at two point five percent and then there's a space to debate. Detroit is an urgent need of water. Affordability have already been shut it off. It's time to water. Should be paid for through general taxation and made available to off and then you vote Yes yes no or you want to upstate. So at the the end of that process you'll have a decision being made so in theory you could stay engaged with issues on your way to work. You could weigh in on the construction of a local park mark while waiting for coffee. You could talk about a proposed tax increase while you're at the grocery store. Ideally Peel once elected officials to vote the way their constituents kitchens vote on the APP so she reached out to some politicians in Buenos Aires. where she lived we said? Look here you have a platform that you can use to build a two way conversation with your constituencies and yes we failed. We failed big time. We were you know. Send to play outside like legal kids amongst other things were called naive and I must be honest. I think in hindsight we were because the challenges that we face they're not technological. Their Cultural Hanley became a obvious that if we wanted to move forward with this the idea we need to do it ourselves and so we took a leap of faith and in August. Last year we funded our own political the party Alberta read or the net party in the city of Bona size and taking an even bigger leap of faith. We run for elections on October last year. With this idea if we WANNA sit in. Congress are candiate our representatives chiefs were always going to vote according to what citizens decided on democracy as it was a very very bold. More for a two-month month hold party in the city of one us but it got attention we got twenty two thousand votes. That's one point two percent of the votes and came in second for the local options. So even if that wasn't enough to win a sitting congress it was enough for us to become part of the conversation sation now of course democracy. Os is not a perfect idea. If you don't have a critical mass of people so using the APP you basically have power to the small group that does use it. And then the other problems at every little vote becomes like a referendum which in some ways makes makes democracy less functional and then there's the issue of secrecy like an article of faith in most cases is the secret ballot the right to go into a closed booth and secretly make your decision and And then walk out and a wonder if in a sort of an paradoxical way by being so open you actually create slightly less free space that you know the less likely that we will say or do what we we really want. Yeah it's look. It's an extremely valid point that I think it's worth iterating and prototyping every possibles of scenario reo and and trying out different arrangements. There's some are Korean philosopher and he wrote this little book called the transparent society and what he says is that we are so in love with transparency and they deal you know everything being out in the open that we forgot how to trust because to trust test you need to have something under covered right bills. Everything is out there. What's there to trust but I must say that in our experience also the anemia of certain spaces even more online produce a fair amount of of trawling and hate speech that hides behind behind those avatars? Are those fake names. So I think it's finding a way of striking a balance. Do you see open source. Democracy has fundamentally mentally changing the nature of democracy or or just improving it. I think fundamentally changing it and the reason is because also the existence of the Internet. I'm not saying it's going to happen overnight. Obviously but the impact that I think the Internet has is comparable to the impact the printing press had and those changes happen when certain barriers are put in place or are lowered and what the Internet did for us was low. No word of our era extremely quickly for us that was the access to information and the access to being able to express ourselves on a regular basis peony is the Co founder of the net party and one of the developers behind the democracy APP. You can see her full talk At Ted Dot Com on the show today open source. How sharing ideas is changing the way we live breath? So how often do you walk into a building that not a fancy building just ordinary you know normal building. How often do you walk in and slow down really? Just look at all the things around you. That's what Alastair Parvin does all the time. He's a designer but I'm really interested in his the background stuff off the stuff. People take for granted so I kind of I find myself walking into a hotel room looking plug sockets and going that's interesting why the plug sockets here different than somewhere else. How did that come about? I can't get I can't get y hotels don't have plug sockets next to the bed. The alarm clocks alarm flex. And how many times have you unplugged the alarm clock to plug your iphone plug in there. I know right right and the reason why is because we've always done is we've separated design. Join.

Congress Argentina Detroit Tim Burners Lee NPR Boina Cyrus Klay Shirke Alastair Parvin Alaska Peel Co founder Alberta Buenos Aires. Arctic two hundred years five percent two percent two-month
"a. source" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

05:32 min | 1 year ago

"a. source" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Wake up to a fresh take on the day's news with APU I. Every weekday morning and now Saturdays at eight. Am Eastern to ten minutes is all. You'll need to start your day informed and now you can listen six days as week. I'm Scott Simon and I'm Lou Garcia Navarro up first to start your weekend from. NPR News Ted Radio Hour from NPR. I'm Guy Roz and on the show today ideas about open source and just before the break we we're hearing from clay Turkey about the early days of the open source movement and one programmer in particular. His name is Linus torvalds. An eight twenty two linus decided to create a truly open source operating system which he called links open source software. The core prom terms of the open source license is that everybody should have access to all the source code all the time but of course this creates the very threat out of chaos. You have to forestall in order to get anything working. So most open source projects just held their noses and adopted the feudal management systems but torvalds said. I'm not not going to do with his point of view on this was very clear when you adopt tool you. Also adopt the management philosophy embedded in that tool tool and he wasn't going to adopt anything that didn't work the way the Lennox community worked and this is a tremendously complicated process. This is is a tremendously complicated program. And yet torvalds ran this not with automated tools but out of his email box people would literally mail him. Changes changes that they'd agreed on and he would merge them by hand. Linus was the first person to consciously use the entire. Your world is his potential talent pool because by that point this is the early nineteen nineties pretty much. Anyone who had the technical skills needed to contribute to an operating system was also online. Yes but this the context. How big of a deal was this? So what is really extraordinary ordinary about Lennox people think of it as a kind of Geek operating system for some desktops and laptops but what people don't realize it's the background operating system of every kindle and Nook and existence. It's the background operating system of every android phone and existence and almost the entirety of what we call. The cloud links has been the thing that enabled those subsequent tools and services to be built. And that happened because does he basically said Hey. This is what I'm doing. You want to check it out. Here's everything that I'm doing nothing secret. It's nothing secret part because at every moment and and there are you know you see this pattern over and over again when Wi fi router manufacturers said we're going to need an operating system to run on this thing they could write their own own it. Nobody can copy it and they wouldn't have to release the source but Lennox was just sitting there and it was free so they adopted routers become a tool that people can write new things on top above. When the people making the kindle said you know we could write a brand new operating system to run e books and it won't work well to the third version or we clinics is just sitting there and it's it's free and at every moment? It does just enough of what people have wanted it to do that. It was worth it to grab it and extended rather than writing something from scratch. When when something is open source is the result always better? No good no I mean we know many any cases where the results are almost. Never you know the famous example of open source novels the disastrous wiki OP ed the La Times tried. But then there are also. Treat US where you have to say. This product is better in one way but worse than another way so anyone who used an android phone and an iphone is looking at a phone that has been develop on more open source and more closed source models apple famously obsessively secretive famously obsessive about the design of the icons in the uniform. Any of the behavior of the phone. The pleasure of that phone is quite extraordinary. android is just a little clunky or it's more inconsistent but number one android phones are much cheaper which means that it is android and not the iphone that's bringing the smartphone revolution to the masses passes it is android that is responsible for a billion people having access to some sort of smartphone right now so if your choice is no smartphone at all or an android then the open source world has really made your life considerably better so the key thing I think understand is as we are open source works. It tends to spread not because it's always perfect but because it's never so bad that you wouldn't get an advantage from picking hang it up again. This is why Lennox got picked up so many things not that it was ever perfect for e books or the cloud or android phones or any of the rest of it because it was cheap enough and good enough enough that it gave people boost if they adopted Klay Shirke writes and teaches about the Internet and society. Diety you can watch all of his talks at Ted Dot Com..

Linus torvalds Lennox NPR Scott Simon APU Lennox community Ted Dot Com Lou Garcia Navarro Guy Roz La Times apple clay Turkey programmer Wi
"a. source" Discussed on The Ken Coleman Show

The Ken Coleman Show

03:29 min | 1 year ago

"a. source" Discussed on The Ken Coleman Show

"That just tends to be a little pollyanna a little bit too positive. Here's the four thing for filter. Here's the flipside. Is this a person who's just like a human your you know what I mean. They would win the lottery. This is an extreme example they win the lottery and their first comment common would be gee. whiz kid believe how much I'm going to have to pay taxes. You won the lottery or snap out of it. You know so here's the deal. This can really really affect you. The source is the source known for being a negative lily. What was the character on Saturday night live? They would be in a group setting and then something amazing Debbie Downer Debbie Downer this is I tell you what is your source Debbie Downer. Well wait a second so just like I made fun of me about being too optimistic. Somebody can be too pessimistic and so the truth is somewhere in the middle if you get what I'm saying. And then finally the filters rumor. We don't even know if it's true untrue. It's just sort of floating around and has become an urban legend now these they're just get I made this up. I took six admitting that is not the world's greatest content but those are five basic filters. I need to go see if this is true. I need to go see if this is untrue and by the way these depend these filters are used on your instinct instinct. Trust your gut if you walk somebody you go is all that true then go figure it out if it's true. Let's go investigate so I told Blake to do. If it's it's untrue you feel like it's completely ally then I would go investigate that if it's just come from somebody who tends to always paint the sunnyside and you know and there's got to be that's too good to be true. If you use the old colloquialism too good to be true and in the negative this is the Debbie Downer and then this is the wild rumor right. I'm telling you I saw a guy the other day and he was talking about how he saw a double Rainbow Bhutto with a Unicorn sliding down the bottom he saw it three other people were with them. It's impossible nobody's ever heard about or seen it before. We don't even think Unicorn Surreal but this guy saw in three other people with them in already. Tell people so this is how an urban legend. It's ridiculous Diculeng example but again folks. Why am I taking the time to talk about this because I meet minimum all the time that have made life decisions based on the wrong filter? Be careful for be careful who your sources are surround yourself with truth tellers have the courage to dive deeper to look into something before for you. Let it change your direction. Don't you dare change your direction until you know it is true by the way this goes for your inner voice as well. Your inner voice tends to be Debbie Downer. You better have some voices better. Have some positive voices better have some true.

Debbie Downer Rainbow Bhutto Blake
"a. source" Discussed on Pop Culture Tonight

Pop Culture Tonight

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"a. source" Discussed on Pop Culture Tonight

"Bob culture denied is brought to you and barred by go daddy go daddy makes registering domain names fast simple and affordable save thirty percent on your domain name now at try go daddy dot com slash pop culture tonight we get erupted program to bring you hush but he report the very latest celebrity interview entertainment news in more jobs twilight peace this is bob called your did i width fabric phillips by their good evening and welcome to pop culture tonight i'm patrick phillips i've got a great program for you this evening abby stirred is here she's a freelance writer and celebrity journalist and she's here with us tonight to discuss her new book according to a source which gives us an inside look at hollywood that indepth interview is coming up in just a moment but first let's take a look at some of the stories coming out of the wonderful world of entertainment you might five this story a music while others say it's utter nonsense call it what you may but a calf recently born here in texas looks exactly like gene simmons the cavs distinct facial markings are reminiscent of the iconic singer from kiss and they even share a similar name with a ranch owners where she was or naming the calf jeannie symonds itself weighed in on the strange occurrence with the posting on twitter the next star wars film will reportedly give actress carrie fisher an amazing sendoff that according to costar john boyega the actor who plays finn in the franchise shares several seasons with the late actress in the upcoming film and has said she is still kept alive in this franchise man that's the beauty of it she lives forever in a sense fisher passed away unexpectedly last december.

Bob culture domain name patrick phillips abby writer hollywood jeannie symonds twitter john boyega texas carrie fisher finn thirty percent