17 Burst results for "A. P"

"a. p" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

03:29 min | 3 weeks ago

"a. p" Discussed on The A&P Professor

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"a. p" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

02:38 min | 2 months ago

"a. p" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Of teaching. What goes through your mind when you hear that phrase. Yeah i know all kinds of things. Go through my mind when i think about student. Evaluations of teaching good bad and ugly. So that's what. I'm going to talk about right now. Think of this as a starter discussion because there is such a big set of things to discuss that. I can't possibly hit all of them in this episode. So i'll make a start now. Then continue the discussion with a sequel in the next episode. Maybe i'll call it return to the planet of student. Evaluations of teaching no doesn't work. I clearly have to work on a better title and then after that next episode Who knows maybe. I'll return to it again sometime down the road. Of course you're always invited to call in to the podcast hotline and give your take on things were send email. Besides insides and tips perhaps Many editorial you might consider sharing a story or to cut her bad with without sound effects on your experiences in student of of teaching in this episode. I'm going to start with a few ideas about the good the bad and the ugly of student.

"a. p" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

01:47 min | 3 months ago

"a. p" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Take it a step further and make it an active engagement with appear. That's my serving suggestion. For all our episodes you can send your friend to the episode page at the professor dot org slash eighty three and listen there or even better sign up at the professor dot org slash refer to get a personalized share link. That will not only get your friend. All set up a podcast player of their choice. It'll also get you on your way to earning cash reward. Refer to friends and you get five dollars. Refer ten friends and you get twenty five dollars really. And you're always encouraged to call in with your questions. Comments and ideas at the podcast hotline. That's one eight three three alliance or one eight three three five four six six three three six or send a recording written message to podcast at the ap. Professor dot org. We'd love to have you in our private community well away from the ads. The spam the tracking those darn algorithms. That hide what and who you want to see the convoluted email threads all that stuff in a comfortable supportive space filled only with amp faculty just like you. Just go to the professor dot org slash community. I'll see you down the road. The.

"a. p" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

01:43 min | 3 months ago

"a. p" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Bones and more in the show notes at the episode page at the ap professor dot org slash eighty two in case. You want to get the book or check out the bone blog or if you want to visit our sponsors and you're always encouraged to call in with your questions comments and ideas that the podcast hotline. That's one eight three three lion or one eight hundred three five four six six three three six where senator recording a written message to podcast at the ap professor dot org. And you know what we'd love to have you in our little private online community. Well away from off those ads. Spam and tracking. Oh those darn algorithms that hide. What in who you want to see and the convoluted email threads. It's a small and comfortable and supportive space filled only with amp faculty like you. Just go to the professor dot org slash community. And i'll see you down the road. The amp professor is hosted by actor. Kevin pat an award-winning professor and textbook author in human anatomy and physiology do not stick objects such as coathangers inside this episode to scratch your scam..

"a. p" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

05:21 min | 3 months ago

"a. p" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Make the indians more subservient and then also the bison were big pain afford the railroads because particularly winter particularly in the costs were The bison which stand in there to get out of the weather and after stop if it could and they have to drive the vice enough the railroad tracks him so that there were marksman a road on the trains and actually a shot the bison and so for these two reasons are probably thirty million a bison that were basically exterminated some of their hives were salvaged but the rest of them are just left to decay. Will the railroad started coming through. Andy pioneers were out there. Is that the. The settlers realized that they could pick up these bones. Put them in their car. Take him to the railhead and sell them. And so at least trains were coming west with consumer goods and They otherwise returning east Empty but they would load these huge piles of a bison bones onto the trains and take him to detroit and chicago divert allies plants in they grind into fertilizer and bone has a lot of phosphorus in plants. Love foss person so this was a a great source of fertilizer. All the way across the country and as the rail lines expanded will then People could start not picking up bones and kansas and nebraska in eastern colorado but also in oklahoma and texas and going north into such catching on so further north and eventually all the bones are picked up so after about thirty years of this industry died at the time. They say that there are not long picked up to fill to railroad trains. Full boxcars of that would span twice from san francisco to new york in in a few extrapolate into current dollars. Is they think that that was probably like a a four billion dollar industry over about thirty years in jokes as i drive across kansas. Now look after. See if can find one that's left. Yeah right right. After all that. But i mean that that you know that. That's the kind of story to that. You know if we have time to tell our students that or even if we're just chatting with students outside of class if we tell those stories i mean it because they need to know about the phosphorus content ofcom to consider ourselves teachers in a broader sense to them in terms of cocktail parties ending friends for dinner. You know the weather. The weather in the virus can go so far. That's a good point. Yeah it is a marketing support. For this podcast is provided by half's the human anatomy and physiology society.

Andy pioneers foss kansas detroit nebraska chicago oklahoma colorado texas san francisco new york human anatomy and physiology s
"a. p" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

04:50 min | 7 months ago

"a. p" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"There's one semester i was always had the first class in the morning was an eight. Am class and i would go to the lecture hall and go in there and make sure everything was where it was supposed to be. I had an intercom. pa system. That i use so. I got that all set up and got all my material setup and so on so that when i came to class i could be greeting students as they arrived and chatting with them and didn't have to worry about getting things set up so i remember one morning i had walked in or actually i just kind of looked in the room because the door was locked in normally the public safety officers had unlocked it for me So that could get in there and so it was locked up. And i thought well. That's really weird. I'm going to go after. Go find somebody with a key to open this up. Because i didn't have a key to that lecture hall. Then i noticed. That was a sign on the door. That said please use a different rumors. I forget what exactly it said but made it clear that this room was sort of out of order inside look appeared in science. Kinda damn i look inside and the suspended ceiling that was normally appointed. Suba was now dow. It had fallen down. Well they had been doing some renovation to the lecture hall above it in so for the days preceding that incident during class sometimes there'd be like some jackhammer on above our head and there'd be a little whisper dust come flying down and stuff like that and i wondered about the safety of this. Well sure enough it caused the ceiling are lecture hall to get loose and it foul completely down and guess what it was resting on the seat bax so if someone had been in the classroom and thankfully there was. I checked into this. There was no one in the classroom when it fell but if students had been in there and they had noticed things were starting to fall apart if they hit followed the advice i'd given them and got down on.

pa
"a. p" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

03:38 min | 7 months ago

"a. p" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Explanation of things that students should probably know if this were an ideal world but we know this is not an ideal world and mine is not an ideal course. I'm not an ideal teacher. And i don't teach ideal students so there are things like issues of academic integrity where it continues to surprise me. That students think that certain behaviors are okay. And they're not okay. I think some. I'm just really don't understand what. Plagiarism really is so i have a link to a site on why be honest. Why is that important to you. Besides the fact that you can get in trouble for not being honest. And i have that lincoln my show notes in episode page. So you can just use that same link to that little article on. Why be honest. You might have some other links that you found that explain. Plagiarism and academic integrity or you might want to write your own another one that i linked to is a little blog article. I did called. Y deadlines are important. Because i think sometimes students don't really understand how that affects their on learning how it affects the operation to the course out affects other students when people aren't meeting the deadline. So that might be worth linking to. How about why. Correct spelling is important. Take a look at the link. That's in the show notes and you might want to link that in your own syllabus. There's all kinds of links you might be able to find on classroom and online etiquette and professionalism that might be helpful Maybe links to how to do. Certain kinds of assignments like term papers. And you know here's some help with research methods another kind of link you might want to consider is how to use the learning management system or other tools are probably video tutorials user manuals. And so on that you can link to so the student can find them easily and go to and get their answers answered right away without having to wait for the help desk. Call them back at an inconvenient time. You might also linked to resources on how to navigate your school like the campus map and things and how to find resources in your school and where the learning center is and are there tutors available in. Where would i go for them. Are there any open. Labs available in. Where would i go so you can link to all of that something that i started doing a while. Back that i found very useful is to have a page of. Faq's frequently asked questions about my course. Some students are going to look at those frequently asked questions on their own. I think most students just sort of ignore it. If they don't have to look at it they're not going to but at least you can refer the students there when they ask questions say well. I explained fully why i do that in. Faq faq's cola. Come up or if nothing else you can go use the faq's yourself as the instructors. When a student asks you a question and drops a little thing like i just don't understand why you give so many tests then you can just go into the faq's copy the answer that you posted there and paste it right into your response to that student and say oh. You mentioned something about so many tests. Here's why do it and just drop it right in there. So what kind of faq's do i put in there. Well things like. Why do i insist on correct spelling. I explained my rationale. It's not just because. I'm being hard on them. Okay that's part of why i do it but mainly i'm doing it because of the accuracy and the professionalism issue yet you can read that when you look at the link another question i put their. Why am i harder than any other teacher they've ever had. Don't you encounter that comment a lot. I get as in every other class except this one with the implication that that somehow the teachers what. Here's another question..

lincoln cola
"a. p" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

05:53 min | 7 months ago

"a. p" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Then they're gonna see that ahead of time. If anything is called into question later then you kind of backup and say well. You know. I i gave this you. I ran this by you first and you didn't say anything to me. Then so let's start at that point of conversation and move forward from there realize that you're going to be held. Whatever you put in your syllabus so keep that in mind you might want to consider adding a disclaimer sort of statement somewhere in there like a disclaimer. That kind of admits idea. There might be a mistake in here and the students shouldn't expect the instructor to be held to a mistake. Like oh you know. I forgot to put this test in. Well you can't add it later because it wasn't in the syllabus. Well yeah you can. I mean as long as you communicate that early enough and clearly enough. You don't wanna blindside your students but you do want to be able to fix mistakes and you might want to have in that disclaimer. Not only well. You know a reserve the right to correct mistakes. We also reserve the right to make changes. Because there's all kinds of reasons why changes need to be made me one of those weather emergencies. I spoke of an earlier segment. Or there's some other situation on your campus or in your school or in your course that requires a change. Maybe the required textbook didn't come in on time. He got to make some changes all kinds of things and then tell them that. It's their responsibility to wa- toby watchable for changes so make that part of the disclaimer. That students are responsible for keeping track of the current version of the syllabus or for announcements that announced changes to the syllabus. As long as it has in it where you think should be in an in. It gives you enough wiggle room and also alerts. The students that what is in the syllabus is not written in stone it could change you know. We want to be flexible. And you're telling them that ahead of time..

toby
"a. p" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

04:02 min | 7 months ago

"a. p" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Okay so this is the part where i figure out where i must stop and designing my syllabus like hoops. That is an important question. And yeah right. That's not syllabus anywhere. And i'm going to write myself a little note right now and i always have a pocket full of three by five cards so i pull out my little deck of three by five cards and i write it down there right in front of them modeling of behavior. I hope that they'll do is when they have questions. Write it down right away and then they can ask me and not forget about it and totally miss something. So i do that. I write it down and then next time around. I'll add it to my syllabus or something. That wasn't clear like oh you're right. That part of the service is not clear. Let me clarify it for you. And i'll make sure update my syllabus. So that's how. I find things that i've missed or ma stop or whatever and then i put it in the next time so that's part of my first day activity and by the way i have a link to that in the show notes an episode page. If you wanna go and see exactly what is i do on that day too. It's the hand. I actually to handouts because the one i do for a and p one's a little bit different than the one i do for amp to my friend. Krista who sent me the powerpoint that i just mentioned she also asked a question about what about a syllabus quiz Now the question she asked is would that come across badly to students. Could that seem maybe a little bit paternalistic or maternal listrik. Or i'm thinking maybe even condescending to have a syllabus quiz sort of like as grade school or what and i think she's got a good point. I think that we need to keep that in mind. So that if we do a syllabus quiz and i do. And i'll explain how i do it in a minute..

Krista
"a. p" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

14:36 min | 11 months ago

"a. p" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Org under the resources tab and have a snack or beverage Andy. Because you're going to be there for a while exploring all the resources listed there home in a recent caps virtual townhall meeting. I was asked to give a short presentation. Distilling what I've learned about quickly moving from on campus to remote teaching including some of the ideas that I've already shared in past episodes. Those of you who have the tap may have already seen and heard are re recorded video version based on that presentation given the townhall meeting this video re recording became available on tap app last week because it kind of draws things together and also serves as a distillation of some core ideas of my pandemic teaching book. I thought I'd share right now. A brief audio version in this segment. I'd like to spend a few minutes with you. Sharing some ideas for moving our on-campus courses quickly to a remote learning environment. Before I share my first idea. I just want to clarify that. Not only do. I have experience in teaching on campus. Then moving to remote education I also teach in a program that trains teaching faculty in ways to effectively teach both online and face to face. Because of this mentoring for at least the past eight years. I've been paying attention to what faculty find that works. And what doesn't work so well besides that because I've been covering this developing phenomenon of pandemic teaching in my podcast. I've been paying close attention to what other experts are saying about the best steps. We should take right now. It turns out that in and I'm as surprised as anybody about this. What the experts are saying aligns very closely with what we've been teaching in our faculty training program and when I've been sharing in my podcast so I have some broad sweeping idea some very simple ideas for us to consider that distills what I've been learning. A lot of this has already been said by many of my colleagues in various venues and. I'm just kind of pulling this all together and we need to keep in mind that many of these ideas go against what our gut is telling us. They're not only different from what we do on campus courses. They're just well wild and crazy sounding so I'm asking you to join me in suspending disbelief and give these ideas a chance. My first point is don't just pick up your course and move the whole thing too online. My first reaction when I first started considering teaching online was to do what I do in the classroom especially in the lecture part of the course and simply translate that into a digital format video but what I found out actually what my students found out and let me have it with both barrels is that is boring. Which means it's hard to engage students which means I lose some students which means I eventually lose most students. I'll those amazing recorded lectures just well. They just sat there out in the ether. Not Being listened to and now I see all these teachers all over the globe doing that very thing that I found to not work very well. What to even more surprising. We already know that. It's not the best way to teach online and yet our campus tech people are giving us workshops on how to do that. Now I'm not saying don't do video. Lectures I'm saying don't do this. Same lectures the first step is starting with. Your learning outcomes are course objectives. Identify only those concepts. That students really must have I mean really must be taking out of the course with them when they leave. When we do that we have to remember that. Our course is not their only course. Are there only learning experience? They cannot and will not learn all there is for them to know about our discipline or our sub discipline from only our course so we need to get over ourselves and realize that art course isn't as important as we think it is which turns out to be a great relief when we truly embrace that idea. Wow the pressure is often our well. Maybe not so fast. The next thing we need to do is take those core ideas antrim everything else away from all those beautiful lectures we've created over the course of years and then go in again and really do some trimming because it's never enough terming the first time and then let's do that again and again keep trimming and trimming and German. Keep going back to our material until we have. Well I'M GONNA go out on a limb here too we have about one third. Orlando ass of what we had before the next step is to chunk those lectures into pieces. That are no longer than about eighteen minutes because when working remotely students are going to tune out if they're longer I've been using the analogy of being forced to leave your course home and you can only take what fits in the back year car. Not The entire contents of your course home. What's essential what is it must be saved during this emergency. Just take that and nothing more. We're heading off to teach a course in Tanta Course.

Andy Orlando
"a. p" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

07:39 min | 11 months ago

"a. p" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Wrote when we have no relevant experience or expertise the vulnerability uncertainty and fear of these. Firsts can be overwhelming yet showing up and pushing ourselves pass. The Awkward Learner Stage is how we get braver. Welcome to the professor a few minutes to focus on teaching human anatomy and physiology with veteran educator and teaching mentor. Your host Kevin Pat episode. I talk about fumbling first tries zoom by a protein folding game and keeping teaching slides. Simple that quote by Bernie Brown that. He used the episode opener from a recent blog posts that she wrote which also resonates with the first episode of her new podcast called unlocking us then emphasizes something that I've seen in my students and in myself over the years that is that whole set of fearful panicked frustrating maddening training emotions that we experience when we're doing something for the first time what Brown calls and F F T which stands for well. I'm not sure how I can say this without. My podcast kicked out of fourteen different countries. Let's say effing first time I having a name to call it and Brown emphasizes that naming it and recognizing it can help us a lot but for me F. F. T. stands for fumbling. I try as because for me. The f-bomb is the nuclear option. Which I'd rather hold in reserve for something really really really really big but you know this pandemic thing maybe the time you WanNa consider using Brown's version of F. F. T. Instead of mine for me it's still in reserve for now. If you've been around me or my podcast for a while you've heard this from me already but it's probably a good time to revisit it. That is the idea that trying something new to us as always always always always going to be frustrating it's going to produce any or all of those F. F. T. feelings but as soon as we can recognize the situation as a fumbling I try and that it well as Kinda expected to include some foaming after all it's right there in the name fumbling. I try then. We're in a way better spot than just being pulled down by it or distracted by the negative aspects as soon as we recognized that frustration is an essential part of learning something new. We can turn it from a force of evil to become a force for good. I often remind my students that babies just learning to walk. Don't just get up and start walking. They try they tip they fall. They get frustrated but they get back up again and again and again and eventually they master that walking thing but it seems like the older. I get the less resilient I become about learning the more frequently I let that F. F. T. thing either my attitude before recognizing it and well SORTA Kinda embracing it as part of the learning process in her blog. Post Dr Brown tied the F. T. phenomenon to the sudden switch to remote learning that we're all experiencing right now in gave three pieces of advice that resonates strongly with the advice that I've been giving in this podcast over the last few episodes. Now I recommend that you read her post but in a nutshell. She summarized three key principles in going to remote learning successfully. Her first one is build the container. I which he means by that is spent some time on how things are going to be working not on the content that is physically your students a little bit and just get them all settled in and forget about the content in your first or second meeting. You need to have that container there before you can start putting content into it. Her second principle is don't assume that every student has the same access or attention span or freedom from a distraction that we do or that. They did when they were still on campus. Things are always different now which leads right to her third point which is do everything in small chunks. When she explains that she mentioned the research that went into setting limit for Ted talks to eighteen minutes. So remember. That less is more thing I've been harping on kind of fits right in there kind of dumped sales right in there. Doesn't it which leads me to one last thought? Ha Ha I got you. It will be years before I even get close to my final thought but one last thing that I'll mention in this segment his to emphasize the advice. I'd given this podcast or the advice that I share from others is not gonNa work for everyone. I know that but I'm sharing it because it will likely help you sort out what you WanNa do our new things you WANNA try. I've pushed through my F- ft's with techniques and principles I've share with you and I know you'll struggle with even believing that they might work just like I did at one time and that you'll have your own f. f. t. struggles if you do try to adapt them to your own course but I'm telling you that's where some of the best fun and teaching is wrestling with been pushing past our F. F Teas are fumbling first tries a searchable transcript and a captioned audio. Graham this episode are funded by AAA. The American Association for Adamy the April annual meeting of AAA had to be cancelled. We know that but triple as doing something. That's well just kind of amazing. They put together what they're calling the virtual annual meeting week or V. A. M. W. for short it's not really an online version of the conference. Not exactly instead. It's this like well-thought-out set of resources and activities and so on for example there's a whole list of open access online symposia and other events that you can choose from. There's an anatomy art show. Here's a rundown of some of the research. Highlights that would have been explored at the meeting. Had the meeting actually taken place. Well his I don't know it's just hard to describe. It runs from April sixth to April tenth. So you WanNa tune in soon now and you can find out more about it at the. Ap Professor Dot Org Slash v. a. m. w. twenty again the AP professor dot Org.

Bernie Brown professor F. F Teas Kevin Pat F. F. T. Ted American Association Graham AAA A. M. W.
"a. p" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

02:36 min | 1 year ago

"a. p" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"So it's even more important for us to use headphones and ear buds than for our students. Because that's going to enhance the sound quality by preventing at Gaza and other problems..

"a. p" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

04:55 min | 1 year ago

"a. p" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Your students. Don't expect a Ron Howard film or Morgan Freeman voice over. They just expect you being you in fact the more you you can be the more comfortable you and your students will be during this weird adventure that we're all on right now or maybe a slightly more laid back and casual. You might be an order. You know to engender that all important. We're all in this together vibe that we want to create right now tip number nine. Do some audio visual courses such as anatomy and physiology. You probably need at least some images for some of your instructional media but consider supplementing with audio in remember your textbook into our lab manual or lab atlas probably has a lot of the images you need anyway now audio is often even easier than video and students love it. They're part of the podcast generation after all and they can stream it to their mobile device and listen while they're doing other stuff like organizing their survival bunkers supply of toilet paper and bottled water. You'll be right in their ears as if you're sitting on their shoulder and sharing your insights tip number ten keep things brief. The knee jerk response to switching from live video and audio his simply do lectures that you've given classroom into a camera and Mike you do that if you want. If your anxiety level is climbing that may be the best strategy for you but remember an earlier point about less being more. Consider just doing really brief media clips. It's easier to hold the tension into effect of instruction in short bursts when working remotely trust me on this one too if you must spend a lot of time on a topic then break it up into short clips but consider taking those. Long winded presentations and chop chop chop them into a simpler easier to digest version. Tip number eleven be nimble in the martial art called Tai Chi Chuan. One way that we practice being nimble is to always keep our knees flexed a bit sort of like cats do when they're on the prowl. Doing that one can quickly move with great power into any of several defensive positions swats do that. Let's be nimble by being ready to shift positions quickly in response to what's happening in our course ready to change directions if we have to expecting to have to shift some things around. If your regular listener you knew I was GonNa Work. Taichi analogy somewhere right. You're probably also waiting for me to somehow work in term carbon no hemoglobin. But you know what I just could not find an angle. So you won't be hearing me say carbon hemoglobin at all in this podcast because carbon me. No Hemoglobin just doesn't apply right now. Tip Number twelve teach by testing. Give a lot of low stakes open book multiple attempt quizzes and tests retrieval practice. Any I've been preaching this message for decades but even in face to face courses. This strategy is a game changer. Now's a good opportunity and try and prove me wrong. Tip Number. Thirteen testing is not always teaching. Okay wait really I think. The testing is always teaching something. But you know there's the formative kind of testing I was just talking about that. Is All about retrieval practice. And then there's the summit of kind of evaluation after students have had a chance to do retrieval practice in this kind of some of testing test. The final outcome of learning. Maybe for this emergency we could just combine them and call the formative testing summit of when I picture when I say this is that we could allow multiple attempts at an online test with only the best score counting toward the course grade that would allow students to do retrieval practice until they gain more and more mastery some links in the show notes and episode page at the A. P. Professor Dot Org Slash Sixty Four B. That explain more fully what I mean by this..

Morgan Freeman Mike A. P. Professor Dot Org Tai Chi Chuan Ron Howard
"a. p" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"a. p" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Useful <SpeakerChange> for you going <Speech_Music_Male> forward. <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> Hey <Speech_Male> don't forget that I always always <Speech_Male> put links in the show <Speech_Male> notes and at the episode <Speech_Male> page at <Speech_Male> the Professor <Speech_Male> Dot Org <Speech_Male> case you want to further <Speech_Male> explore any <Speech_Male> of the ideas mentioned <Speech_Male> in this podcast <Speech_Male> or if you want visit <Speech_Male> our sponsors <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and you're always encouraged <Speech_Male> to call in with <Speech_Male> your questions <Speech_Male> comments and ideas <Speech_Male> that the <Speech_Male> podcast hotline. <Speech_Male> That's one <Speech_Male> eight three three Lyon <Speech_Male> Dan <Speech_Male> or one eight <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> three three five <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> four six <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> six <Silence> <Advertisement> three three six <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> or send a recording <Speech_Male> a written message to <Speech_Male> podcast asked <Speech_Male> at <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the <Silence> <Advertisement> Professor Dot Org. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I'll <Silence> <Advertisement> see you down the road. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> The <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> ANC professor <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> is hosted by <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> actor. Kevin Pat <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> An award-winning <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Professor and textbook <Speech_Music_Female> author in <Speech_Music_Female> Human Anatomy <Music> Physiology. <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> The content of this <Speech_Music_Male> episode is <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> ninety seven percent <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> recycled waste <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> therefore unsafe <Music> drinking <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> support for this episode <Speech_Male> comes from <Speech_Male> the American <Speech_Male> Association <Speech_Male> for Anatomy <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> the Human Anatomy <Speech_Male> and physiology society <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Male> the master Sir <Speech_Male> of science and Human <Speech_Male> Anatomy and physiology <Speech_Music_Male> instruction. <Music>

"a. p" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

09:56 min | 1 year ago

"a. p" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"We dissected the term Allah stasis and Alice Static and then we we dissected the term emoji and looked at the word Emoto Khan and and we also decided the term cumulative then episode sixty one Chimera came up again and forensic and apoptosis and we talked about the controversy surrounding the pronunciation of apoptosis and then we discussed WIFI which we learned is a registered trademark. So Oh shoo man. One hundred seven terms and I made it in one hundred eight lot of terms there that we dissected for the last year and so so now I think we can better see that when we do just a few were dissection set time in our classes that over the course of many classes over one semester oster and then the next semester named Py one. AP to it really gives the students a lot of examples and of course those are just examples they get the students started on doing their own. A word dissections immune. This podcast is sponsored. By half's the human anatomy and MM physiology society promoting excellence in the teaching of human anatomy and physiology for over thirty years. And don't forget February twenty honey i. It's coming up soon. And that's the deadline to get the early bird rate for the annual conference in Ottawa Ontario. This may it's also the deadline to submit a proposal for a poster or a workshop at the conference. I hope I'll see you there. Just go visit habitat the AP professor dot Org Slash paps. That's Ha ps okay..

Emoto Khan Alice Static professor Ottawa Ontario
"a. p" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

12:24 min | 1 year ago

"a. p" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Are episode. Page can you the topic of required prerequisites got me on kind of a ramp about how we can't really expect students remember much of anything thing from a prerequisite course. I hope you stayed with me anyway. Because now I'm ready to tell you the really good news about amp requisite. Perhaps you remember that I mentioned layering or interleaving in the previous episode. That is episode. Sixty one way that can work is when you keep bringing back concepts that we're learned in earlier experiences that could be earlier experiences from that course or could be from from learning experiences from a prerequisite course and every time we re encounter previously learned concepts concepts that were likely lead to a forgotten we relearn it probably more quickly this time and in doing so. That strengthens our knowledge and it also promotes our long term retention of it. Each time we do that encounter the need to retrieve that knowledge again we strengthen our mastery sorry I really think that to learn amp deeply. We need to go over it again and again and and again then again that's four again which is about as high as it gets on my scale so for me that means and that it's good for me to accept that my students probably don't remember much from the prerequisite course or courses but I also so now that this is how we learn that. Is we learn. We forget we relearn we forget again although probably not as much as we forgot the first this time and we relearn and we forget in a cycle that brings us closer and closer to full mastery. I'm not really sure when that the cycle ends for amp. Because I've been at it for decades and I'm still not finished. I'm a lot further along than I was ten or twenty or thirty years ago but I'm still a student not a master and that's how I look at learners coming into my ap course with their prerequisites. They're still in the process of mastering what they need. I'm meeting them at an early stage in their learning process and I accept that being novices. They've not really mastered anything yet. At least not much for many of them then the next question Russian is this if we can't expect many of our incoming amp students to know much about those foundational concepts. We really really wanted them to know what we do. The first step I think is that we need to review foundational concepts whether there we have prerequisites are not. I'm not saying we need to do it all at the beginning of the course but I do a lot of it at the beginning of the course at least east some of it. The first thing I do is give them a self paced online test at the beginning of the course that reviews all all those foundational concepts. They should've learned in the prerequisite course. I call that tested zero which I introduced way back in episode twenty twenty four which. I'm now thinking I should've made required prerequisite to listening to this episode but you would have forgotten about it so here it is. I'm reviewing something that maybe you learn about before Kevin Zero and what that does if they really have mastered mustard all that they were supposed to learn them prerequisites than ten zero. We'll take them hardly any time or mental effort and the handsome retrieval practice to refresh their knowledge right at at the start of a p one but for those who forgot probably most of my incoming students they have time to get back up to speed and if there are any concepts they never really did learn. They have time to get at least a little bit acquainted with them and you know what if they get stock I hi and their classmates can help them. But it's not just that independent review in the form of a task that they can attempt several times. I also quickly quickly review some of those core ideas in the course this further refreshing and reinforcing knowledge. I admit I've I have gotten a bit of pushback from students when I do that. For example I'll never forget a student talking to me at the end of the first week and he asked if this was I was going to be a repeat of general biology. Maybe he was in the wrong course he wondered. I explained my strategy and the student understood what I was doing and he was okay with that now even though that rarely happens I mean very rarely happens his still looms Arjun my mind like any pushback does disproportionately large mind. Isn't that weird. How I do that not give much thought to when my I students are on board with my course design but fret over the rare student who may not get? What I'm doing is not right away? I don't know maybe you do that too. Who sometimes but way? That's not all remember that layering I was talking about. I'm going to keep on doing that. Bringing bringing back concepts again and again throughout amp p. one and continuing on the MP two and you know what when I start amp too. I'M NOT GONNA assume assume they remember everything from AP one so. I'm going to have that test zero again and I'm GonNa keep on just a layering stuff off throughout amp to marketing support for this. PODCAST is provided by half's the human anatomy immune physiology society promoting excellence in the teaching of human anatomy and physiology for over thirty years. Go visit us at the professor presser dot org slash half's and speaking of H- APPs I wanNA give a shout out to listener Kevin Flaherty. Who mentioned this podcast and a reimposed imposed from the House blog? He mentioned the annual episode. That I do called Kevin's unofficial guide to the annual conference. The last one I he did was episode. Forty two in anticipation of the two thousand nineteen conference in Portland. He mentioned that because he was going to be a first timer. There there that episode really helped him get the most out of the meeting not that one needs a guide to the conference but it can kind of prime the pump a little bit it and get you in the mood for a great meeting. Well thanks a lot for that testimonial Kevin and you know what I'm planning the next edition of my unofficial guide to the half Samuel Conference as we approach the twenty twenty conference in Ottawa Ontario. And I'd love to include your questions your for advice or tips and any of your stories from half's conferences. You might have and that you wanNA share any kind of story really even if it's silly especially if it's silly just call the podcast hotline or send me an audio recording or written message and remember you can always always find out details about the upcoming conferences at the AP professor dot org slash paps h APS. Dan I've been chatting about required prerequisites in the AP course and I proposed the we shouldn't expect students to remember or anything from any prerequisite courses they've taken and that's okay because that's how learning works. And when we know that we just start there and and make it all work for them. I'm saying that by laying aside that frustration with prerequisites we can be both happier with our task and and more effective. And now the question remains what good are prerequisites should we even have them. And if so what what exactly should they be okay. That's more than one remaining question. I realize but they are kind of all wrapped together at least in my mind. Signed their illogical bundle of questions. So here's what I've come to believe I think prerequisites are valuable people. I don't think they have the magical qualities that we often believe they have. That is they really. Don't give us any expectation that students coming into amp will know any particular concept or at least know it particularly well. Yeah okay there. There will always be that group of students in the front row. will but I'm kind of thinking? They know it all whether they met the prerequisite requirement or not. I've also come to believe that what prerequisites do give us. Are those initial layers of learning. Yeah the learning thing is mostly forgotten. But it's mostly still there somewhere and just need some more layers refreshing and retrieval practice to bring it to full fruition. So what is the perfect prerequisite for amp. I don't think there's an an answer for that. I think perhaps guidelines offer some great help but it really does depend on what you want accomplish in in your course. What kind of pre learning will best support that? I think it also depends on some practical things. For example is there room in your institutions curriculum to add a coarser to without requiring that two year degree program to become a two and a half the three year degree program or to extend that four year degree out to four and a half for five years. Not just that but can they really squeeze that yeah prerequisite in before an MP in their semester by semester schedule. I think some sort of introduction of biological principles is useful even if not absolutely necessary but having a prior experience of them as much better than not having them write. What I don't think is all that critical is exactly what form those prior experiences take? I have a feeling that each new generation of teachers will continue to want to reinvent the a p prerequisites in the earnest. Hope that will finally only get this right. That's okay let them. You can't see me but I'm smiling with that. Buddha like smile all right now while they're all fighting that fight. I think it far more productive for us to use our time and effort to learn how to make what prerequisite we do have work to. Its full capacity. That is to spend our time on taking our students and just where they are when they reach us and design learning experiences for them that will bring them closer and closer and closer Tomaso before they leave us alone as.

Kevin professor Kevin Zero AP Kevin Flaherty independent review Arjun Tomaso Buddha Portland Dan Ontario Ottawa
"a. p" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

08:34 min | 1 year ago

"a. p" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"A common and perennial conversation among amp. Faculty is what prerequisites If any should be required for the amp course that is should students have to pass a biology course or some other course maybe chemistry or maybe even some flavor of English or Algebra before they can be expected to succeed in our anatomy and physiology. Of course heck I've thought about requiring a solid study skills course before student gets into my AP class. I think I'd rather they be able to make a news flash cards and make concept maps then to be able to solve quadra equations for example the AP Course skied lines from the human anatomy and physiology society half's suggest a whole list of required and recommended courses with a minimum among grade of C hats. Members can access the course guidelines at the AP professor dot Org Slash perhaps that's Ha ps ps but perhaps guidelines are well intended as recommendations for programs that want to align in well with the learning outcomes which I've mentioned before in this podcast specifically in episode fifty and for courses that one have a high level of rigor in their program in my mind at least these recommendations are not absolute requirement. And that's that's helpful but when things are not strictly definitive are when we have obstacles at our school for implementing anyone's list of recommended prerequisites requisites. Then we meaning. I tend to still fried about things a bit or sometimes fred a lot. Sure sure any answer to the prerequisite question is going to depend on factors unique to that institution or to that program or department. Our course Actually they're even more considerations than those I just listed but I'll circle back to some of those a little later even after we account for all all those factors. The answer never seems to satisfy Est.. Does it at least not over the long term. We we seemed always WANNA come back to it because no matter what our prerequisites aw or our previous decision not to have required Requisites it's we never seem to be fully satisfied that things are just right. Why because not all our students students seem to transition easily Dr Course and not all of them succeed at least not at first so a solution that always seems obvious? Assayas maybe we should reconsider our prerequisite requirements and it seems to me that this is a wheel that is continuously elite. Reinvented over generations. And remember. I'm as old as an oak tree. I've actually been around for generations all that time paying attention to what we're doing with prerequisites because that's what we aim peaches do right we ask teach other about prerequisites and we theorize about what's ideal and it seems that no matter how much or how often we fiddle with our course prerequisites that prerequisites situation. We have just well never really works. I've come to the conclusion that it's not that prerequisite courses don't work it's just the prerequisites never truly fulfill fill the expectations that we have for them so that begs the question. How much should we expect students to remember from their prerequisite? It's my answer to what we should expect from prerequisites. Is this nothing really. We should not expect anything. I know I know that. Seems like a negative cynical answer but but I don't see it that way. I think it's realistic. And it's well kind of freeing in a way if I'm not really expecting expecting my students to really own concept of ions protein synthesis or chemical equilibria or what. ATP is what it does then. I'm free of expectations and because of that I won't front about it really now. I smile the smile of a Buddha when I hear my colleagues fretting about the prerequisite requirements or at least. I like to think I'm doing that not only that now. I'm far less likely to be tempted to judge. Judge my colleagues teaching those prerequisite courses badly and I'm less likely to be tempted to judge my students. Badly to by not having Any expectations of prior learning were all starting with a clean fresh slate. What a great feeling man you might ask ask? Why don't I expect students to remember anything useful from what they may have been exposed to in their prerequisite course or courses well first off? I don't mean to imply that none of them know anything. I'm just saying that I've come to believe leave that. It's just not realistic to assume that most of them remember everything and that's kind of what we do right. Expect them to know everything from their prerequisite courses. Why don't I expect that partly because we don't typically teach for the long term think about it the classic way of teaching and approach that I used myself for many years is to prepare students for the next test best and hope they all pass for those that pass? They've learned at least sixty percent of what I wanted them to learn. Now think about that for for minute. That's just a little over half of what they ought to have mastered and that's just for those who actually passed for those who didn't pass pass that test all is not lost. They can learn about two thirds or so of what they ought to on the next test and it might average out to a passing course grade right. But let's say they're learning a solid. Seventy percent are so on average a C grade that means means they've mastered or at least become familiar with a bit over two thirds of the material for their unit test. But because they're not asked about again until the end of the semester it's going to disappear until the week before the exam one. It's going to be relearned at least in part for another week or a two and then lost again. That is unless we excuse them for the exam. Because they've been doing well on the unit tests that measure short-term learning even those with solid long-term learning need refreshing but let's say they were and of course that really did promote long-term learning. Let's say they had to master eighty five to ninety percent of the concepts and that they were continually expected did to retrieve that knowledge and demonstrate mastery on a test. Okay they're still gonNA forget some of it even if they mastered a hundred hundred percent of the concepts and then taught the prerequisite course or the or maybe they taught all the prerequisite courses. There's still gonNA forget some of it maybe not all of it but some of it but of course the more typical case is they're not that competent when they reach us so again. Isn't it more practical. That is more useful to just assume that.

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