17 Burst results for "A. P."

"a. p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

02:02 min | 3 months ago

"a. p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"The course i go to the instructor they say well. Yeah if you do you know get this level of score are better on each of your next assignment tasks or whatever then yeah. You're your squeak by with a b. Plus you want and there's all kinds of different scenarios where that works out but the idea is that you can mess up at least to some level in most courses. Not all courses are like. There's some courses have a policy that if you get below sea on any test you can't get a grade any higher than whatever it is and so on but i think most of us just too simple adding up a points are averaging appoints so that you can have weak spots here in strong spot Coverage is out. And you got your beer better in your onto the next step. Now there are some advantages to that because we know that there are things that are out of our control of anyone's control that can affect people. They might be a flood or a fire or an earthquake. They might have medical challenges Epidemic might come up that affects them. There might be certain challenges that they've always had that they really need to work hard to overcome. There could be all just anyone of a variety of things happening. That is forgivable that is not meant as something that should harm us. that shouldn't harm. Students shouldn't keep them from passing. Our course in i you know i guess. Theoretically that is a way to handle those like okay. You know you can have a couple of scores. That aren't so good. That are actually pretty bad. And you can still pass this course. It's okay we can still make it work and you'll get out and can continue on and in pat you on the back in and hope the best for you and be truly sincere in doing that but there are other ways to do that to take care of that problem in so that's part of what i wanna talk about as well but before i do we're going to take a quick break and then we'll be.

earthquake
"a. p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

05:31 min | 5 months ago

"a. p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"The american association for anatomy. I recently joined a discussion group of podcasters interested in new emerging strategies and technologies and one recent. An lively thread. His centered on the importance of transcripts for podcasts. Many podcast provide transcripts or captions. And those that are available are often not very accurate. But it's important of course it's important for accessibility. Those with profound hearing loss can't access the content without transcripts captions. I myself have moderate hearing loss and it helps me to and even those with no hearing loss can benefit but it also gives you away to search for and find the topics in past episodes. The you wanna go back and revisit and listen to again or maybe to recommend to a colleague when it comes up in a conversation or maybe something going on in your department or coarsening want to go back to it. An accurate transcripts captions. They cost a lot of money. Our friend to triple a. Pay that for us. Maybe a quick note of thanks to them at anatomy dot org are one of their social media. Accounts is a good idea to say. Yeah.

american association for anato
"a. p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

05:14 min | 5 months ago

"a. p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"First off. I.

"a. p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

03:24 min | 5 months ago

"a. p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"And which these if any are open book. Finally how do you try to maintain standards of academic integrity with repeat test opportunities and open book test. Thank you for considering questions. I look forward to hearing your take care kevin. Thanks for the call jerry. It's always great to hear from you and of course i'm thrilled anytime. I got on the podcast hotline. Now this set of questions. That jerry sent isn't all that long but as you might expect my answers are gonna be long. They are going to take some time most of the rest of this episode in fact so we'll take each question in a separate segment so that you know where you can easily pause to. I don't know returner call that you've got on your outline now. All my answers are kind of interrelated so if it seems like i missed an opportunity to fully explain things. It's probably one of two things happening. Either i'm gonna come back around to it is i answer a later question or it's wealth. I miss the opportunity. In which case you're encouraged to call the podcast hotline and ask follow up questions. I'll give you that number in case you don't have it memorized. Ready at the end of the episode before we get started. I want to emphasize that. I'm answering from my own experience with my own courses because jerry asked me. It's not at all that. I'm trying to promote my way is the best way or they. You should follow my pattern exactly or in any way. But i do think that will we hear about what other faculty of tried successfully in their own courses in this case me and mine courses. It bronze our perspective and adds potential new arrows in our quiver of teaching strategies. Or maybe it gets us thinking differently about how to shoot the arrows that we already have in our quiver. And i also want to emphasize that i didn't invent any.

jerry kevin
"a. p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

04:01 min | 6 months ago

"a. p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"That i just told that's similar to the version i tell my. Ap classes now. The one i tell my amp classes is a bit shorter. Thank goodness right. That was a long story in that olot happen. But when i do it my class i get to add a lot. More physical drama aside act. I would happen and walk around the room and in yeah okay. I- overdramatize a little bit and and you know that's an example of where a story based on a real situation even if overdramatize to make it more fun and into more clearly emphasized the main point it can be a way that we can use storytelling in our teaching and i pulled together some ideas about storytelling in teaching and what that really means to me episode forty-eight which was called the story telling special so you might want to go back and listen episode forty eight some time but in this case the star story. It's teaching about how to learn science rather than a science concept per se but the principle still applies no matter what the concepts are that we're teaching whether it's science content or something related to learning science content as star story. So what i do in my classes. This i tell that story near the beginning of the course and then i wanna get to a point where i say something like. Oh i don't know how. When i ask you to put the layers of the skin in the correct order from external internal or internal to external and i mean all of the sub layers of the upper durmus and the dir- missing. Let's even go down to the subcutaneous layer and everything you need to be able to put that altogether on a test and they're all looking at me nodding their heads. Yes okay. I get what you're saying and then i'll stop and i'll just look at them and they're not writing anything dow maybe one or two are. They're the ones would've had chemistry adverse..

"a. p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

04:25 min | 6 months ago

"a. p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"I want to tell you a little story way back. In the olden days it was my first semester as a freshman at the university and me and a buddy of mine from high school were invited to participate in a one semester version of their chemistry course which was normally two semesters but this was a pilot program to see if by screening out students that already had done well in a high school. Chemistry course could do what they needed to do in one semester and my high school teacher knew this university professor in so i guess that's how i got in. I guess that's how i got invited. And boy that made me feel good. But on the other hand being a freshman at a well regarded. University has a little scared. Because even though i enjoyed chemistry in high school. And i did do well and i also knew that it's not easy and so yeah i could do well in high school course. But how is that going to do in this course especially if it's accelerated and as for smart chemistry students which i it was not a label. I saw myself wearing very easily so we went in there and Dr malone leo j malone was our professor in he walked in was very welcoming and made us feel good about the fact that we were in this class and shared his excitement over this educational experiment to see how it would go in and we got excited about that but it did kind of crank up the pressure. A little bit at least for me that. Oh my gosh would skype better do well. Because i don't wanna disappoint my professor. Who so excited about this experiment..

Dr malone leo j malone skype
"a. p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

05:03 min | 6 months ago

"a. p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"It's interesting the way science works. I'm always fascinated. How when things don't go quite as expected can turn into a big and maybe important scientific discovery and the other thing. That intrigues me about it as well. Just what they found in how it works and that relates to this idea in immunology that all cells have some immune capabilities. I mean there's very primitive thing. Probably the original cells from which we have evolved over time at least built up some defensive mechanisms now later on when you get to a complex multicellular organism like the human body. Now we see. Some professional sells whose lives are dedicated to immune defences those cells that we sometimes talk about in amp whose main function is to be defensive and we sometimes in zeroing in on them lose sight of the fact that every single cell can defend itself at least in some ways we might mention the interferon process for example. We know that infected cells can send signals to nearby cells to warn them that they've been infected and that can trigger those nearby cells to activate their defenses and maybe they can resist lease at some level resist infection by the microbe that was hitting out infecting that original. Sell that released. The interferon was actually that mechanism. Some scientists were looking at trying to figure out the details of what goes on in the many varieties of interferon processes that might be occurring in the human body so they were looking at epithelial cells and they were scanning across genes that they thought were producing proteins involved in this interferon process in when they did that they ran across a gene for protein called. Apo l. three it turns out that a pl three acts as a detergent. It is like so it can dissolve lipids and lipid films and we know where to find lipid films in bodies. Don't wait yes. We know that they're forming cell membranes. Will you know what. There's a layer of the salmonella bacteria which is what they were using in these experiments..

"a. p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

01:46 min | 6 months ago

"a. p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"To this episode i though and there's an easy way to share this episode with a friend and also earn yourself a bit of cash. Simply go to the professor dot org slash refer to get a personalized share link. The will not only get your friend also set up with this episode. It will also you on your way to earning a cash reward and remember. I always have links for you. If you don't see links in your podcast player there's simply go to the show notes at the episode page at the ap professor dot org slash ninety seven. And while you're there you can claim your digital credential for listening to.

"a. p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

02:27 min | 7 months ago

"a. p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"I thought it would be engaging and also kind of a brain break issue. Some classic piece of art like chili's venus or something like that us that one when we start talking about certain aspects of the female reproductive system and In you know in explained that who painted it and what era it came from what the symbolism is because a lot of art in different eras of styles have symbolism Explained that symbolism and how it relates to what we're gonna be talking about and then move on in you know what i've had students and this is more than one student. I swear his have run into him later and they said me by doing that. It made me more interested in what was going on with some of that art and i remembered some of it in art history when i took art history and some even said. That's why took art history. Might my fine arts option is because of the things that you did with that. And i'm thinking whoa this is get a commission from the east department or something. But that's cool that that's helping them crossover because we hear so much information about how that helps for students to do that. That crossing over of concepts among different disciplines and they can see how the humanities relate to the sciences. When we do that sort of thing. Another kind of of title slide you might wanna do. Is some current news story that relates to the topic. You're about to get into or some recent scientific discovery that has been made. You can talk about that and say okay and we're going to be talking about this science now in this part of the story so my advice is to use a title slide into us that is an engaging transition into a new topic and not just a sharp sudden kind of alarming. Just jump okay. Now we're done with that are starting this and oh man. We need kind of a moment to gather our breath at. Oh look at that painting. That is kind of cool. I can't like that. Or i relate that or whatever and.

east department
"a. p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

04:40 min | 7 months ago

"a. p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Book something. I want to say about that. That i really strongly believe is no matter. What tax book you're using you want to try in feature the images from the textbook and all the major textbook. Publishers provide images from the book that you can use for that very reason. Sometimes they'll even have some. You know remade slides not. I don't like using premade slides. I don't like using premade much of anything as far as a teaching tool goes. Because i kind of have developed my own ways of doing things and they don't necessarily follow along with the way. I want to tell a story or things that i want to emphasize so i will look at those tools. But i don't necessarily use those tools myself but i do use the images either labeled or unlabeled depending on what it is and how it works out on the slide but the reason why i wanna use tax book. Images is because that's what the students have available to them. That's what they're used to seeing. So if they're looking at home neurons in plasma membranes. In iran in their tax bill can they're looking at the way ions are represented their textbook in the way those little ion channels and pumps a represented in the tax book and then they walk into class. And you're showing them something. That looks very different. Different colors different shapes different perspective. They're going to have a hard time even students. That don't typically have a hard time connecting things. They're going to have a tough time connecting it and you might think but this is much more beautiful than what's in the textbook are. This is from the textbook. I used in graduate school so therefore it must be better. No it's not better if it's not gonna work for the students in so you know for naive learners. This is critical for connecting what they see in their textbook with what you are telling them in showing them in your storytelling. So my advice is to always use. The image from the tax book is your primary teaching image. Now learners do not have the level of expertise that we do. So they're not going to be able to make connections but even those of us that have a certain level of expertise are gonna find that jarring to go from one kind of representation to a very different kind of representation so we need to think about that again. It goes back to universal design for learning. We don't wanna trip our students up and there are going to be students in our course that are going to have weaknesses in their processing things the same way we do. Our maybe not as easily as we do and make those connections and so we're throwing unnecessary obstacle in front of them in sistan on using the images from this other textbook which i like better and why didn't my department pick this one. 'cause i like this other one batter you wanna use the images that the students have so you know. Let's start with obvious thing that the students had already at least the heretical at least potentially have had some experience with if they haven't already looked at their book least they have their book available to go back and look at later. So you know it also works in reverse. So that what they've seen in your explanation in your storytelling. They're going to be able to to recognize again when they opened up the buck later on. Now i'm not saying only used images that are near textbook. 'cause i don't do even with my own textbook teaching but i don't do that. I start without. That's my primary mode. But then i'll get to a point where i feel like we've we've been exposed to that. We've learned a little bit about that..

one kind one
"a. p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

05:47 min | 7 months ago

"a. p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Then but if you have a big giant title that's taking up twenty percent or more of your slide and then you try to fit an image of the kidney and then you try to fit. All these words describing. Let's say the parts of the kidney. then how golly. That's not gonna work very well least in my experience. That doesn't work very well. Get rid of that darn title. Now you've got lots more space and then stretch that image out now you gotta stretch your proportionally in. I'll come back around to that idea and a couple of minutes but the idea is that you wanna make that image as big as possible because that way the students can read the labels that are on the image if you have any label. It's you know Image from your textbook for example and not only the labels might be important but also the details if all they see is the rough outline of kidney It looks like a beam. And that's all i can get out of that slide. I can't see with that instructors. Talking about about you know pyramids in kayla season and columns and cortex All that stuff on now they need to be able to see that stuff so you need to have a big kidney where the parts are easily. Not that stained by squinting in in in you know moving your head up a little bit asking the person in front of you. What is that little dark spot there. Nano you want big so everybody can see it easily. Even people that maybe can't see so well. I mean cutting used to seeing things pretty well. I have a really good optometrist. But not everybody can do that. We wanted big in move. The taxed way off to the side or even overlap the texts over the The image a little bit because a lot of those images have a lot of white space built into them anyway. Have to be in a box. That's totally separate from the image. If there's room put it in there now. This takes some finesse to make it. So it's not so confusing. Or jumbled together that students aren't going to be easily be able to to interpret what's going on there but you can do it. It just takes some practicing. It takes a good i and and What am i secret. Weapons is looking at it again later. Setting it aside go do something else comeback. Look at it again later. And you'll see like oh my gosh. I know that all run stick together. I can't tell what it is. I better fix that. So yeah okay. Let's let's try to you. Know have the texan image on the same slide. And let's make it so. The image is featured in the tax does not feature. And let's be creative. Let's literally go outside the box listener boxes of the template. Think outside those boxes in think about how. It's going to be best for teaching and speaking of artwork in images that we're using and i mentioned you know if you're using image from the textbook make sure the it's enlarged enough on the slide that the students can actually read the labels in if they can't then you're gonna have to edit in your own labels or cover up the labels or something like that because students are gonna try if you think. Oh they don't need to read the label so took if they're small need them looking at the labels. They're going to try anyway. And what is there squinting and trying to read those labels. You know what they're not doing. They're not listening to you. Tell your story. And that's the whole point is to hear you tell your story that's part of your job you're conveying the story or if it's not you maybe it's you know part of a discussion but there can be focusing on that so i tried to read those labels..

twenty percent lots more space couple of minutes
"a. p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

04:04 min | 8 months ago

"a. p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"A really long thin hollow tube between them that's made of memory so functionally they're kind of shall and things can move back and forth along that to so one shell can communicate a very direct way and very rapidly if need be with that other cell so can be different kinds of signals either signals to do something or signals to stop something could be signals to Destroy yourself or something like that all kinds of policy in. We're just learning about these. I mean we've been learning about him for a few years but still in the very early stages and that's kind of the point of this review article which i'm not gonna go into all the details. It's really a very fascinating read. And i think that my appreciation for my understanding of cell biology has improved greatly because of this. I look at other organized differently than i did. Before for example think about how nerve extensions like accents are made. They're made it turns out just like these. Tnt's tunneling nanotubes and in may be and they propose this the paper. Maybe this is how the nervous system forms at least in the brain. How brain tissue forms maybe cells neurons developing neurons connect with each other in the very early development of the brain with these tunneling nanotubes and then eventually those are replaced by synapses. So maybe when. I described picture. Tunneling nanotubes like along exxon. Maybe there's more to that than just being an analogy. Maybe that is kind of. Maybe they're part of that same process. Maybe accents really are toiling. Nanotubes that don't quite make it to you. Know connect up entirely with that posting epic sell and If if that doesn't actually happen in embryonic development of the brain Then maybe evolutionary laid preceded the formation of a synapse based network in brains. So there's that and there's oh my gosh just all kinds of other aspects to this but my point is is that i don't know i'm kind of excited about learning more about tunneling nanotubes in you might be excited to maybe not. Just try it and see. I know it sounds kind of walkie. Go ahead and try it and see and read it and see if you're excited and see what kind of insights it gives you in about other parts of the cell but also you know that excitement. I want to carry that over to my students. I wanna tell him. Hey there's some exciting things were discovering about sows. All these new organizations that are being discovered or can house that are being proposed what we're learning about them and You know that kind of engagement enthusiasm and excitement. I think really helps learning so there. You have it. A the free distribution of this podcast is sponsored by the master of science in human anatomy and physiology instruction the happy degree..

one shell
"a. p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

02:45 min | 9 months ago

"a. p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"No. That's four knows but for answering students questions. I do think there is a lot to learn from how customer service agents do their jobs that is when they actually do their jobs and do it well and make me as the customer feel satisfied and maybe even feel good about them and about myself when i interact with them well. I recently had all week of experiences. Where help center agents did not listen to my issue. They must've just heard key words or key phrases. Maybe these are like commonly encountered issues that the hero watt and they gave me an answer. That only peripherally related to the issue. I needed help with. I even had one of those exchanges where they didn't address my issue at all and then blew me off by telling me that if it happens again and let them know and they'll look into it like what why not solve it now. Let's not wait for it to happen again. I don't want it to happen again. And that's why i am contacting you. This wasn't what happened. But here's an example of what i mean by not answering the question. Let's imagine. I ordered a pair of brown shoes but i received black shoes instead stat. So eye contact the customer service agent. Who responds that all the shoes. Come with black shoelaces even brown shoes. And then i responded. It's not about the laces. it's the shoe collar and they respond to that. The laces are not shipped on the shoes but are in a separate package inside the shoebox. No that's not the concern. Have you looked inside the shoes for the packet of shoelaces. No i have shoelaces as a courtesy. Like in mail a packet of shoelaces. But we only have black shoelaces. No i don't need shoelace. Is i need brown shoes. Oh okay that style of shooters come in brown. Would you like to order a pair now. Oh see that's what i'm talking about now. I do understand that..

four one of those exchanges a pair pair
"a. p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

03:09 min | 10 months ago

"a. p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"The inventor and futurist nikola tesla once wrote of all frictional resistances. The one that most retards human movement is ignorance. What buddha called the greatest evil in the world. The friction which results from ignorance can be reduced only by the spread of knowledge and of the unification of the heterogenous elements of humanity. Effort could be better. Spent welcome to the amp professor. A few minutes to focus on teaching human anatomy and physiology with a veteran educator. Teaching mentor your host. Kevin pat in this episode. I talk about taking old steps and teacher by ask is digital no taking better than paper. I talk about the pandemic twenty and diluted blood plasma effect on aging well. Here's an argument. That's been okay. Sorry debate this on for quite some time. And that is the debate between whether it's better for students As far as they're learning goes to write out their notes in paper notebooks or to use a digital device which is a tablet or a laptop or something like even their phone may be and take their notes that way. And you know there have been several papers have suggested that writing out your note on a paper notebook or in a paper notebook with a pen or pencil better for memory and for learning than using a digital device such as a tablet or a smartphone or laptop or whatever. Even if it's tablet or pad device that you know can be used with a stylus so it's kind of like riding on paper there've been a bunch of studies that seemed to prove that a writing out the notes is way way better but there's also been a bunch of studies and replication of those previous studies and meta analyses of the various studies. That say nope. There's no statistical difference so one is not truly better than the other of course another issue with a lot of these studies. Is you know what they're actually measuring you know. They're measuring often short term memory. So they'll have the participants take notes on some kind of presentation or whatever and then let them wait an hour. Maybe distract him with cookies. Or i know what they're distract. Cookies would distract me doughnuts. Yes they would distract me and so then they come back in an hour and then they take a quiz or test or whatever and they measure how much learning was done in. Compare that and you know. I don't think any different than i am in this regard. I don't want my. Ap students remember. He thinks for an hour. And.

nikola tesla an hour Kevin pat pandemic twenty one buddha
"a. p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

02:40 min | 1 year ago

"a. p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"What is that professor who teaches endocrinology. The whole endocrinology blocked. What are they going to do now. So not very. Many schools adopted french textbook and the publisher was losing money on it and not surprisingly they stopped publishing it so nobody got to hear that version of the story. Well okay a few people do. But they're probably long gone in case you didn't know it. It's incredibly expensive to produce textbooks especially anatomy and physiology textbooks really. You have no idea so if you come up with a better story and put that into a textbook you better have a large enough pool of adopters ready to jump on that or your book will never see another edition and then nobody gets to hear the story. Actually it won't get past the first review stage. Says you can forget about that. I vision anyway. And there's the learning outcomes and other standard guides on the order of topics. Yeah i know. Nobody is obliged are expected to follow. The order of the hats learning outcomes but they are there and the topics are in the order. Found in all the mp textbooks. So it's really it's kinda part of that. Massive body that resists chain now part of that resistance comes in other practical matters such as transfer transferability of credits being first and foremost a community college educator. This is a big deal for me. If i teach my amp course in unexpected order and then my ap one course will be different than yours and if my student wants to transfer my ap one course to your institution so they can take ap to there. It's not gonna work your school. Probably won't take my course as transfer course but if they do well they do and then that student will get some topics twice which is not bad but some topics will be missed entirely which is bad before moving onto my main point. Yes i do have a point. I'm getting to here. Let's.

twice first first review ap french
"a. p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

04:05 min | 1 year ago

"a. p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"As i mentioned in the previous episode that is episode eighty seven triple a. supports a new virtual dissection database called the dvd or virtual dissection database. You can access at at. Www dot virtual dissection database dot com. Just fill out the form. When you're there wait for approval. The link takes a day or two and then he can start exploring now. I recently did that. And while it is amazing we don't do dissection of human body donors at our community college so i can see this being a great resource to help. Our students extend their learning far beyond what we normally provide for them for access to the video and other.

a day two dot com dot episode eighty seven triple
"a. p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

04:55 min | 2 years ago

"a. p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Your students. Don't expect a Ron Howard film or Morgan Freeman voice over. They just expect you being you in fact the more you you can be the more comfortable you and your students will be during this weird adventure that we're all on right now or maybe a slightly more laid back and casual. You might be an order. You know to engender that all important. We're all in this together vibe that we want to create right now tip number nine. Do some audio visual courses such as anatomy and physiology. You probably need at least some images for some of your instructional media but consider supplementing with audio in remember your textbook into our lab manual or lab atlas probably has a lot of the images you need anyway now audio is often even easier than video and students love it. They're part of the podcast generation after all and they can stream it to their mobile device and listen while they're doing other stuff like organizing their survival bunkers supply of toilet paper and bottled water. You'll be right in their ears as if you're sitting on their shoulder and sharing your insights tip number ten keep things brief. The knee jerk response to switching from live video and audio his simply do lectures that you've given classroom into a camera and Mike you do that if you want. If your anxiety level is climbing that may be the best strategy for you but remember an earlier point about less being more. Consider just doing really brief media clips. It's easier to hold the tension into effect of instruction in short bursts when working remotely trust me on this one too if you must spend a lot of time on a topic then break it up into short clips but consider taking those. Long winded presentations and chop chop chop them into a simpler easier to digest version. Tip number eleven be nimble in the martial art called Tai Chi Chuan. One way that we practice being nimble is to always keep our knees flexed a bit sort of like cats do when they're on the prowl. Doing that one can quickly move with great power into any of several defensive positions swats do that. Let's be nimble by being ready to shift positions quickly in response to what's happening in our course ready to change directions if we have to expecting to have to shift some things around. If your regular listener you knew I was GonNa Work. Taichi analogy somewhere right. You're probably also waiting for me to somehow work in term carbon no hemoglobin. But you know what I just could not find an angle. So you won't be hearing me say carbon hemoglobin at all in this podcast because carbon me. No Hemoglobin just doesn't apply right now. Tip Number twelve teach by testing. Give a lot of low stakes open book multiple attempt quizzes and tests retrieval practice. Any I've been preaching this message for decades but even in face to face courses. This strategy is a game changer. Now's a good opportunity and try and prove me wrong. Tip Number. Thirteen testing is not always teaching. Okay wait really I think. The testing is always teaching something. But you know there's the formative kind of testing I was just talking about that. Is All about retrieval practice. And then there's the summit of kind of evaluation after students have had a chance to do retrieval practice in this kind of some of testing test. The final outcome of learning. Maybe for this emergency we could just combine them and call the formative testing summit of when I picture when I say this is that we could allow multiple attempts at an online test with only the best score counting toward the course grade that would allow students to do retrieval practice until they gain more and more mastery some links in the show notes and episode page at the A. P. Professor Dot Org Slash Sixty Four B. That explain more fully what I mean by this..

Morgan Freeman Mike A. P. Professor Dot Org Tai Chi Chuan Ron Howard