2 Burst results for "A Ton Of Blood"

"a ton blood" Discussed on Alright Mary: All Things RuPaul's Drag Race

Alright Mary: All Things RuPaul's Drag Race

04:04 min | 1 year ago

"a ton blood" Discussed on Alright Mary: All Things RuPaul's Drag Race

"In my english mcmuffin. There her line delivery. I thought was nuanced and funny and comedic and again a breakout for her. It was a it certainly. Yeah yeah i mean. I that like you know. I think she's very funny. I think it's just like of as an actress. But i think in in terms of all of the women all of the funny women in this movie i she's overshadowed for me by pretty much everything else. Yeah sure i get that the scene with the little girl in the jewelry shop just the back and forth yes meeting that ends with your little con- you're like tons blood that scene that's there's a cut version of that on youtube. That goes on for like fourteen minutes just goes on. I think it's still the last one. But it's just back and forth and back and forth and i don't know how they did that. I'm assuming that was all improvised. Very popular with the blow job. Yes Yeah no so good and of course she would. That character would get into an argument with sixteen year old. I kind of love that we didn't talk about roads. You know i i understand. There's nothing really to talk about. Except what a sweetie dotty what commentary. what a commentary. Also on cops that they were able to make very subtly. Yeah i mean here. I love i love it. We're not all bad. But i'm the best of them. He says she doesn't hear him. We're right we're not all i love that. That's great great the next yeah the next morning when he's got all the baking supplies that i was like any. This is really this is at this is this is good. You should stay here. Make cake with him. Oh god he is so so cute. He's certainly like back over. Steam type. Total schlumpy schlumpy. Mix silverstein because silverstein. Exactly i would have such a crush and you gotta say a an irish accent is. He's irish right. I think he is yes he is. It's certainly like a small fantasy of mine for an irishman to whisked me away and i moved to dublin. And that's where i. That's where i spent you know and I just there's something so charming about that accent about that culture. he would. He would ruin me. He would wreck my heart. Oh yeah among other things. Yeah oh yeah the kind of guy. I would give house keys. It's like what are you anything you want here. You go and that would be my downfall god and just his ability to be like like. I love his acting as well when you know. She's like better go and then he's like fuck. Yeah that one reaction of off fuck this up or even when he's like i'm so happy i'm so glad this is happening. I'd love oh. Yeah i love that i think for as much of the movie is not about the men. I think the way that jon hamm and chris o'dowd characters are portrayed is so smart because obviously jon hamm is just this like him bo in porsche and like i would certainly give them forty five minutes of my life and then i would never tell anybody about it but like come on nile. Not nihilistic but masochistic enough to so one hook up with them but canetti yeah absolutely oh one hundred and ten percent but i. I love with roads that lake. He's not just prince charming on a white horse like he has his own little quirks neuroses and i think that moment of all. I'm so happy this is happening. Is such a lovely humanizing moment for him. I thought that was really smart. I loved his when she throws the carrot up. It really bothers me..

silverstein youtube jon hamm chris o'dowd dublin canetti porsche
"a ton blood" Discussed on The Nick Taylor Horror Show

The Nick Taylor Horror Show

07:16 min | 2 years ago

"a ton blood" Discussed on The Nick Taylor Horror Show

"To the Nick Taylor Horror show about three months before he passed all on I was afforded off the opportunity of a lifetime to interview Stuart Gordon. And what was already a tremendous honor looking back is made even more special by knowing that this was one of the last interviews he ever gave birth. So this being episode number 50, I really could not be more proud than a present this conversation that I got to have with Stuart when I spoke to him Stewart was right on the heels of completing his autobiography. So he was naturally in a very reflective mood. So we talked a lot about his major life lessons that he learned as a director as well the kind of connective themes that presented him. All throughout the course of his career all of which he was able to realize retrospectively looking back having written his autobiography Stewart was beyond a horror director. He was an innovator. He was at a loss Eliezer. He was a showman. He was a director that made you think made you laugh and made you squirm all in the same movie his work defied convention and was beyond subversive strong and just push boundaries. He bulldozed over them. He was also one of the most prolific adapters of HP Lovecraft and famously brought his own wonderful signature interpretations to his work. So Thursday October to commemorate the 30th anniversary of Re-Animator. I'll also be releasing a remembering Stuart Gordon episode where I sit down with some a Stewart's friends and collaborators and hear what they learned from him going to feature Larry fessenden Graham Skipper and Brian yuzna. So look out for that on October 18th. Anyway now for your listening pleasure, please enjoy this conversation with the late. Great Master for Stuart Gordon. Stewart thank you so much for taking the time. I'm a tremendous fan. And this is definitely a big honor. So thank you first and foremost know it's my pleasure. So there's a real undeniable of subversion to all your films to put it lightly and one thing I read about was the Psychedelic political satire version of Peter Pan that you had done and the fact that you got arrested. Yeah. So what I'm curious about is what level what effect did that incident have on your work? I mean, would imagine that something like that during a formidable time. Like being in college would probably make you more determined than ever to make subversive work. Is that accurate? Well, it definitely got you know, a lot of people's attention, you know, it became sort of a national news as a matter of fact, I remember Johnny Carson making jokes about it on his show. Oh wow. And I mean just the whole idea of you know, psychedelic a Peter Pan, right all by itself was enough to just kind of get people wage to the perfect people and and get their attention. Right did that did being arrested for your art give you this kind of more wage admissive purpose to make art that does push the boundaries and make art that might be a little dangerous and not quite make the type of art that Society might not quite be ready for I mean, does that give you any sort of em, you know, it's funny. It's I had done, you know, we had started a theater company. I did a play in you know with the University of Wisconsin called the game show. That was the first thing and that was a long way in which we made the audience believe that they were locked in the theater and it was very extreme and we had plants in the audience who I am. You're the audience believe we're you know audience members who were beaten and oh, wow, you know, you know kind of suck humiliated and so forth and and so you know that show that show got it a huge amount of attention and that led to you know, one of the professors at the University offering to give me a program that I could, you know summer program where we could produce five plays and the idea was that should all be kind of experimental Theatre and we do all kinds of things. We did a production of Afraid of Virginia Woolf that started at 1:00 in the morning and we the First Act was done. Conventional way men and women in the second act was done with all women and the third Act was done with all men. Oh wow. So we were doing all kinds of stuff. We did a production of Titus andronicus that was done non-verbally in a in a burned-out building that was you know, there was just a basically a huge Crater where the building had been and the audience sat on their sides of this pit looking down and watching this watching, you know, these these characters, you know off the kitchen at 6. Most violent play right and you know tons of tons blood and we did it all with, you know, instead of two packs Shakespeare's language and digital just grunting and sort of caveman Style. So we were doing doing a pretty crazy stuff. And Peter Pan was the last play in that series The Common Thread with all of those different Productions sounds like wage you kind of intentionally put yourself in very challenging scenario as a as a director by doing Shakespeare without words and doing a big elaborate plays in small locations and things like that and it sounds like that may have been by Design. So I'm curious about is did how much did that contribute to your ability as a director predict certain later on because from everything that I've learned in talking other directors one of the most important qualities in being a director, if you don't have those big crazy Hollywood budgets is resourcefulness, and it sounds like you're kind of training ground for being a filmmaker was was these Productions because you were you were kind of forcing yourself to be very resourceful from an artistic perspective. Is that accurate? Yeah. Yep. I'm sorry, you know the thing that sort of turned me around was the production when I was you know, I didn't direct it. But I was in this production of a play called Marat Sade which is the which is a play that's put on by the inmates of an insane asylum and the idea is that at any moment the actors could go crazy and jump into the audience and started attacking people and that turned me around cuz I used to think that theater it's just sort of like a bad movie and and then I realized after doing brats on the theater..

director Stuart Gordon Stewart Peter Pan Nick Taylor Johnny Carson HP Virginia Woolf Marat Sade Larry fessenden Shakespeare University of Wisconsin Titus andronicus Society Hollywood Brian yuzna caveman Style Graham Skipper