35 Burst results for "A Page"

NBC News: Federal Officials 'Could Have Prevented' Jan. 6 Riot

Mark Levin

01:50 min | 14 hrs ago

NBC News: Federal Officials 'Could Have Prevented' Jan. 6 Riot

"NBC News reported the other day I wasn't here That federal law enforcement could have prevented January 6th ride did not act on intelligence Look how they slipped this by On February 1st at 9 28 or so p.m. Look how they just slip it by You and I have been talking about this forever And this is not even a subject in the report By the January 6th stalinist Politburo committee NBC nightly news is Lester Holt introduced a segment that detailed federal law enforcement agencies failures in the lead up to the January 6th capitol riot So I want to salute him for doing this In the segment NBC News echo criticisms and concerns like conservatives have expressed since the attack occurred What they mean is me but that's okay Not our NBC News exclusive the January 6th committee's final report was more than 800 pages but some material did not make the cut including much of its findings from the failures of federal law enforcement leading up to the attack halt set Now why Would they cover that up This committee covered it up They censored it Because it would have exposed them the Democrat party and Nancy Pelosi and the Biden administration Subsequent actions by the Biden administration The images of the attack on the capitol stunned America in the world they say And tonight in an exclusive interview the chief investigator for the January 6th committee says that government could have prevented it I'm quoting The government could have prevented it

Nbc News Politburo Committee Lester Holt Biden Administration NBC Democrat Party Nancy Pelosi January 6Th Committee America
Columbia Journalism Review Calls Out the Media for Misinformation

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:17 min | 17 hrs ago

Columbia Journalism Review Calls Out the Media for Misinformation

"We're all familiar by now with the Russia collusion hoax. A hoax that was cooked up by the Hillary campaign, probably with Hillary's knowledge if it wasn't her idea in the first place. Hillary campaign cooks it up. They involve the FBI and the deep state. The deep state then leaks falls accusations of Russia collusion to the media, the media is only too eager to collaborate. There's massive communication traffic going on between the FBI on the one hand and other agencies of the government feeding inaccurate information to various media outlets, including in the end The New York Times, The Washington Post, really all of them, all the major media are in on this. And all of this is now come to light. It started to come to light with Robert Mueller looking at this and going to the astonishment, by the way, dean baquet, who's the executive out of The New York Times, says he says he was stunned when he realized that he goes holy as obscenity. Bob Mueller is not going to do it, meaning he's not going to find Trump guilty of any kind of Russia collusion. And of course, this is what the media had been reporting for for years. And so the real kind of new development is an article in the Columbia journalism review, written by a media insider. We're talking about a guy who is deeply connected, he used to work for The New York Times. In fact, the Columbia journalism review was edited by a guy Kyle Pope, whose wife, Kate Kelly, is a reporter for the Washington bureau of The New York Times. So we're talking now about a part of the journalistic establishment. And this is a giant article in depth. And it goes on for it seems like about a hundred pages. It's four parts long. And the striking thing about it is that it in systematic detail, even though it has a kind of friendly bias toward the media. It goes on to say, guys, you really blew it here.

Hillary Russia Bob Mueller The New York Times FBI Dean Baquet The Washington Post Kyle Pope Kate Kelly Donald Trump Columbia Journalism Review Columbia Washington
Tony Perkins: The State of Faith, Family, and Freedom Address

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:40 min | 19 hrs ago

Tony Perkins: The State of Faith, Family, and Freedom Address

"You've got a big, big event happening tonight, and I wanted to talk about that. You are delivering your state of faith, family, and freedom address. That is tonight, FRC dot org is the landing page there. Tony, what is the state of faith family and freedom? Well, it's under assault by this administration. We're going to talk about the core value issues that define America. America was a great nation because it was a good nation that moral foundation has been steadily chipped away at over the centuries over the decades, especially the last 6 decades. This administration taking a jackhammer to accelerating the pace at which they are pounding this very foundation. So we're going to talk about those issues that the president will not touch tomorrow night or we'll be talking about the reverse side. I'm sure he's going to tout his administration's championing of quote unquote reproductive freedom essentially violating the law pushing abortion pills through the mail trends our children with as radical agenda coming out from the left. And so we're going to talk about that. But we're also going to highlight Todd, the fact that Americans have had enough and they're not waiting for Washington to solve the problems anymore. And so parents across the country are taking matters into their own hands, running for school board, electing school boards, protecting their children, we see more work in the pro life arena taking place. So there's a lot to be encouraged about as people realize that our faith, our families and our freedom. Really, they really are under attack.

America Tony Todd Washington
'Died suddenly' posts twist tragedies to push vaccine lies

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 2 d ago

'Died suddenly' posts twist tragedies to push vaccine lies

"A growing online conspiracy theory is using the tagline died suddenly to baselessly claim that COVID vaccines are killing people. The filmmakers and anti vaccine activists behind the misinformation campaign have flooded social media with news reports. Obituaries and GoFundMe pages about sudden death or injuries alongside the term died suddenly, and emojis of syringes. The media intelligence firm signal labs found that the use of died suddenly or a misspelled version of it in tweets about vaccines have surged more than 740% in the past two months compared with the two previous month. Rigorous study and real world evidence from hundreds of millions of administered shots proved COVID vaccines are safe and effective. I'm Julie Walker

Julie Walker
Wendy Patrick: Hunter Biden Can't Have It Both Ways

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:28 min | 3 d ago

Wendy Patrick: Hunter Biden Can't Have It Both Ways

"Always appreciate your analysis because you have the perspective as a news analyst and the background as a lawyer to help make sense of some of these things. I want to talk about something with you that I set up the last hour and that has to do with Hunter Biden's legal team and some letters that they've been sending out this week concerning that laptop that they're still not admitting is his. That's the first part that I found interesting. They're on a full frontal assault, but not admitting it's his. How did you react to some of these reports? I think the same way you did in the same way the readers did is the first letter, the 14th page letter was very clear about complaining about compromising mister Biden's personal data, circulating it, sharing it with people that had no right to see it, et cetera. And then the second letter seemed to suggest and that the first letter shouldn't be interpreted as we all interpreted. The second letter basically said, we're not agreeing that it's his. Now obviously nobody's on the road. This isn't testimony. This is, as you pointed, a full frontal assault, taking the offensive by the lawyers, but everyone probably recognizes is they can't have those ways. There's no standing if it's not his laptop. You can't represent someone sort of in the abstract as if I have your property, you know, I shouldn't be able to share it, but I'm not sure I have the property. So it becomes a logical dysfunctional argument. And I think that has made more news, ironically, Jeff, than the original letter. Well,

Hunter Biden Mister Biden Jeff
Tom Brady Retires... Again

The Doug Collins Podcast

02:37 min | 3 d ago

Tom Brady Retires... Again

"To the final segment today. I think we're going to take into and it is also again New York Post play this out very well. If you're looking at it, it says we miss you, Tommy. And this is the retirement of Tom Brady for the second time. I run it, not an ironically, I think he probably planned this. It came on the same day he retired last year. Oh, weird. Who would have thought Tom? Look, the post has had some incredible front pages on Tom Brady over the years and some good something bad. I mean, I was going back through some of these James and looking at and frankly, I'd almost forgotten about the flight gate. You know, of course. The balls and anything going by my brain. Anyway, Tom Brady retired. I think he will retire this year. I think he, I think, probably in, you know, look, I'm not getting anybody else's business, you know, for that matter, but you wonder if he really at the end of this year thought, well, maybe should have done it. Hindsight is 2020, hot dog. Yeah. Every month. But now he is, you know, the rumor, you know, again, he's got a ten year already signed contract with fathers. I mean, 375 million or something like that. This is to show you this is interesting. He's the greatest quarterback of all time. I mean, player, you know, that goes. Of course. He might like 324 million playing football. He's gonna make 375 million and I was total in his football career, 20 something years. He's gonna make ten year prior to 375 million sitting in a booth with Fox and he's never been in the booth before. Yeah, I mean, this is like. But don't you feel, I mean, don't you just know Greg Olsen's like saying, really, man? Really? Yeah. You know? Well, first of all, Greg Olson got his shot on the big stage and he blew it. Was a disaster. But he's been Greg Olsen's fun. He's actually from my neck of the Woods. They play, we used to get our tails handed to us in football by them. I think it was Wayne in northern Holland. I don't know. But this is what I think today, because Tom Brady says he's not Russian of the booth, right? He wants to spend time with his kids and all the other lies he's telling. Because he can take a gap year. I mean, it's open to whenever he wants to come. I mean, isn't that crazy? Yeah, a contractor just whenever you want to show up. Yeah, somebody calls me up and be like, hey, any time you want to show up, here's your tears, $10 million. $365 million for ten years. You're like, okay, cool. I'll see you in a couple years. I'm going to take some time off. That's like winning the lottery and then saying, why don't you just hold my ticket for a couple of months?

Tom Brady New York Post Greg Olsen Football Tommy Greg Olson TOM James FOX Holland Wayne
Why the Celsius Examiner Report Shows 'A Complete Disaster'

Unchained

01:46 min | 4 d ago

Why the Celsius Examiner Report Shows 'A Complete Disaster'

"Today's guest is kadam schubert investigative reporter at the Financial Times. Welcome Adam. Thanks for having me on. This week, the Celsius independent examiner, shoba Pelé, dropped her 476 page report on the failed crypto lender. And it was quite the bombshell. What were your main takeaways from the report? The main takeaway from the report is that Celsius was a complete disaster in almost every way imaginable and almost from the very beginning, in a way. One of the major things that came out in the examiner's report is to do with the Celsius native token cell, and the way that the way that the examiner portrays what was going on with Sal, is that Celsius spent an enormous amount of money, including its customers, Bitcoin and Ethereum, including investor cash, simply on buying its own native token to prop up the price. And then the real kicker here is an examiner's report. One of the reasons that they were spending so much money buying its own token was so that executives, including Alex mashinsky, could sell their token. And so that their sales would not crash the public price. And I think the amount is something like $68 million worth of sound that Alex musky sold. Yeah, and that's referring to the CEO. That's right. The CEO and former CEO and founder. You know, it's a very long document. It's almost with the appendices. I think it's like 600, 700 pages. But it is extraordinarily damning.

Kadam Schubert The Financial Times Shoba Pelé Ethereum Adam Bitcoin Alex Mashinsky SAL Alex Musky
Will Donald Trump Nickname His Potential Competitors?

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:28 min | 5 d ago

Will Donald Trump Nickname His Potential Competitors?

"Let me close before Margot calls up by asking you about governor youngkin governor Abbott, governor desantis. You know, you got like 8 people who might run. Well, they all get a nickname. I know Pompeo's nickname is my mic, but will they all get a nickname if Mike Pompeo runs or youngin runs rabbit runs? Well, they all get nicknames. Well, first of all, that's not Pompeo's nickname. Oh, I thought in his book he says it's my mic. Well, I don't know. I haven't seen the book yet. I haven't read it all about her. He was generally nice. Oh, very good to you. You took a little bit more credit than he said, but that's okay with me. It's all going to the same because we did it. And we did a great job. I got a lot very well with Mike. But we did a great job. This country has never been run so well. Despite the COVID and all of the things and all of what you read yesterday that report. Don't forget, these guys, before I even got in, they were spying on my campaign. Long before I got in, this didn't just happen. And if I didn't fire Comey and if I didn't fire mccabe and a struck and page and all of that scum that was in there, you would have had they were trying to do an overthrow. And they just think of it. They spied on my campaign from the time I came down, the escalator, and here I am innocently running to do something great and I have this garbage that's in there. Headed up by Comey and the group. They spied on my campaign. And I got rid of them all.

Pompeo Governor Youngkin Governor Abb Governor Desantis Mike Pompeo Margot Covid Comey Mike Mccabe
How to Find Lauren Chen's Movie Reviews

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:02 min | 5 d ago

How to Find Lauren Chen's Movie Reviews

"Tell us where can people find your movie reviews? Sure, you can find my movie reviews on Facebook. They're just under Lauren Chen, my general Facebook page, or on YouTube, they are on the media holic channel. So that's media holic, like alcoholic, but for media hall. Media Hollywood, what's the last thing you reviewed? I believe the last thing that I reviewed was the horrendous just truly terrible velma series on HBO that not only race swap, but also sexuality. Is it a conservative ploy I've heard some people say it's so bad, it's got to be a conservative troll. Part of me has wondered that because it's just very hard to imagine anyone even a far left liberal progressive who would think that this is good content. And actually the next video I have coming out is a review of Bros, which has been touted as the first gay RomCom. It's a tough competition as to which show or movie is actually worse, but essentially a lot of the videos that I do over on the media channel revolve around the idea of me watching it so you don't have to.

Lauren Chen Facebook Velma Youtube HBO Hollywood Bros
The State of California Is Seeking to Disbar John Eastman

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:51 min | 5 d ago

The State of California Is Seeking to Disbar John Eastman

"So if they want to disbar this constitutional scholar, they already got rid of him at Chapman. Which is another discussion we should have. So let me repeal the charge of the state of California bar. Composed as all of these association by leftists and cowards. An official complaint of 11 charges on reading alleging that John eastman at Denver to quote plan promote and assist then president Trump in executing a strategy a strategy unsupported by facts or law to overturn the legitimate results of the 2020 presidential election by obstructing the count of electoral votes of certain states. And as is written in a very important piece by roger Kimball, was a major thinker. Not a single one of those charges is true. And then he writes Wikipedia and other left wing megaphones, please no ladies and gentlemen. That he is right about a Wikipedia. I used to sue. I used to actually send checks to Wikipedia Wikipedia has been thoroughly corrupted as well. If you want to look up a list of the kings of Britain, its magnificent, if you want to do music research as I do, on the keys of all 104 haydn symphonies Wikipedia is terrific. If you want to look up anything or anyone that is conservative, I have not been able to edit the Wikipedia page of Dennis prager for about 5 years. I can not touch it.

John Eastman President Trump Chapman Roger Kimball Denver California Britain Dennis Prager
DOJ Searches Joe Biden's Delaware Home

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:27 min | 5 d ago

DOJ Searches Joe Biden's Delaware Home

"Now on the Mike Gallagher show. The FBI is currently searching President Biden's Delaware vacation home for classified documents. They are in Rehoboth beach Delaware, his legal team had said that they had searched the Rehoboth beach home and found no mishandled papers, however, similar assurances had been given about Biden's Wilmington home before they found more records there on January 20th, so right now the FBI is on the premises, searching Biden's Rehoboth beach, Delaware home. Boy, what a absolute dilemma this has to be. For Trump haters. On the one hand, they want to use the mishandling of classified documents as a way to hoist Trump on his own petard. As they say, so what are you going to say about grandpa Joe? And he's got him apparently spread out all over the country. His Wilmington home, Robin beach, the Penn Biden center. I mean, this guy is a veritable cornucopia of mishandled classified documents. So I guess you got to turn the page on that one, right? Trump gets vindicated yet again.

President Biden Delaware Rehoboth Beach Mike Gallagher FBI Biden Wilmington Grandpa Joe Robin Beach Donald Trump Penn Biden Center
Will Rep. Mike Gallagher Devote a Hearing to TikTok?

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:46 min | 5 d ago

Will Rep. Mike Gallagher Devote a Hearing to TikTok?

"Was possible to hold a hearing with your democratic colleagues, will you devote a hearing just a TikTok because it seems to me that when very responsible teachers are not aware of the threat bows by TikTok, then lots of Americans aren't or they're churning it out or they're saying, what's the big deal I'm on Twitter a lot. And it's just so completely different. Will you be devoting a hearing to TikTok? I think we will. One thing to flag. Kathy McMorris Rogers on the energy and commerce committee is actually going to have TikTok CEO before her committee. Basically, any legislation on TikTok. So I have the bipartisan bill to ban TikTok. It's referred to the house foreign affairs committee, but energy and commerce also has a piece of this jurisdiction. So we just need to make sure that E and C and foreign affairs and the select committee on China are all on the same page in terms of both hearing oversight as well as moving forward on legislation. And so one option would be for us to partner with the NC and with foreign affairs on a joint hearing or after they do their hearing or around the same time. One thing I've been thinking through is we can have a hearing devoted to TikTok, but teased out some of these bigger issues at play, right? So for example, in my opinion, it's not just enough to ban TikTok or force a sale. You also need to have a bigger proactive strategy for how we share data across borders with free world countries that we actually trust. Shinzo Abe gave a great speech before he was killed, where he laid out this model of data free flow with trust. So I think we can do two things. Identify and expose the threat posed by TikTok or really any app controlled by a hostile foreign power. While at the same time laying out a strategy for cross border data flows throughout the free world that actually makes sense.

Kathy Mcmorris Rogers Energy And Commerce Committee House Foreign Affairs Committe Twitter NC China Shinzo Abe
Independent Examiner Excoriates Celsius As a Ponzi

The Breakdown

01:53 min | 6 d ago

Independent Examiner Excoriates Celsius As a Ponzi

"The independent examiner in the Celsius bankruptcy just dropped some absolute bombs in a filing first thing this morning, so that's where we're going to start. The report is 476 pages long and comes from chaba Palais, the examiner who was appointed to be a completely independent voice. To read the reporting around it, the banner headline is that it effectively accuses Celsius of having been a Ponzi, using new customer deposits to pay for old customer withdrawals. People are just starting to dissect it, and I'm drawing from a number of those threads, including one this morning from Ramallah of lumet a wealth. So as I mentioned, one big theme is the Ponzi like dynamics of using customer funds and especially new deposits to cover older obligations. From the report, quote, Celsius recognized that it should not use customer assets to purchase the coins necessary to cover liabilities to other customers. But it justified its use of customer deposits to fill this hole in its balance sheet on the basis that it was not selling customer deposits, but instead posting them as collateral to borrow the necessary coins. Celsius also used the proceeds of these borrowings to continue to purchase cell, which editor's note is their native token. In April 2022, Celsius is coin deployment specialist described Celsius practice of quote using customer stablecoins and quote growing short and customer coins to buy sell as quote very Ponzi like. Now moving farther in the report as part of these Ponzi dynamics, it sounds like some executives were nervous about how high the rewards they were offering to the public got. From the report again, some in Celsius management sounded alarm bells over this practice and attempted to lower reward rates. Mister mashinsky, who prioritized growth in Celsius customer base over profitability, however, overrode their recommendations and refused to do so. The result was that between 2018 and June 30th, 2022, Celsius accrued reward obligations to customers of $1.36 billion more than the net revenue it generated from customer deposits.

Chaba Palais Ramallah Mister Mashinsky Celsius
Israel Will Allow More Citizens to Carry Guns for Self-Protection

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:44 min | 6 d ago

Israel Will Allow More Citizens to Carry Guns for Self-Protection

"It is, Fox News, Israel, to expedite gun licenses. After deadly shooting their Jerusalem synagogue. Did you have to see that? No. I knew you'd like it though. Israel is poised to speed up gun applications in response to a shooting in east Jerusalem over the weekend that left 7 people, including a 70 year old woman dead. The measure was among several that Israel security cabinet announced Saturday evening firearm licensing will be expedited and expanded in order to enable thousands of additional citizens to carry weapons. Facebook page of the prime minister. Ready? National security minister itamar Bengal told reporters over the weekend. When civilians have guns, they can defend themselves. Radical notion, though. Civilians have guns. They can defend himself. Who'd have thought of that? Yes. The things that the left come up with, we don't want you to be able to defend ourselves. We don't want anybody armed in a school because after all, if it's a, if it's a gun free zone at a school, who's going to attack it, there is no issue upon which the left things clearly none zero. These are convoluted minds.

Jerusalem Synagogue Israel Itamar Bengal Fox News Jerusalem Cabinet Facebook
Bart Herbison and Doug Share Stories About Elvis

The Doug Collins Podcast

02:31 min | Last week

Bart Herbison and Doug Share Stories About Elvis

"And I share a my birthday in his death day. August 16th. August 16th, he died on my birthday. And I told the story the other day on one of the podcasts about my next door neighbor Beatty, who, again, lucky you loved Elvis and everything and she came running across all my birthday party. He's dead, he's dead. He's dead. We thought it was. I mean, I thought of her husband and died and it was Betty talking about Elvis and died. And so, you know, the sharing this. So the last part where they actually showed real video of him in those last concerts where he was bloated. He was there. I mean, some of those actually, those are memories are not memories for me. Those are actually, I saw those concerts. That's all. So it was really, really interesting to just see. Well, one last Elvis plug and a story. Peter go around a controversial author. And he was very controversial when he wrote to John Lennon book and the Elvis book too. There's two Elvis books, careless love, and last train of Memphis. There are over a thousand pages, and they're so thorough. It's like he was in the room, so he tells everything good, bad and different. And I particularly love a lot of the stories he told in the famous RCA studio B across the street from my headquarters. And here's one. I got the privilege of knowing Chad Atkins a little bit. One of my mentors, the late Joe Talbot, took me to launch at a place called I forget what it was mauds down on music grow. It's not there anymore. And chat was there. They had a standing launch every Friday they were in town. I couldn't make this up. He sit there playing his guitar at the table quietly. And I looked at Joe and he goes, that's why he's Chad and he plays everywhere. So Chad is the only major artist I've ever heard of that wanted a closing act. Chet went to bed at 8 o'clock if he could. 8 30, he was a country farmer, got up in the wee hours, three or 4 o'clock in the morning. And so Elvis is showing up late or wants to record at ten, 11, 12 may not show up, sits in their place gospel songs all night, and he can't stay awake at 2 o'clock in the morning. So he calls Elvis's team and RCA and goes, look, I like the kid. And at that time, Nashville did not embrace Elvis. They threw him off the grand Ole opry. They didn't know what he was. But Chet liked him and saw that he was about to change music, but he said, I don't care. 11 o'clock tonight, I don't remember if it was four or 5 songs we do them and we're out.

Elvis Beatty Chad Atkins Joe Talbot Betty John Lennon RCA Chad Memphis Peter Chet JOE Nashville
KPR, Lil Pudgys, Unisocks, The Flower Girls and more collections added to Kraken NFT

Kraken Blog

00:36 sec | Last week

KPR, Lil Pudgys, Unisocks, The Flower Girls and more collections added to Kraken NFT

"2 p.m. Thursday January 26th, 2023. KPR, Lil pages, unisocks, the flower girls more collections added to kraken NFT. We're thrilled to announce that we have added 8 new NFT collections to crack an NFT for our current beta testers to explore, collect and trade. After revealing dozens of NFT collections over the past few weeks, we carefully selected these new collections so you can. The post KPR Lil pages unisocks, the flower girls more collections added to crack an NFT appeared first on kraken blog.

On this week's AP Religion Roundup, Pope Francis says homosexuality is sin but not a crime, protests against Quran desecrations erupt across the Middle East, and a group of young Jewish rescuers are commemorated on Holocaust Remembrance Day.

AP News Radio

02:08 min | Last week

On this week's AP Religion Roundup, Pope Francis says homosexuality is sin but not a crime, protests against Quran desecrations erupt across the Middle East, and a group of young Jewish rescuers are commemorated on Holocaust Remembrance Day.

"On this week's AP religion roundup, Pope Francis says homosexuality is a sin, but not a crime. Protests against coran desecrations erupt across the Middle East, and a group of young Jewish rescuers are remembered on Holocaust remembrance day. In an interview with The Associated Press, Pope Francis criticized laws that criminalize homosexuality as unjust. Francis acknowledged that Catholic bishops in some parts of the world still support laws that criminalize homosexuality or discriminate against the LGBTQ community. He said bishops in particular need to undergo a process of change, recognizing the dignity of everyone. Although the Pope's comments call for an end to criminalizing homosexuality, the Vatican still considers the act of homosexuality a sin. Protests were held Friday in several predominantly Muslim countries to denounce the recent desecration of Islam's holy book the Quran by far right activists in Sweden and the Netherlands. In Tehran scores of worshipers burn the Swedish flag enchanted slogans after Friday prayers. Earlier this month, a far right activist staged a protest outside the Turkish embassy in Stockholm, where he burned the Quran. Days later, the leader of a far right movement in the Netherlands, Tor pages out of a Quran near the Dutch parliament. The moves angered millions of Muslims around the world and triggered the protests. On Holocaust remembrance day, the underground zionist youth movement is remembered for helping Jewish refugees during World War II. Members in their 90s like Sarah Epstein recalled supplying refugees with food cards and forged documents. She was among a group of Jewish youth leaders in Hungary that jumped into action just before Nazi Germany invaded in March 1944. She says the actions of Jewish youth leaders who save tens of thousands from the gas chambers should be remembered. I'm Walter ratliff.

Pope Francis Coran Turkish Embassy The Associated Press Middle East The Netherlands Francis Dutch Parliament Pope Tehran Sweden Sarah Epstein Stockholm Hungary Germany Walter Ratliff
John Eastman Responds to Charges by the California State Bar

Mark Levin

02:00 min | Last week

John Eastman Responds to Charges by the California State Bar

"Like the similar complaint filed against me with the Supreme Court of the United States By a group calling itself the 65 project the states united democracy centers complaint is full of falsehoods But the California bar nevertheless announced last march that it was conducting an investigation the existence of which is supposed to be confidential unless the bar determines as an astonishingly did here that the subject of the investigation is a threat to the public So their suggesting that John eastman Is a threat to the public During the course of that investigation the bar investigator sent me an extraordinary 38 page letter Centrally demanding I provide them with every bit of evidence and communication to support every line in every memo and communication I made Every complaint and brief I filed on behalf of the president every statement I made publicly And every article I published I think anything to do with the 2020 election I provided a fairly comprehensive response about a hundred pages And incorporating by reference thousands of additional pages in sworn affidavits expert reports court decisions scholarly articles clearly demonstrating the validity or at least the tenability The claims of election allowed illegality and fraud that I was making and the legal advice I was providing Unmoved by the massive amount of evidence and apparently under intense political pressure to take action against me the California bar has nevertheless filed a massive notice of disciplinary complaint Against me today which like the state united democracy center's complaint itself is filled with distortions half truths and outright falsehoods We will respond to each charge in due course but for now he has posted the response we provided last September to the bar's investigative letter

United Democracy Centers John Eastman Supreme Court California United States United Democracy Center
"a page" Discussed on Crime Junkie

Crime Junkie

07:51 min | 6 months ago

"a page" Discussed on Crime Junkie

"Rang at around like 2 a.m., she just instinctively picked it up. But whoever was on the other end didn't say anything, they just hung up. So her first thought was that it was probably Steve checking up on Kathy. But she had no way to know for sure. She tells police that what she does know for sure is that Steve called her at 6 a.m., and she knows it was him because he spoke to her asking where Kathy was. Now, at the time when she got this call at 6 a.m., it wasn't super weird. But Charlotte finds it ultra weird now since she knows that by 6 a.m. Steve not only knew where Kathy was, but he also knew that she was dead. Why is he calling her? Now to be clear, as far as I can tell, the timing of this phone call is never corroborated with phone records. And I'm not sure why that is. It seems like a pretty simple thing to me to go back and check to verify exactly what time the call was made. But we only have this he said she said between Charlotte and Steve. And he's saying that the timing is all wrong. He says that he only made that first phone call at around two 30 a.m. and he completely denies a later phone call. Though he does later change his story to include a second phone call, but changes the timing of said phone call multiple times, though Charlotte, on the other hand, repeatedly says she is sure Steve called her between 5 30 a.m. and 6 a.m.. Now all of this is weird, but police now have someone else they need to talk to. They got to get to this guy that Cathy was meeting that night. Police track him down, but the details about this encounter with him just really aren't there like you'd expect. Like I would have expected to know what questions they asked him, how they vetted him slash his alibi. But there's almost nothing. We just know that he's super cooperative and even voluntarily takes a polygraph, which detective Moseley says that he passes with flying colors. And then we know that they clear this guy. Though this man wasn't the killer that they were looking for, talking to him wasn't all for nought. They are able to narrow down their timeline for Kathy's murder because according to court documents, detective Moseley learns that Kathy left the motel in Beaumont at around two 30 a.m.. Between the pages separation, the boyfriend being cleared and Charlotte's account of a phone call after Kathy was found where Steve's asking where Kathy is like he doesn't know, not to mention Steve strange behavior with police, authorities are laser focused in on Steve from the very beginning. Just one day after her murder, Steve visits with Kathy's mom and has a whole lot to say. He tells her off the wall things like that Kathy was using drugs, specifically doing cocaine at night and taking valium during the day. He also kind of offhandedly mentions that he spilled some fish grease on the carpet the day before, and he tells her not to listen to Cathy's friends because they'll say he killed her. And I mean, dude is just all over the place. Stranger still, Steve refused to let police search their home when they requested to. And he tells Dorothy that the reason that he doesn't want the police poking around is because he's afraid they'll find Kathy's blood. Steve tells Dorothy as well as several other family members that Kathy was always shaving her legs in the living room and that there may be droplets of her blood, and he thought that that might incriminate him if police found that. Though no one in the House reports seeing blood. Now, I don't know about any of you out there, but I don't know many people who opt to shave their legs in the middle of the living room. I certainly have never done that in my life. Either way, later that same day, Kathy's sister, sherry Valentine, visits the page home and immediately notices this really strong chemical odor when Steve answers the door. Now Steve tells her about that like spilled fish grease on the carpet in their living room. He says that it happened when he was carrying this pan or dish or whatever from the kitchen out to the trash outside and after it spilled he needed to clean it up. Now, just keep in mind, Steve has now told two people that he spilled fish grease on the carpet Wednesday may 15th. Now fast forward, days later on Saturday the 18th, Dorothy, her mom witnesses Steve burning something in the backyard in which she asks him about it, Steve says that he spilled fish grease that day and then he missed the trash pickup. So he decided to burn the trash in his backyard. Now when asked by officials, Steve always sticks to this Saturday story, and he denies that he ever said anything about spilling it on Wednesday to anyone. But if fish grease was spilled on Saturday, then what was the reason for the chemical odor right after Cathy's murder? And just in case you weren't sure what to believe already, one of his daughters says that no fish grease ever spilled ever. And listen, I know this seems like a lot of hoopla over some fish grease, but as silly as it seems, it's one of the most contentious points of this case, mainly because of where the grease supposedly spilled. It seems to be around the same exact spot where Kathy's supposedly cut herself shaving. Which is just like ultra convenient, apparently everything in that house happens in that spot. And it's also pointed out that even his story about spilling it doesn't really make sense because I guess the way that their house was set up, it would have made no sense for him to take this thing across the living room floor to go outside to the trash because apparently there was like a door off the kitchen or something that would have given him a cleaner, clearer path to get rid of this stuff. Around this time, the results from Cathy's autopsy comes back. And it reveals that Cathy was brutally beaten, which caused bruising and a broken nose, but ultimately her cause of death was manual strangulation, just as police had suspected. Also like police had suspected, according to the medical examiner's report, Kathy was not killed in her car. There was no blood on the outside of her clothes, but there was transfer blood on the inside, which suggested that she was killed, cleaned up, and then redressed. There's also grass on her clothing, suggesting that she was actually dragged to the car to stage it as an accident. The autopsy also reveals that Kathy was dead by four 30 a.m., which narrows down their window even further since we know she left the Beaumont at about two 30. So they're working with only a two hour window of missing time. Now, it should be noted here that when detective Moseley inspected her body, he reported that she had no makeup on and no jewelry, if you remember. While Cathy's friends and family are adamant that her nighttime routine was to put her hair up, take her makeup and jewelry off and then go to bed. So for that reason, her friends and family feel strongly that Kathy drove the 15 minutes home to vite her after meeting her boyfriend in Beaumont and then had an altercation after getting ready for bed. And when you think about that scenario, there aren't many people she would have or even could have interacted with at that hour in her own home. Interestingly, the autopsy also revealed that Cathy had sexual intercourse shortly before she died, which isn't too surprising because we know that she met up with her boyfriend, but something about what they found is surprising. According to the orange leader, the semen found was absent of spermatozoa, which is indicative of a person who has had a vasectomy. And wouldn't you know it, detective Moseley confirmed that Steve page had a vasectomy earlier that same year. Now when police confront Steve with this evidence, he has an explanation. He says that just before Kathy went out that night that she died at around ten 30 p.m., they had sex on the living room floor.

Kathy Steve Charlotte Cathy Moseley Dorothy sherry Valentine Beaumont House Steve page
"a page" Discussed on Crime Junkie

Crime Junkie

14:33 min | 6 months ago

"a page" Discussed on Crime Junkie

"Is suspicious to the police right off the bat. Like he switches between speaking to authorities in a calm, collected manner, and then like spontaneous fits of crying, you know, still minus the tears, though. And in the pre dawn darkness. And I say darkness because this is the other weird thing Steve won't turn on the lights even after he's asked to, but detective Mosley notices a pile of clothes. Again, in the dark, on the living room floor. Now, doesn't mention at the time, just kind of like makes note of it. All in all, in the time spent with Steve authorities can't help but notice that he never once asked to see Kathy, nor did he try to go to the scene, even though, again, you can literally see the flashing lights from his doorstep. After police leave around 6 a.m. on that same morning, Steve calls Kathy's mother, Dorothy Fulton, and he tells her that something terrible happened to Kathy. Within the hour, Dorothy and Kathy's father James are at the page home. Dorothy notices that Steve, again, is acting kind of strangely. He's like wiping his hands incessantly with a wet washcloth, and according to the Texas Court of Appeals, Dorothy also notices Steve is doing laundry. Laundry, at 6 a.m., not even an hour after being informed that his wife was likely murdered. But, when Steve's asked about this, he says that he's doing the laundry because his daughter wet the bed. Now listen, Joe is still in diapers, I don't know how I would react to this, so I asked one of the women in our office who has a son that's a little bit older. And she said, honestly, this isn't weird to her. Like, if her kid had an accident, she said he would almost be like instinctual to just like strip the bed, throw everything in the wash. Now I can't find any details about whether anyone confirmed what was actually being washed or that the kid actually did have an accident. It's just a lot of people speculating. Now around 8 a.m., Kathy and Steve's two daughters, 12 year old Aaron, and 7 year old Monica wake up and are told the unthinkable has happened to their mother, and she's gone. Family and friends are coming in and out all morning to offer condolences or just to be together during this time. And just as a side note, it's interesting to me that the home was not secured in any way, like they established from about a second into the investigation that she wasn't killed in her car, which means that they, to me, should be looking for another crime scene, seems like maybe her own home would be a good place to start. But again, just a podcaster, what do I know? So these not podcasters let literally dozens of people traipse through the page home and let Steve do laundry and it's all just hunky Dory. Anyway, one of those family members that comes through the page home is Kathy's sister Jan. According to Jan, when she asks Steve what happened to Kathy, he says that she was probably drunk and drove her car in a ditch, which makes no sense because police have already told Steve at this point that Cathy was murdered. It's not stated in the source material exactly what the family makes of Steve's behavior, but I have to imagine that they were just as confused as I am by his statements. But I also tend to think that between their own shock and grief that they may have just kind of written it off at first. What's harder though to write off is the fact that Steve tells police that he is against an autopsy, and sure there are cultural and religious reasons that oppose autopsies, but Steve's not citing any of those. He simply just doesn't want an autopsy to happen. So Kathy's father James Fulton steps in and he's the one that gives the okay against Steve's wishes to have her autopsy. And in the meantime, police get to work on their investigation. To start, they interview Cathy's friends and family to piece together a timeline and to try to understand who may have wanted to harm her. And off the bat, they learn that Stephen Cathy's marriage was rocky to say the least. Just the week before her death, Kathy actually asked for a separation from Steve. And on May 13th, that would have been the day before Cathy died. Steve was supposed to spend his first night sleeping at an apartment that he had rented due to their separation. So obviously now police are wondering what the heck was he doing at the house the morning that they found Cathy murdered? Well, Steve tells police that there's a super innocent explanation for that that Kathy called him and asked him to come over and watch the girls while she went out with a friend named Charlotte. So police want to talk to Charlotte. According to the cold justice episode on this case, titled the case behind the billboards. Charlotte tells police that that's not necessarily a lie. But it's not the truth either. You're listening to crime junkie from audio chuck. Whether you're ready to pop the question or you're celebrating a milestone moment, find unique jewelry with the convenience of online shopping at blue Nile dot com. And listen, we are talking high quality jewelry that you would get from like a really high end store. I was always super nervous about buying diamonds online. I don't know why I felt like everyone was trying to get one over on me. I guess that's just my paranoid crime junkie. But once I tried blue Nile, I fell in love. It is more affordable because there's no brick and mortar, no middle man. I got myself a diamond ring because no one needs to sit around and wait for someone else to buy jewelry, but I also bought my mom a diamond necklace, and I'm over the moon with both pieces. And that blue Nile dot com, you can create custom engagement rings or search for classic and timeless jewelry pieces all at prices you won't find a traditional jewelers. Make your moment sparkle with jewelry from blue Nile dot com. And going on now is the blue Nile anniversary sale. Save up to 40% on classic fine jewelry pieces and 25% on engagement ring settings. Plus, every order is insured, ships free and arrives in discrete packaging that won't give away what's inside. Shop stress free and find your forever piece. Go to blue Nile, dot com today. Now she doesn't think that Steve is necessarily lying because she doesn't think he knew the real truth, which was that Kathy had called her around 9 30 or 10 p.m. on May 13th and asked her not to answer her phone in case Steve called to check up on her. Because she told him that she'd be with Charlotte. But Kathy was actually planning to meet a man that she'd been seeing at a motel in nearby Beaumont. Now, this information about another man is obviously hugely important to detectives, but police's interview with Charlotte reveals something else as well. Charlotte tells police that despite Kathy's request, when her phone rang at around like 2 a.m., she just instinctively picked it up. But whoever was on the other end didn't say anything, they just hung up. So her first thought was that it was probably Steve checking up on Kathy. But she had no way to know for sure. She tells police that what she does know for sure is that Steve called her at 6 a.m., and she knows it was him because he spoke to her asking where Kathy was. Now, at the time when she got this call at 6 a.m., it wasn't super weird. But Charlotte finds it ultra weird now since she knows that by 6 a.m. Steve not only knew where Kathy was, but he also knew that she was dead. Why is he calling her? Now to be clear, as far as I can tell, the timing of this phone call is never corroborated with phone records. And I'm not sure why that is. It seems like a pretty simple thing to me to go back and check to verify exactly what time the call was made. But we only have this he said she said between Charlotte and Steve. And he's saying that the timing is all wrong. He says that he only made that first phone call at around two 30 a.m. and he completely denies a later phone call. Though he does later change his story to include a second phone call, but changes the timing of said phone call multiple times, though Charlotte, on the other hand, repeatedly says she is sure Steve called her between 5 30 a.m. and 6 a.m.. Now all of this is weird, but police now have someone else they need to talk to. They got to get to this guy that Cathy was meeting that night. Police track him down, but the details about this encounter with him just really aren't there like you'd expect. Like I would have expected to know what questions they asked him, how they vetted him slash his alibi. But there's almost nothing. We just know that he's super cooperative and even voluntarily takes a polygraph, which detective Moseley says that he passes with flying colors. And then we know that they clear this guy. Though this man wasn't the killer that they were looking for, talking to him wasn't all for nought. They are able to narrow down their timeline for Kathy's murder because according to court documents, detective Moseley learns that Kathy left the motel in Beaumont at around two 30 a.m.. Between the pages separation, the boyfriend being cleared and Charlotte's account of a phone call after Kathy was found where Steve's asking where Kathy is like he doesn't know, not to mention Steve strange behavior with police, authorities are laser focused in on Steve from the very beginning. Just one day after her murder, Steve visits with Kathy's mom and has a whole lot to say. He tells her off the wall things like that Kathy was using drugs, specifically doing cocaine at night and taking valium during the day. He also kind of offhandedly mentions that he spilled some fish grease on the carpet the day before, and he tells her not to listen to Cathy's friends because they'll say he killed her. And I mean, dude is just all over the place. Stranger still, Steve refused to let police search their home when they requested to. And he tells Dorothy that the reason that he doesn't want the police poking around is because he's afraid they'll find Kathy's blood. Steve tells Dorothy as well as several other family members that Kathy was always shaving her legs in the living room and that there may be droplets of her blood, and he thought that that might incriminate him if police found that. Though no one in the House reports seeing blood. Now, I don't know about any of you out there, but I don't know many people who opt to shave their legs in the middle of the living room. I certainly have never done that in my life. Either way, later that same day, Kathy's sister, sherry Valentine, visits the page home and immediately notices this really strong chemical odor when Steve answers the door. Now Steve tells her about that like spilled fish grease on the carpet in their living room. He says that it happened when he was carrying this pan or dish or whatever from the kitchen out to the trash outside and after it spilled he needed to clean it up. Now, just keep in mind, Steve has now told two people that he spilled fish grease on the carpet Wednesday may 15th. Now fast forward, days later on Saturday the 18th, Dorothy, her mom witnesses Steve burning something in the backyard in which she asks him about it, Steve says that he spilled fish grease that day and then he missed the trash pickup. So he decided to burn the trash in his backyard. Now when asked by officials, Steve always sticks to this Saturday story, and he denies that he ever said anything about spilling it on Wednesday to anyone. But if fish grease was spilled on Saturday, then what was the reason for the chemical odor right after Cathy's murder? And just in case you weren't sure what to believe already, one of his daughters says that no fish grease ever spilled ever. And listen, I know this seems like a lot of hoopla over some fish grease, but as silly as it seems, it's one of the most contentious points of this case, mainly because of where the grease supposedly spilled. It seems to be around the same exact spot where Kathy's supposedly cut herself shaving. Which is just like ultra convenient, apparently everything in that house happens in that spot. And it's also pointed out that even his story about spilling it doesn't really make sense because I guess the way that their house was set up, it would have made no sense for him to take this thing across the living room floor to go outside to the trash because apparently there was like a door off the kitchen or something that would have given him a cleaner, clearer path to get rid of this stuff. Around this time, the results from Cathy's autopsy comes back. And it reveals that Cathy was brutally beaten, which caused bruising and a broken nose, but ultimately her cause of death was manual strangulation, just as police had suspected. Also like police had suspected, according to the medical examiner's report, Kathy was not killed in her car. There was no blood on the outside of her clothes, but there was transfer blood on the inside, which suggested that she was killed, cleaned up, and then redressed. There's also grass on her clothing, suggesting that she was actually dragged to the car to stage it as an accident. The autopsy also reveals that Kathy was dead by four 30 a.m., which narrows down their window even further since we know she left the Beaumont at about two 30. So they're working with only a two hour window of missing time. Now, it should be noted here that when detective Moseley inspected her body, he reported that she had no makeup on and no jewelry, if you remember. While Cathy's friends and family are adamant that her nighttime routine was to put her hair up, take her makeup and jewelry off and then go to bed. So for that reason, her friends and family feel strongly that Kathy drove the 15 minutes home to vite her after meeting her boyfriend in Beaumont and then had an altercation after getting ready for bed. And when you think about that scenario, there aren't many people she would have or even could have interacted with at that hour in her own home. Interestingly, the autopsy also revealed that Cathy had sexual intercourse shortly before she died, which isn't too surprising because we know that she met up with her boyfriend, but something about what they found is surprising. According to the orange leader, the semen found was absent of spermatozoa, which is indicative of a person who has had a vasectomy. And wouldn't you know it, detective Moseley confirmed that Steve page had a vasectomy earlier that same year. Now when police confront Steve with this evidence, he has an explanation. He says that just before Kathy went out that night that she died at around ten 30 p.m., they had sex on the living room floor.

Steve Kathy Charlotte Cathy Dorothy Dorothy Fulton Texas Court of Appeals James Fulton Stephen Cathy cold justice Mosley Beaumont Moseley Monica Aaron Joe James sherry Valentine
"a page" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

Terrible, Thanks For Asking

03:10 min | 1 year ago

"a page" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

"Just want there to be <Speech_Male> the voice of another <Speech_Female> autistic person out <Speech_Female> there. <Speech_Female> Because <Speech_Music_Female> I feel like <Speech_Music_Male> in the <Speech_Male> history of societies <Speech_Female> understanding of autism, <Speech_Music_Male> a lot of the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> dialog has been <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> led by people who <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> are not on the <Speech_Music_Male> spectrum. <Speech_Music_Male> They're either parents <Speech_Female> of children who are <Speech_Male> autistic or <Speech_Male> they're involved in <Speech_Music_Male> a nonprofit, <Speech_Music_Male> but they <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> themselves don't <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> know what <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> it's like to experience <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> being autistic. <Speech_Music_Male> And I <Speech_Music_Male> just kind of want to get to <Speech_Male> a point where we <Speech_Male> as society can <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> normalize <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> autism and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> not necessarily see <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> it as something that <Speech_Music_Male> needs to be <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> cured <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> because <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> it's not something that needs to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> be cured. It's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> just a <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> way that <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> people's framework <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> that isn't <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> quite in line with the way <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> our society is right <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> now. I feel <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and I think that we <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> as a society would <Speech_Music_Male> do better if we could just <Speech_Music_Male> understand <Speech_Music_Male> a little <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> more about <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> what <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> it's like to be autistic <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> just be more accepting <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> of when <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> someone's like, hey, I <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> need to do this a different <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> way or hey, I <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> need to keep this routine <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in place. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Just being <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> accepting of <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> making these adjustments. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> This has been terrible. <Speech_Female> Thanks for <Speech_Female> asking. I'm Nora <Speech_Female> mcnerney, our team <Speech_Female> is Marcel malaki <Speech_Female> boo Jacob Maldonado <Speech_Female> Medina, Jordan, <Speech_Female> hurgon, <Speech_Female> and often Megan <Speech_Female> Palmer are executive <Speech_Female> producers, Beth <Speech_Female> Perlman, <Speech_Female> executives in charge <Speech_Female> are lily cam, <Speech_Female> Alex chafford, <Speech_Female> Joan Griffiths, <Speech_Female> where production of <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> APM studios, <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> I make <Speech_Music_Female> this these <Speech_Music_Female> episodes in my closet, <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> I'm also an author. <Speech_Music_Female> You can <Speech_Music_Female> Google and buy <Speech_Music_Female> any of my books or <Speech_Female> not by any of my books. <Speech_Female> I am one hell <Speech_Female> of a salesman. <Speech_Music_Female> Salesperson, <Speech_Music_Female> saleswoman. <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> And <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> yep, <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> okay, <Speech_Music_Female> well, that's what we got. Okay, <Music> bye. <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> Also, <Speech_Male> before <Silence> we continue, I <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> just saw a <Speech_Male> moth on my <SpeakerChange> wall <Speech_Female> and it's really buggy, <Speech_Female> so I'm gonna go <Speech_Female> get it go get it, <Speech_Female> let it outside. Yeah. <Speech_Female> You <Speech_Female> get it? <Speech_Female> I did. <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> He's <SpeakerChange> gonna go on my <Speech_Female> insight collection later. <Speech_Female> My brother <Speech_Female> collects mods. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> We actually <Speech_Female> had a giant one in our <Speech_Female> pool, holy <Speech_Female> crap. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> The size of a hummingbird. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> I have one that <Speech_Female> large in my collection. <Speech_Female> And it <Speech_Female> had a beautiful <Speech_Female> blue face. <Speech_Female> Like it <Speech_Female> was crazy beautiful. <Speech_Female> We kept it in a <Speech_Male> cup for a while. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Well, too long. <Speech_Female> And I was like, we got it. We got <Speech_Female> it. I was like, can I <Speech_Female> mail this to my brother? <Speech_Female> And my husband was like, I'm <Speech_Female> not mailing them off. I was like, <Speech_Female> okay, well, <Speech_Female> I guess we'll just look at it. <Speech_Female> Okay. There's thought <Speech_Female> I would ask, sorry. <Speech_Female> Sorry, <Speech_Female> everybody. <Speech_Female> Okay, so we were just talking about what

autism Marcel malaki Jacob Maldonado Alex chafford Joan Griffiths mcnerney Nora Megan Google
"a page" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

Terrible, Thanks For Asking

05:34 min | 1 year ago

"a page" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

"That autism diagnosis has helped grace understand herself. Has helped her realize that she's not a bad roommate or a bad coworker or a bad friend. It's allowed her to see herself for exactly the way she is. And it's allowed grace to see herself more clearly during moments when she isn't feeling so great. Moments when she would have previously shamed herself for having such a strong reaction. It validated the panic attack I had in a Costco one time. I don't do well when there's a lot of people around and there's a lot of noise. Which Costco is just this condensed bundle of a million people making a lot of noise. All the time. From 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. all the time. And so every time I've been in the Costco, I would be in the store for maybe 30 seconds and I'd suddenly feel just really dizzy and lightheaded and whoever I went with. It just boiled down to, I would just make sure I could see the back of them. So that I didn't like wander off and get lost somewhere. And then by the time I would get out, I would be so exhausted by the end that I just would not do well for the rest of the day. So I will never have a Costco membership because I will never willingly go in unless you bribe me with a hot dog. That's the only thing from Costco that I am cool with is the $1 and 50 cent hot dog and soda. I used to have just one of the small single serve blenders, but I feel like it was designed really poorly because the blade of the blender was in the bottom of the cup and I do quite like smoothies. It's one of the few ways that I actually managed to eat fruit. So I'm like, okay, I need to invest in a nice, solid blender that can do exactly everything I want. So I got online and I did all my research and I'm like, okay, I want the blade to be in the lid, so it's easier to clean. I want the cup to preferably be larger. And I want it to come with multiple cups that I can just buy and also buy extra cups. So I narrowed it down to the exact blender I wanted and like, okay, this one is at Walmart. It's in this aisle. I'm going to go there after work someday and pick it up. And so I go to Walmart one day and I'm standing in the blender aisle. And it's not there. There's like the little tag that says the blender brand on it. It should be right here and there is nothing. And I walked up and down the aisle like ten times I searched behind boxes. I double checked that there were no other blender aisles. This is the only aisle that I have to surge. And I looked on every shelf, checked every box and there's my blender is not here, it's said it would be here, and it's not. The one time I want unfettered capitalism to work in my favor, it doesn't work. And I just eventually got to the point where I'm standing in the middle of the blender aisle in Walmart and I don't know what to do now because they don't have my blender. I had already had this all figured out and what do I do? And it maybe it took me a solid 30 minutes to realize great, there's another store in town where you can get this blender. Go check that store. But for some reason, when my mind had made the plan of okay, I'm going to go check Walmart, see if they have this blender. That was the only thing my mind had, and it didn't allow for that flexibility of, well, maybe there's a different story. You could look at or maybe you could order it online because now I went to the plunger right then. And it's not just blenders or the stress that naturally comes with making a big purchase. This kind of fixation happens a lot to grace. There's a specific brand and flavor of breakfast burrito. And I can't do any other flavor even if it's the same brand. And this is the same flavor that tends to be sold out the most at my grocery store. God damn it. So that's like, well, I guess I'm just not getting breakfast burritos. Meeting new people in a way that allows her to feel connected to them can still be hard for grace. Like even doing this interview, for example, so for this interview, I knew intellectually that you guys are not mean you're very nice people. You're humans who have had really crappy days and really good days. And so there shouldn't be any tension there shouldn't be any nerves because you're all very nice. But that's completely separate from the emotional aspect of I am freaking terrified because I appreciate these people in the work that they do and I really don't want to make an idiot out of myself in front of them. And so it's just trying to hold both of those in my mind of, yeah, I feel terrified even though I know I shouldn't be. So let's just see how this goes. I think in a room full of people I've never met before. In person, there's a different aspect to it because I think I get more conscientious of how I'm holding myself or the fact that I can't really stay plugged into one conversation and so I tend to end up bouncing around from one conversation to the next. So if there are three conversations going on, I'm like holding all of them in my head at the same time..

Costco Walmart autism
"a page" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

Terrible, Thanks For Asking

05:34 min | 1 year ago

"a page" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

"Why I thought they felt that way, which was not my favorite part of the test. And then just there were a lot of like puzzle based tests and mathematically based tests, which I did find those to be quite fun. When grace finally gets her results, they come in the form of a lengthy document explaining that yes. She has autism. He would go on to write a report about how I answered every question, how I did with the intelligence based part of the test in what his formal diagnosis and recommendations were, and it came out to be this 26 page packet of why grace's autistic. 26 page packet, yeah. I joke to myself. It's a page for every year of my life that I want undiagnosed. It was kind of a relief because the entire time that I was kind of sitting on the whole maybe I am autistic, maybe I'm not. I felt like well maybe I think I am because I'm just projecting what I know about autism onto myself, but to have somebody who's actually certified to tell if somebody is autistic or not be like, yeah, you know, she is. It's kind of like that whole, I'm not crazy. Like I'm not just making this up, it's not just in my head. It's like I'm not just doing this for attention because I have a history of people in my family calling me a hypochondriac. And so what the autism thing, as I was starting to wonder about that, I was like, well, am I doing this for attention or because it would be convenient compared to just being an asshole? And it's really assuring to be like, no, you are actually autistic. The things that stress you out, stress you out for valid reasons. It's almost like proof of something that you already knew. Like you knew your brain was different and this is like a doctor being like, yep. Yes. Now it's certified different. And I got them report to prove it. That makes me laugh every time I bring up the report, it reminds me in Big Bang Theory or Sheldon's like, I'm not crazy. My mother had me tested. Who said that feeling? Like, I am crazy. I have a report to prove it. The first person grace tells about her diagnosis is in her mom or one of her siblings. Not her roommates, or her colleagues. It was actually my former microbiology professor from the university I went to because that university since it's in the same town as the office where I was diagnosed. I was there anyway and I thought I might as well go buy the college so if there are people that I know there and she happened to be there working in her lab. And this was at the height of COVID. And so like I had my mask on, she had her mask on, we're standing like 9 feet apart. And we're just making small talk catching up on the last 6 months. And they're kind of a lull in the conversation and they just standing there. It's still holding my report. Because I didn't want to leave that in my car and just hold on to my report. And I just like, oh yeah, I got diagnosed as autistic. And she's like, she just kind of looked at me and was like, oh, well, what really is there that you can do about that? And I'm like, it just helps me to understand myself better. Yeah, it's so interesting. It's like, what can you do about it? Because we want everything to have a cure. Yeah. I think as a society, it's like, what's the point of being diagnosis, something if you then can't do anything about it, and I really wish the perspective would shift to it's okay to be diagnosed with something to understand yourself better because it's not necessarily that there's something wrong. It doesn't necessarily need to be cured. It just helps you understand why you've always been that weird person. Yeah. I had an ADHD diagnosis in my 30s, but I also had a Doctor Who was like, but you're fine, because look, you've written three books, and you have a podcast, like how hard can it be? And offered me literally no coping mechanisms or medication or anything. And truly was like, yeah, but it can't be that bad. And I feel like having a Doctor Who did the report, by the way, who gave me all this information, I felt like, oh, now I have more compassion for myself and the things that I hated myself for. Yeah. I think I got that too when I got my autism diagnosis because one of the things I've always had an issue with is when I get really stressed, I'll cry. And it's ugly crying. It's like everything that can make a fluid on my face just starts making fluid and it just pours out. I've had to leave a college program because of that. I have been scared that I will lose a job because of that. I feel like people look down on me and are kind of demeaning if I'm like that in public because it's like, well, if she can't keep her shit together, she's crying like a baby, so.

autism grace Sheldon ADHD
"a page" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

Terrible, Thanks For Asking

05:39 min | 1 year ago

"a page" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

"Of that, the fact that I am a woman in the fact that I grew up in the 90s when autism diagnoses were less prevalent as than they are now, that also I think contributed to it just going unnoticed. In elementary school, I was in academic competition and enrichment courses and then throughout school I was ahead a year in math and a head of your science. And so even though later on in high school, I did start to struggle with certain courses, again, it never really presented itself as enough of an issue for someone on the outside to think, you know, is there something going on with grace that might need to be addressed? I developed this tick in third grade where I would just get the really intense urge in my head that I had to shake my head and it felt like a pressure building up and the only way to release it would be to shake my head. And I remember my mom telling me grace, if you need to get the hair out of your eyes, just use your hands. And I was like, it's not the hair on my eyes, or something in my head, which I think freaked out my parents because if your kid tells them, there's something in their head that'd be pretty weird. And that was enough for them to get me into see a neurologist in Seattle. And so we went to Seattle. I had this appointment. I feel like I basically just took a roadside sobriety test for a third grader. You know, or the heavy walk a straight line, they had me follow his pen with my eyes. Do all that stuff. And he's like, yeah, no, she just has a tick, she's fine. She's not drunk, we check. No, and it definitely didn't help that many of the things grace loved and enjoyed were banned in her home when she was growing up. A lot of things like Harry Potter Pokémon, stuff like that was not okay, I got the vibe that if you read Harry Potter, you're going to hell that kind of thing, which I think was big in Christian families in the 90s and early 2000s. And in junior high, I just finally reached a point where I'm like, you know what? Screw it. I'm going to check the books out from the library that sneak them home. So I ended up reading most of the Harry Potter series. Under my blanket, in the middle of the night, with a flashlight, and I would hear my heartbeat and think it was footsteps and I would like to turn out my flashlight and listen really close. Okay, no, nobody's coming. Can I go back to reading? I feel like this is a very appropriate way to read Harry Potter given the kind of relationship he had with his aunt and uncle in the series. It seemed very appropriate. Yeah, anything that was anime or even in the style of anime, they didn't like. They thought it was bad. And so I wasn't allowed to watch Avatar The Last Airbender. When I was a kid, because they thought that was evil also. And I find it incredibly ironic because coming from a Christian family, I think I've actually drawn one of the best parallels to the way that Christians understand the relationship between God and humans from Avatar the last year bender. I'm just seeing here like, if you guys would give this a freaking chance, you would realize it's not just evil. There's actually stuff to be learned from this. Friendships were hard for grace, too. I remember I would make friends okay, but then after like a year or two years, especially if they moved away, that was one thing, but even if they stayed in the same school district in the same classroom, I feel like my friendships just kind of broke down and just kind of fizzled out and I didn't really understand how come the people that I knew in elementary school I wasn't very close to in high school. Even though we're still in the same school and I still don't understand because I feel like I have friendships now where it's like things are starting to fizzle a little and I don't know what to do. I don't know how to fix it. I don't know if there's something that I did. That led to this or if this is just how friendships saw her. We'll be right back. We get support from purple and I have been waiting to record this ad. I've been looking forward to recording this ad because do you know what I got for Christmas? I got the purple mattress. They have the gel flex grid and it is the super stretchy super squishy material that adapts and flexes around pressure points. It feels like not a cloud, something better than a clap because you know a cloud you imagine you just sink into it. You'd be like, oh, God, no support. It is like you were being held in the hands of.

Harry Potter Seattle autism bender
"a page" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

Terrible, Thanks For Asking

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"a page" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

"Older siblings. At best, she often felt like she just couldn't connect with her family members. At worst, she felt ostracized by them. I always joke with people that by the time I was born, my parents just kind of gave up on being parents. They were like, yeah, she's fed. She's not dead. We're good. 'cause I've always felt like my mom especially has a really good relationship with my siblings. But my relationship with her is always just been kind of tense and awkward. My family in general, they're very social with each other, so they'll cut together for family dinner and get together to play cards and stuff like that. And they would always wonder why I prefer to just hang out in my bedroom and they would always complain, grace, you never want to hang out with us. You never want to socialize with us. But then on the flip side of it, it's like every time I do go to hang out with you guys, somebody feels the need to crack a joke that I found particularly upsetting or I have one brother who his show of affection was to punch me in the arm, which everyone else seemed to be fine with if he did it to them, but for me, it was like it didn't feel good and I didn't understand why he felt the need to do with that. And I even remember asking one time, hey, don't do that in everyone's just like, oh, well, that's just what he does. I suppose what brothers do, and it's like, that makes me feel not okay. If somebody doesn't like being touched or punched in the arm or something, can we just please respect that? And I never feel like I got the respect from my family. Because again, my mom never saw the issue with the.

"a page" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

Terrible, Thanks For Asking

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"a page" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

"I'm Nora mcenerney and this is terrible thanks for asking. In one of our march 2021 episodes, we talked with a woman named Cynthia, but her experiences as an adult living with autism. Many people with autism are diagnosed at a young age. According to the CDC, the average age of diagnosis is about four and a half years old. Cynthia was one of those kids, diagnosed when she was a toddler. Today's guest grace is also autistic. That's the language she refers. So it's what we're using. And grace reached out to us after hearing that episode last spring because unlike Cynthia, grace wasn't diagnosed with autism until she was 27 years old. It wasn't a doctor or some other medical professional who opened grace's eyes to the idea that she might be autistic. It was a TV show. Was atypical in your Netflix recommendations? How did you end up watching it? And when did you start to identify with that main character? I think it was in my recommendations just because I don't remember really how I came across it, but I think it was from the very first episode the moment that you find out that Sam is really into science and especially Antarctica in penguins. Like I really related on that. And then I also noticed how the socially awkward aspects that you see in CM, I also relate to that. And so I just, as I watched the series continue on, I just became more comfortable with relating to this character. I watched it and I'm sitting there being like, I get how he feels like I understand that or like I'll watch it and be like, that's me. That's me. I think there's this one scene where his sister is about to start school at a new school. And so he goes and buys her a pack of pencils to be supportive and stuff because, you know, you need pencils for school. And I think an average person would see them and be like, oh, well, that's not really a big deal, but I'm that kind of person where when I know somebody needs something like I want to be supportive and I'll be supportive in the weirdest ways. Grace knew from a young age that she was different from her 5.

Cynthia autism Nora mcenerney grace CDC Netflix Antarctica penguins Sam Grace
"a page" Discussed on Uncensored Direct Marketing

Uncensored Direct Marketing

02:44 min | 1 year ago

"a page" Discussed on Uncensored Direct Marketing

"If you're working with merchant processor then you can just ask them what options they have for international sales. A lot of them have different plug ins or different solutions for them. For example direct payment. We offer something called planet payments where It's just like an additional plug in. It's a you fill out one sheet. You tell us what you're looking for like for example if you're looking for Pounds and brazilian rows and all these different currencies. We can add them for you and it's it's a very quick and easy setup another berry underestimated and kind of takes a little bit of time. But it's it's definitely worth it is to give your customers the correct decline message. Why are they Being declined as i said earlier if you have an older demographic and you know the person is just putting in an invalid card number. Two good idea to tell them. Hey this is not a valid card. You want to check the number and try again now if somebody has insufficient funds. It's a good idea to tell them again. You have insufficient funds. Try another card If if somebody's bank is the climate transaction for unknown reason. Which is you know those pesky issuing bank declines they're just these random Random declines that merchants are accustomed to seeing while you could say. Hey we don't know why your your card has been declined but please call your bank and ask them to accept this transaction so you can kind of talk to your customers and explain to them. What's going on and that will educating your customers. As to why they're transaction will decline will likely convert more sales for you and we'll just give your customer a better experience at your checkout another thing that you can do just as a bonus tip. 'cause i always loved to give those opponents steps is You know if you know. They don't If they decline and they're not willing to turn on the carter or whatever. The case is often on alternative payment method so for example. Ach in the us in the uk. It can be different types of it. Be sepa payments in europe. And so so. Just make sure you cover all your bases and you know if somebody really wants to buy. Make sure you try to convert them and give them what they're looking for. So that is mike. Quick checkout page episode. Just quick tips. Like i said. These are super simple for you. Guys to implement doesn't really cost you very much money and you can just put them in there and you know you'll see a couple of hundred if not a couple of thousand dollars in savings every month just from unnecessary fees and losing losing sales for no reason so i hope you enjoyed this episode. Please like it if you do. Please share it with your friends and subscribe to the channel for more content and have yourself a great day..

berry sepa europe uk mike us
"a page" Discussed on Uncensored Direct Marketing

Uncensored Direct Marketing

05:24 min | 1 year ago

"a page" Discussed on Uncensored Direct Marketing

"Want to attempt to to salvage some of your your decline subscriptions then kinda take a look at what's happening and see how it makes sense. How many times you should try. Typically i advise not try more than three extra times like you try the the time that it's supposed to then you could try a couple of days later. It's also a good idea to to try at the beginning of the month. Lot of people of pay their bills and take care of things. At the end of the month they might have more money at the beginning of the month. and then you might want to try one more time but two or three times really at most. There's really no need to try card ten times and soon enough visa. Mastercard will likely have some regulations to avoid merchants abusing this type of thing rather just hitting up card constantly so you might as well clean up that process as soon as you can In terms of an and that's you know things that you can do on your checkout page specifically In in terms of converting more sales. And just you know using different tricks to want. Somebody comes into your final to make sure that they end up. Being able to buy is set the card number as a client is inputting it so especially for older demographics. A credit card number is usually sixteen digits. If they're all kind of stuck together and you know somebody who may whose vision maybe isn't that good they might get mixed up They may forget a digit. So as you're typing it in in the field where you know. The credit card is input. You can just put a space in between every four characters and that way. It's just a lot easier for them. And it looks likes looks on their credit card versus just one long sixteen digit number so keep that in mind especially if you have an older demographic it can make a really big difference consider a shorter checkout for your mobile checkout page so especially if you're selling a digital product or you have con content based business. You don't really need to collect people's addresses you don't really need to collect their phone numbers and so forth so it doesn't really make much sense. And when i say for mobile. I mean if somebody's on their desktop in this is something that you should test of course but on their desktop a lot of people have auto fills and so forth even on mobile they have auto fills is just they have a lot less space to see things so they have to scroll longer But in general when we've done testing on a desktop or laptop type page It usually doesn't have a a huge impact but on mobile if you make your checkout page shorter you convert more so you might wanna just for example collect zip code and not the full address. You know so that that could be something. I understand that now. You know collecting more customer information is very valuable. So you have to kind of balance. You're conversions versus collecting the information on. What could be more valuable for you but it is something to consider is on a mobiles assured at checkout page will convert better for you When i was talking about zip code you can collect all the information for the address but then just do a partial match. Meaning just up the zip code with the customers address. The reason that i say that is if you do a full street and zip match. If somebody's address for example is a twenty five fifteen first avenue on their credit card statement. It might be spelled out as f. I r. s. t. of and they may write it as number one s t avenue..

Mastercard
"a page" Discussed on Uncensored Direct Marketing

Uncensored Direct Marketing

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"a page" Discussed on Uncensored Direct Marketing

"And save a couple bucks so a few things on your checkout page that you should be doing These are little things that you can do to avoid. Sending unnecessary transactions to your processor. The goal of that is two fold first the less transaction the less bad transactions. You sent to your processor. The less fees you're gonna be paying for transactions that are be declined so you save some money there Secondly if you do send a lot of bad transactions when i say bad transactions i mean transactions that eventually will decline or are stolen cards and so forth the more you're processor will scrub your transactions. Scrubbing means bill. Wanna transaction comes in if it looks like it's missing information or something doesn't make sense or if it seems risky they have different rooms for. That won't get too into that. But if different rooms to determine if a transaction is risky they scored and if you have a tendency of sending a lot of declines you might start getting scrubbed in losing more transactions than necessarily so it is a really good idea to have some checks on your checkout page that prevents your your processor of forgetting all these quote unquote bad. Transactions were decline transactions. One way you can do that is by adding a loon. Algorithm check so the lunar algorithm that l. u. h. n algorithm is essentially to check if a card is valid. So if it's actually a card number that exists it's an algorithm that determines credit card numbers. So she just do the loon algorithm check on your checkout page as somebody's inputting their card number while that will really help You know if. Somebody's ms typing their account. Or whatever it will say invalid car number and that prevents you from sending the transaction over to the prosser just to get a decline and then the customer may not even know why it's being decline may have not noticed that they didn't put in the correct card information so that's really really important Another thing that you can use your gateway fraud checks so most gateways. whether you're working with 'em i authorize dot net or you know any of the bigger gateways. They have fraud checks that they that they can do these are usually pretty basic. But still it's it's worth a check just to go in there and see what they have and what you can what make sense for your business model for example you might have you know a subscription or something like that you can say you know each card number. Technically should only be charged three times a month so if somebody tries four or ten times or whatever that could be obvious fraud you could also say that after two declines you do.

"a page" Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

Gadget Lab Podcast

06:04 min | 1 year ago

"a page" Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

"Exchanges felix. Gray glasses dot com slash wired. All right mr. Tom simon. I you are the guest this so you get to go first. What's your recommendation. Thank you for the owner mike. My recommendation is a novel called. No one is talking about this by patricia. Lockwood who is a poet and also one of the funniest people on twitter. And i guess kind of annoying talented. 'cause she's a great novel The main character is she's an internet influence. I guess but in the book She doesn't use twitter or anything. You recognize everyone's on something called the portal. She online famous for posting a question that went viral canada dog be twins and the book. The book follows her as she wrestles with ups and downs and paradoxes anxieties of life online. Which i in a very relatable way in a way that sort of captured some of the essence of the internet in a way that. I haven't read a little litter. The mystery show that does it and the book also sort of is what happens when a very flying family crisis comes along and she has to deal with that while also maintaining her internet existence. It's pretty good rate It's like a it's like a plot ripped from today's non headlines from today's calendar events. It sounds like a plot ripped from a taylor. Lawrence story in the new york times. Sounds really wonderful though. It's very reliable and actually touches on it touches on on a couple of points. The the problem you identified and you'll excellent recent feature lauren. The problem is not so chummy known as the miscarriage problem at tech companies where they do thing like. Hey remember this post. Remember this photo and may not be something that you actually wanted to remember. That comes up. A couple of times adds to the realness. Nice the name of the book one more time. No one is talking about this guy. Patricia lockwood lauren. What's your recommendation. My recommendation is also a book by a woman writer. It's called girlhood and it's by melissa feebis who is a wonderful writer. This is not her first book It's a collection of essays. It's basically about this social conditioning. That starts to sort of effect women when they're girls and how. It changes the way that girls perceive themselves and how they're sort of conditioned to believe that they're supposed to act in certain society and how it just affects our whole experience growing up and melissa herself. It just seems like such an interesting person. She super interesting background She at one point was a heroin addict. She is a now recovered. She was a dominatrix in new york. City She did all of this before she got her. Mfa and became a writer. She wrote another book at one. Point called abandoned me which is about loss and abandonment Also incredibly emotional. It's a collection of short pieces. Right it is a collection of essays. But i'm already just really immersed in it and it's it's really really powerful and she such a powerful writer that i i highly recommend checking it out nice mike. What's your recommendation. This week weird. It's not a book we could. You could attack tack on last minute. No no i got one all picked out. Okay everything i do. I do extensive research and decision making before they make recommendations of the show. I know it doesn't seem that way. But that is actually what happens okay. So what's your recommendation. okay i want to recommend an album It's i don't do this very often but it's of music. I want to recommend the new album by the brazilian artist. Save you that. C. e. u. she's brazilian. She sings in portuguese sometimes in english but mostly in portuguese. The new album is called a pico. And it's the portuguese spelling of that. So it's like a c. u. s. t. i. Ico it's an album. That's all acoustic versions of her songs. So it's kind of like a greatest hits album. She's got six or seven albums at this point in her career and she goes back and sing some of her most beloved songs but she does it with just her voice and an acoustic guitar It's a pandemic album. Normally she records the full band She has these really intricate arrangements. That makes electric sounds and live band. sounds and that's what you would normally expect from an artist like say you but this album is just her voice and a guitar and it's fantastic. It's like a a redesignation of everything that she's done at this point in her career I'm recommending it. Because she's an amazing singer. An amazing songwriter. A really great gift for like pop melodies also like touches of of on guard throughout her music. but she's not really well known elsewhere in the world. You know like she has maybe one hundred thousand streams or or ten thousand streams on spotify for most of retune. so she's not like a superstar but She's absolutely fantastic. And not enough. English speaking people know about her and know about brazilian music in general so she sort of great serve path into what's going on in modern day brazilian pop world so that's my recommendation acoustic echo by the brazilian artist. Cu that sounds good. Can you Some of it for us. I could but i'm not going to adding the summer playlist. All right well thank you off your recommendations. Those were great and of course tom thanks for joining us and telling us about a in healthcare is family and thank you listening. If you have feedback you can find all of us on twitter. Just check the show notes. This show is produced by boone ashworth. We will be off next week. Because of the fourth of july holiday it is inconveniently right in the middle of a long weekend. So we're going to take that time to clean up our studio. Tom sitting in now disinfected once again and then move in and hopefully at some point july..

boone ashworth six Patricia lockwood lauren melissa feebis next week mike twitter Tom simon This week english spotify Lockwood melissa tom Tom portuguese lauren first book new york ten thousand streams
"a page" Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

Gadget Lab Podcast

07:19 min | 1 year ago

"a page" Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

"We just talked about how artificial intelligence can cause complications in hospitals but is also a growing part of how were using our own personal internet connected devices at its i o development last month google announced an ai powered dermatology tool. You can just take a picture of that. Weird mole on your skin uploaded and algorithms will tell you if you have anything to worry about. That's the idea anyway in reality. It's not so simple now. Tom you worked on another story. This week about google's ai powered dermatology service. What's the skinny on that. I see what you did them like this. That this is one of the cavalcade of new announcements made goo and i thought it was one of the most interesting because it pinpoints this fantastic potential future of medicine right. If this technology gets really good maybe we could just give the technology to consumers and you have on your phone or watch or whatever and it will tell you. If you'll say call you have a problem without you. Having to and see a specialist and that's kind of almost four. Google showed off. It showed a demo of app. Where if there's something on your skin you're not sure what it is and it doesn't fly away when you wave your hand you can pull out your fun. Take three photos and upload google and google. we'll come back with a list of what it calls suggested. Conditions things that might be and this follows a handful of studies that google published on algorithms that can detect different skin problems. Problematic moles things that and then those studies. Google shown that technology could rival board-certified dental gist at recognizing these things and so the potential of having an app is is is very intriguing but it's very preliminary and so we still waiting for somebody tells them how will be rolled out. I assume it works differently on different colors of skin. Yes thank you very good question. Google has been criticized for not having a good representation of different skin tones in the previous studies. It has published and that has caused some people to worry a bit about. This new app knows being pushed out to consumers as maybe as soon as later this year however the company says that the data sets in its published. Studies don't represent its latest and greatest stuff and they say they've been working on making it work full time just tons or the hem released a lot of specifications on day. John exactly how widely it's been tested about something to wait and see about so at the top of the show. I mentioned my apple. Watch to us for some health tracking and it seems like every time apple rolls out a new health tracking feature. It comes with lots of disclaimers like this is not a diagnostic tool. And if you think something's seriously wrong you should call the doctor right. Basically they don't wanna be totally liable for this health app. And i'm wondering first of all if google has put out any kind of caveats disclaimers around this this skin identifying application also wondering what this is going to do to people who are already probably a little bit predisposed to diagnosing themselves with a deadly disease within six clicks. Like if i use this app am. I gonna like just going to be cancerous in my mind. I'm also wondering those things Lawrence o. in google's demo there's a disclaimer on the results after someone has their photos analyzed. Somebody suggested conditions a diagnosis. And i think a couple of other disclaimers as well as you know. This is not a substitute for going to the doctor. But this is a new app and it also comes with some presentation that might encourage people to think. It is some kind of super expert. You know so. When we will present i owe. It was mentioned that. This app was pony. Motivates a by a lack of skin specialists worldwide people to go to their problems. And you know the company also pointed to its result. Saying is technology could be more accurate than a dermatologist. And so there's a lot of open questions about how consumers are going to think about this when it's in the hands of his reputation for being really great. Ai maybe some people will think they should trust this thing to help them make a decision about their own health. That's something that is spoken to. It'll be concerned about what sorts of ethical concerns arise. when you're taking these medically sensitive photos and handing them over to google for processing. I mean these aren't like cat picks. No they're very personal when they could be on very personal parts of your anatomy. I don't believe. Google has released much information about how it would handle. Those photos has said that the app is so far approved for use in the european union. But not in the us. So i guess that would mean. The trial starts in the u. They have gdp and other privacy protections. But i would expect the google gonna say something like you know. We encrypt everything in transit. We delete it after we process it but it is another step. You know along the constantly slippery slope of lots and lots of new tech. It does great things you have to share data with a big company to use of it. That's a good segue to another question. Tom and you've been doing some reporting on this. Which is this move towards on device. It's a phrase. We hear a lot particularly in the world of ai. Companies like google and apple and others have said they're starting to take some of these machine intelligence functions that normally require sending a bunch of data to the cloud processing it and sending it back to the end user and instead doing some of this processing this intelligent computing on the device itself. Which i in theory is supposed to keep information more private right. So is this something that ultimately could run quote unquote on device. And how private is that really. That's a great question. Could it run on the vice. Maybe i think google apple of both worked pretty hard to be up mobile hardware and software. So they can process photos using machine errands on the device. So yeah i guess we could see got the way. Yeah google apple in particular have been talking a lot about pricing data on device knowing the cloud. And there's one way of looking at where it's just a great thing if you will go to have your data process by our them. Yeah kind of fit. Maybe feels better if that happens in your pocket and not on someone else's computer way you don't quite know what's going on but some privacy scholars say that. That's kind of a narrow wave thinking about privacy. If apple is processing your data on your iphone which it controls and is super secure. Then that's send the keeping data confidential is between you and apple and the iphone. But that isn't how some people think about privacy for some scholars. Privacy is a broader set of freedoms from being washed so for companies watching every single thing. You do online maybe around your house through a small device just because they don't tell other people about it doesn't mean that you don't feel watchdog surveilled and so one way of thinking about on device. Trend is that it could be a way to sugar coat. The general trend which is the every aspect of your life becomes enmeshed in a mobile ecosystem. Run by big company. I'm not just something to bear in mind next time you hear company talk about the benefits of on the voice all right. Let's take a quick break. And when we come back we'll do our recommendations.

John Tom apple Google iphone google last month This week Lawrence o. both later this year european union six clicks one way three photos i o one first every single thing disclaimers
"a page" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

02:59 min | 2 years ago

"a page" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

"A huge work in progress in that friend. For many years ago has been developed. The script and now indy crowdfunding stage believe they're going through kickstarter to try and get funding and as you know with any film project The amount of dollars you have has a profound effect on what you can do. Sure until we know what our budget is I'm loosely designee creature ideas for it and He has written a role specifically for me as an actor which is nervy but higher a. Welcome the challenge. That was my career before right. Call it a career And it'll be fun to to where that once again. Oh cool that sounds like fun. Why films are made very differently. I think the crowdfunding thing is a very cool way to get it done. It's amazing it really is a very wonderful because those types of films are fan generated fan based and you know if you're a fan and you got five bucks to get to participate in something that yeah it's five dollars and what does five dollars and the scheme of a film. Well at least five dollars is a bag of fries in craft sources for someone all adds up. It's one of the years one of the many moving parts that makes a difference. Five bucks five bucks now. Yeah and. I think that it's such a cool way for almost anyone who's got five bucks or whatever it is you dollar to be a part of something and get to watch. That's something come together and also for those who are doing it. Having my books do and realize their dreams is like appear lynch. Lastly i would say that the cool thing is because the show does a lot of prosthetics and sage of digital makeup and kinda mixing both or calling one way or the other. I guess you know. How do you stand in that area with With the digital makeup being incorporated or being used on its own. I haven't very strong opinion about it. Is people need to realize those who overly support digital and those who overly disc digital the need to realize that. It's a good thing no matter how you slice it and the complaint that digital ruins everything and bad. Cg it's so obvious when something is cg which if you take that phrase. It's so obvious that it cg okay. It's also obvious when it's practical. Neither of those you want to have happened. It's obvious because it's.

five dollars Five bucks five bucks both one many years
"a page" Discussed on #QualityMatters

#QualityMatters

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"a page" Discussed on #QualityMatters

"I'm obviously whatever you did didn't fix it right but then you can have on the flip side where you know mostly shops. They know how they communicate the work vokes. They know how they communicate the task. They know how they they perform the checks but again generally speaking they don't have anything documented but those are ones where you could just kind of jump in and say okay. Tell me tell me about what you're doing and you can almost take a page of notes and make it a little more wording. You've got a procedure right. That's what i was going to ask. How detailed do the procedures need to be. I worked at a company. Where every possible scenario that could happen was written into the procedure. Wow that feels like something. Nobody would look at that many pages and like something else happens old. Get right that in and the procedure to say well. This is how we're going to deal with it well to me. Then you're not really relying on your supervisors or whatever to make decisions. Based on things that happen. I think there's an overall process you can right and then the things that show up then you deal with them because they're always going to be different. Never going to be the same so trying to write something around each and every possible scenario that can happen. It's just crazy. Yeah makes it very wording. Does it. Will it kind of depends on the culture of the organization to like. We says you know you could write it so detailed that really your your management is only there just to make sure that the procedures being followed to a t and they they really have no real authority note. No no innovation new ideas. It's just really stagnant boring dole place to work which is fine for some operations. She can have to decide like where you wanna go. Now i think about was in college. I worked for a call center for a while. Those terrible book was was absolutely horrible..

each a page scenario every
"a page" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

07:15 min | 2 years ago

"a page" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

"And i. You know. I couldn't rehearse the stuff at the end because they require. You know a lady on my bag physical comedy that i couldn't do until you know could we couldn't even rehearse it until right towards the right while we're gonna open so schools start at and one of my directors saying this place will brownish here. You can't consider usefully rose because you know what if you break your leg. What if you you know what i mean. Yeah and and look very difficult. Is i was at theater major and i play football and both of those are two demanding sports. I mean do demanding curriculums that you have and you in college you know. And i was trying to do both of them and saying that he trained who The doctor told me i don't know. How long are you play football. I know you can act forever. You might want to stick it. And that's what i did. I quit and there. You are in here you are. You know here i am. Here's a right here. I am getting up play. i. I've gotten to play football on screen. So there you go there you go. I talking to an actor years ago played football and he got hurt and he you know he just when attacking and i asked him. What's the difference between college in the nfl. Because he was with the cleveland browns for awhile and he goes you know in college maybe three or four guide. Maybe five six guys are really fast and the nfl. Even linemen are fast. It's like you just lose step in you're done. There's no way you can. You just can't run away from these guys so Yeah he knew when he got hurt he was finished because he was just. It's amazing so you did the right thing. You definitely did there aren't they. I'll i was. I wasn't making nfl. And even if i had you know that would have been well over now. Yeah yeah. I hear ya yeah. It's better to better to be able to do it on on on tv. And they last forever. That i of my major on my major roles. I play the quarterback on a show called blue mountain state. Token that is one of my most popular characters and rose to date and look at it for the rest of my life. You know people are gonna look at me as this amazing quarterback. I'd never played quarterback in real life. Like i would never you know. So when i grow. I had to learn how to play quarterback snaps before. I never had to learn a proper drop. I had the you know all i mean. The quarterback is the runner to captain. Yeah And and all i knew was getting a handed ball running on so forever. I will have that that football tie which is better than you claro anyway. Because they made me cool. Yeah yeah i mean you know on tv. You know what your character is gonna do in a real game. Who knows what's going to happen. So it's i wanna ask you about a project. Called same difference is that. I saw them on the great. Imdb is that something that's Is you're in the middle of or had done already. Yeah a little indie film. That i did and Starring essence aci-. Nice to meet your ship. There should be coming later this year or next year. I'm not sure But also have Same page different story. Oh cool that is coming in. That is my second out. Oh nice nice. Yeah and i'm very excited about it. As amazing features has big stories about my life from my childhood interesting. How i am the way i am. And most importantly it has the audition part to Make and an. I go through and i i explain all of the details though auditioning for the role of the person that i initially lost into about the you know the try like this stuff that you would never know that you would want to know. Yeah you know and so that that comes out. Monday's nobody here is probably out in available. The on same page there for story comes out the same day as the main august. Oh that's nice so how how do you. How do you kinda juggle both of those careers. How do you. How do you find time for the music part of it. When you're you know we need with your acting career well creative. Add so. I'm constantly trying to create. You know whether that the social media things like you know skit Whatnot are making music or acting. You know always time. You know. Even even while i was I i was putting the album out when i was filming. Make Muscle my first album out pages. That's available now streaming platforms. I was. I was putting this album out while i was in new zealand shooting his movie. Because a lotta times just wait. Yeah she you know. Connor do other stuff. If it's just great. Yeah that's true that's true. Yeah there's a yeah movies. I always call them. Hurry up and wait wait. Like how are you gonna do. The scene okay. Let's wait wait a minute. We gotta shut up here. Early is exactly what's great to talk to you man. I'm looking forward to seeing this. I love a good creature feature. And and i i love this. Cast it's It's it's a nice mix of people and You know it's there's there's a lot of things represented in which i really like and i. It's going be fun i think. Oh definitely gotta check this out right. Well it's a pleasure talking to you. Best of luck to you. Man your careers and look forward to seeing you again in something else. All right thank you very much. you take care. Page look for the megadeath theater near you this weekend. August tenth or on dvd depending on when you listen to this interview checkout page kennedy dot com and look for him in black mountain state not to mention check out his facebook page as well and his tune said he talked about her is to cd or album is same. Page different story available at night. And leave your comments or questions to speak pipe dot com forward slash sci-fi. Talk grant. this is tony tomato. Thanks for this hi. I'm george decay. And i listened to sifi talk..

football nfl cleveland browns Connor new zealand kennedy facebook tony tomato george
"a page" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

07:53 min | 2 years ago

"a page" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

"Strength and conditioning training as well as Yes when train two times a week which is very packing difficult. Yeah off but but awesome. And i start putting like stuff from harnessing on my instagram twitter. Okay cool yeah. Yeah at as kennedy My you know in some of the stuff. I was doing a lot of dives 'cause i didn't know how to die. I got there. And i learnt while i was there till you had to guess which scuba gear and things like that. No no no no no no not not not not deep dive right on my normal normal jump into water. Okay okay yeah so i guess I guess they used were you out in the real ocean or day use tanks or maybe both wow. I hope but water was warmly sports. Yeah the water was warm in in The tank for thank god. I love the fact you know you know how much it probably cost a heat apple because this is like this is like the biggest that you've seen as gigantic. Obviously you know 'cause they have the and i hold my shit. Yeah yeah that's pretty. Yeah to that must have been something. That's cool Yeah any anything that happened during shooting stood out to you and thing happened this out. I noticed that but whoa cool moment happen this war. We were out on the ocean. The first day we went out there then entire day of filming we were Followed by a potett dolphin. Nice so that was cool because they just they're just kept following us the whole that watching them go up and under shipping going around playing our school. That is cool. There's more on the meg. And the bard with page candid billy boy. I have been in the rings and you're listening to science find talk. I know that You know you that one of the things you concentrated on your life is a playwright than i admire very much as well william shakespeare so i have to ask you. I always ask actors when we talk about shakespeare which which one of his is your favorite playing hard. Isn't it richard. That third really reaching the third. Wow i can't use the rea. The reason they are is because there's different genres right. There's comedy distracted tragedy. There's you know. And so you might have a favorite comedy and you might have a favorite trauma. Plays too hard to peak was favorite that but to me richard. the third. Because you know. I've always wanted to play that role. Lert arolla alert. The whole row of the play in college and i practice an entire year for the audition happened. The entire faculty knew how badly i wanted. All the students who are badly. I wanted it and all dishes. And i didn't get it. And they gave it to actually one or two comedic actors in our department at western michigan university. And that's absolutely chris chris me because at the time. I didn't think that the person got. It took it seriously if i did And and. And then i was offered to play richmond which you know that was very ironic from the to play the guy who kills richard love richard. So much you know. What one of the Reasoning is that. The director gave me was a one said well. If you're richardson who's armed. Be able to kill you. Because i'm pretty big. And then she charlton said at that time. She felt that. That actor had more colors to backed into me. And i think what she probably meant by that is. Maybe i was so fixated on his playing him. This one way And i think because that guy Specialized events specializing in comedy. He had more. There was more interesting right. 'cause he he thinks that i would probably take this ultra seriously. He might do sarcastically. Which made more interesting. So i get it. I get an understanding now. And i've added all those elements to myself and i feel desperately wanna play that role for somehow some way. I don't know how are it ever happened. But that is my during the play richard third. Yeah that's such a great part. My favorite play. I have actually. There's several it's hard to pick one. But lately i've been i few many years ago. I saw kenneth braun henry fifth. And i just totally i. I fell in love with that performance. And i actually went back. And i watched laurence olivier's henry the fifth and i'm watching it. I'm going He's not doing it for me. You know it's like i like brian. I think really kind of hit on something and brenna also is the e is my favorite shakespearean actor. Yeah these are perfect so so so perfect because he's so diverse is the best Yeah his hamlet is his film version of ham of is amazing to so and even he did. I think he did as you like it or did one of the comedies. As well so much to do much ado. that's right. that's right. So yeah he's just he's amazing but yeah that's the one that did it for me. Of course. I'm gonna like romeo and juliet. That's such a classic of you know forbidden love and and you know there's Some some really good lines in that to this day we still recite and You know that's the thing about shakespeare. He shows up snippets of lying shows up everywhere and even in popular culture. He's a such an influence. But that's cool and i know you've played. I know you played football to a little bit. yeah I played football in high school and then also played at western michigan university and Ended up getting hurt my ribs broken. Yeah i got my wrist. Broken plan football. I think i was I was in practice. And we're doing their drill. That was not even all contact. You know or just kinda it was kinda just engaged. And i think i was trying to spend away or something i was running back and wild. I was trying to spend Somebody came from the back me. broke my ribs. And at the time i was in the house of as clay called loves lightens light and the community theater in kalamazoo and is very physical Romantic comedy.

Lert arolla richard chris chris richard love richard billy boy western michigan university kennedy william shakespeare shakespeare kenneth braun henry fifth twitter apple charlton richardson richmond laurence olivier brenna football brian juliet