17 Burst results for "A."

"a." Discussed on RollFare - A D&D Podcast

RollFare - A D&D Podcast

05:08 min | 5 months ago

"a." Discussed on RollFare - A D&D Podcast

"Is. It's like a pulse of some sort. And she just kind of rubs it along the inside of his cheek and she she then hands you just kind of a A basic sack like a leather sack. That has this poll police in it when she says Just give this to him about But once a day and within approximately a week he he should be fine. all right. well thank you very much. The marines the vossen does help me out plenty of times in the past. I don't want to. I feel like they more than deserve me to return a favor every now and then you'd give me the list for the. Yeah so she she goes back in gets the the ingredients that she needs enhancing to you and then she just again reminds you and these are primarily found to the southeast of here. You can find the you can find the The giant scorpions usually near the road. But again hopefully you can find a debt. one. I will just need some of their Their blood specifically is what. I'm looking for your by all means if you can extract. Some of their venom now certainly paid for that. And then just you've had to us some vials to collect this right certainly. Don't have those on hand. All right we will make recruit. Just bring her a giant. Rpm perhaps have to pull it on the caught. Has she been giving me the stink eye at all. She hasn't paid attention. Okay so but So she she tells you about that and then she she hands the list of herbs and says there are difficult to find but There are some rare flowers that Occasionally grow within the desert Where small patches of water maybe flow beneath the ground If you can find them those would be helpful as well..

once a day approximately a week
"a." Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

04:03 min | 5 months ago

"a." Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"Greg said no and how many of the individuals who aren't taking this vaccine are individuals who don't take any vaccines or is that. That's probably not no. I don't think we really know i mean. Naturally they'll be some carryover from people who are hesitant about vaccines we've had for decades To be hesitant against a vaccine we've only had a year or so but i don't think any exact numbers are no okay. I'm tell us a little bit about reinfection rates. At this point we actually do have some data on reinfection rates that were published by clinical infectious disease journal. This past week they studied a little over. Nine thousand subjects. Who had previously had code had at least a two negative kobe tests so they resolve their infection and then subsequently developed cove it this was sixty two clinical centers across the us. So what did they find about. Point seven percent of them got reinfected in a mean of about one hundred and sixteen days. Now this is important because a number of studies like this have been done including the so called sirens study in the uk with healthcare workers and those that collection of studies have shown somewhere between point five and about two and a half percent of people who develop kkob subsequently get reinfected now they tend not to have as many symptoms. But you don't always know in the study we're talking about. Two of those patients died even though they had previously had kofin. The risk factors are what you would expect. But in particular patients who had asthma or who were smokers were at particularly higher. Risk of reinfection. So this is. I think really important for people to understand. I should say by the way that the mean number of days after which they got reinfected somewhat surprised me was a hundred and sixteen days. The we have told people you know if you develop kobe. We weighed about ninety days. Other people are thinking while. I'm protected for a year or two or three. I mean i hear all kinds of things for which there are. no data. here is a collection of data. Now showing that as i say between Point five and two and a half percent of people previously infected are getting infected now. There's one proviso those studies were done when the delta variant was not circulating. And it's something helene. Unicef taken pains to explain to our listeners. The data keep moving on so what was known a year ago four months ago. Don't depend on that. It can change as these new variants arise. So i expect that that rate will be even higher as we get into a higher delta circulation had any of these individuals have been vaccinated between the first infection and the secondary infection. No these in this particular study. No in some of the other studies people had gotten at least one dose and raises an interesting point. Know that the m. r. a. vaccines after one dose are only about thirty percents effective against the delta. Variant two doses. Get you up in the high eighty plus percent Wow quite a different so two doses makes a big difference huge difference greg. I had seen something about a pill for treatment. Yeah mirka actually what has happened. Is that the government released. I think it's three point..

Greg two doses uk eighty plus percent one dose Two three Nine thousand subjects two about one hundred and sixteen mirka seven percent a year a year ago first infection a hundred and sixteen days about two and a half percent three point four months ago a half percent
"a." Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

03:15 min | 6 months ago

"a." Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"The first is an individual who tells us that their friend has received the cova. Nineteen vaccine developed a headache after the first phaser Station in still has a headache a month. Later is concerned about getting a second dose. What do you think about that. I mean understandably when you have a side effect soon after vaccine the temptations to blame it on that vaccine so point one. I'd like to make is that temporarily is not always causality as we found out over and over again for this particular listener. If you have a headache that's gone on for a month and you're not somebody who's had an issue like that I would urge that listener to go in and be evaluated. There are number of things diagnostic possibilities that go through my head hearing that story and i would not just say well. It was the vaccine and leave it at that. I would investigate further right. Say the other thing. I think helena's that you know having had a side effect after one dose does not guarantee that you're going to have that side effect or even have that side effect in a worse way after a second does that does happen. But there's no guarantee that that's going to happen and when you look at an issue like headache and you know i don't wish month-long headache on anybody but when you look at the incidence of headache and complications after getting covet that is a far worse proposition. So there are people that are put in the unfortunate position and many of us myself included will be in. this group. Comes to the possibility of a booster dose after you've had a side effect of valuating whether or not you should take a booster dose in light of that side effect will be a very individualized sort of decision. You make in association with your healthcare provider. I have similar question. is from a listener who stays at their niece. Had a sore arm for about a week. After the first dose it then went away but recurred after a week arm was sore again. So should this individual get their second dose absolutely and the reason. I say that so quickly as you know. A sore arm is something one can deal with something that one will recover from whether the sore arm a month later was due to vaccine is is impossible to know and they may. Well have a sore arm after a second dose. That's a common thing to have happened but that pales in in consideration to the side effect profile that we see in people who actually go on to develop kobe so a sore arm in service of preventing cogan is I think for me that balance of risks and benefits would clearly be in favor of getting the vaccine makes sense..

first dose one dose second dose Nineteen vaccine first a month later about a week a month a week second first phaser helena
"a." Discussed on You Need a Budget

You Need a Budget

03:16 min | 6 months ago

"a." Discussed on You Need a Budget

"I'm saying i'm saying if you actually ask them to run that list through the filter of cash. I actually see them start to physically like look at the ceiling and start to process and start to say things like well. I guess if we're talking about whether i'd rather have more of this thing or more of that thing. I would like more of that thing. So they bring it back to something closer to today's reality and how they would like to adjust and improve today's reality instead of going straight to while i want a private island now they want a private island fine but i think my experience with my clients in their businesses is if you ask them what do you really want and they say i want a private island or i want you know. I want to solve world hunger because they often will go to very aspirational places. I'm all for those aspirations. Those seem not to impact behavior in the way that acknowledging the things that touch the cash today. So if i were to say hey you have a You have you have several vice presidents in your company for example would you like a ceo and they say oh actually that would be great. I would love to phase out. I would love to move onto the next phase. Where i'm still involved in my company but i'm not running my company more so now the oneplus becomes once list becomes much more tangible. And they're saying. I would really love to hire a ceo. Well how much do you think you wanna pay her well. I don't think i'm going to be able to pay less than a quarter of a million a year or something and okay. Great so now. We're grounding that that very tangible aspiration in the context of what's exciting to you today and that shapes behavior much more easily than some of the things people say to me do fall in the direction of sort of. I wanna private island or i want to solve world hunger. We tend to be altruistic all of our all of our good and bad quirks come out and sort of goal setting exercises but if we actually want to shape behavior going all the way back to something like wine apps rule one is way more impactful because it grounds us. In today's truth it'd be a little bit like what do you want to accomplish. You know like let what's yeah. What's your bucket list. Or something like that little bit further afield or even just saying hey. What would you like to accomplish. And just don't put a time on see where people's heads go. And then say whoa. Whoa today what can you do today. Yeah i mean today. I have you know you and i are doing this. And i have just backed about toback stuff so some i could say some aspirational thing. But the reality is oh today. Gosh if i could do one thing for that big thing. I'd have to be really selective about it and so you get to something tangible actionable while the action part is probably yet. Because if it's actionable its behavior based you'd actually see. The behavior reinforced the desire and contribute to it versus. Just what you said that. And i'm seeing no change at all in what you're doing so that you know there's no not even the smallest little maneuver that would change trajectory. Yes that is a. That is a great way of making the point because if they're having sort of.

today one thing less than a quarter of a milli rule one
"a." Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

05:10 min | 7 months ago

"a." Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"Your participation of patients And being really thoughtful about how. Those trials are designed because Because you know even small differences obviously in terms of of of heart disease risk reduction are potentially clinically significant but but again proving that in the context of randomized trial maybe challenging. That's really interesting rob. You've mentioned side effects a couple of times. What are they both the short term and potential long term side effects or I guess adverse effects of radiation therapy the most common side effect that patients experienced during treatment is irritation of the skin. I tell patients asked him have have had a sunburn before most of them in minnesota with fair skin they say yes i have and i say you know. That's the most similar experiences as Is why would describe what we call radiation dermatitis. The severity of that depends on our treatment and so in some patients that we treat We're actually targeting. The skin because the skin could be penetrated by the cancer cells and so in those situations were giving full. does the skin being very aggressive and And those patients make experience. Very brisk Sunburn reaction may a blister maybe sore The most know the worst part can be under the arm Where the you know the arm is rubbing and that could be tender. And then you've ever had a sunburn there yet booking relate to that it's very uncomfortable place seven that's right. It's so and so having a so having that once the radiation over a week or two later that typically fades until almost like a tan and then slowly. The skin returns towards normal. But that's a nuisance and so we've actually have a lot of innovative approaches that we have been studying mayo to to reduce those risks. I have. I have a colleague. Dr kim corbin who's the principal investigator of a clinical trial investigating. What's called a barrier film. It almost looks like saran wrap. That goes over the chest and it seems to protect the skin from abrasion from close and and other things like that and it seems to really have a noticeable effect in our initial trials in terms of reducing dermatitis or skin reactions. And so we're studying at in in a in a larger. Clinical trial through the alliance oncology group. So that's really a really exciting. Gather side effects. I just mentioned briefly that some patients might experience is a mild fatigue during treatment in the breast or or chess might feel a little bit more swollen than than than typical in the long term Radiation also has side effects. And that's where this research interest is in terms of trying to limit exposure of the normal tissues. Can we by doing so. Can we reduce the risk of these late side effects from radiation so we already talked about the potential for accelerating the risk of heart disease. This is something that we pay extremely. Close attention to designing radiation therapy plans now. It used to be that the doctors were perhaps paying less attention to this potential. Risk because The heart can actually tolerate a fair bit of radiation acutely But it's really what was found out after many decades of falling patients is it. Patients who have radiation exposure to the heart even low doses. This can accelerate the process of athol scroll sclerosis or hardening of the arteries. This is the disease leads to lease to heart attacks. We we saw an in for example and patients had left. Cited treatment in the sixties and seventies had a little bit higher risk of heart disease than patients treated for the right side..

kim corbin minnesota both scroll sclerosis sixties seventies two alliance oncology group week of times radiation over a
"a." Discussed on M&A Science

M&A Science

04:57 min | 8 months ago

"a." Discussed on M&A Science

"Can you walk me through the scenarios you talked earlier about. Different strategies require a different approach. You touched on a little bit. Like hey if i if this person so called the business. I'm gonna spend a lot more time developing relationship. Walk me through the different scenarios in those different approaches that you would take in developing those relationships. Mike lowry called out once or archetype. It which is the found marooned successful startup parted this person or a small group of people usually who had vision and took an enormous amount of risk is in some ways like their child. They have a law in protectiveness for it before the entity. Forget about the people. Of course they have to the people as well but they almost attached this humanity to the company that they've built that's a classic archetype in they don't care if a bad person comes along and wants to pay them a ton of money from their babies some will say yes anyway but a lot of them just won't so a need to trust you as michael said earlier..

michael Mike lowry a ton of money
"a." Discussed on Not A Single Fork

Not A Single Fork

04:35 min | 8 months ago

"a." Discussed on Not A Single Fork

"Toaster oven. Now what okay. I toast it on my flat top okay so or actually going doing the oven. I do eat tosa park this and you always do on the front. Yeah okay. I mean a better taste delicious. I just tastes like toast. It's toast grilled. Brad toasted on both sides and you flip it. Dry is dry. I toasted you don't put butter. I take it off the griddle. Yeah but not before a okay no. It tastes just like toast. And that's how i make toast and that's the end. Yes okay and then we had well. I don't colton was. I can't remember if it was in this order. Gap ginger and the s. and colton was net and i thought that was super cute and i know i'm jumping ahead. But like casey was like. I could really relate with him like you know. I thought that was super cute. That he he was like. I just sat around and like dragon. Complete video games to a lot of people did that tail at least for a while. Because it's a. I mean it gives your mind vacation right and sometimes shit. Yeah yeah you need that. Yes we need a mind to vacation right so colton and his partner. I mean boyfriend partner. Lover lover part. They're not married. But that's i mean they're still oregon live together. They're in a committed relationship so yeah they played a lot of video games but then they they still play video games. Probably my guess and they worked out now. They've got a soccer coaching thing. Going on with kids with kim loves that we haven't we don't know the why don't even remember his name. His partner his clay. Okay clay on face okay. Clay in colton but we see colton like once a week so he was telling us that they've started coaching little. And they're not as little as i think. I think they're in middle school. I think they're middle but he's he's outside and of course they both like soccer and you know they. They like sports forty guys. Yeah for sure there certain. That's what i'm saying is just fucking do man. They play video games. They drink beer and they play sports and they work out and they work out. I mean that sounds like my brother like every dude. I know but also address really nicely dressed very nice flavor. Very well put together. Yeah and colton. I think as i think about all of the interviews we did..

colton forty guys both sides both kim once a week
"a." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

03:10 min | 9 months ago

"a." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Enough money to live until one hundred twenty. You know i mean. Human lifespan leaves the beginning longer. At least if you look backwards it seems that way just looking back a half a century or a couple of centuries ago we see that were living on average way longer than we ever did before in so. I don't know if i should really need to plan to be one hundred twenty but yeah there's a chance i could live to be pretty long and i think we're all interested in knowing. How long am is an individual gonna live. You know what are the predictors of the things i can do to maybe enhance a healthy life for a long period in so we're looking inside the body we've been looking inside the body for a long time to look at things going on in our anatomy and physiology that might predict whether we're going to be long lived or not. Are we going to be one of those. People lives into our nineties are in our hundreds are we gonna live to a hundred and twenty this. There's something in our body now that we can look at. It's going give us a hint at that. Well they're a little piece of the puzzle has been discovered recently at least a potential piece of the puzzle and that involves a protein called. Nfl nfl stands for neuro. Filament light chain. Nfl narrow filament light chain protein and that is found in our blood in if we have a high level of nfl in our blood that usually indicates brain damage of some sort. So it's kind of ironic. I think that if we get for playing football we get hitting the head we get brain damage our. Nfl levels are going to go up at our blood. But of course this nfl a different nfl. It's neuro filament. Light chain protein is going to go up. It's going to be a signal sort of like you know. Are those markers in our blood that tells us when there is damage to our myocardium tells us there's damage to our and we also see a rise in nfl levels as you would expect in neurodegenerative diseases.

one hundred twenty hundreds nineties a couple of centuries ago myocardium one a hundred and twenty a half a century
"a." Discussed on A New Direction

A New Direction

03:34 min | 1 year ago

"a." Discussed on A New Direction

"A. C. R. A. F., T., dot com. and. We're back here on a new direction with author, Chad, Ford, and his book dangerous love transforming fearing conflict at home at work and in the world and. We are just digging into some of the nuts and bolts of dangerous love at the beginning of the book and Chad first of all, I can't speak enough about how much I enjoyed this book because it really I think one of the things that it did is it made me reevaluate. Myself rate every I mean every time I was reading. Someone's like, do you do that? Do you do that? Do you really do that? I? Think you do that I think do that J. You have you been doing that with your wife? J Two We're use your back turned right I. Mean I'm asking myself these questions, right because one of the things that you that you say in this chapter one and I I, promise you we will get chapter one although it's hard. When we see people as objects, we haven't inward mindset you said this, and then when we see people as people, we have an outward mindset. Right and and I was thinking to myself as I was reading this again for like the fifth time I was saying to myself it's really a true. When when I am am conflict with someone there just a thing and it's and it's insect I'm inwardly focused. It's about me. It's all about me me me me me me me me me. But when I see a person. And I actually see them for the human being that they are and that they are capable of being, they're capable of love and being loved. Then, I'll send us not about me. That's a challenge for us as humans right It is because you think about the stories that we tell in conflict and I like to think of them as stories right? Because if you think about it you, you have a difficult situation at work you come home. You tell a story. This is what happened at work here. The good good guys me or the bad guys she'd lay out what they did. Here's how they impacted me. This is why it sucks for me and this is how they should change. Right? I. Mean That's that's essentially our story people come to see me as a mediator they tell the exact. Same. Story and what's interesting because I sleep through these interviews is two key components right to our to our stories. One is that there self-focused? Right? Just like you said, it's all about me. You'll hear me me me me me over and over again almost never hear someone say you know I really wonder how impacting them I really wonder how they're taking. I. Really Wonder if I'm being difficult or they're really struggling with me right now that's that's that's not our concern right and then the other thing that's meek because it's also if they're seeing me, it's helped me I can't change them. No matter how hard I try no matter what I say, no matter what I do they won't change right and so for me as a mediator, it's helped me help me change them writing, and so these these stories that we tell they're both self obsessed. which blinds us to half of the conflict and they feel really week because we we locate conflict externally and we say that the conflict ends when someone else changes when someone else does something to end the conflict and the conflict ends and that leaves us feeling helpless, which is one of the reasons I think that people are afraid of conflict is they feel like it doesn't matter what I do I can't change them and because I can't change then nothing will change..

Chad Ford A. C. R. A. F.
"a." Discussed on LGBTQ&A

LGBTQ&A

05:51 min | 1 year ago

"a." Discussed on LGBTQ&A

"If it is okay with you I'd like to jump right into talking about being queer Sir I would love to. . Amazing. . So in June you posted although I've never announced it publicly before I'm proud bisexual woman that was just a couple of months ago why in your life was that the right time to share that with people you know I've wanted people to know that I am bisexual but I've never felt that there was like a right time to do it I was afraid of coming out. . I didn't want people to tell me that I was lying to get attention or something, , and so I, , kind of just kept my mouth shut I. . Also, , I've told people in the past and they've told me Oh you know it's a phase and I'm like, , okay. . Great. . Thanks. . So you know that's discouraging obviously I think that happens with bisexuality a lot because I like men and women they're more of a let's phase. . You like what you're. . You're it's a phase with women and I'm like. . Whatever you say. . So take us back you write this post and he hit send what is that moment feel like for you before the reaction started coming in I think I. . Didn't want people to think that I was making something that really wasn't about me about me in referring to see the protests that was going on. . You know I came out when supporting a protest I kind of tried to do it as nonchalantly as possible I guess coming out is not a nonchalant thing. . It just didn't seem like a big deal to meaning also like the way I look at the world right now I'm like isn't everyone I, , look at it isn't everyone bisexual like is this you know? ? So I didn't really feel like this was any breaking news by any means and so to get kind of the attention that I got was kind of surprising to be I I wasn't expecting it I was like Oh ship I'm really fascinated by the public versus private coming out. . So it sounds like this is something that you did not just discover about yourself. . Yeah. . You know I remember being in fifth grade and thinking to myself like I'm thinking about girls law I didn't tell anybody it was very like a private thing I was only ten that's point quite young in my opinion. . So that was an. . Interesting revelation for me, , and then my idea of sexuality kind of it didn't really come up again until I like moved to La when I was eighteen and <hes> started to have feelings for this role when I was here and like being sexually attracted to her and a really kind of identified as story I didn't really think about it other than that until I was put in a position where I found myself like really attracted to this one girl that I was hanging out with and then I, guess , just over the course of the last couple years like I've I've realized that is just part of me and I didn't really stop to even think about it until. . A couple of years ago again. . It was just an interesting self exploration. . was so interested in how you came out also because you've been on magazine covers and very easily could have had another cover to announce your queer ness and I think it shows like what progress we've made as a society where like celebrity had come out ahead to be on the cover and now it's so nonchalant and I just love that message that sends to other kids that like, , Hey, , this is not like the biggest deal ever. . Yeah and it shouldn't be like I. . Didn't I did not want that for for. . Me Like Oh do I need to make it a magazine cover for me to tell people I'm bisexual like no, , it's not who cares like I. . It's not that big of a deal to me like it's not something that it's not like our sexuality define who we are. . But I think a lot of times people wanted to they want our sexuality to be the defining that gay guy or that lesbian you know like that's that's what people love to do and left to say in it's like I would hope that. . Being out and owning your sexuality isn't something that needs to have press around it. . So even though you're. . Not that big of a deal to you. . We still live in a world where it is a big deal correct. . I mean were you afraid that you were going to be quote unquote outed to like the world before you're ready? ? Not Necessarily I think my biggest fear to be honest with people telling me that I was coming out for attention that was my biggest fear and I'm not necessarily sure why but I think it to me in my eyes kind of became like of fad like that people like you know Oh we're coming out people were bisexual people were dating women like and it was coming out kind of rubbed me the wrong way. . I believe it or not and I know I get myself in a lot of hot water sometimes space speaking up and being vocal about things. . But I do not like to be the center of attention. . It's ironic because I am like a pretty open book. . So I'm I'm constantly balancing Matt like but I, , but I also don't think that sexuality is something that needs to be. . It's just. . Not, , something that needs to be super private I. Guess . in one of my friends was saying, , why did you feel the need to do that like he wasn't judging me for saying, , why did why did you need to do that? ? Just why did you feel like you needed to tell the world and I was like I don't have like a very philosophical beautiful answer for that. . I just think. . Why not it's not a secret it's not something that I was ever ashamed of and I felt like in that moment I wanted to show my full support for this community in the that I belong to it. . It was very lake freeing in that sense. . It felt very much like, , yeah, , I'm here I've been here the whole time. . Part of this

Betty Cooper Jeffrey Masters Lily Lilly riverdale reinhart
"a." Discussed on M&A Science

M&A Science

05:45 min | 1 year ago

"a." Discussed on M&A Science

"I would say that it's really not necessarily about the deal killers it's about all of the mitigations that can happen in early integration planning and then also looking at your definitive agreement and whether or not there are changes that you want me to that as a result of some of the people issues that come up. So from what I seen, the worst thing that could happen is you lose key people during integration. Yeah. I would say that there are probably worse things that can will one of the worst one of the. So it, it depends a lot on who those key people are but I've seen deals that were done basically to hire really high level technical professionals and it's not just about losing key people. It's about losing significant numbers of those folks and then. One of our round table members a guy named Marble Tony. He refers to it as the triple bump when you start to lose your key players in the first bump happens when the announcement occurs and you end up losing all of your a players. So that's your first bump. All of your a players disappeared acquisition announcement is like blood in the water if A. Head headhunters are sharks they come in they try to pull all your good people out especially if they don't have some kind of retentive mehcanism in place or there's not clear communication, they're gonNA go take care of themselves i. mean that's what players do right there a players because they're proactive their in high demand and they will go work somewhere else in a heartbe. Even in the middle of pandemic, your be players then end up trying to fill a player shoes and your second bump really happens win your be players are so demoralized and demotivated that they actually end up underperforming themselves. So you've now lost, you're a player's your be players are now you're see players and then the final bump happens because the organization now has such. A bad reputation that you can't recruit new talent. So it's not just about losing a handful of key employees. It's about really messing with your entire talent ecosystem but there are other risks that come up. It's not just about losing those folks if you think about it if I P ownership isn't managed properly and you've got a situation where you're missing Ip agreements and then. All the sudden you find out that there's a dispute over the source code for something that's a significant financial risk that comes up or you end up mired down different decision making styles and nobody can make a decision to save their lives and you end up tanking your whole.

A. Head
"a." Discussed on M&A Science

M&A Science

03:52 min | 1 year ago

"a." Discussed on M&A Science

"Support the assumptions that they've made will the things that are going to derail that deal thesis from being met the things that'll keep us from achieving that Roi that growth strategy, a lot of times are going to be people culture and leadership risks. But in HR, we do have a couple of others that we look out for and it's enough to just identify the risks. In my opinion we we then have to assess them. Is there materiality threshold or are they significant or can we deal with them later and? Then, finally, how do we mitigate those risks? So I see it as an entire system that helps us in a jar to support the individuals who are trying to make this deal make money. This is interesting because it sounds like you're starting to poke at the the deal model itself at the corporate team comes up with and we both know they're very protective around that. How do you sort of work around that and and bring those issues especially when people are really reserved around keeping it to get the deal done. So it all comes down to what are the incentives. So if the deal team is really just trying to get a deal to close, then there may not be an opening for hr to to get in and really have a conversation about what this takes. But I found that at least working with in-house deal teams that really want to make sure that this deal is the best thing for the company. So if we can sit down and have a conversation about what the final integration plan. Rather, the final integration model is going to look like I can then ask some questions about the the HR elements of that that will help them meet their ultimate goal of getting a strong Roi the. So in those situations where I've been able to get in prior to L. A. Y. and look at some of the assumptions that are being made, I, can at least point out some of the financial impacts of the deal model..

L. A. Y.
"a." Discussed on LGBTQ&A

LGBTQ&A

05:13 min | 1 year ago

"a." Discussed on LGBTQ&A

"You know for all the Presi during the Democratic primary and for everything that was written about you. . It wasn't until reading your book that I realized how unique your position also was as an out gay man in a relationship with cylinder running for president that has never happened before in our history with that something that you thought a lot about our talks about with the team I thought about it endlessly. . I obviously encouraged him to run. . You know gave him all the support and instead go for it. . But that's because I had no idea what running for president was like so it's very easy. . Say Like Yeah I love you great president and then you know the campaign took off rapidly and then my profile rose pretty rapidly and for a few months as you read in the book I had there's a lot of anxiety about how do I feel this rule? ? This world has never been done before there's no playbook I was anxious for a long time about making sure I got the moment and making sure that I was doing it whatever quote the right way was and ultimately I just decided. . I have to be myself like I can't do this pretending to be anybody else or. . Expecting people to think anything else but myself and that worked really well, , and it was also disappointing to some other people but at the end of the day, I , just wanted you know people liked me I, , want them to like me for me and if you know if it wasn't enough in at least it, , I wasn't going out there pretending to be something else every day. . Are you able to explain why it was different being a gay man married to a gay man in the middle of a presidential campaign compared to like any other spouse? ? Will there was sometimes, , it was like sitting in the middle of the blender and just kind of like watching the world like swirl around you and you're getting all this input and feedback and everyone has an opinion about what you should do, , what you should wear what you should say, , and then sometimes with really invasive things like how you should perform your identity, , your sexuality things you should talk about or shouldn't talk about and it was weird to watch. . You know one side of the aisle we were far too gay for people like rush Limbaugh, , right of course, , and then other people saying like there he is or he is not performing a way that is what I would like to see and you know at the end of the Dan thinking like I am just being myself but I I don't think I would have been as successful. . Had I been trying to pretend to be this mash up of? ? Michelle Obama and Chrissy. . Teigen. . Something I was wondering during the campaign was. . Fun joked that people had was calling you the future first lady did hearing things like that like hurt or offend you know? ? I mean I felt like a lot of it was just ingest and felt like people were celebrating it. . They knew that it would be historical and they and they knew it was something to be celebrated I never really took offense to. . Anything like that was a piece of criticism that was the hardest to hear some of the criticisms that sort of made my head spin. . You know when when we talk about like what is enough in what isn't enough? ? And I was spending so much time on the trail and I. . Wish. . I. . Wish more media would have covered what I was doing on the trail because I spent most of my time with teachers, , students, , lgbtq centers, , homeless service providers they all have very personal connections to me in my story and so almost every day I was in some sort of LGBTQ senator or Having roundtables with young people and I. . Hear these stories that were so reflective of mine you know young kids who had ran away from home without they didn't belong who were bullied in school who were pushed out of their churches who didn't feel like there was space for them and who are literally questioning their worth and their dignity, , and then I see these criticisms of myself, , my marriage, , this campaign saying were straight men I think one. . Person Quips that you know we're just two straight men without women. . These situations that like Queen's must look a certain way and I'm thinking like, , why are we policing the boundaries in making young people believe that clearness has to be performed surgery has to look a certain way as if you have to exist a certain way to belong in our community when many queer people are sitting, , for example, , in Tulsa Oklahoma or in the desert and California. . Wondering if they even deserved exist at all and at the end of the day like I'm, , I'm a big boy. . I can read that criticism and think about it and you know examine it through our critical lens. . But then I thought that was really dangerous to to young people. . It is a funny thing because you know talking to somebody queer people everyone's like digesting messages of how to be gay how to be translated all these things and a common theme I've heard over and over again is they didn't feel like the right kind of gay and then suddenly we have you the national spotlight and like throwing that same criticism that hurt so much on you as well. . Yeah it's funny because like I was I was at an event once and this woman asked me. . Does being gave matter. . I. . Mean You keep talking about it like you talk about running away from home and you talk about. . Marriage equality and the fight for Trans writes does any of that really matter I think it was one of the only times I had to like look at my team on my God you know hold me back. . This is is so insulting and I said. . You know until people stop killing us it does matter. .

president Charleston A. Time Jeffrey Masters Kate Buddha Iowa baseball Michelle Obama Chesterton Trans Limbaugh Tulsa senator Oklahoma Dan Chrissy California
"a." Discussed on Open A Fucking Book

Open A Fucking Book

02:58 min | 1 year ago

"a." Discussed on Open A Fucking Book

"Riverhead books. Comes out the August. Hundred Twenty, four pages. So it's Kinda like Novella. Bigger than a novella. That is A. Three hour book for you. That's less than three hour for me. Yeah. nonfiction. I get the nowadays all the nonfiction is about. Rum or family or people call them out. So livewired the inside story of the ever changing brain by David. Egan. Okay. What does drug withdrawal having common with a broken heart? Y is the enemy of memory not time but other memories. How can a blind person learn to see with her tongue or a deaf person learned to here with his skin? Why did many people in nineteen eighties mistakenly perceive book pages to be slightly red in color. Why is the world's Best Archer Armless? Might we someday control A. Robot with our thoughts just as we do our fingers and toes why do we dream at night and what does that have to do with the rotation of the earth? The answers to these questions are right behind. Our is the greatest technology we have ever discovered on our planet is the three pound Oregon carried in a vault of the skull. This book is not simply about what the brain is. It's about what does the magic of the brain is not found in the parts it's made of. But the way those parts unceasingly relieve themselves in electric living fabric in livewired, you will surf the leading edge of neuroscience atop the anecdotes and metaphors have made David Egan. One of the best scientific translators of our generation covering decades of research to the present day. Livewire also presents new discoveries from Eagle Eagleton's own laboratory, from Senate, sesia to dreaming to wearable Neuro Tech Devices that revolutionized how we think about the senses that is from Pantheon Books Out Twenty Twenty twenty page down about three hundred twenty. So again, not a huge book, but probably filled with stuff though. Okay. So He's A. neuroscientist and a neuro psychologist. And A. Scientific translator. So. That sounds really 'cause that's. That's Kinda like whenever I was studying psychology that some of the things I wanted to. Write about you know like. 'cause he it seems like he's putting in. A person's environment and their upbringing and seeing how things are coming out. That's what he's testing and that's what I. I constantly see every day with our children and. It that seems pretty neat. That might be a nonfiction book.

Twenty Twenty David Egan A. neuroscientist drug withdrawal A. Scientific translator livewired Eagle Eagleton Oregon A. Robot Senate
"a." Discussed on Talk Like a Leader

Talk Like a Leader

05:43 min | 1 year ago

"a." Discussed on Talk Like a Leader

"And. They're struggling so hard to figure out what the structure is that they have a hard time paying attention to you. Have you noticed that? Yes, not only hard time following or tracking? Can Get to the point of shutdown. To wind up just checking out. Can Get to the point of devaluing. What's being said? And so I mean those are. Learned through experience and you, sometimes you win. Sometimes you learn right. Right right. Those are some things I've learned a hard way in working with folks that have a lot of see Tennessee. It's you just have to really. You have to think it through. You have to be prepared you have to. If you have. To have data tend to have A. Information that helps to explain what's needed. What needs to take place? In on that same vein, kind of a corollary idea data and all that. and have instructor. I'm thinking that what something occurs to me that when I'm working with another person who has see traits? Is. To remember that they need time to think things through, yes, and so. It's. Probably, not likely! or I should say it's very unlikely that in your first conversation they're going to absorb everything you said and just be onboard board with it right in coaching. People of cautious traits, it is not uncommon at all to have to have two conversations about the same issue one to. Give them an opportunity to hear your perspective and put the issue on the table, and then put some space between that and another conversation, so they have a chance to think about it a little bit. If you try to push for a commitment to soon. It's highly likely. You'll get some phrase like this. On need some time to think about it or ask them. What do they think about this and they go well I? Don't know I hadn't thought about it yet. Right on time, you.

Tennessee instructor A. Information
"a." Discussed on The A

The A

05:02 min | 2 years ago

"a." Discussed on The A

"Off. It's it's time once again for were dues Where we practice what we all do in our teaching and take apart words and translate their parts to deepen our understanding sometimes? They're old familiar terms. And sometimes their terms new to us. Or maybe so fresh rush that they're new to everyone our first term on our list for dissection. Today is the term aloe stasis breaking apart that I word part off of the whole we have Allo A. L. O.. And that literally means different and then on the second word part is stasis which means standing still so we put that together and translate it literally. It's referring to standing still when things are well. Hit different from normal so we can think of that literally think of trying trying to stand still and think of something unusual like a gust of wind or somebody brushing by you and knocking into you. What do we do? We try to still stay standing up. When we apply the term aloe stasis to physiology what it refers to is all of those active processes that our body uses when it attempts to maintain or to restore typical optimal conditions while under stress? So in other words something is happening. Some kind of stressful thing is happening and we're trying to maintain vein are balanced which we know his home stasis so Alice Day says is what's happening when we're under stress and it's hard to maintain homeostasis. Oh Me Oh stasis so we pull our all kinds of different processes that allow us to still maintain some sort of stability even even if it's not the usual stability like you know. Think of again trying to stand up in a windstorm you might be able to remain standing on necessarily going to be straight up and you're probably going to be spending a lot more energy to stay standing than you would be if it were just normal. Conditions put it simply. We could just say that Alistair is is is a set of coping mechanisms that our body uses when things are different from normal and that leads us to our second term on our dissection list and that is alice static data. It's just another form of the word Allah stasis. It's the adjective form so again. Allah means different states means standing still in the icy ending means relating into. It converts it into an adjective so alice static is then going to be a term that we use to describe anything that somehow relates to Alice. Stasis for example there's a term that's often use called L. static load so that means it's the load that relates to L. Stasis yes so it's a physiological load the wear and tear increased energy expenditure of other stress responses that are occurring winging trying to maintain a stability our next term on the dissection list is not one that you would expect his I'm a list of terms but maybe we should and that is the term emoji. Yeah Emoji Moldy E. M. O. J.. Now when we started a sack this one the first thing that we noticed is it's not Latin tonight even Greek week not even old English. I mean those are the things we're kind of used to sing. In this case it derived from Japanese word parts the first word part. The part in Japanese can be translated as picture. The second word part the Moji Part M. O.. Jay I means a character or a letter of an alphabet would be an example of a character so we put that together in literally really. It means a picture character or a picture letter. It's a Pictogram or pictographs. Now a lot of people think that that the word emoji is derived from or of a different version of the word Emoto con now in a motor con is he is when one or more tax letters are used to represent emotions. Like when you use a single parenthesis to represent a smile and therefore represent the the emotion of happiness but it turns out that these are Japanese word parts making up Emoji. It has nothing to do with the source of the word. EMOTO CON Even though there are some similarity in terms of when and how you might use them..

Alice Day Allo A. L. O Jay Alistair E. M. O. J
"a." Discussed on The A

The A

11:09 min | 2 years ago

"a." Discussed on The A

"Or Click Lincoln. The show notes are episode page. There's a new cohort forming all the time so basket on this soon. Yep It's time once again for were them. Um and this time we have a couple of convoluted terms and some really super simple terms. But you know it's all about practice practice practice. So we're you're going to dive into this list beginning with and Osmania A. N. S. A. and Osmania and what that refers to is a condition where you don't have a sense of smell or you've lost the sense of smell so breaking that down we can see exactly the that's literally what the word means the an part at the beginning the am means without the Osm word part means smell and then the IRA ending. We've seen that a lot of times in all kinds of other words and that means a condition so it's a condition without smile smile and Osmania the absence of the ability to smell the absence of olfactory perception. Another word word on our list for dissection is crib reform play now. This is a term that we use a lot right because we ask our students to be able to identify. And we're going to be referring to it when we're discussing the sense of smell because the crib performed plate has all these little holes in it. It's in the mode bone and he. It has all these little holes in it. So that the olfactory sensory neurons can pass through breaking that down the Crib Bre word part. That is C. R.. I B. R. Means Sieve that is a device for separating particles by size. and You you know what it looks like right. Looks like the crib of foreign plate. It's got a bunch of little holes in it or big holes depending on what kind of you have. The form part of Kripa form form means shape. So it's a sieve shaped structure and that makes sense right. That's what it looks like. So that's good handy name in if students no. Oh that's what crib bre means sieve. Then that's a good mnemonic device. They can picture in their minds. I as save and that will help them remember what it is where it is what it does and then of course. The word plate is just an ordinary English word. We don't need to break that down but it's interesting when you go back in the history of that word plate literally means or originally means anything. That's flat the crib perform played. has this flat part. That has house all these little holes in it forming a SUV like structure. And it's part of the bone so let's take a look at that word employed. We haven't done that before in our word dissections in you know what it means kind of the same thing because the F. Mo- part of means sieve. You know you might think wait a minute. I thought crib remains sieff. Well Yeah I mean any language including the English language has many different words for the same concept or idea idea. Sometimes they're subtle differences in their meaning. So it's different aspects of whatever object is being named but sometimes it's just a full synonym. That is that it's just means exactly the same thing so F- mo- means sieve. Crib means sieve. And you know what that's okay and then of course the oil end on Eth- moines means like so if we take ethno sieve and oil like we get a word that means sort of like so. The more bone is sievelike because of course a major feature of the F. Bone is the career foreign plate. which is a a flat thing? That has the shape of a sieve. So those two words are very closely interlinked in terms of their meaning or their translation. Another word on our list for dissection today is Holly Gender site this term. I'm sure you can break down and figure out on your own. Poly Ali means many Andro. That's a word part that we see in a lot of terms that we commonly use in empty in ten zero means tree week. Now I want to stop here for a second emphasize that literally means tree. But I've heard a lot of people defined as branch inch and adds not exactly right. It really means tree. But of course the concept of tree involves branching right so it doesn't doesn't literally mean branch but it implies a branched structure so it's not exactly wrong to translate his branch. It's just not as literally the correct in terms of the literal translation of that word parts. I just wanted to stop and give that aside. And then the last part of the term polly Dondra site is site cit and that means so so you put it all together and you have a cell so that has many tree like branches. Now that's very similar to a term that we use much more frequently named P as as a matter of fact I don't use polly Denver site at all teaching of I'll be honest Until I ran across a recent news item I don't recall ever having seen that term polly Denver site but I'm going to talk about them In just a few minutes and explain what they are but it immediately reminded me of Alexandro site and to me. It's an Oh. Well it's sort of like an Alexandra site only this one has a lot of branches because Alexandra Oh Denver ascites they have that word part Aldo L. I. G. O.. EILL AGO which means few so they have a few branches. They are a cell that has branches but just a few poly recite has branches but many branches so here to cells that are distinguished extinguish by the amount of branching that they have now polly dendritic sites are also called by several other names and and a couple of the names that I'm going to mention in the news item in the full episode R. N. G. Too so or energy to glee and when I say energy to that's capital letter N.. Capital letter g and the Arabic numeral two N. G. Two and and usually just all run together although I have seen N. G. Hyphen to the end. Part stands for the word neural meaning referring to the nervous system or two nerves the G. part refers to Cleo which means referring to clear the number two refers to something that has been called Antigen to which is pretty okc Lichen that is a protein with a bunch of Lichens attached and remember. The lichens are sugar. Polymers so N.. G. Two cells ourselves that are part of neural tissue and they express the Proto Gleich and that is sometimes called the antigen to now these cells are still being figured out. There's still some things we don't know about these sales. But what we're fairly fairly certain of. Is that their progenitor cells. That we had I thought produce Alexandra site and that is turning out to be true but we we now have evidence that they do much more than that or at least they're capable of doing much more than that and they can differentiate into Astra sites and under the right condition. They can even differentiate into neurons so polly gender ascites our progenitor cells that produce elegant under sites Astra sites neurons. And who knows. Maybe they do some other things but the polly Denver ascites and Njit new cells. They're gonNA come up in one of the news stories of the full episode in full episode number fifty eight and the last word on our list is is a really simple one. That is placard which I've already mentioned we're GONNA be talking about in the upcoming episode. And when you break it down you toured parts flash which means Flash and card which means card so okay. You know that's kind of silly to do a word. Dissection like that right but you know in anatomical dissection we don't ignore the simple stuff when we do dissection right because when we do the dissection sometimes there are things that we didn't realize about that structure before actually doing the dissection just talking about it thinking about it. We didn't realize until we actually saw it in a human body or an animal body and Lord Flash Card is kind of like that yeah. It's a card that using a flash. Okay use them quickly and so it it relates to one of the aspects of how we use flash cards for learning so okay you know and we haven't learned much more by doing that but I kinda WanNa use this opportunity to go. You know a little bit into the history of Flash Cards. It's just a little bit. We know that they've been used widely. Since the late eighteenth century they actually go back probably to the seventeenth century. Maybe even earlier than that and thought to have evolved from what are called Horn books now horn. Books were basically one-sided flash cards that students students used for learning often in the primary grades so they would learn the letters of the alphabet or other very basic kinds of information and so these horn books they were basically a flash card that was laminated with a very thin transparent sheet of animal horn. Sometimes they used Mica which is a mineral that worms are as found in sheet and so they would use that sheet of animal horn to protect the the flash card or what we now call the flash card and they laminated them that way so that they could be used by many students over many years. So next it's time you see eliminator sitting in your faculty workroom or College Copy Center. You might better appreciate that laminating. Learning materials originated with Horn books. That go way back to at least the fifteenth century. Maybe before some things never change.

polly Denver ascites Alexandra polly Dondra Osmania Osmania A. N. S. A. Astra Horn F. Mo F. Bone Poly Ali Eth- moines College Copy Center Mica Proto Gleich N. G. Hyphen R. N. G. okc Lichen