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"ape  r" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

05:52 min | 4 d ago

"ape r" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

"You bring that up. Because the very first day of shooting was an outdoor scene where neighbor. Attack that you've seen yes. About halfway through shooting. Turns will. Charge of the movie through Weta. Thinking that. We can really I know very very smart. Finger and folk is you know. And it just came up in conversation that we pay. History never saw the difference now. And none of us knew it. You know. Let guys new long. Before. Like well, you know.

"ape  r" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

05:52 min | 4 d ago

"ape r" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

"So lucky to. His. Are they were not already developing. Former and Hired A. Seen resume out of rainfall. Her believable. And suffered. Career. Later that recipe hands on. Your. Reverse. My Back Mobile. I Guess Answer Your questions of making arc the. The enormity of trying to recreate cardiac. Yeah, letting we.

Stamped On The Phone

Topgold Audio Clips

04:58 min | Last week

Stamped On The Phone

"Hi, it's pretty globeop. Give that few minutes that I can explain to you that an inside story. About stamped. I'll make it a topcoat audio clips. They can hear it over there episode five to seven and on talk about it during audio Mo- here on Lima and on other goods social networks. Because in two thousand seventeen I started. Getting advisories through good reads in through some other deep dies. and. The end of ACP names stamps. Give it a top prize for outstanding literature and. I've had it on my. GotTa read Realis- Since then. The books by Lebron Mix kindy. I have discovered. There's a back channel conversation about stamps. It's something. That Ray Gerard would have resonated with and then during a phone call. I had with Paul Manny the book itself. Start agreeing to me on the phone in the middle of call that had with Paul. So. I thought it might be worthwhile to take the exact segments that was playing through a foam. And let your let you hear it because it's a revealed to me. Very revealing to know. How many cultural values I have or stamp with racism, people form immature images of places of people of Cultures and of meanings that are embedded to religion or to history or to sociology or to family values. Stamped by racism. So here's a little bit of an excerpt. It's exactly the segment that was playing when a audible. BOOT booted Paul off my phone. Have, a quick listen. Men that have low and flat nostrils are asked La Bitterness as apes cleric Edward topsail explain in sixteen o seven in history of four footed beasts King James made the Comment Association of Apes in devils in his fifteen ninety seven book deem -Nology, and one of his last plays the tempest, sixteen eleven shakespeare played on these associations of the devil, an African in crafting Caliban, the hyper sexual bastard, child of Demon, an African witch from a vile race in sixteen, Fourteen, England's first famous working class poet John Taylor said that Black Nations adored the black devil. In a sixteen fifteen address for the planters in Ireland and Virginia the Reverend Thomas Cooper said that White Sham. One of Noah's three sons shelby Lord over the cursed race of Cham- meaning Noah's son, Ham and Africa. Future Virginia politician George Santa's also conjured curse theory to degrade blackness. In a sixteen twenty paraphrase of Genesis, future politician Thomas in road of. The southern man as a black, deformed Elf, and the northern white like unto God himself. Five years later clergyman Samuel Purchase released the Gargantuan Four Valium Heck latest posthumous of travel manuscript left to him by his mentor. Richard Hackett Purchase blasted filthy sodomite sleepers, ignorant beast disciples of Cham- to whom the black darkness is reserved forever. These were the ideas about African people circulating throughout England and the English colonies as African people were being hauled into Tanzania on slave ships. In Sixteen Nineteen Richard, mather begin ministering not far from the future center of the British slave. Trade the port of Liverpool. And those days, the British slave trade was miniscule at Africans, hardly existed in Britannia, but that would soon change. The vessels of slave traders were cruising deeper and deeper into the heart of west Africa especially after the Moroccans armed by English, guns crust, the Songhai Empire in fifteen ninety one. The vessels of English Commerce were cruising deeper and deeper into Virginia to as English merchants competed with Spanish Portuguese and rising Dutch and French empires. To get the rest of the story, Shrek she by the book or listen to it on audible. I know the history of America the history of the Great. Western expansion of European culture to the states. Had elements of the slave trade as part of the foundational elements. Of our natural growth. It's called STEMP's but Hebrew mix candy. Having all my kids read it. Before. We go back to school in the autumn of twenty. Twenty

Paul Manny England Africa Virginia Thomas Cooper Cham Samuel Purchase Lima Richard Hackett Comment Association Of Apes Shrek Lebron Ray Gerard Heck Liverpool Noah Edward Topsail Tanzania
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The Indy Mogul Podcast

01:05 min | Last week

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"Then and then fishing without nets happened in. That was a huge span of time because we shot for like four hundred. Went down for like eight months went back and finished shooting. The next year, so. but that was the project then allowed the big step into the studio system which was. The producer on that was Rupert Wyatt. He was an exact producer. Plan the apes. He was helping. Qatar are directors ins clutter to kind of. With general questions about things in any way, you like my work on, and so he literally called me up one day. and was like. Do Project Review. And we finally linked up on a little commercial down in south, America and then he called me again in I have this. Script for the exorcist Don't hang up on me. No way okay. This is okay. This was this. This is the fastest time line I think. We've interviewed a lot of DVD's. This

Rupert Wyatt Qatar Producer America
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The Indy Mogul Podcast

01:05 min | Last week

Expand - burst 04

"Then and then fishing without nets happened in. That was a huge span of time because we shot for like four hundred. Went down for like eight months went back and finished shooting. The next year, so. but that was the project then allowed the big step into the studio system which was. The producer on that was Rupert Wyatt. He was an exact producer. Plan the apes. He was helping. Qatar are directors ins clutter to kind of. With general questions about things in any way, you like my work on, and so he literally called me up one day. and was like. Do Project Review. And we finally linked up on a little commercial down in south, America and then he called me again in I have this. Script for the exorcist Don't hang up on me. No way okay. This is okay. This was this. This is the fastest time line I think. We've interviewed a lot of DVD's. This

Rupert Wyatt Qatar Producer America
Human Speech Evolution Gets Lip Smacking Evidence

60-Second Science

02:56 min | 2 weeks ago

Human Speech Evolution Gets Lip Smacking Evidence

"Imagine it jetting to a chimp in chimpanzee whether portray by REX. Harrison Eddie Murphy or Robert Downey Junior Dr. doolittle learn to talk to animals, but in reality signs has remains some distance from solving the long standing question of how we humans learn to talk during our evaluation, his one new clue, a team for searches in Great Britain have demonstrated how the rapid succession of opening and closing mouth rhythms by chimpanzees. Lip smacking mimics the natural pace, acumen mouths talking. The. Findings are in the journal Biology Letters. This phenomenon has been observed before in other ape species who performed lip smacking movements at around five hurts, which falls within a range of mouth, opens, and closes characteristic of all spoken languages namely between two and seven huts, but this lip smacking timing connection had not been made in our closest. Relatives until now mouth and vocal signals with speech like rhythm, Hetero been observed in some monkeys in gibbons and Orangutans, one of our closest great relatives, so the last years had seen accumulating evidence that these rhythm other than something that only talking humans do. This was the rhythm from deeper within our prime ancestry recycled so to speak as a cornerstone for speech pollution. The Mirror of University of Warwick. Who led the study, but the sense of evolutionary continue towards speech steelhead, a big gap to cross the African Apes. There was no evidence for speech like rhythm, neither in Gorillas Bonobos nor chimpanzees, the study followed two captive populations of chimpanzees one in the UK. I'm wanting Germany as well is to wild populations in Uganda. Researchers observed lip smacking at an average of four point one five hurts the made all the observations whenever a chimpanzee was grooming another think of a hairdresser engaging an idle chatter with a customer at the Beauty Salon, the coffee mation of speech like rhythm of the mouth into Pansies, not revealed per se how language came about in our own lineage, but he offers the final confirmation to scientists that we are looking at the right place that. That, we are on the right track to solve this mystery. In that great apes in captivity in the wild steel have to reveal all their secrets about human nature in human origins, Numero also notes the variation in Lips. Mac Times both between and within the chimp groups do not appear to be hardwired rather the lip smacking variability likely reflected how individual differences and environmental factors and even social conventions affect how chimpanzees communicate with each other. Even Dr Doolittle will be amazed.

Lips Harrison Eddie Murphy Dr Doolittle Biology Letters Dr. Doolittle University Of Warwick Robert Downey Numero Britain Uganda UK MAC Beauty Salon Germany
Controversial statues toppled in cities around the world

1A

05:38 min | 2 weeks ago

Controversial statues toppled in cities around the world

"Since the death of George Floyd Confederate monuments are coming down in states across America some are removed quietly in the dead of night others are ripped from their pedestals in broad daylight and it's not just here in the US either protesters overseas are toppling monuments to slavers and colonizers as the protests over police racism and brutality rumbled across European cities some activists targeted that own country's colonial history in Belgium demonstrates a spray painted a statue of king Leopold the second Wallenstein U. K. statue of seventeenth century slave trader Edward Colston was toppled and thrown into a rhythm can the push for justice move forward without first looking back maybe the best way to reckon with our racist history is to dump it in the river we're going across America and abroad today as part of our one A. across America project it's a partnership with six public radio stations in various parts of the country we're joined now by someone who once said a great nation does not hide its history it faces its flaws and it corrects them which Landrieu is the former mayor of New Orleans and author of the book in the shadow of statues a white southerner confronts history welcome back to the show image thank you so much exactly also joining us is only a haci nada she's a writer and organizer of black lives matter U. K. black lives matter U. K. has compiled a list of sixty statues that it wants removed because they celebrate slavery Ali I joins us from London welcome hi Larry thanks for having me Mitch you brought down a number of Confederate monuments while your mail it may or you did that legally I wonder what do you make of protests in various cities that are taking down statues and monuments illegally well it again do it up myself and I wasn't the first one to talk about it it's been a long history of people who were leaders in New Orleans who tried to take those monuments down they all legal processes for doing it and there are the process used to do on it a peaceful protest you know the important thing is is that people now are beginning to understand how insidious those monuments are the ones that was specifically put up to celebrate those individuals who've spent their lives protecting slavery and so that's what the Confederate monuments are in the United States of America I can't speak to the ones because I don't know enough about them in other parts of the in the south in the United States of America there are three thousand monuments that will place up with the state and direct purpose of revering and honoring individuals who fought to split the United States and have all the calls of preserving slavery and that's just on the civil war or the confederacy was on the wrong side of that war they were on the wrong side of history and the last thing that we should be doing is honoring what's called a lost cause which is meant that somehow of the confederacy was a noble cause when in fact it was not in these monuments will put in places of public places yeah man on on public on public land and with and will put up with the specific purpose of Riviera the person I general Robert E. Lee Jefferson Davis PGT Beauregard and their whole host of others whose mission it was was to preserve slavery yeah and I felt very strongly being the mayor of a multi cultural city that is historically always prided itself on its diversity as an essential part of who we are as people to have those monuments in public places that was sending messages to people of color that they still want welcome here after all those years and so I couldn't be more thrilled that they're coming down you know we can get we can get kind of caught up in how they coming down and whether we should have long conversations a short conversations but essentially we're all finished with us if you just take the monument down and you don't get to the root of why they were put up in the first place or the ideas that they were trying to perpetuate that manifest themselves in institutions Holly and police and etcetera etcetera then we would have made some progress but not nearly as much progress as we should have this is clearly a hot topic of date debate in the US Stephen wrote on Facebook this is needed and long overdue Tommy wrote on Facebook I assume sarcastically by all means a race history get rid of it that will fix everything and then sailed sailor apes tweeted I say pull them down melt them and resign them to the garbage bin where the losers of history tip Oakley wind up yeah what do you make of this issue of whether a statue comes down legally or illegally doesn't matter in the end to a to a movement I think in my personal opinion whether it comes down legally or illegally is not the conversation we should be hopping Bob why is it being taken down and debated in the first place I think if we get into the legality and illegality over we then can get into a very polarizing conversation of good and bad it wouldn't really that's not what any of this is trying to do is really trying to have a conversation around what to be glorified in these countries and what do we put public money towards glorifying because these statues these plaques all of these things that glorify the slave owners these colonizers all paid for out of the tax pay is pocket and given that we've had two years of austerity I think there are a couple other ways that we might be able to spend this money instead of glorifying

America George Floyd
Why Can't You Tickle Yourself?

BrainStuff

03:12 min | Last month

Why Can't You Tickle Yourself?

"Hey I'm Christian Sager and this is brain stuff. Pop Quiz Hotshot. Have you ever tickled an ape before it could work as tickling as common between many types of primates? What about Iraq? You ever took one of those. You'd know if you had because rats let out these. Little high pitched chirps when you tickle them kind of like rodent laughter. Okay so maybe some of you beast masters out there have tickled both Iraq and an APE. But can you tickle yourself? Probably not because that is kind of impossible now before we continue. Let's do a primer on. How tickling works under your skin. There are millions of nerve endings. That alert your brain whenever you touch something a light touch what we usually associate with. Tickling is analyzed by two regions of your brain the somatic sensory cortex which processes touch in the anterior cingulate cortex which processes happiness together. They processed the two types of tickle sensations. We can experience. The first is known as Missus. This is the light sensation. You feel when something like a feather brushes against your skin may be giving you goosebumps. The second gargle. Lisa's is like when your older brother? Hold you down and tickles you until you laugh. So Hard You pee your pants. This is the kind of tickling. You can't replicate yourself evolutionary. Biologists believe that the reason we laugh when we're tickled is an innate submissive response to a potential attacker. It's kind of like when a dog rolls over on. Its back and exposes. Its kill points to you these same biologists theorized that we developed tickling so we could teach our children how to defend themselves from attacks. So think about it. The areas where we're the most ticklish. The underarms the stomach the neck. They're also the most vulnerable to attack. Now this is some black widow. Red Room lethal training coming up here so pay attention. Your underarm is home to veins arteries. And because your rib-cage doesn't protect it. Someone could easily access your heart through there especially with a long enough blade. Likewise your stomach doesn't have any defensive bones and you neck also has two important arteries as well as your trachea bringing air to your lungs. Now we're aware of

Iraq Somatic Sensory Cortex Anterior Cingulate Cortex Christian Sager Red Room Lisa
Eating the Wild: from the lost primeval forests of Europe to Robin Hood

Gastropod

08:10 min | 2 months ago

Eating the Wild: from the lost primeval forests of Europe to Robin Hood

"Used to be covered in these dense wet deciduous forests which is very different from what we see today where really hardly any of this primeval force exists anymore for her book feasting. Wild jeanneret actually visited one of the last tiny slivers of European primeval forest. It's in Poland. And it really is just a shadow of its former. Self Europe's forests were so vast that actually we think that the root of the word wilderness came from descriptions of these places the roots of the words wild and wilderness. I'll go back to untamed animals. The forest was a place. Teeming WITH ANIMALS UNGOVERNED BY HUMAN HANDS UNGOVERNED BUT NOT UNTOUCHED FOR THOUSANDS OF YEARS. Europeans would go into the forest to find dinner day all kinds of animals wild boar venison there is something called the RMC which is the precursor to domesticated cattle. There was for a spice in moves the animals so abundant here. That really there was no form of hunting restriction it was abundant but it was also really valued killing a huge wild animal and then being able to share it was a sign of how wealthy and powerful you are. King said to have lots of wild game. At all their banquets. Animals would be breezed in rosewater and spices. Sometimes they would be covered in gold leaf and brought to the table hole and kind of carved up in front of the guests so while it was very much a form of status for kings so by the Middle Ages Those Morris. Were already starting to shrink between one thousand. Ad and thirteen hundred thirteen hundred. Europe's population grew by about fifty million people and all of those people needed to eat so there was increasing. Need to cut down the forests in order to grow grain and various crops and then also would was used for everything it was used for building houses and making carts by the fourteen and fifteen hundred. Europeans began sailing around the world. They first set forth to trade and then to stake their claim on foreign lands is colonialism spread across the globe. There was demand for very large old growth trees to create the ship. Masts that were needed and as early as the eleventh century The demand for wood was really threatening the forest where these kings went out and hunted the game meat that was so important to their diets and their status. Gina races that originally European forests had mostly being treated as common land. Anyone could hunt there. But as far back as ancient Rome the elite had sat down laws saying yes anyone could hunt but only as long as they weren't trespassing sort of by Default European kings and noblemen were the ultimate owners of the forest so as European king started to see their game meat being threatened by the need for Forest Land Day set out some very similar conservation measures whereby the king really restricted access to hunting in his forest. This is really the beginning of modern conservation lives whereby people were kept out of the forests. It's weird to think of royalty preserving their hunting grounds and keeping out the poor folk as the blueprint for the conservation movement. But jeanneret says these laws were really some of the earliest forms of environmental legislation forests. Were no longer for everyone to use as they pleased they were just for the Kings. They had very large administrative networks to manage this for so the forest wardens would they would hand out hunting licenses. They would make sure that game. Animals didn't starve winter or in times of drought. Sometimes they would prepare the venison for royal feasts and they would mete out. Punishments punishments were usually for poaching and they were definitely not just a slap on the wrist. If you ignored the game laws you could have a trial by hot iron and if you were found guilty then your eyes would be torn out or you were castrated. So poaching really big deal. The kings went to great lengths to prevent people from poaching and this had an impact on how people related to the natural world around them. The forest said always been wild in earlier centuries in Europe. They'd even been places of spirituality. But at this point the forests started to become scary rather than sacred. The authorities deliberately painted a picture of forests filled with outlaws and rebels dangerous rule breakers people who posed a threat to society with the stories. The authorities told a violent outlaws in the forest. Some of those were based on reality. There were people breaking the rules in the forest but they were breaking them because they thought the rules were unfair and they were hungry for poor people. This was one former getting food. And any time there was an economic downturn hunting would rise poaching would rise in the forests and so people did find it as an active resistance against the sort of forms of power and some of the rebels who broke the rules and hunted in the forest. They actually became folk. Heroes like Robin Hood and his band of Merry men. So Robin Hood was stealing from the rich and giving to the poor but this also came out of this idea that the force were not necessarily landscapes that poor people were allowed to access or use the resources of and so it wasn't active resistance to go in there and to get in game animals and feed yourself on one level. This is a story of power who could hunt and eat the wild game and wendling European forests and who couldn't that it's also the story of the impact that split between rich hunters and bore poachers had on how Europeans thought of wild food and the whole concept of the wild and wilderness. This is a very particular way of thinking of wild meat. As game to be hunted for sport by the elites and otherwise off limits and this is a template that the Europeans took with them as they colonized countries around the world so when the first European colonists arrived in the Congo Basin they sort of carried this cultural baggage of seeing forest as these dark empty wastelands without people so even though there were a long history of human habitation and numerous groups living in the Congo Basin forests. The European comments kind of didn't see them and there was this real sense of Europeans thought of this landscape as Darkest Africa. Take David Livingston. He was a Scottish missionary and explorer. Who is obsessed with finding the source of the Nile? He did a an exploratory expedition across the Congo wilderness. And he described Congress for us as suffocating wilderness and people waste that seem to have an oppressive silence so in May of eighteen eighty five. The you know quote unquote international community. Which is England France Germany Belgium and Italy? They recognize King Leopold the second of Belgium as having a sovereign claim over much of the Congo and five years later these same countries created what was effectively the first international conservation law this lowest passed in the early nineteen hundreds and it was called the Convention for the preservation of wild animals birds and fish in Africa. Local people couldn't hunt or trap or fish in certain areas of the country. The law was modeled. After the way European forests had become protected game reserves for rich people rich people in particular but of course just like in Europe the forests in Africa weren't actually pristine empty wildernesses before there were plenty of people who depended on them. There were a lot of different groups. Living in the Congo forest somewhere. More nomadic hunter-gatherers others were farming communities living within the rain forest but for all of these groups wild meat provided a very essential source of food. So there were all kinds of animals being eaten everything from various kinds of antelope to forest buffalo wild boar monkeys. You know just hundreds of different animals that communities ate in the forest there were cultural. Taboos around eating certain species particularly ones that were long lived and slow to reproduce like elephants which could and did occasionally provide a lot of meat was considered a sacred act to kill an elephant similar with eating bonobos which are great ape. That's very similar to us. There were beliefs that there is a direct link to that ancestral spirit world so all of these cultural beliefs had an ecological basis to really help conserve animals that had large social complex social groupings or were slow growing and thus thunderbolts over

Kings Europe Congo Forest Robin Hood King Leopold Congo Congo Basin Poland Africa Rome Jeanneret RMC Darkest Africa David Livingston Gina England France Germany Belgium Belgium Congress
Beastie Boys Made a Movie. We Made a Beastie Boys Podcast.

The Big Picture

09:03 min | 2 months ago

Beastie Boys Made a Movie. We Made a Beastie Boys Podcast.

"I'm Shawn Fantasy and this. Is the big picture a conversation? Show about Beastie Boys. That's right beastie. Boys made a movie beastie boys story which is directed by Spike Jones and available to watch right now on apple. Tv plus. If you're like me and worship Beastie boys you need to watch this movie later in the show. I'll be talking to add rock. And like diaw Beastie boys about their movie history their favorite fruits. How they're doing in quarantine. The New York Knicks documentaries that they want to see a bunch of other stuff as I tried to keep them focused on our conversation. A really love these guys beastie. Boys are my favorite band ever and it isn't even really close so to talk about them before we get to them. I asked the VIC Ferrari to my Alessandro Allegra. Join me it's Chris Ryan. Hi Chris. I've always seen myself more as a Nathan Wind Guy. I've been waiting my whole life to do this. Podcast so let's go. I'm very glad you're here with me. I can't think of anybody else. I'd WanNa have here other than you. Except maybe Mike the Inadequacy and they're coming later. So when I say beastie boys what's the first thing that pops in your head Chris? Probably the invention of cool so I think one thing that we've talked about a lot over the last twelve to eighteen months. We've had a lot of Quentin Tarantino podcasts. We've we celebrated a lot of his movies on the watchable. We talked about them on. Big Picture Podcast with him and something that comes up. Ally is kind of how he gave us a vocabulary or language to through which to understand culture and understand the world and I think the Beastie boys are equally responsible for that in both of our lives in terms of introducing us to so much music and so much other culture that wound up becoming just part of our like way in which we relate to the rest of the world through these like Kung Fu and exploitation movies through rap Reggae punk rock weird funk like all like it just basically made collectors and fans out of out of us at the risk of stepping on music exists. I wanted to ask you why you think you. And I to some extent to are so interested in figures who are all about basically like recombinant culture. You know who take all the disparate parts of stuff that they love and smash it all together because that is the thing that the movie and then returning to all of this music that I listened to over and over and over and over again in my life that I have thought about is like wow they really just jammed all the stuff they liked together to make something new like. What is it about that? The second part of what you said is the most important thing. Do you think about the people that we really respond to. Wu Tang clan quitting Tarantino. Beastie boys it means we're very basic very and B. It's the most important part is finding the second thing the thing that you're GonNa make out of all this shit. And that's what makes me so excited is when someone uses all these postmodern tools in these reconstructs. All these things out of this of Cultural Ephemera to say something else. Wootten Klan took all those Kung Fu movies and took all those samples but made something that could only have been made in Staten Island. You know back could only have made the music. He made with the experience that he had. And the Beastie boys could only have been the beastie boys by combining bad brains with run DMC. Yeah and I feel like it's not a mistake that so much of what we do at the ringer and so much of what you and I have been trying to do in. Our lives is basically celebrate and be enthusiastic about the things that we care about and I feel like these artists are the same way if you if you think about Beastie boys and you even look at the way they tell their story in the movie. It's just we really liked was the clash and grandmaster flash and Cheech and Chong and we were trying to find a way to make all those things make sense together and I feel the same way about what we do every day I feel about you and I love the NBA and we love Top Gun and we love. I love deb's I don't know how you feel Dad's but You know just trying to find a way to make all those things fit together so I feel like I have aped and tried to copy a lot of what those guys do. And I feel like a kinship to their their mission their creative project. Absolutely I mean like you and I don't mean to make it sound like you. And I are the Beastie boys here but you know. I think that we use the Internet the way other people would use a sampler right and we draw in all these different media. We'd take youtube videos. We take a picture and I think it was probably more the case before we started working professionally together in an editorial capacity but we would have like tumblers and blog spots and you were just kind of like throw a picture Steve McQueen up in an article you were writing about those face and it would have some sort of relationship and I think that that was our way of continuing along this tradition of mixing and matching different pieces of culture to say something about yourself. The thing that you said that I think is probably one of the most important parts of the movie that will nocco very remarked upon because a lot of it is going to be spent talking about. Yok and it should be because this is very much I think an image to him in a real moving tribute to their friend but when Mike D says in the beginning of the movie that he was just this weird kid who found the clash. Not only is that like. That's the origin story for a lot of people. Who like they find that one band? Whether it's the dead or the clash or you know run DMC. Whoever it is that makes them think that they are now. All of not alone in the world the clashes like a really really important. Template for the Beastie boys because they are basically A Crossroads Group A marketplace. At Crossroads Group. It's where all these different cultures are coming. And they're setting up their wares and you can pick and choose off these tables and then you go home and you make something out of it. And that's what the clash did too. I mean you can make a lot of arguments about appropriation. And whether or not the people who the clash were taken from or or paying homage to properly compensated for the work that they did And the same thing could go. For the Beastie boys but I think a lot more people know about Lee Perry. Because of the Beastie boys did not you know and and that's like a really really important act in culture. Everything is about timing too I think about when they hit the scene and who they were working with and on the one hand I guess there's an appropriation question. I think they've moved past that so effectively because they were just literally there with Russell. Simmons and Rick Rubin and run DMC making music together and they were a part of something that was essentially punk at the end of its first true like lightning rod phase at the end of the day and and rapid the Dawn. You know I mean. They weren't there necessarily in in the parks in the south. Bronx but you know one thousand nine hundred. Eighty three played on the radio. Yeah Yes yes. And there's that great moment in the movie where Africa is asked about cookie. Post by one of the members of the Beastie boys and you can see like they're they're they're they're in the moment and they're going to dense area and you know performing for white people introducing them to wrap it away and that couldn't have happened if they if it was just five years earlier five years later. The same is true for the class. You know it's like they arrived at a time when the world was ready to hear rock and try to play reggae. And what that means for the future reggae. There's something also about this specific approach to the world though that jumps out to me. Which is it's not. Just this is what we like. It's this is what we like and I don't care if you don't like it and I don't I actually don't care if you don't get it because when I think about the things that I knew when I first heard the band it was you could fit it inside of a very small box. I just did my cultural reference points. The music that I knew about the the records the comedy everything that they were throwing in. I wouldn't say that I discovered them because they were sampled for three seconds on a on a record on policy boutique but they were a window. You know I had never heard of Sadaharu. Oh until I heard the beastie boys rap about him you know like there's so much in their music the sampling the lyric writing even if it is in their songs are very rarely like high minded. They're not necessarily pursuits of big ideas. But they put big ideas in front of you. Just by dint of what they were interested in and I I liked that kind of take it or leave it quality they bring to it and I feel like that really comes out in the movie too. Don't you think yeah? It's only a couple of people are lucky enough to have other people care about the thing that they care about. You know you can. You can play the game and you can try. Ride the wave of what's popular at any given moment. But it's so weird because what the beastie boys did especially once they move to La. I think wound up having such an incredibly profound formative effect on all the culture that comes after it but it so it winds up being underrated as as to what a zag that was how crazy it was for those guys to be like. Yeah we'RE GONNA LEAVE NEW YORK. We're GONNA leave behind rapper. We're going to go to capitol from Def Jam. And we're GONNA work with these two producers that basically no one's ever heard of an assemble these like really out there incongruous samples to build together a new sound that we're gonNA use to define us for the next couple of decades. The only thing I wanted to talk about because I think is probably also a reason why you and I like them. Much is that and this comes across very much in the movie much

Beastie Boys Chris Ryan Mike D New York Knicks Spike Jones Quentin Tarantino Shawn Fantasy Diaw Apple Steve Mcqueen Ferrari LA Africa Wanna Wootten Klan Wu Tang Bronx Crossroads Group
Panic in the Streets

Now Playing - The Movie Review Podcast

09:08 min | 3 months ago

Panic in the Streets

"We're discussing panic in the streets starring. Richard Would Mark Paul. Douglas Barbara Bel Getty's Jack Talents. Zero mastel directed by Eliah Kazan. This is the now playing. Co-host who's fond of Shishkabob Arnie Stewart? And this the CO host. Who Likes High Foreheads Jacob? Well we hope everybody at home is healthy and safe and likely quarantined. No matter where you're listening to us from the world. Yeah at the moment of recording. We are all separated apart. Watching the news is one of the shows that we've taped since this pandemic has hit America. We are hearing reports. There are over sixty thousand cases in America by the time this airs. Who knows but we are thinking about this pandemic and checking in with you. You guys told us you were interested in watching movies about viruses. I don't know about that you know I can understand why some people might be like. I want to turn that off. I don't WanNa think about that. It's scary to contemplate when you turn on the news these days. Yeah but people are I think indulging in it in some ways entertainment as of this recording contagion is the number four movie on Itunes and it has been for weeks and outbreak is in the top twenty five and let's face it. We had to kind of fill out our schedule. The new mutants is punted for the sixth time or something but James Bond got moved black widow. The new saw film fast and furious nine and just a couple days ago when we're recording. This wonder woman. Eighty four half of our schedule for the spring has no release date anymore. Yeah I thought it was going to be a super busy month person July and lots of new releases and now we don't know yes and we didn't really necessarily know how to approach virus movies. Either there are a lot of them and we've covered some of them and you can go find those in the archives. Twenty eight days later and I am legend. All the stand. I did a list. I wanted to see how many we've really done if people wanted to do. A full now. Playing virus retrospective. There's the I am legend trilogy. Starting with the last man on earth in nineteen sixty four. Yeah then Omega Man in seventy one. There's the stand from ninety. Four twelve monkeys. That counts right. Nine Hundred Ninety five definitely twenty eight days later two thousand and two resident evil also two thousand two twenty eight weeks later as well. Yep Yep rise of the planet of the apes and then its two sequels but rise. Came Out in twenty eleven. Dare I add it in the name of the King Two worlds. It might make you sick watching it. And there was someone plotting to release a virus. Yes and they did. That's the thing it's not if they were blinded they released it in the Kingdom of EB World War Z. And Day of the dead bloodline. Yeah I think what's different here because we do want to be sensitive. We're not doing the sensational Zombie outbreak. Type films I mean. We talked about all kinds of viral outbreaks. And we really wanted something that that would speak to. What's going on right now. Though yeah I agree I mean I want a very clear eyed view if you WANNA laugh and enjoy camping ones no judgment but it might seem inappropriate to make light of something that seemed so severe the way I thought about it is. It's more interesting even though we're told. Time and again. These are unprecedented times. Mankind has always dealt with viruses. It has always been a part of our story and it was interesting to think that we could go back through the decades and look at the ways that it was presented on film and how the general public thought about contagion and viral outbreaks. And it makes sense that we would start with panic in the streets in one thousand nine hundred fifty film when we were discussing the Tom Cruise film losing it Stewart. You pointed out that in the eighties. A lot of movies were being set in the fifties because baby boomers who were in their formative years in the fifties grew up and now they were writing films in the eighties so setting them thirty years earlier while thirty years or specifically thirty two years before nineteen fifty. The Spanish flu was out there so a lot of people. My Ninety nine year old grandmother is regaling me endlessly with this coronas. Nothing you should have been there for the Spanish flu. Nine hundred eighteen. Not many of us can say that we were there for that but it does sound awful. It killed a whole lot of people. And Yeah that comes up a lot. But even in the nineteen fifties which is the start. I think of the movie. Sub-genre virus movies kickoff with panic in the streets. Nine hundred fifty s were a scary time. That looked a lot like. Are you know right. Now we're thinking very much about protecting our seniors because they're what's at risk for covert nineteen but back in the nineteen fifties. Hide your kids to let them go to the pool. Don't let him play with other kids because if you do they're gonNA get infantile paralysis. Polio I mean the scare was real people close pools. They didn't let their kids out. He was considered a summer plague. School's out and then all of a sudden just populations of people all throughout the United States would suddenly be hit hard and kids would suddenly lose motor function and only able to breathe when they were put into an iron lung interesting statistic by the way it sounds a lot like corona only two percent of the population actually develop the disease and most of those cases were mild. Most of the people were not left with long term disabilities but it did impact a whole generation. I know my mom believes. She was diagnosed with polio. My Dad's second wife had it. You know the thirty second president. Fdr The reason why he was in a wheelchair he got it when he was thirty. Nine years old. You didn't even have to be a kit. People were living like we were back in. One thousand nine hundred eighty. When this movie came out there was a real field. If you send your kid to the movie theater. He touched another kid. This could happen wasn't until one thousand nine hundred eighty five. When Jonas Salk released his cure which was very controversial he was doing things that scientists disapproved of in order to get that vaccine and it worked one monkey equaled six thousand doses of immunization. And before you know it all the kids got to lead the iron lung and come home and famously. He didn't even keep the patent. It's something that warms my heart. When I think about it he thought it was unethical for anyone to profit from this cure and so he gave it away for free so there was panic in the streets in nineteen fifty and I think the other thing that might have inspired. The onset of movies talking about viruses was the smallpox outbreak of nineteen forty. Seven guy got on a bus in Mexico. City drove all the way to New York City. Didn't feel so well with feverish. The whole time went to Bellevue hospital a week later he died. That was when the doctors realized. Oh my God is smallpox. They had had a vaccine for smallpox for over century but because smallpox was so rare like nobody was immune from it so suddenly everyone. That man had come in contact when the bus was infected and it was being you know across the country so everyone literally was being impacted. Kind of like we are now. Everyone potentially could have smallpox what the government did was they started a big PR blitz. They put out commercials on the radio. Tv magazines go to our free health clinics. They opened them up all over the country. Get your vaccines and so everyone could sing the songs everyone knew about shots and the necessity of getting immune to smallpox. Hollywood jumps on trends. If something is big in the news. They're going to come up with a movie about it and I think that's the movie we're here to talk about today. I'd never heard of panic in the streets until we decided we were going to cherry pick. What is what the best the most iconic virus movie from each decade the fifties through the teens. And you said this is the top one on the list I I. I never heard of this. Yeah nor have I. This is totally new to me. I knew by reputation but I've never seen it either. I do think most people know Elia Kazan. He was a director more famous. Maybe for Broadway the stage but he helped pioneer the method acting. So if you know Brando if you know James Dean if you know all of those leading light actors for the nineteen fifties Elliott. Kazan probably worked with them and got them to be the actors that they were. Yeah I did look up this director and and unfortunately Brando. Unless he's in Superman or the godfather I I got a blind spot for his films as well as James Dean so I recognize. Yeah Kazan oh he's he's actually done some big movies but this one isn't one of his that I've heard of

Eliah Kazan Smallpox Shishkabob Arnie Stewart America Kazan Polio James Dean Brando Director Douglas Barbara Bel Getty FDR Richard Jonas Salk James Bond Bellevue Hospital New York City United States Jack Talents Mark Paul
Coronavirus: Tiger at Bronx Zoo Is First Animal in U.S. to Test Positive

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:46 sec | 3 months ago

Coronavirus: Tiger at Bronx Zoo Is First Animal in U.S. to Test Positive

"Among places taking precautions the Detroit zoo this after a tiger test positive for covert nineteen in the Big Apple Detroit zoo director and CEO Ron Kagan says there are no coronavirus cases in animals or people at the Detroit zoo and the tiger testing positive at the Bronx zoo came as a big surprise to the entire scientific community we obviously take all sorts of precautions so we do screening of employees as soon as they arrive to the gate we have staff didn't pee pee and and they're interviewing and observing staff and then anybody who's taking care of animals like great apes or baths and now big chance is wearing P. P. as well that is right it was not open because of the stay home executive order but he says they're doing live streaming in E.

Director Ceo Ron Kagan Detroit Zoo Bronx Zoo P. P. Detroit Executive
Tiger at New York's Bronx Zoo tests positive for coronavirus

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:45 sec | 3 months ago

Tiger at New York's Bronx Zoo tests positive for coronavirus

"The Detroit zoo is taking precautions this after a tiger test positive for the corona virus out of New York City Detroit zoo director and CEO Ron Kagan says there are no coronavirus cases in animals or people at the Detroit zoo and the tiger testing positive at the Bronx zoo came as a big surprise to the entire scientific community we obviously take all sorts of precautions so we do screening of employees as soon as they arrive to the gate we have staff didn't pee pee and and they're interviewing and observing staff and then anybody who's taking care of the animals like great apes or baths and now big cats is wearing P. P. as well the Detroit zoo is not open because of the stay home executive order but he says they're doing live streaming in E.

Detroit Zoo Director Ceo Ron Kagan Bronx Zoo P. P. New York City Detroit Executive
Alfonso Ribeiro twists our brains on golf

Fore Play

12:01 min | 5 months ago

Alfonso Ribeiro twists our brains on golf

"All right folks are joined by a very special guest. Alfonso Ribeiro Big Time Golf Guy so you just walked into Barcelo. Hq I Kind of impressions walking into Barstool checking on her office. All new. I mean the last time to Barstool it was like a it was literally did not look like this. How about we go there? We just going to be pleasant. It was It was an office been was like just not really new new. Feels like a little bit of a facade like this nice and like state of the art and it's not really us just put snow it it did you listen. Everybody needs to go to work and feel like they're going to a nice place. Okay you know what I mean you can talk about whatever you want. It's gotta you'll nice going to work today. What he's saying is the last place was a dump and couldn't believe that he was brought there and that that he likes plays a lot more? I'M GONNA go with the last part of that. Okay because speaking to work got a couple of things going on a couple of things on funniest video absolutely how you know so like the greatest Family show in American television history. Right like its thirtieth season iconic for the Shell my fifth season as the host. And like what's better than watching people do really dumb stuff stuff hurt themselves but what Asta laugh at them by sending us the video so you get the approval of them to laugh at them and and we get to laugh over and over and over again. And I get to go to work and I actually one of the things that I'll do is so I typically have to do the voice overs for all the videos at that net. Need my voice over. Okay okay but I won't watch any of the ones that I don't have to do voice over on so that when I'm actually at the taping and I enjoy them for the first time you're right at the tapings aping and I'm like this way. It's like it feels less like work right. You go to go and it was like wow didn't see that one and can laugh and have a great time so I actually enjoy the taping and as much as the audience gets to do you ever slip up like Oh shit. It's just a good at that because kids so I've learned how not to allow that slip to come out. I always say I know my audience and when I'm when I'm there I'm pretty good at making sure that because we have some kids in the audience. I've become America's Dad. There have to be very responsible. It's amazing my gallstone hasn't made it onto that show yet. It just put it out with. Just keep sending US videos. We'll get it on you get one with a wedge in its everyone's laugh back actually on on Sunday eh the. At and T. I actually wanted to see whether someone got one of my swings on video. 'cause it absolutely would make it onto my show where where it was on. The fourteenth holds a par-five long par five and I'm trying to like possibly see whether I can get there in two so I'm really really digging into one and my right foot completely slips out onto downswing I'm talking airborne it's completely gone right and I still hit the ball but I was on one leg almost down on the ground and I actually hit the ball. So the two the pros and the group because my pro was Kevin Na right and the other the pro is j b Holmes and both of them were like in they were shell shocked because they were like okay. Are you all right. And I'm like and I'm walking gingerly because I'm like I don't know if I'm alright yet Then they go. How did you make contact right like? How did you literally literally you were falling down and you still hit the ball on an ethnic? I like that things eh but it really was. I said to everybody the gallery. WHO's watching anybody? Get that on tape tape. So you're good player. You're scratch. Is that right well. They had me as a three okay. So so you've played golf in some in some big circles right so you're Alphonso Ribeiro your but at the at and T. Pablo pro-am pro-am it's it's TV it's legitimate PJ toward crowds. What's kind of your nerve level on the first tee? You're on the seventeen. Maybe more conic shot. What's your nerve you know? There's probably only one shot at Pebble Beach that I am fearful of It's the second shot on eight right light. That is the only shot where you're like. Okay I don't have this. This is GonNa talk to me about it and we follow him about it and play the whole Goddamn golf course. You know it's a train wreck where we can't bring one hundred none of us for playing in a couple of weeks for the US Open. He's trying little fairy on a in Richmond right flying on a on the fly right behind the flag as for Mr Berry missed. The net. Green is great work. It was great because and I was on my way to triple digits so of course I'm walk through seven holes. Okay you knew where this round was. Nobody's lying along the best part of that is your only through seven holes right this aide whole and you haven't even gotten to the teeth of the golf course you know. That's the easy part of the grass. You get one two three four or five. You're like Ooh and you're doing like if I par in I can shoot ninety uh-huh and you're not going to say the only confident walk. I had all day was walking up to the Green on eight. I had my shoulders up is in my head was held high and I felt good but the rest of the day absolutely you know we had a twenty five mile. An hour rose wind no going from left to right right into the water. Yeah not good. So it's one of those shots where you're like. Okay where am I aiming. That's far let's into I can play it from the left rough. Can't play that from the Pacific. No right you know I was I was left. What's what's the dichotomy like with if the pros and you've got you know the guys played different? teases it awkward at all. No it's it's I'll say this like they're I'm sure there are groups and I've heard many stories the of playing in groups where because it's too amateurs into prose where guys really are not enjoying playing with those amateurs and there are guys on tour who alike I am not playing the. At and T.. I can't stand it like it's just playing with the amateurs but like this group that we had this year which was my self with with Kevin A- and then it was Michael Pena with a guy named Martin trainer. Right and Michael the opinion I are pretty much the same for even though he was getting seven shots. I was getting three but we when we play at home. We are about the same so when you play with guys. We're actually indecent golfers right. Then it's not bad because he's not like all right. Let's go look for his ball. Not that right. The flow of the game feels like it's just a normal for some going out to play and it's not so bad for them. Because I even sent cavanaugh a text message yesterday kind Hannah saying you know a dude. Thanks for an amazing week. We made the cut. We finished nineteenth right like out of one hundred and fifty six teams. That was awesome. He was in there grinding. Like trying to get the team to to to make the cut and you know it was just a really really enjoyable week and he was like dude. Thank you for being the way you were because you knew when to talk and make it light but you also knew when to leave me alone right. Let me have of my space when I needed it and I'm good at that like I'm the dude in the group who's like we're not talking to him some people don't that'll that I'm not going to be the one to tip it. Everyone feels they look at Jon Rahm by the way sitting at dinner. Just don't go near him. L. People for one degrees. That's his nickname like but you know but that's what I was doing you know. That's but that's what happens when it's guys who know how to play golf right who play golf and been in that circumstance stands. This is my fifth year the. At and T.. I've been up at the American Century Tournament now for maybe fourteen fifteen years I get it like I get how to play golf in front of people. It doesn't affect me right like you asking the question earlier like does it like. Does it affect you. Like going to that I T- I have no nerves. Did it affect you. I the first time I absolutely. Yeah but now it's like maybe maybe after like the fourth or fifth time playing in one of those like bigger tournaments after that I was like I. Nobody cares correct right like we all have this thing in our minds that like. I'm going to go embarrass myself. I'm like no not you know why because I'm so much better than the audience sitting there watching me play golf that they're impressed even if I hit a bad. That shot hit that bad shot right so I'd look at it like oh well they don't care whether I play well or not. I care whether I play well or not. Well well I know that if I'm in the moment and I'm actually all messed up about it but I'm not gonNA play. Well right I gotta get into the same space where I've had some of my best rounds and all of my best rounds of been when I'm like. Yeah whatever you gotTa Find Your Happy Place Right just like you're not caring right. The moment you care is the moment you get tents the moment your tents is the worst Gulf swing right. So I've certainly got myself to where I can just kind of be in the moment I want you know. Pick a target small targets right. No no no. Don't hit over there to the right. No pick a target hit the target. Don't worry about anything else. You're not gonna hit it there anyway. But at least you're gonNA you're GonNa make a good solid swing with the right effort by familiar with the exact opposite approach of that on the TV. You got a couple of groups backed doc. You know and you're standing in for wherever you think that they care a lot about how your shot goes right. You're standing the biggest fair way in the world and you're just like all right there's OB forty yards left. You can't it'll be and meanwhile correct just pick a small targets a giant fairway even a decent drive. You'll have a good approach. NOPE bodies a train wreck. You don't know how does golf club you're thinking. Oh Oh my God I saw. Nobody cares their phone there and watch it right. Well I I became friendly with Justin rose and he has a putting guru right who works with okay and this. This guy gave our whole little group when when we were all together Some information is called C.. Burn right and I was like okay. Okay well it's a putting thing where if you put a ball on the ground and if you move that ball quickly you're going to see what looks like a burn of a ball on the grass right and I was like what is that like why he goes. Your brain doesn't understand no or don't write. It only understands what it saying doing. So don't hit it left. Your brain heard hit it left right so there's no don't yeah it doesn't it doesn't recognize. Don't right it only recognizes do. Yeah so people say. Don't move your head you're moving your head right. What this guy is saying is his see the burn? If you see the burn you didn't move your head. It has to be an active positive. Thought not a negative thought because there's is no way that your brain understands the negative thought. Why do you always hit it in the water when you look at water if you have to hit the ball over the water like all right? Don't hit it into water. You're the water. Your brain doesn't understand. Don't you have to just don't even worry about the water. See the target and hated at your target. So it's a mental exercise absolutely but it but it becomes a physical thing because see the burn. You didn't move your. I can't tell you over

Golf Alphonso Ribeiro United States Kevin Na Michael Pena America Pebble Beach Asta Justin Rose Richmond Gulf Jon Rahm Pacific Holmes Cavanaugh Kevin A Mr Berry T. Pablo Hannah Martin
With the next Xbox, Microsoft is done competing with PlayStation: 'We see Amazon and Google as the main competitors going forward'

DLC

02:57 min | 5 months ago

With the next Xbox, Microsoft is done competing with PlayStation: 'We see Amazon and Google as the main competitors going forward'

"Think I'M GONNA go with for my story of the week this interview with Phil Spencer of of xbox saying that Latte he considers their competitor xbox not to be Sony or Nintendo but Amazon and Google Google That Sony Nintendo are not playing in the same sandbox. Because they don't have cloud tech like Microsoft's Azure platform and that. That's really where xbox is competing with project X cloud and with Microsoft game pass that they are really services company and Nintendo and Sony are doing something that Microsoft is basically leaving behind signed The quote here is when you talk about Nintendo and Sony. We have a ton of respect for them but we see Amazon Google as the main competitors going forward. That's not to disrespect respect Nintendo and Sony but the traditional gaming companies are somewhat out of position. I guess they could try to recreate as your but we've invested. Tens of billions of dollars is in cloud over the year of years So the reason I think this is interesting is not just because it makes for a good headline which does but because I think this really shows an insight into something we've talked about on the show over and over again which is the future that Microsoft is positioning for. And the the idea of how we are all GONNA be playing video games in the future you know. I made a a cool cool ranch prediction at the end of last year about halo being on a Sony System on a Nintendo system on some other system the go ahead and prediction but I think this bolsters that that idea. I think this is what he's talking about. What is the idea that Microsoft gone are the days of the console wars so to speak? This is all about that next. He's you're fine taking the four hundred dollars once every five years. They want your ten dollars every month for five years. They want your commitment to their platform. They want they want to be The bartering every dollar that you spend online in their ecosystem and I think that is going to be ultimately a pretty awesome prospect for Gamers in the short term will. I don't no no in the long term but I think in the short term. I think that's going to be a pretty interesting thing where we are going to have the freedom to play things on anything we want. Things aren't going to be locked to consoles. Microsoft doesn't care anymore they don't care they wanNA create things that are compelling and then have you use their infrastructure to play those

Sony Nintendo Microsoft Amazon Google Phil Spencer Latte
Would King Kong Be Considered an Endangered Species?

BrainStuff

04:07 min | 5 months ago

Would King Kong Be Considered an Endangered Species?

"All that. So new show from the creator of the control. Group comes a new scripted. podcast the seventh daughter. Why in the southern have no right to put her in this seven daughter all ten episodes available? Now listen on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcast Josh. Look into brain stuff. Production of iheartradio. Hey brain stuff. Lauren both Obama here. If you're considering a summer vacation to fictitious land then skull island isn't eco-tourism dream. Come true they are. You can avoid the genetic mischief of drastic parks Isla New bar end the radioactive horror of monster island but still visit a place where prehistoric creatures thrive in the wild skull island. Sometimes sometimes called. Kong's island is home to perplexing array of organisms as captured in the nineteen thirty three film King Kong and its sequels and remakes. It houses everything everything from native populations of Homo Sapiens to dinosaurs like tyrannosaurus and stegosaurus. And then there's the Ape Lord himself King Kong. Ah Unlike the dinosaurs tear soars and please sores palm. Island Kung doesn't quite line up with any known prehistoric beast even gigantic pethick. As the largest known primate of all time stood no more than ten feet tall. That's about three meters Kung however stands at least eighteen feet or five and a half meters tall in the nineteen eighteen thirty three film and is even taller in some telling 's sizing up like this can prove something of a risky move evolutionary speaking bigger bodies come with increased energy demands and body changes to keep everything from falling apart noted zoologist r McNeill Alexander once explained the King Kong would collapse under under his own weight. He'd be a hundred and twenty five times the volume of a real ape loaded with one hundred and twenty five times the weight but on the physical frame of a typical guerrilla. His legs simply wouldn't be able to support him. Essentially you can't just scale up creatures size and expect it to function the same way plus an apelike Kong might be big enough to defeat all its fellow beasts in a brawl but couldn't cope with climate change habitat loss or the destructive tendencies of human civilization. Even if he somehow could support weight being big isn't enough to cope with these other dangers. Priest titans like gigantic pickus and the giant Slavs present a valuable lesson in the vulnerability of life as giant land mammals national geographic ones pointed out that based on computer modeling of Heights. Every species species has an effective upper limit of size and the closer they evolved toward that size the greater the risk of extinction. Perhaps that's why King Kong is typically described as the last of his kind even skull island seems incapable of supporting a robust population of rampaging giant apes. Not only would he be considered an an endangered species. He's also what's often referred to as functionally extinct because let's face it. Kong species is at a dead end despite an alleged had sun cong popping up from time to time the population of this species has clearly dipped well below the threshold for genetically stable reproduction in other words. If there are female cones out there the resulting offspring would be subject to the sort of lack of genetic diversity that leads to genetic disorders and eventually extinction and Kong's not alone. Several real life species exist in the state of impending doom including the Baiji a freshwater dolphin once found in the Yangtze River. We've we've even seen a recent example of a last known member of a species succumbing to extinction George the last Hawaiian tree snail who died in captivity on January first of two thousand nineteen George No giant but his death highlights the lesser known plights of extinction that of snails and slugs amphibians face a similar crisis and in both cases there are inevitable ripple effects throughout the

King Kong Skull Island Island Kung Yangtze River Apple Josh R Mcneill Alexander Barack Obama Lauren George
Do Monkeys Lack the Brains or the Vocal Anatomy for Human Speech?

BrainStuff

04:01 min | 5 months ago

Do Monkeys Lack the Brains or the Vocal Anatomy for Human Speech?

"Boko bomb here back in the nineteen sixties and Seventies. It was all the rage with primatology to conduct studies in which infant chimpanzees were raised as though they we're human infants this practice tested. The limits of what a non human primate could accomplish if raised in human society aiming to Parse what was nature and what was nurture her. These studies often played out like dark fairy tales with chimp babies growing up into tragic half humans living between two worlds and belonging to neither but but one thing that came out of these studies was the realization that although these chimpanzees raised in human environments learned how to behave eerily human. Shwe's none of them could ever be taught to talk. We spoke with a safe zone far A professor of psychology at the Princeton Neuroscience Institute. He said I think that surprised a lot of people they weren't even producing rudimentary words. Like a drunk person would say according to Suzanne far that led researchers to develop a few theories about why this could be one that other primates might have the brains to produce speech after all they can do rudimentary symbolic communication about. They're lacking the vocal anatomy anatomy to make speech sounds to that. Primates completely lack the neural control to produce speech sounds or three that they lack both the proper. We're brain and the proper anatomy for speech around this time linguist and cognitive scientist. Philip Lieberman tried to determine which if any of these these conclusions were true in a nineteen. sixty-nine Study Lieberman and his co authors examined Cadavers of Rhesus monkeys to estimate based on their anatomy what speech sounds announced they could theoretically be able to make a Lieberman's conclusion was that based on the anatomy of a recess. They wouldn't be able to speak even if their brains were wired just just like ours. Based on the study the idea took hold that one of the main reasons chimps and other primates can't speak is that they lack the vocal anatomy to do so but but now half century later. A study published in science advances has revisited. The question of why monkeys can't talk and debunks Lieberman's notion that monkeys lack the appropriate vocal anatomy instead. They say monkeys mouths and throats could form human sounding words but their brains aren't good enough to tell their body how to do so so then far and an international team of researchers captured x ray video of a racist eating squawking and making facial expressions then made a model of those movements that could predict the potential vocal range of the animal. They found that anatomically speaking a recess. has everything it needs to form entire sentences of human speech. Although it's voice definitely wouldn't sound human what it doesn't have. Is the necessary neural ability to coordinate respiration Orel facial muscle control and laryngeal attention all things we have to do in order to talk in fact czar says all of the old world primates all the species in Africa and Asia including hooting. The Great Apes. Probably have the same ability. They conclude this because these monkeys and apes in large part have very similar vocal and facial expressions why humans got such tricked out. Brain in comparison to our primate relatives is hard to know. But it's fun to think about. This is on fire. Said nobody's sure what driving forces and pressures led to humans

Philip Lieberman Princeton Neuroscience Institu Professor Of Psychology Suzanne Orel Scientist Africa Asia
3 women investigated for causing deadly blaze at German zoo

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 6 months ago

3 women investigated for causing deadly blaze at German zoo

"Three women in Germany are under investigation after admitting to launching paper lanterns that are blamed for igniting a fire at the creek they'll do the destroyed in a passing killed more than thirty animals Cree fell criminal police chief carrot Hoffman says the three women a mother into adult daughters went to the police on new year's day after seeing a news conference about the blaze hopping describe the women is completely normal people who seem very sensible and said it was courageous of them to come forward he said the women ordered five sky lanterns on the internet and believe that they were legal in Germany investigators think one lantern started the blaze and they found four other lanterns later with hand written messages for good wishes in the new year the zoo says the ape house burned down in more than thirty animals including five meringue tanks into guerrillas were killed I'm Jennifer king

Germany Jennifer King Carrot Hoffman
Apes, monkeys among 30 animals killed in zoo fire

The World

00:19 sec | 6 months ago

Apes, monkeys among 30 animals killed in zoo fire

"An investigation has begun into a fire at a zoo in Germany on new year's eve which destroyed the monkey house killing at least thirty animals the two thousand square meter Rickman closure at Kleinfeld zoo near the Dutch border house highly endangered apes and monkeys including run attends chimpanzees marmosets and a

Germany Kleinfeld Zoo Rickman
German zoo fire kills over 30 animals including apes, monkeys and bats

Sean Hannity

00:35 sec | 6 months ago

German zoo fire kills over 30 animals including apes, monkeys and bats

"In the first moments of twenty twenty a fire at the Crutchfield do in western Germany kills more than thirty animals including apes and monkeys bats and birds witnesses report sky lanterns flying at a low altitude near the zoo shortly after midnight and just before the fire the zoo near the Dutch border says the entire ape house burned down only two chimpanzees could be saved by firefighters the director adding many of the dead animals are close to ex engine in the wild the usually safe lanterns are both illegal and rare in Germany sky lanterns have been used in Asia for centuries and Kerik fox

Crutchfield Germany Director Asia Kerik Fox
"ape  r" Discussed on Undiscovered

Undiscovered

09:09 min | 7 months ago

"ape r" Discussed on Undiscovered

"By the late nineteen sixties. The killer ape theory is really big. That doesn't mean that everyone is buying it from the beginning. Darton arteries evidence seems shaky. There's a lot of assumption built on assumption built on assumption starting in the sixties this paleontologist in South Africa named Bob Brain starts taking down those assumptions. Certain artery had read as you will recall a whole lot of murder into some dented. Dented and cracked. Fossils Bob Rain looks at those same fossils and is like this it just fossil wear and tear like this is what happens when piles of bones are crushed under sediment for thousands of years. And we'RE DR DRI had sold us this picture of ancient man as this bloodthirsty bone wielding Predator bob brain something a a little bit more deflating. He says maybe looked at the scenes. Were pray like he finds this Osceola. Disney's call with two holes in it. That perfectly line line up with the spacing of a Leopard's canines so maybe it wasn't actually man. The hunter maybe it was man the hunted but this is a debate. That's largely happening happening. In the scientific press none of this is reaching the public who still at the theater watching two thousand one. But then in the nineteen seventies Jane Jane Goodall discover something. The makes everybody pay attention so decade earlier. Jane Goodall made us all fall in love with chimps. She's on TV in the sixties playing with her friends. At the Gumby stream reserve in Tanzania the chimps gradually came to realize that I I was not dangerous off but after about fifteen months I was allowed to approach small group without attempting to hide. This is from a prime time. Nineteen sixty sixty five documentary an ele- oh my God. This is the cutest documentary. I have overseen baby chimp. So tiny. It poked her Abukar on the knows. No is made friends of wild animals. So doing been able to observe them at closer quarters in more intimate detail and has been managed before and all this cuteness works amazing for the killer ape theory because remember chimps are supposed to be the path taken we are the killer apes they are the peaceable colle- knows bloopers and then in the nineteen seventy s goodall pulls the rug out from under us when Google first goes to go Mbaye. There's only a single group of chimpanzees and between nineteen sixty and one thousand nine hundred seventy four. That single unitary group has actually split. And there's now choose shoe social entities one in the north and one in the south and in one thousand nine hundred for the male chimps in the southern group. Start getting murdered murdered so one of the first hits in this chimp war as it comes to be described is on one of my favorite chimps. It's an older chimp named Goliath. And and he's cornered by a group of five chimps from the northern group and he's savagely beaten so much that goodall reports that he can no longer sit up shit she later sent some of her resistance out to try to find him to see whether he'd survived but they never found him again and the same thing happens to other males in the southern group. So by nineteen seventy eight there is no southern group of chimps anymore. So that's what's going on with the males circa nineteen seventy four in Bombay. What's happening with the females else is actually in my opinion more disturbing the main culprit? If you want to use that word is passion so passion Ashen is a female chimp. She has two kids a female chimp named palm and a male chimp named proof and one day goodall gets a call over her radio from combat that passion has been seen eating another chimps baby. Passion goes and kills the invent advent of Glinka and then brings that dead infant back to palm and profit and shares the meat as has if it is normal prey passion eight another Chim's baby. Yeah eight eight and this keeps happening over the next year passion and her daughter they kill and they eat too more baby chimps from their own group goodall is their groups still hanging out with them. The question are you saying something. Good good all describes being out in the field and watching palm the daughter Chimp and passion the MOM. They're sitting next to this. Other mother from their group called little has her baby and goodall describes seeing being palm. The daughter turned to look at Little Bee's baby and reach out her hand towards the infants. And then look back at her mom Like hey what about this one and actually tries to stop it. She starts yelling throwing things trying to make a racket distract palms so that little being her baby can get away and they do but goodall is horrified. One of the things that she says is that her vision of chimpanzee nature was never the same. That this fundamentally changed the way that she thought about chimpanzees as a species and the kinds of so behavior that they were capable of chimp. Violence is a problem for the killary theory. Like if Darden artery or saying that the key thing saying that separated us from all the other apes was our ability to kill explain chimps. It can't be the thing that made the difference so the killer APP theory died and in the end it wasn't one thing that killed it. There was a whole range of evidence from paleontology anthropology evidence evidence from other primates all came together to say you know what the theory doesn't really hold up in fact we're not even sure that Australopithecus S. Africanus was our direct ancestor. So obviously they were in the family and frankly it's kind of a relief killer apes along with whatever other problems that might have wasn't incredibly cynical theory and these days it seems like the pendulum swinging the other way like scientists are looking at the fossil record and they're not seeing a whole lot of evidence violence instead they find. We were really compassionate. That's August as he's an anthropologist at Notre Dame we developed developed not only the ability to hurt one another but was seems like we spent more time feeding elderly who have lost all their teeth or caring for you know five year old Homo Erectus rectus. who had a congenital defect or helping individuals broken legs or limbs so there's really good evidence in the fossil record that we began to care for one another in ways that go way beyond? What other organisms do well before there is good evidence for us whacking each other over the head on a regular basis? I mean yeah I mean of course this is the thing that we do really league well. Kindness not to discount are horrible violence but sometimes people obviously do incredible things for each other like we. We literally give each other body body parts so if if I was going to pick something that made us human special among the apes I I would pick that yes so Scientists are also thinking along. He's lines they're thinking that actually what makes us special and different from other apes. It isn't murder its cooperation But that can also cut both ways cooperation and allows us to build hospitals and save lives and change the world for the better and to do you know awful things. Genocides atrocities torture economic inequality racism. And all of that means cooperation so I think we gotta get away from. Is this idea. There were hardwired to be good or bad. We have the cash to be the worst thing on the planet and the best thing on on the planet simultaneously so any last thing before we go while you were researching this killer ape story. I got curious about who really is the murderer list of all the mammals. The murderer is the the most murderous somebody has in fact studied this US inevitably they tried to. They ranked all these different mammal species and at the very top at nearly twenty percent so one in five deaths in this species they attributed to murder. Please tell me it's not us. YOUR CATS NO MON ON. Yeah according to this one study anyway. One in five mere cat deaths are the result of murder that has ghastly so if murder as dart proposed is the the path to world domination. Thankfully you showed that it is not But if it were this would not be planted. The apes it would be planted of the Mir cats.

Jane Jane Goodall murder Bob Brain palm Bob Rain South Africa Tanzania Osceola US Little Bee DR DRI Disney Google Bombay Glinka Darden Chim Mbaye dart
"ape  r" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

09:26 min | 7 months ago

"ape r" Discussed on Science Friday

"Read as you'll recall a whole lot of murder into some dented and cracked fossils and Bob Brain looks at those same fossils and is like this is just fossil wear and tear like this is what happens when piles of bones are crushed under sediment for thousands of years. And we'RE DR DRI had sold us this picture of ancient man as this bloodthirsty bone wielding Predator Bob Brain something a little bit more deflating. He says maybe also look at the scenes. Were pray like he finds this Osceola business. Call with two holes in it. That perfectly lineup. With the spacing of a Leopard's canines so maybe it wasn't actually man the hunter maybe it was man hunted but this is a debate that's largely happening in the scientific press. None of this is reaching the public. Who still at the theater watching two thousand one? But then in the nineteen seventies Jane Goodall discovers something that makes everybody pay attention so a decade earlier. Jane Goodall made us all fall in love with chips. She's on TV in the sixties playing with her friends. That the Gumby Stream Reserve Tanzania the chimps gradually came to realize that that was not dangerous after all but after about fifteen months I was allowed to approach small group without attempting to hide. This is from a prime time. Nineteen sixty five documentary. And Oh my God. This is the cutest documentary. I have overseen baby chimp. It poked her Abukar on the knows no is made friends of wild down so doing has been able to observe them at close quarters in more intimate detail has been managed before. And all this cuteness works summating for the killer ape theory because remember chimps are supposed to be the path taken we are the killer apes they are the peaceable colle- knows bloopers and then in the nineteen seventy s goodall pulls the rug out from under us when Google first goes to go Mbaye. There's only a single a group of chimpanzees and between nineteen sixty and nineteen seventy four. That single unitary group has actually split. And there's now choose social entities one in the north and one in the south and in nineteen seventy four the male chimps in the southern group. Start getting murdered so one of the first hits in this chimp war as it comes to be described is on one of favorite chimps. It's an older chimp named Goliath. And and he's cornered by a group of five chimps from the northern group and he's savagely beaten so much that goodall reports that he can no longer sit up shit she she later sent some of her resistance out to try to find him to see whether he'd survived but they never found him again and the same thing happens to other males in the southern groups so by nineteen in seventy eight there is no southern group of chimps anymore. So that's what's going on with the males circa nineteen seventy four in gun bay. What's happening with the females else is actually in my opinion more disturbing the main culprit? If you want to use that word is passion so passion. Passion is a female chimp. She has two kids a female. Chimp named palm and a male chimp named proof and one day goodall gets a call all over her radio from combat that passion has been seen eating another chimps baby passion goes and kills the advent of Glinka and then brings that dead infant back to palm and profit and shares the meat as if it is normal prey passion eight another chimps baby. Yeah eight eight and this this keeps happening over the next year. Passion and her daughter they kill and they eat too more baby chimps from their own group goodall is their groups still hanging out with them the question are you saying something. Good good all describes being out in the field and watching palm the daughter Champ and passion the MOM. They're sitting next to this. Other mother from their group called little be holding her baby and goodall describes seeing being palm. The daughter turned to look at Little Bee's baby and reach out her hand towards the infants. And then look back at her mom. Tom Like Hey. What about this one and good old actually tries to stop it? She starts yelling throwing things trying to make a racket getting distract palms so that little being her baby can get away and they do but goodall is horrified. One of the things that she says. Is that her vision of chimpanzee. The nature was never the same. That this fundamentally changed the way that she thought about chimpanzees as a species and the kinds of love social behavior that they were capable of chimp. Violence is a problem for the killer ape theory like if Darden artery or saying that the key thing thing that separated us from all the other apes was our ability to kill explain chimps. It can't be the thing that made the difference so the killer ape theory died and in the end it wasn't one thing that killed it. There was a whole range of evidence from paleontology anthropology evidence from other primates. All came together to say you know what this theory doesn't really hold up in fact we're not even sure that Australopithecus Kazakhstanis was our direct ancestor. So obviously they were in the family and frankly it's kind of a relief killer apes along with whatever other problems that might have wasn't incredibly cynical theory and these days it seems like the pendulum swinging the other way like scientists are looking at the fossil so record and they're not seeing a whole lot of evidence of violence instead they find. We were really compassionate. That's Augustine Fund as he's an anthropologist at Notre Dame we it developed not only the ability to hurt one another but was seems like we spent more time feeding elderly who have lost all their teeth or caring for you know five year old Homo Erectus. who had a congenital defect or helping individuals broken legs or limbs so there's really good evidence in the fossil record that we began to care for one another other in ways that go way beyond what other organisms do well before there is good evidence for us whacking each other over the head on a regular basis? I mean yeah I mean. Of course this is the thing that we do really really well. Kindness not to discount are horrible violence but sometimes people obviously do incredible things for each other like we. We literally give each other body body parts so if if I was going to pick something that made us human special among the apes I I would pick that yes so Scientists are also thinking along on these lines. They're thinking that actually what makes us special in different from other apes. It isn't murder its cooperation but that can also cut both ways cooperation and allows us to build hospitals and save lives and change the world for the better and to do you know awful things. Genocides atrocities torture economic inequality racism All of that means cooperation. So I think we gotta get away from this idea. There were hardwired to be good or bad. We have the capacity to be the worst thing on the planet and the best thing on the planet simultaneously so any last thing before we go while you were researching this killer ape story. I got curious about who really is the murderer. List of all the mammals murderer is the the most murderous somebody has in fact studied this inevitably they tried to. They ranked all these different mammal species and at the very top at nearly twenty percent so one in five deaths in in this species they attributed to murder. Please tell me it's not US your cats no mon own. According to this one study anyway one in five mere cat deaths are the result of murder that is ghastly so if murder as dart proposed is the the path to world domination. Thankfully you showed that it is not. Yeah but if it were this would not be planted. The apes it would be planted of the Mir cats undiscovered was reported and produced by me anti-monopoly and by me Ella fetter. Our senior editor was Christopher and Talladega composer. With Daniel Peterson. This free version of also SCHRAFFT's are through Stra is by Kevin mccloud. Erica my limbs new book about the killer. APE Theory is called creatures of Cain. You can find a link to it plus more INFO about this episode in our show notes we are undiscovered podcast dot Org.

Jane Goodall murder palm Bob Brain DR DRI Gumby Stream Reserve Tanzania Stra Little Bee Ella fetter Kevin mccloud Google gun bay Daniel Peterson Australopithecus Kazakhstanis Darden Tom Augustine Fund Mbaye Glinka
"ape  r" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

05:27 min | 7 months ago

"ape r" Discussed on Science Friday

"Why would it have been beneficial for our ancestor to have invented murder like? Why is this good evolutionary? It's generally not considered good evolutionary. The concept of murder was deeply tied for artery for dart to the idea of hunting for meat. Hunting for meat is phenomenally useful useful for DART killing animals for meat killing each other even. Cannibalism they're kind of all part of the same phenomenon and dearth thinks. He is really good evidence. That Australopithecus was indeed killing other animals for meat. He and his students have been looking at these fossils from South African caves and darkness is there seemed to be a whole lot of humerus bones in those caves. Okay and him those humourous bones look a little bit like clubs. Sure and then he notices Some of these animal skulls have these cracks in kind of like they've been bashed I in with by club right. Yes and it's like it's all coming together. Our ancestors grabbed some of these clubs wacked each each other just like in the opening of two thousand one space odyssey and they also whacked other animals and ate them or as dart this slightly more colorfully. A scientific paper australopithecus quote battered them to death tore apart their broken bodies. Dismembered them limb from limb. And how did he put this. slaked slaked their ravenous thirst with the hot blood of victims gross. Not Funny Language like like this did not win. Raymond Dart a whole lot of scientific support kidding but Robert Artery dramatist script writer. He is very very alive to the dramatic possibilities of the Hillary Theory Robert Artery rights for pop science books inspired by killer Apes. A few of them are bona fide bestsellers major newspapers review them columnists debate them on TV. NBC Airs a Prime Time Documentary featuring Dr Raymond Dart talking about his killer ape theory and then of course comes two thousand one Stanley Kubrick had gotten a hold of arteries first book. Extensively incident underlines it and he brings this theory to the big screen with a level of accuracy and attention to detail that is startling. Like I'd always assumed those those apes the beginning of the movie were just some kind of generic human ancestor ape. I thought they were chimps. No they are actually re-creations of what people really really thought. australopithecus would have looked like at the time they are very specially created masks. Kubrick goes so far as has to hire a Paleo anthropologist to them on the set and to teach his actors how to move like they think also scenes would have moved so we asked this question. How did the killer ape theory get so popular and I think honestly Robert Artery is a huge reason but arteries timing is also just really good? Because it's the nineteen sixties and people are thinking about violence alert. What doctors are working feverishly over? Senator candidate there are a whole series of high profile. Assassinations just been brought in their lifting Senator Kennedy onto the Gurney now the US involvement in Vietnam is really communicating scenes of violence and destruction in in to American homes through flickering television scenes. Violent acts that would never have been allowed on TV if they were not real art. Gerber should the assassinations of John F.. Kennedy Martin Luther King Junior Robert Kennedy Ted offensive. The my Lai massacre like this is what is coming through your television screen in the sixties and early seventies and not that far era from World War. Two right yeah and so. It's really easy to imagine people watching this and thinking like what is the deal with humans like is is this who we are and then Robert Artery comes in with the killer ape theory and he's like maybe people are Don. They can't believe what's happened one woman's crying and then it also apart coming up we were wrong. The fall of the killary theory by the late nineteen sixties. The killer ape theory is really big. That doesn't mean that everyone is buying it from the beginning. Darton arteries evidence seems shaky. There's a lot of assumption built on assumption built on assumption and starting in the sixties this paleontologist in South Africa. Et named Bob Brain starts taking down those assumptions. So dirt and artery had read as you'll recall a whole lot of murder into some dented and cracked fossils and Bob Brain looks at those same fossils and is like this is just fossil wear.

Robert Artery Stanley Kubrick Dr Raymond Dart murder Bob Brain Kennedy Martin Luther King Senator Kennedy Robert Kennedy Ted South Africa NBC Hillary Gerber US John F Vietnam
"ape  r" Discussed on The Dictionary

The Dictionary

10:12 min | 10 months ago

"ape r" Discussed on The Dictionary

"Hello Word nerds and welcome to another episode of the dictionary. Am I sounding announcer enough for you all right. Let's get to the first word it is ape eight P E. It's the first form of three I love apes and primates monkeys. They're my favorite animals YEP now. You know a little bit more about me. This is a noun from before the twelfth century one a a the synonym is a monkey especially one of the larger tailless or short tailed old world forms one be any of various large Tayla semi erect primates of Africa and southeastern Asia as the Chimpanzee Gorilla Orangutan Dan or Gibbon of course I always used to say a renting I think most people do but there is no g at the end so I learned that it's really Aranka Tan and then the end of the definition says called also anthropoid or anthropoid ape and then compared to the synonym great ape was there a drink called grape. Ape knows a cartoon character. Yeah I think there was a cartoon character called grape to a we have these synonym mimic and with that definition of the word ape is often used in crossword puzzles to be eh a large uncouth person. APE like is an adjective all right. Let's do this second form of the word ape. It's a transitive verb from sixteen thirty two to copy closely but often clumsily and ineptly synonym is the word copy apor deeper is a noun and now we have the third form of a it's an adjective from nineteen fifty five synonyms are crazy and wild usually usually used in the phrase. Go Ape. Don't mind if I do well next. We have a Peek A. The E. A. K. A. Word. I don't think I've ever seen before it's an adjective or adverb from fifteen ninety six being in a vertical position as in with ors a peak. I'm assuming that's ores like in a boat or canoe. The etymology says this is an alternative of earlier a pike. Api K. E. A. Probably from the French pick which means vertically next we have a man there is a hyphen between the two words. It's a noun from eighteen sixty nine a primate as in Australopithecus pissing intermediate in character between Homo Sapiens and the higher apes and yes. I think I actually did say author low pithy incorrectly early next. We have a French word that I'm sure I will butcher but it is something like a pursue yeah sort of It is spelled spelled A. P. E. R. C. You and the C has that accent underneath the letter. I do not know what it is called apologies for that but you you know what I'm talking about. This is a noun from eighteen o nine one a brief survey or sketch synonym is outline to an immediate impression especially the two definitions for the word insight so yes as I said this is French from from the verb appar save war or wa which means to perceive that is from old French appear few I do you know how to pronounce this eight p. e. r. c. v. r. e. and that means to perceive and there's more at the word perceive. There was some some other information but it basically says the same thing that I already said next. We have a period and a p. E. R. The N. T. It's an adjective from sixteen twenty six gently moving the bowels while did not expect that synonym is laxative. Have a period is also a noun next. We have a periodic. It's the word periodic with an a at the beginning. It's an adjective active from eighteen seventy one of irregular occurrence not periodic as in a periodic floods to not we're having periodic vibrations not Assila Tori a periodically is an adverb and a periodicity is a noun next. We have oppor Tif A. P. E. R. I T. I F. This is a noun from eighteen ninety four an alcoholic drink taken before a meal as an appetizer. I hope that's not the only appetizer you're having because you're GonNa get drunk Parada quick doc next. We have aperture A. P. E. R. T. U. R. E. This is a noun from the fifteenth century. One One and opening or open space synonym is whole to a the opening in a photographic lens that admits the light to to be the diameter of the Stop in an optical system that determines the diameter of the bundle of Rays Trans versing the instrument to see see the diameter of the objective Lens or mere of a telescope as I've mentioned in the past I have a background in film and video and photography and so I am familiar with this term aperture and I find the whole mechanics and optics of lenses pretty interesting. I don't know the physics of IT Really I. I only know the the very tip of the iceberg but it's pretty interesting when you really dig into it. Let's see the etymology says this is Latin then from opportunists which is from the verb op array which means to open next we have a pelous. AP AP E. T. A. L. U. S. This is an adjective from circa seventeen o six having no pedals and pedals is spelled Velde P. E. T. A. L. S. Those are the petals on a flower not the pedals on a bike next have apex. This is a noun from sixteen o one one A. The uppermost point synonym is Vertex as in the PECs of a mountain one be the narrowed arrowed or pointed end synonym is tip as in the apex of the tongue to the highest or culminating point as in the apex of his career. I think I've hit mine synonym for all definitions is the word summit next. We have APP Gar score are two words. The first word is capital A. P. G. A. R. This is a noun from nineteen fifty nine an index used to evaluate the condition of a newborn infant based on a rating of zero one or two for each of the five characteristics of Color Heart heart rate response to stimulation of the sole of the foot muscle tone and respiration with ten being perfect score so in each of those is five characteristics. If the baby did a great job in each of those it seems like they would have gotten a to which totals up to ten. I wonder what score I got. Maybe that's in my old records or something. I'll have to look into that see if my parents have that somewhere this is named after Virginia APP Gar died in nineteen seventy four and she was an American anesthesiologist. I love saying that word all right. I think we will do one more for this episode. It is a for ASIS A P. H. E. R. E. S. I s. this episode is filled with words have never heard before. It's a a noun from fifteen fifty the loss of one or more sounds or letters at the beginning of a word as in round four around owned or a round now who says a round it's around and Kuhn for raccoon. I don't know if they needed to put coon in there. That seems a little bit racist even though they're specifically talking about raccoons but the history of that word is not great so Can you change that please dictionary. Thanks APHORISTIC is an adjective this is from the Greek off for racists which literally means taking off and that is from Farina gene which means to take away that is from Otto Plus Herron which means to take what a what shall I choose to be the word of the episode. There's a bunch in here that I liked ape ape man APERITIF apgar score. What do you think let me know Send me an email. A tweet a message on facebook I liked aperture to this is a hard one. I think I'm just going to have to go with Abe as I said apes and monkeys and primates are are my favorite animals and so they have a very special place in my heart the one a definition of a had the synonym monkey which reminded me of a phrase that I learned how to say backwards while ago I won't go into the details but I will say it now for you and then I will reverse it and then we will end the episode so it is economic impact cool look at me. I'm on the hopefully that worked out well. I'll find out in the editing. That is the end of the episode. Thank you very much for listening until next time this suspense or reading the dictionary maybe I.

Aranka Tan Asia Africa Assila Tori Otto Plus Herron Parada APERITIF apgar Abe Virginia wa K. E. A. A. P. E. R. A. P. E. A. P. E. R. T. U. R. Kuhn coon Velde P. E. T. A. L.
"ape  r" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

03:27 min | 11 months ago

"ape r" Discussed on Overdue

"Reading it. Are there reasons why are there things to find in there aside from like a critique of it that are still worth finding now or like. What's your what's the one ended up being your read on the on the series. I guess sure i found it easy to read and like it moved at a good clip. It is a pulp adventure story so like right like that. Yeah that's part of the thing that part of it does work like it doesn't linger linger on stuff. There's some like weird comic duo nonsense with the professor and his buddy that like doesn't quite read you can tell that it's supposed to be like a funny yuck yuck moment and whatever but the basic like action of fighting with apes and stuff is pretty cool and works the jane stuff is mostly gross because you have no access to who she is as a person other than her like falling head over over heels for this sculpted god would man <hes> instantly. There's like a little nod to her. Precarious social position through the forced marriage marriage stuff <hes>. Let's largely underdeveloped because burroughs didn't seem to care <hes> and there are like decent turns of phrase as when it's not about stuff that is very dated <hes> there's a section that i will find <hes> that is about 'bout it's about like trees falling in the jungle and a tree falls in the jungle tarzan. Okay okay okay. Okay good good okay and this is just the like every once in a while. You'll get a cool turn of phrase when tarzan is learning about the mystery of clothes and there's a rain storm <hes> and some trees get knocked over <hes> now and again some ancient patriarch of the woods rent by a flashing bolt would crash a thousand pieces among the surrounding trees carrying down numberless branches and many smaller neighbors to add to the tangled confusion of the tropical jungle. <hes> i liked ancient patriarch in that among the jungle in like it personifies the woods in a way that puts it in in place with the other animals we meet and so there's like a sensibility of place that really works <hes> every once in a while again like you'll get a cool turn in a phrase but then sometimes that is deployed in ways that is like okay. That's some racist early twentieth century nonsense so yeah. That's the book you i. I think you read it as an academic exercise if you want to get in there i don't think a two thousand nineteen reader can read it and just i accept it for for like what it's trying to do. You probably find somebody who could do that but yeah take. Take your meaning yeah. That's my meaning <hes> <hes> so if you have read tarzan or read the other like ant man books or whatever <hes> with tarzan then you can tell us all about them. I want to hear about them. Send us an email. Overdue pottage dot com hit us up online twitter dot com slash overdue potter facebook.com pod. Sorry don't have names to read of folks folks because we're recording these in the past but i'll be man those social feeds and interacting with you. Regardless andrew folks want.

professor burroughs andrew
"ape  r" Discussed on Screen Dive

Screen Dive

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"ape r" Discussed on Screen Dive

"Tired? As a fan himself. Terry was all in from the earliest days when his dad introduced him to the original. It was my favorite franchise when I was a kid. I was just you know, ten years old. And it was just sitting there watching them with my dad going. Wow. This is cool. You know? I mean, you could project yourself into the I sided with the apes. I was rooting for them. Yeah. I think it out all the things that humans need to work on when Terry began working on rise. He I spent some time with two actual chimpanzees, and like Natalia he couldn't look into their eyes and not see more than just an animal. He bonded with one young chip in particular named Jacob initially. I started out wanting to to imitate and play an ape. But it was this moment where Jacob jumped into my arms and looked into my eyes. And it was like a little child of baby looking into your eyes in. They just you just looked right into my soul. And it was like. It was so human it was it was so compelling how human he was and how intelligence and how much he was just open invulnerable and real. And it was at that moment. I just went. Oh my God. I've been thinking the wrong way, I've been thinking completely the wrong way up until then Terry had thought he would need to put on behavior and movement to become rocket. But after working with real chimps, he realized it didn't need to do more. He needed to do less when you're can sort of conditioned as as kids as you're growing up where we're kind of taught to not be afraid and to work hard. And and have tension of when you're in class like work hard, you know, stop stop daydreaming and stop wasting time. So what we do is regret faces and we create all this tensions in our body and apes don't have those sort of tensions built in. They have this what I call soft entail. Which is like this amazing strength and it's effortless for them. So Terry started working with the actors to strip away all the things they had learned to get back to the court the truth of being it's kind of like being absolutely true. And real, and that's that's the most fun part for actors because it's it's really not about playing an aide at all it's about shedding all of the BS and becoming absolutely real to yourself and true. And allowing yourself to feel everything we really wanted the audience to project these characters and say, you know, what I could be Caesar. You know, I could be marine. That's that's me. Why do I defy with his animal so much, and it's because we all feel emotion sign it of the apes has shown us for fifty years that at the end of the day, we all just want the same thing. Apes humans, and whatever is in between to be seen and heard and believed it leaves you thinking about yourself. It's not something you step away from a new UC like this fantasy world that you're like. Wow. That was that was a spectacle. That was really amazing those those creatures were cool, but you're totally removed from them. This is a fantasy world that you can actually see yourself walking around in and project yourself into into the characters inside with both sides. What will he find Dr? Destiny..

Terry Jacob Natalia fifty years ten years
"ape  r" Discussed on Screen Dive

Screen Dive

03:33 min | 1 year ago

"ape r" Discussed on Screen Dive

"I definitely feel like the work of Jane Goodall rocked the scientific community in the early nineteen sixties a twenty-something British student with a lifelong love of animals named Jane Goodall went to Africa to live in the jungle and observe ape behavior, basically to pick up where Darwin left off, and what she found challenged everything we thought we knew about our place in the animal kingdom it rocked humans in general because we wanna believe we're special. It's so part of who we are. We are so special. We are we are apex. Top the food chain. We are the smartest beer the greatest fear. The fastest people were trying to determine what makes humans human and tool use a huge part of it. However when Jane was finding that chimps were using tools. Oh, wait a minute. Wait a minute. Wait a minute. Wait a minute. And that's what I think we're seeing in this film. We're seeing just the idea that are these quote unquote animals that we have sort of put in zoos killed eaten. Even maybe they are a lot more like us than we thought. That's what the characters the audience all of us are afraid of the other the unknown the possibilities. We haven't even thought of yet. Specifically, the possibility of a shift in power as we see in the movie, and and with the Reagan's that really dig their heels in because when you when you admit that an animal in this case, they are trying to admit that human was more than just an animal if you'd mitt that it could possibly have intelligence on par with yours, then you have to treat them as equals. And then and then you give up power, and that's why I felt this film is much deeper than what I thought when I was six. When you start looking at humans, or in this case, if we start looking at apes as if they are people too because they are actually have been in one instance in Argentina an arena tan in a sanctuary. Her name was Sandra was given non person person hood, which basically she was granted the ability to be released from her. I think she was at the zoo, and now she's in a sanctuary so yeah, it really calls into question who holds the power. But back to my original question, why apes in this movie, as we're learning more about how sense yet, these these apes are I think that was what made it the perfect film or the perfect choice for what could possibly take over our world. I think there's always been a fascination with non human primates just because if you ever looked in the eyes of gorilla orangutan or a chimp, you know, that that's not a vacant space behind those eyes. So I think we like things that are similar to us. But also slightly different. It's kind of sort of where we're both inspired. And and intrigue, but we're also slightly terrified intrigued and terrified that pretty much sums it up. Although there was one thing that even caught Natalia off guard and somebody from California, I was very impressed at the statue of liberty made it all the way to Malibu. We've talked a lot about how switching the power dynamic between humans and apes gives humans unsettling nearer of you of our own misbehaviors, and what might happen if we don't get our act together. But one group of people is there to help us both sides to find Tom and growl, and between apes and humans, with empathy and authenticity. The actors Terry notary, and I play rocket in the apes franchise. And I'm also the movement rocket is a prominent character in the recent trilogy..

Jane Goodall Sandra Africa Reagan Malibu Argentina Natalia Terry Tom California
"ape  r" Discussed on Screen Dive

Screen Dive

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"ape r" Discussed on Screen Dive

"You know, damn dog -ly does being really interested in how how did they how did this all happen and going back and watching it now? All the science and all the social and critiques of planet of the apes. Now make sense so much more. I asked her to give us the basics eight biology one. Oh, one we are living in planet of the apes right now because humans actually are part of the great eight family were part of the family today, and in that great ape family there are humans chimpanzees bonobos gorillas Aranka tans, and then there's the poor lesser ape the gibbon which gets the shaft chimpanzees, which our closest genetic relative about ninety eight point seven percent, similar DNA to us and bonobos are two closest genetic relatives. Okay. But just to be clear apes and humans evolved differently in parallel. Right. They aren't just in line behind us on the highway. We have a common ancestor. So when point with chimpanzees about seven million years ago, we had a common ancestor, and our lineage what one way and there's one another and that the point being what? Chimps were seven million years ago is probably could be very will be very different from what they are today because they've been evolving, and they still are just like humans, but it's not just our genetics that similar our behavior. Overlaps two they used tools so they use dipping sticks when they're eating termites or ants. They're good at solving problems. As you see in the reboot of the series. What are the things that that primates do quite a bit is grooming, grooming, a huge deal? So the whole idea of us going getting our hair done or like, even like, your mom, braiding your hair or just sort of scratching each other's back. They have their own ways of grooming, one another and usually grooming in terms of who is in line in terms of hierarchy plays a role to one thing. That is very important is is primates all of them are social very, social when they are together, they embrace they hug, they, you know, they they roll around they play, and I should also mention plays a huge part of all animals, but specifically primates and chip. Being at war wasn't something invented by the movies. Males will actually have these groups patrolling the actually get together and they'll silently patrol their territory looking for outside males. And if they do find an outside mail. They can be very aggressive in times fight them and kill them in sometimes even eat them. So yeah, it's pretty rough out there sometimes for chip so apes our family, but maybe don't invite them to thanksgiving in our world. At least for now human primates are on top. I asked to tell you what do we have that? They don't communication. I think is really what gave human sort of a leg up language is incredibly important in terms of increasing sociability. I mean when it comes to communication, you can only do so much with your hands. You can only do so much with grunts. And and we and went not the fact that humans could communicate very well with one another meant that they could be able to hopefully survive in an environment. That is pretty forboding. Or warning each other for predators, for instance, to being able to speak basically is kind of it opens up the doors to a lot more possibilities for innovation. So there is a way to communicate. But even further you can explain okay ogg here take this stick. And if you rub it together, you know, you could only demonstrate so much. We often talk about finding our voice being heard speaking our minds as a metaphor for advocating for ourselves or having agency or even claiming our humanity. Natalia was telling me that essentially having a voice is what makes us human. So no wonder it's terrifying. To look at a world where we have lost our voice and another species has found there's but I was curious if apes right now could start talking. What would they say if apes Raval the talk tomorrow, I think they'd be very miffed at our behavior. That's fair. We've talked about what was going on in the nineteen sixties, politically and socially. But there was something crucial going on anthropology to something that dealt a major blow to the way human saw themselves..

Natalia seven million years seven percent
"ape  r" Discussed on Screen Dive

Screen Dive

03:25 min | 1 year ago

"ape r" Discussed on Screen Dive

"Kobo. Tried to kill. Fear. What I will do that. So. They serve you. Just to survive before playing Caesar circus was transformed into Gaul them for the Lord of the rings trilogy. But Leterrier found that they couldn't use the same tricks that works just a decade. Earlier didn't feel like we captured everything that was there. So we tried this idea of of Boashan capture asking Andy to come back in put markers on his body and just recapture recreate the performance for us, and what was really a bit of a science project in those days. But we are so excited about what we are seeing because Andy is such a great performer because on Ghalem it was only his body that we could capture the faces all done by hand by key frame on King Kong. We learnt to capture the face we figured out that by blowing all these markers on the face by this time, the new trilogy was in the works motion capture technology or more cap was not just ready for Andy circuses face. But also the complex sets the movies were filmed on clad in MO cap suits, the actors brought research labs ape cities and battlefields to life. Matt Reeves told us all about it. And then we had the actors in their more kept suits and all of what is cameras all over. And they were just roaming all over it. And so a lot of stuff that I think people think was created so much of it is created because the apes weren't there. But the environments are all real. So these filmmakers both fifty years ago and just this decade. Have you stayed at the art techniques for the time to create a physical space and personal look they made audiences suspend disbelief and give the idea of a planet ruled by intelligent apes a chance and the filmmakers got to use the actress performances on the day of shooting. No, more face painting in post. That's how good the technology got. And that's part of the reason these eight seem so human it's do doesn't give me the y. Eight vote for men. Got to be. Keta? You'll may not like what you find. There's another reason biology this movie isn't planted of the bunnies or planet of the cheetah's. It's planet of the apes and not by accident. There's no denying that the very real biological Abe human connection is part of what makes this movie, so compelling and unsettling. On the surface. But I wanted to really unpack it. So I called an expert. Hi, I'm Natalia Reagan. Tell ya is a primate anthropologist. She said he's non-human primates and gets the word out about all kinds of science in a fascinating way. I also was a comedian before I went into science. So I now combine all of those things and make content that hopefully reaches abroad audience and informs them in hopes sleek cuts down on science literacy, I wondered if she remembered the first time she saw planet of the apes. And if it may be served as an inspiration for her future career. I saw it when I was a kid. So this is got to be in the early early eighties. I would say, and I remember being I already obsessed with primates. But I remember just being I I love sci-fi. So I was into the film very much. But just the idea even in the end when Taylor kisses era, and she just calls them..

Andy Matt Reeves Taylor Gaul Kobo. Natalia Reagan Leterrier Boashan King Kong Ghalem fifty years
"ape  r" Discussed on Screen Dive

Screen Dive

02:13 min | 1 year ago

"ape r" Discussed on Screen Dive

"Actress faces every day strip. He credits those actors with making it all work. I don't care how good a makeup is on on a performers face or body. If they're not performing it doesn't work, and this is where the genius of Franklin chapter came in because. Marie sevens. And actors of that caliber, and Kim hunter and Roddy transcend or go through that makeup and bring it to life, and that's what made the whole thing work. Ultimately, these days making a human look, like an eighth takes a lot more than mak- the modern movies had a challenge that the original didn't the apes had to start out as regular apes, then become more human over time. But like the originals the new creative teams new the getting the look and performances of the apes right was crucial Rupert. Wyatt was the director of the first in the trilogy rise of the planet of the apes. It didn't take long for him to realize that Abe costumes weren't the answer. We couldn't put a human actor into a suit because we had to evolve chimpanzee into something more human. And so we very quickly moved away from percents from that practical reason, and then we looked into the notion of doing a film. With live apes and aside from the ethical reasons that was also many practical concerns with that yet. Again, the technical challenges of a planet of the movie fueled innovation and this best special effects geniuses in the world were brought on to solve the problem of creating a moving realistic eighths performance. One of those things we discovered right off the bat is Andy was playing Gullam is to go back in to try to recreate that league using traditional animation techniques. That's Joe la-, Terry. He's the director of weta digital and his work as senior visual effects supervisor on the new apes trilogy got him three Oscar nominations. He's already got four Oscars for Lord of the rings, the two towers and return of the king, King Kong avatar. Yeah. He's kind of a big deal. The Andy he's talking about is Andy circus, the actor who plays Caesar the leader of the original, hyper intelligent, apes On on Nobis. Nobis.

Andy circus director Wyatt Kim hunter weta digital Marie Rupert Franklin King Kong Roddy Joe la Caesar Abe Oscar supervisor
"ape  r" Discussed on Screen Dive

Screen Dive

04:21 min | 1 year ago

"ape r" Discussed on Screen Dive

"Capita Chia looks like a place formed by bubbling lava that eventually cooled off in hardened holes in the rock looks like giant ant tunnels. Ios. These things completely created like sculpture with the only the only way they could have done is mentally do these artists that was assigned picture Minna Hupa, and he's a little bit crazy. And I said, here's what I see. I said someone based on this feeling of camping don't you? You don't have to copy it. But see what you play with. Creepers research paid off Abe city looked like a natural, but civilized center for Abe society. It was so well done in fact, that it inspired future. Filmmakers takes on primitive versions of Abe strongholds for the modern trilogy, which took place at a time when the apes were less volved the apes structures had to look far less advanced even more connected to the natural surroundings. We just looked at forms, and then tried to figure out how we would take those forms and put them into nature and do it as if it had to do with the strength of the apes, and what they would build what they were able to do. That's Matt Reeves directed the second movie in the trilogy dawn of the planet of the apes and directed and co wrote the third movie war for the planet of the apes. The idea was that they would make walkways that monkey bars like they would make places that make sense for them, and he built these vertical spaces, and I wanted it to be as little virtual stuff as possible we shot at this parking lot in six flags which. Head closed in its had a sign that said closed for storm and that storm was Katrina and had never reopened, and it was incredible place. It was covered in overgrowth. And I was like, wow. This is like this is like the world without us and in the parking lot, James and the amazing engineers that ahead. They built it. All solid logs. It was an engineering feat. They worked at in CAD and worked out in the computer how they would do it and then built this incredible environment. Like creeper before him Reeves built a world that made his viewers believe that the apes lived there that they may plans and work together to achieve goals, but a few walkways and lava houses can only take you so far for the ends to really believe that the eights were intelligent. The actress portraying them had to look the part two and the original fifty years ago. There was no CGI. No help from computers to make a human look like an ape. The producers had only one place to turn makeup. My world of doing makeup as opposed to CGI you start off by covering the actor's face with impression material rather restrictive and claustrophobic and then transfer that to dental stone and then to do your sculpture on that. And then do the negative and then come up with a positive. And of course, the product is then glued to the actor's face that stands strep key. He was a makeup artist on the original film. They knew they had to nail the makeup or the film would never work. We've started experimenting with what the look was going to be like, and it was just damn difficult to come up with a reasonable. Look that was not comedic or laughable. It became a big enough problem that the producer had to call in reinforcements, call Jacob's they said we're not getting anywhere with makeup at school into slow says CVS, no help them do some. So I went down and met, and John I said if I was examining. I would ask if ever looked at it and ape amazing. Well, we got walls of photographs they made the zoo, and they had research, but a real ape. Well, they're moving in a direction, but they could use seeing eight and says so get an ape and the rest of it over the the next day the helped a week later the makeup team figured it out makeup would prove to be a critical part of the production, and it showed especially on the budget. They spent over a million dollars on makeup alone in particular, lots of foam rubber gave more flexibility to the actor as far as how he could work through that phone rubber and give a performance have it show..

Matt Reeves producer Minna Hupa Abe society Abe Katrina John I James Jacob million dollars fifty years
"ape  r" Discussed on Screen Dive

Screen Dive

03:26 min | 1 year ago

"ape r" Discussed on Screen Dive

"Heston finally convinced Senic and the movie was released in nineteen sixty eight the year came out is important to understand how it was received. By the end of nineteen sixty eight half a million US troops would be in Vietnam. Bobby Kennedy and Martin Luther King junior would both be dead a Nixon would be president elect. But in the background of all of this was the Cold War and its most controversial battleground space NASA was only a decade old and. A few years earlier JFK had told everyone that it was time to get serious with the space race. Thing. Not because they are. By nineteen sixty eight we were gaining on Russia and only a year after eight set foot in theaters Neil Armstrong, and Buzz Aldrin would set foot on the moon, but every escalation in space Menton escalation on earth and the threat of nuclear war loomed over everything as a result space was finding its way into pop culture and making Sifi mainstream TV's most popular show Star Trek the premier two years earlier and the highest grossing film of nineteen sixty eight two thousand one A Space Odyssey. It was in this cauldron that Twentieth Century Fox decided to make an incredibly ambitious movie. The first step getting the look of the planet, right? Frontal, and then I had read the book. And so they asked me what I thought we should do. I said, well, I think you need to some place that won't give it away. That's William creeper. The original films are director, basically, he was the guy in charge of the look of the film. I was seeing that we could according to the book, we could Bill maybe to Brasilia and do it like peer bul said which was monkey bars for Crosswalks, but it was a mild on city, but you know, pretty involved, but I thought there was be basics. And I'm giving you a trip to Brasilia these you're gonna do, and I don't want anybody to know. Israel, arthur. I mean, what are we gonna do? You're gonna find places that nobody's ever seen. They found a few locations the Grand Canyon like Powell and Malibu among them. And it worked at least on the astronauts. Do you have any notion skipper? We're some three hundred and twenty light years from named planet in orbit around his star in the constellation of Orion. Is that close enough for you other worldly landscapes check creepers next project was to build a city. It had to look like something a sophisticated evolved Abe civilization would build as opposed to the humans in the movie who roamed the fields in herds begin look through all kinds of architecture headed start somewhere. And a little book was only about that big called architecture without architects and was all about the native. It's amazing. What what has been done on Africa and primitive societies created arc of actually well that straight lines also researched broader books, and I've found the city of capita Chia in Turkey..

Brasilia William creeper US Twentieth Century Fox Bobby Kennedy Nixon Martin Luther King Vietnam Heston NASA Buzz Aldrin Senic director Neil Armstrong Russia Africa Grand Canyon Turkey Bill
"ape  r" Discussed on Screen Dive

Screen Dive

03:25 min | 1 year ago

"ape r" Discussed on Screen Dive

"Twentieth Century, Fox, this is screen dive a show that takes a deeper dive into your favorite movies. I'm your host and a van Valen. In today's episode. We're talking about another classic the planet of the apes. Now, I know what you're thinking, which one planet of the apes isn't just a movie it's nine movies. Not to mention TV shows books, comics and games. But let's go all the way back fifty years and start with the original film. Okay. I won't normally do this. But planet of the apes has one of the most shocking endings in film history. And we're definitely going to talk about it. So if you haven't seen the original now is a good time to pause go watch it and come back to us when you've recovered anyway, the planet of the apes crash-landed in theaters in nineteen sixty eight directed by Franklin chaff ner who would go on to win. The best director Oscar two years later for Patton also from Twentieth Century, Fox planet of the apes had powerhouse cast of Roddy. Mcdowell Kim hunter Linda Harrison, and of course, Charlton Heston, the only man who could pull off being indignant while wearing a loincloth. Digging of me damn dirty. Viewers watched as an injured and stranded astronaut tried to defend himself against the ruling class of apes this movie blue people's minds a lot of that was visual. Nobody had ever seen makeup and sets like that before. But a lot of it was the story the conflicts and that ending they resonated deeply with nineteen sixty eight audience that was already going through an existential reckoning one that had embraced science fiction as a means to process it. The flipped power dynamic was disorienting upright talking horse writing gun shooting aids lording over mute humans and all the while. The astronaut Taylor keeps reminding us that humans have made a mess of our own planet. Back home Bellamy, though. This man that. Universe. That Murray as paradox who sent me this does still make war against his brother. Keep his neighbors childrens starving. This story of an impossible mythical future managed to address some of the most crucial issues of our very real world. The tension between science and religion, the ethical treatment of animals, civil rights, women's rights, racial. Profiling all by using talking when I saw this movie for the first time, I remember thinking are we sure this isn't a horror movie, I guess as a human cutting pretty used to being part of the dominant species. But even though this world felt eerily like my own the ending totally snuck up on me like most first time viewers. I did not see that coming. All the time. Finally, really did it. You..

Twentieth Century van Valen Murray Charlton Heston Fox Linda Harrison Bellamy director Oscar Taylor Roddy Patton fifty years two years
"ape  r" Discussed on Movie Crush

Movie Crush

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"ape r" Discussed on Movie Crush

"Yeah fiftyeight yeah and it's also as i make sure dodge doesn't win the toss yeah absolutely that that whole thing is is inexplicable and i don't know where that came from it was really weirdly out of place even for a movie of that time it was it was but has thin came late two zero s duties yeah it was the man it was a madman it was just a different completely different era but yeah yeah it was it was it's a big global well my he would even is a plan a doesn't work while yet wonderwoman yeah is going to have a a raise of inbred people rise planet and like every nine months will have all my got that is earth so my wife said uh i'm severely on the apes site at this point and i said well that's the whole point of the movie issue oh well mission accomplished and she deserted checked in and out with but the best character in the movie is of woman zero is the is the heart and soul of the movie axiom 100 and she's a woman issues great yeah as an interesting story because uh she worked up the charlton has some of the premier needed no she was i think i read that yeah because she was always in makeup right but but it here's a great story so at the end of the movie they're shooting at a point doom in malibu and the h everyone has shot there who's ever lived yes exactly the actors play the evs had to get through three in the morning to get it makeup and then get a station wagon in eight makeup and he driven out of to malibu yeah and.

"ape  r" Discussed on The Show About Science

The Show About Science

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"ape r" Discussed on The Show About Science

"So what defies us from the apes i mean apes argues language and apes hughes tolls thanks jane goodall and so what define needs us from the chimps and the guerrillas and the bennell those euro that's a fantastic question okay and i hope you don't mind if i give you a long answer for it i don't mind if you gave me a long answer or gate and you already hit on some of the points so i'm gonna give you some ideas here uh and i'm not gonna play that well everybody would agree with me unfairly what i'm saying but i think when you get to that question here's some important things the first would be what i would call a fully developed a theory of mind okay and i want to explain what that might mean by an example so you come over to my house and you wanna snack and you'd really like at the be candy man and without syria mind you're thinking that i wanted candy everybody wants candy or everybody knows i want can't be that's in your mind time with a theory of mine you're thinking i wanted can't be but i bet he's thinking he wants to give me an apple so you're trying to maybe predict my behavior and understand what i'm thinking and then on top of that to make it even more complex you might say you know i thought i'd say he would like to give me candy but maybe he thinks my parents think she should give me an apple so now you're even thinking about what your parents are thinking about.

apple jane goodall syria