17 Burst results for "89.3 Fm"

"89.3 fm" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:06 min | 3 months ago

"89.3 fm" Discussed on KQED Radio

"FM San Francisco 89.3 FM in Sacramento. I'm Dave Freeman. Good morning. It's now a 35. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Leila Fadel in Culver City, California and I'm Steve Inskeep in Washington, D. C. House Democrats try again to pass a budget framework. Today It's $3.5 Trillion it contains within its provisions, a large part of President Biden's agenda, and it is a special bill because under the rules, it is one of the few bills the Democrats can get through the Senate. Without any Republican support. Trouble is that Democrats face a divide among themselves in the House. NPR congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell has been covering this story, Calc. Good morning. Good morning, You know, I had assumed the problem would be in the Senate that there would easily pass the house where the majority party is usually pretty unified. What happened instead? Well, Democrats in the House really just have a very slim majority, and some moderates have taken advantage of that moment. To try to get some concessions from House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. Basically, she is trying to satisfy demands from two very different ways of her party. Progressives want to get moving on that $3.5 trillion budget framework because it could help them pass a lot of their major priorities. Like you mentioned Things like addressing climate change are paid family leave or childcare programs, but the moderate wing was pushing for an immediate vote on the Senate passed $1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure Bill. They say that those priorities just need to move forward. Now they can't wait for further negotiations on this bigger budget framework. So Pelosi strategy had since June, has been to tie the fate of both of these things together. She's essentially saying that you know the infrastructure Bill and the budget bill have to move together or nothing moves at all. As you mentioned they reached an impasse. And after a lot of haggling and arguing, they kind of came around this idea that they would use a procedural workaround to pass the budget resolution without ever having to actually vote on it, just on the idea of moving it forward, you know, that might sound crazy, but it is an unprecedented and it's within the rules. And it would allow the House and Senate to actually get to work writing the spending plan, because right now they haven't even done that part yet. This is just conceptual. Okay, So if that is the plan, how do they move forward now? You know they have to work out these last details with moderates, and if they can get onto the bills, I would expect a lot more public fighting about the details. Democrats won their majority by pitching themselves as a big party. You know, a big tent party, which meant that they accepted moderates and centrists, so they wind up in situations like this. They have to find a concession consensus, not just on. You know the concept of $3.5 Trillion, but on what the actual policies are, how they actually do it. Plus along the way they need to increase the debt limit and passed basic government funding to keep the government operating past the end of September. So this is not an easy road and it's really not confined just to this budget fight. Council. As you know very well the other job. Congress has his oversight of whatever any administration is doing. They're extremely interested right now, in the evacuation of Americans and others from Afghanistan, How are they responding Well last night there was a briefing, and House Intelligence Committee chairman Adam Schiff said that it's possible but unlikely that the evacuations in Afghanistan will be complete. At the end of this month as planned, You know, there has been bipartisan criticism. Republicans have been certainly more vocal about the criticism. But Democrats are also worried about the manner of the withdrawal and the way it was handled. They say it was chaotic and months of this should have predicted, but ultimately many of them support the goal of leaving Afghanistan. Some of the criticism has been a little bit quieter in recent days since evacuation stepped up, but there will be briefings this week, and that may raise more questions from lawmakers. You know, ultimately, we don't know how long this will be an issue for voters, and therefore we don't know how closely Congress will be talking about this. So that's something that we're gonna be watching in the coming days to see you know just how much they focus on Afghanistan versus the domestic policies that they're also trying to advance. Kelsey always appreciate your insights. Thanks so much. Thanks for having me NPR congressional correspondent Kelsey Snow. The U. S military has ramped up evacuation efforts out of Kabul. More than 16,000 people have been flown out within 24 hours. But Democratic chair of the House Intelligence Committee, Adam Schiff says that may not be enough to get every American and Afghan allies of the US out by the August 31st withdrawal deadline. I think it's possible, but I think it's very unlikely. President Biden is facing pressure to extend the deadline and he's meeting with G seven leaders today to discuss the withdrawal. Meanwhile, Afghans who have made the harrowing journey out of Kabul are being taken to transit centers and military bases around the world before moving on to a third country. One of those places is a U. S air base in Qatar. Joining us now is Germany. Shayan. He's a senior correspondent with Al Jazeera in Doha Hakata and recently visited that base. Good morning, Jamal. Thanks for joining us morning. How are you guys? So you were at the L RD Airbase walk us through who's being housed there now? So it's a mix of there's two kind of operations that are taking place in conjunction simultaneously. One is being led by the Qataris themselves. So Cuttery Air Force planes that are going and bringing in mainly students, women and family. From Afghanistan. Those who want to leave and they're coming in Qatar's processing those number in the hundreds close to 1000. Maybe. And then there's another operation that the Americans are doing in the American military is doing but being also facilitated or helped by the batteries, and that's bringing in people in the thousands. And those are mainly translators. Those who worked for either the U. S military there or the embassy and Other collaborators or those who who worked with them in different fields. I say it's being facilitated by the Qataris because on the ground in Kabul, for example, the Qatari ambassador is ensuring through negotiations with the Taliban safe passage for those people to reach Kabul airport and then when the plane comes here, the American base, although it's a US military base, obviously it's being hosted by the Qatari. So in terms of Certain equipment and other things like that. That's something that the countries are assisting with two. So you're talking about thousands of people on this base. So what are the conditions? Well, initially, there were a lot worse than they are now. That's based on both testimony of those who first came in, as well as the military personnel and officials that we spoke to when we were at the base and simply that is because it's a military base is not equipped to house. Thousands of civilians. Certainly not in huge droves coming within the space of hours, if not just a couple of days. So initially, what was happening was, you know, hundreds of Refugees were being put into these airplane hungers, which weren't equipped, not we're not equipped with toilets not equipped with beds not equipped with air conditioning. The temperature and Catherine this summer month is probably the highest it is. Throughout the year. But swiftly the Americans have tried to bring about some sort of assistance in this, so they were portable toilets. They've housed them now and maybe holes gathering calls, but still, it's nowhere near ideal. There wasn't really warm food and stuff like that. Sounds like a A scramble to deal with incoming people does the U. S person that does US personnel have enough staff to process everyone they don't And that's that's by their own admission. Um, I think a big part of that is because even you know, from the president all the way down to the generals and those on the ground. Nobody expected things to develop a swiftly as they did, and therefore The winds equipped the one equipped either from the basics that I explained in terms of living services or what, Nor were they equipped from a security perspective in terms of processing these visas, So we are told that the people at the base here and a lot of eight are hoping that there are six a staff and other immigration officials and security stuff that are meant to be flying in from the United States here to help process These thousands of refugees. Germany shale with Al Jazeera reporting from the Hakata. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you. We should note here that Al Jazeera is funded by the government of Qatar. This is NPR news back to Joe on KQED with another look at the Richmond San Rafael Bridge..

Dave Freeman Leila Fadel Steve Inskeep Jamal $3.5 trillion August 31st Afghanistan $1 trillion $3.5 Trillion Kelsey Kabul Kelsey Snow Pelosi Joe Congress Qatar NPR Sacramento House Intelligence Committee United States
"89.3 fm" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:54 min | 5 months ago

"89.3 fm" Discussed on KQED Radio

"FM in San Francisco and 89.3 FM in Sacramento. Monday. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm Sarah McCammon. More than 300,000. People lost their pandemic unemployment benefits this weekend, many more will see their benefits cut in the coming weeks, Republican governors in 25 states have decided to end jobless aid ahead of schedule in an effort to push people back to work. For unemployed workers in eight states. This is the last week they'll receive an extra $300 in federal aid. NPR's Scott Horsley joins us now to talk about it. Hi, Scott. Good morning, Sarah. So Congress had authorized these extra $300 a week payments until early September. Why are some states cutting them off earlier than that? Some employers have complained that the enhanced benefits that Congress put in place during the pandemic are making it harder for them to attract workers. You know they're effectively having to compete with those benefits, and in some cases that means having to pay more than they're used to or than they'd like to $300 a week and supplemental benefits amounts to about 7 50 an hour for a full time worker. And that argument from employers has resonated with a lot of Republican governors, especially after a disappointing April when the country added just 278,000 jobs, barely a quarter of what was expected. Job gains in May were significantly stronger but still not as strong as a lot of people were expecting. So by taking away this federal safety net program. Republican governors think they might encourage more people to take jobs that otherwise they wouldn't especially in lower paying industries like restaurants. And what can we say about how that is likely to work out? What does this mean for the affected workers? Obviously, for many people is going to be a hardship. The extra jobless aid has been a critical lifeline for millions of people helping to pay the rent, helping to keep food on the table. For some, the loss of aid might actually push them into the job market. Keep in mind, though there are other factors at play. While vaccination levels have been rising, a lot of people still are not protected against the coronavirus, so they might be wary of going back to work, especially in a job with lots of face to face contact. Lot of parents out there. Also caring for Children who may not have the usual access to in person schooling right now or other kinds of daycare. We've talked a lot about the extra $300 a week that's going away. Most of these 25 GOP governors are also phasing out the special pandemic program for gig workers. As well as benefits for those who've been out of work for more than six months. Overall, about four million workers in these 25 states are going to have their benefits cut off early, and most of those are going to go from having a pretty substantial safety net to having no help at all. This coming weekend. We're going to see benefits cut off in Wyoming, Idaho, North Dakota, Nebraska, Indiana, New Hampshire, West Virginia and Alabama. And so should we expect that this will result in more people going back to work sooner? Well, that is the big question. We had a preview last summer when the original $600 a week unemployment benefit that Congress passed in the beginning of the pandemic went away in all 50 states. And at that time we did not see a sudden mass movement from unemployment into the workforce. Maybe the situation is different now. Vaccines are more widely available, but it's hard to know thanks to our polarized politics. We are going to have this natural experiment. Now we're half the states are following one course cutting benefits off early. The other half are going to keep paying through early September. We will see what kind of difference that makes in all 50 state job markets for the four million affected workers, though it's not much fun being a guinea pig. Sure enough, NPR's Scott Horsley, thank you. You're welcome. Now in Tennessee, extended unemployment benefits and on July 3rd, which is coming right up. Peter Dimas is our next guest. He is a restaurant owner with five locations around Nashville. Which means he's hiring, Mr Dimas. Good morning. Morning. How are you this morning doing? Fine. Thank you, sir. Have you been finding enough workers? Haven't been. No. I mean, finding workers has been the largest challenge. We've had completely for this This last year. We've had, um, I've really and really starting early at the beginning. The beginning of this year, we have been short about 20 to 30% of our normal staff that we've had, and we've had to make a lot of adjustments along the way. Well, the theory here I guess is that more people will come to you for work. If the unemployment extended unemployment benefits are cut off, as is happening in Tennessee, Do you believe it? That's going to happen. I think it's going to have some impact on it. I don't know if it will have the impact that everybody is hoping for. But I do think it will have some impact. Um and partly been part of that that I'm seeing is that after the governor made the announcement in May We started seeing our management teams starting the application started coming back for our management teams pretty quickly after that, and then we also started seeing an increased number of applications. The problem is is that was for them to maintain the unemployment. They were on to give you an idea we had and two of our locations we had over 200 applicants. Of those 200 applicants. We had six people show for interview, They all were asked to come an interview. We had six people show for the interview, and only two took the job I want I want to. I want to clarify what you're saying. I think you're telling me that you believe some people are applying for a job because the unemployment requirements they have to show that they're looking for work, but they're not serious about it is what you that's. That's absolutely correct. And I'm seeing that not only among my industry but also friends of mine who have who have work and landscaping pool construction. Many of those other jobs and they're seeing the same thing. We're getting a lot of applicants, but just no one shows up for the interview. Um, and then even the few that do their very few are actually taking the jobs once they show. Now, let's talk this through a little bit more, because there are a lot of anecdotal stories like the one you've just related. But when economists have tried to look at this over the past year, they've had deeply mixed findings. Our colleague Scott Horsley was pointing out that economists at the University of Chicago were very uncertain about whether extended unemployment was the reason people aren't going back to work There. All these other reasons like vaccinations are parenting needs in schools and And and daycare. Do you think that the end on July 3rd of UN extended unemployment is going to fix your problem? No, I don't think it'll fix it. Like I said, I think it will start the process and I do agree that there are other factors involved. There are people who are still scared. There are people who are wanting and there and there are definitely childcare issues, but but I think at the at the end, I think it is the beginning for some of those people who aren't scared who are taking not once he taking advantage of the system, But there are people out there who are going to be returning from it. So I do think it is a starting process of it. And just to illustrate yesterday alone, we had 22 actually hired employees that came in yesterday. As we start getting closer to that deadline, and in a couple of seconds are you paying people more in this circumstance? Absolutely. We Have increased our pay. We've increased benefits. We've increased everything in order to try to bring people in. Mr Dimas. Thanks very much. Really Appreciate.

Steve Inskeep Sarah Sarah McCammon Scott Peter Dimas West Virginia Congress $600 Wyoming Scott Horsley New Hampshire Alabama North Dakota Dimas Nashville 22 Indiana Nebraska Tennessee NPR
"89.3 fm" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:12 min | 7 months ago

"89.3 fm" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And by the listeners and very important sustaining members of KQED public radio 88.5 of them in San Francisco and 89.3 FM in Sacramento. This is morning edition from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin and I'm Steve Inskeep. President Biden delivered a warning yesterday to unemployed Americans. If you're receiving unemployment benefits, and you're offered a suitable job You can't refuse that job and just keep getting the unemployment benefits. Republicans in Congress and some business groups have alleged that pandemic unemployment benefits which are higher I've been keeping people out of the workforce. Washington Post Financial columnist Michelle Singletary is where this next good morning. Good morning. I'm just trying to think through what we really know here. Statistically, we know that people have generally been going back to work in recent months. Anecdotally, we have heard of some people who prefer to stay home or even think they're getting more for unemployment than from their jobs. But generally speaking, does it make financial sense for some people to stay out of work? So I don't believe those and it does at all. There is no credible studies that show that people are more likely to not search for job if they get it enhancement if it's in fact, just the opposite. That Chicago Federal Reserve found that those receiving those amped up benefits were twice as likely to look for a drop than those who exhausted their benefits. Cells antidotes what they're what they're really the bases of those is that people are saying I don't have child care, or I haven't underlying medical condition. Those air, often the reasons why people don't take a job while they're still on unemployment. Wow, that thing about people being more likely to look for work if they have a higher unemployment benefit. I'm trying to think that through does that just mean that people are in a little better shape to go looking for work. They can afford some new clothes. They can afford a baby sitter while they're searching for work. That's sort of exactly exactly And everyone who's ever lost a job knows it's easier to get a job. The closer you are to when you have lost your job. If you're out of work, the longer you're out of work, the harder it is, And so they know that when those benefits are about to end that they need to race and get a job team, make sure they're employed. And I'm just it just I'm telling. I'm so upset when they talk about these antidotes because they're not based on facts. And if they those folks had ever truly worked with people who are unemployed, they know that those folks want to work. Believe 29 states have now reinstated requirements that if you're getting unemployment benefits, you need to be searching for jobs. And I guess document to the state that you're searching for jobs, which I imagine feels degrading to a lot of people. But this is the requirement. Does it matter if the state requires that you go looking for work? First of all, they've always required it. That's like saying I'm going to demand that you breathe when you already breathing. Yeah, it's already a rule that they have to do that. And I think that President Biden said that to just say okay, I know y'all saying this crazy stuff. But let me just reiterate that that is already the rule of the land that you have to continue to look for a job. Listen in all those people who are listening who hear those antidotes. I know that they get very upset because in America, you those people want to work and they get more and the long term. They know that those benefits are going to run out and anybody who knows that there's been it's gonna run out once to find a job. Michelle Singletary. It's always a pleasure talking with you. Thank you so much. Yes. So welcome. Michelle Singletary is a financial columnist for the Washington Post. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm Rachel Martin Joe McConnell on the job reporting traffic.

Rachel Martin Steve Inskeep Michelle Singletary San Francisco Chicago Federal Reserve Sacramento America Congress Republicans 29 states yesterday NPR News KQED Washington Post 88.5 twice First Joe McConnell President Biden 89.3 FM
"89.3 fm" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:24 min | 7 months ago

"89.3 fm" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And by the listeners and sustaining members of KQED Public Radio 88.5 FM in San Francisco and 89.3 FM in Sacramento. It's a 22. It's morning edition on KQED. I'm Brian what the city of Berkeley's reimagining Public Safety Task force plans to meet tonight It's looking into alternatives to policing. It's the group's first meeting since a Minneapolis jury convicted former police officer Derrick Show Vin of murdering George Floyd, the only student representative on the task force is coming to the meeting with deepened conviction. Her story from KQED is Julia McEvoy. Now you poke is 17. She's a junior at Berkeley High, she's treasurer of the Black Student union. Now she's on this task force in this city. There's a lot of racism. That's when the police and the community and a lot of fellow students agree with my opinion. So I was like, you know, why not speak up for them? Last Tuesday during school in the hallway Now you got a text alert show Vin was guilty. The guy he seemed surprised by that they actually convicted him. Normally, they just let like the white males go off Priest quickly. Third period was English zooming, of course. The teacher asked. Does anybody want to talk about this and a lot of students bookkeeping stating that they were happy to something finally happening, And so is I. Honestly knowing the trial's gonna happen? You get the highlights from the trial. Even talked about all semester. Spencer Pritchard teaches at Berkeley High, he advises the school's black student union. Pritchard says the relentless police shootings this year have been a focus as he works with students. Hospital, like students are Handy sensitized is just so frequent that also to say gang, another one. Pritchard wants his students to have a sense of agency. He's the one who suggested Nyeo joined Berkeley's Reimagining Public Safety Task force. Retreats class is called black economics, and they tracked the shove in trial as a way to get students looking at policing in the context of federalism. Already starting to really ask me once questions of how do we respond to this? Beyond police saying, What would it alternative be? How can you imagine a world without police Because the best resource communities barely interact. The police got off so far, Nyeo and the adults on the task force are still reviewing data on police behavior, looking at an analysis of 9 11 calls and the police budget. All this action birthed from the social justice movement generated by George Floyd's death. The protests, and the constant debates are kind of paying on it. And yet, police shootings continue, Nyeo says. That means she's got to use the wind and the shoving murder trial to motivate more of her fellow students to get into politics. I'm Julia McEvoy KQED news. Has more students go back to classrooms in schools. Surveys of black and brown parents in Bay Area school District's like Oakland, have shown greater reluctance to return to in person instruction than white parents. His KQED Sarah Hussaini reports. Many of those same parents of color say what they need to feel safe. Is actually more information..

Julia McEvoy Pritchard Sacramento George Floyd Sarah Hussaini San Francisco Nyeo Derrick Show Vin Last Tuesday Berkeley Spencer Pritchard tonight 17 Vin Bay Area KQED Oakland English 89.3 FM Brian
"89.3 fm" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:52 min | 7 months ago

"89.3 fm" Discussed on KQED Radio

"FM in San Francisco and 89.3 FM in Sacramento. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep. And I'm Noel King. Good morning is the U. S military prosecuting sexual assault allegations effectively in 2000 and 19. There were around 7800 reports involving service members on Lee 7% of cases pursued resulted in a conviction. That's according to the Defense Department. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand would like a change. And to that end she's unveiling a bill tomorrow with the backing of Republican Senator Joni Ernst of Iowa. Senator Gillibrand Good morning and thanks for being with us Good morning. How does the military handle allegations of assault currently? So today after the military police conduct an investigation. They give their file to the commander to senior level commanders. And then they decide whether or not to prosecute the case. We believe that because that decision rests within the command, Ah lot of survivors do not come forward because oftentimes the command climate is not supportive. They also will say they won't come forward because they believe the command may well be biased. Commanders are typically not wears. They have the help of their Jags, who are generalists who often spend very little time in criminal justice. And what we found in the last 10 years is that they just aren't In the right case is to go to trial. They're not trying of cases and very few cases. You're ending a conviction. And despite so many reforms that we've put in place over the last eight years, things just aren't getting better, and survivors have no faith in the system. Not picking the right case is not prosecuting the right cases. Do you think that is deliberate or our commanders just ill equipped to do this? I think it's a little of both. They're certainly not lawyers, and they're not criminal justice layers. But often times there is bias when it's a, he said. She said case and I've looked at Every case several years at four of the largest military bases to see how do these cases turn out when it's he said, she said more often than not, they believe the he the perpetrator, the perpetrators often more senior. More valuable to the unit. And when you are a sexual assault predator, you often will target your victim will target your victim by choosing someone very junior. Someone who maybe has a credibility issue someone you could easily give alcohol to, or drugs to, and Predators tend to be reservists. They do these crimes over and over again, and unfortunately, sometimes these predators are very good at their day jobs. And so as a consequence, it's very hard for these commanders to sit through a complex cases. These are among the hardest cases for any prosecutor to prosecute effectively. But we believe that if you gave the decision to trained military prosecutors they would make a better decision they would pick the right case is to report to trial and more cases would edit conviction. And if you want to change the culture and start convicting predators and rapists and make sure they go to jail That will send a message that this crime is not tolerated. So your solution is trained military prosecutors. Is that a job that currently exists or is your bill, arguing that there just needs to be a new position created. No, they already exist. They already are responsible for ultimately trying the case. But because the commander has all the authority, they picked the judge, the jury, the prosecutor and the defense counsel. They look at the file and they decide whether the case goes to trial. Survivors, unfortunately, feel that that decision that they make is biased or unfair, and enough cases aren't going to trial and enough cases aren't and a conviction. So we looked at other countries and how they handle these cases and a lot of our allies. Long ago took this decision out of the chain of command and gave it to trade military prosecutors for all serious crimes because they believe that that professionalism was fair, both for the plaintiff and the defendant. Some countries did it just for defendant's rights because they felt that if the commander could put you to jail for more than a year that that decision had to be There. Okay. This is now a bipartisan effort. Republican Senator Joni Ernst has signed on. How important is that? It's very important because this has to be widely bipartisan. This. There's very few bills in the Senate today where you have both, Um Rand Paul and Mitch McConnell and Ted Cruz, as well as Chuck Schumer and Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren and adding Joni Ernst, a combat veteran. Only female combat better in the Republican Party in the Senate to this bill is very powerful Senator Kirsten Gillibrand of New York joining us this morning on Skype. Thank you so much for your time. We appreciate it. Thank you. Why is the coronavirus striking so severely in Indian? Now? NPR's Michaleen Duke, left reports on a variant called a double mutant. Let's start with the name double mutant. Kristen Anderson is an infectious disease expert at Scripts Research Institute. He says that name doesn't make any sense. Scientifically. That's a dumb word. I mean, that doubled mutants all over the place, right? I mean, besides, comes to mutate all the time. And in fact, this one has more mutations and two. In fact, the variant in India has more than a dozen mutations, just like all the other variants of concern, such as the one from the UK and the one from Brazil. Anderson says the term double mutant came about because the variant in India has two important mutations that are known to change the behavior of the virus. They helped the virus escape detection by the immune system. This particular variant in India here has two of those mutations that have been linked to these kinds of immunization mechanisms. So there's concern that this variant, which is officially called B 1.617. May be able to sneak past the immune system, like other variants and more easily re infected person who's already had Cove it Shahi Jameel is a very ologists at a Shoko University near Delhi. I spoke to him on Skype. He says Both of these key mutations have cropped up in other variants before, including ones in South Africa, Brazil and here in the U. S. One mutation was detected in California, and it was responsible for the big surge in Southern California. That mutation has been shown in the lab. Help the virus enter and infect human cells. So it's supposed to be more infectious. Scientists haven't published any studies confirming the variant in India is more contagious. But your meal says he sees signs of it. So, for example, in the first wave, the offense of one member of the family getting infected and rest of the family will be all right. This time. It's not like that this time before the night and their family is infected, So it's it's far more infections, then the strange they previously had in India. What is it more infectious than the variants already circulating in the U. S. Christian Andersen, its script says. We just don't know yet. We just don't have any data yet. And of course, it's very important that we get that data right now. B 1.617 is the dominant virus in parts of India. But his Anderson points out. It's not the on Lee variant circulating in the country. There's also once from the UK in South Africa. All three of these are spreading very quickly and fueling what has become the world's worst coronavirus crisis..

Chuck Schumer Elizabeth Warren Steve Inskeep Mitch McConnell Bernie Sanders Noel King Kristen Anderson Ted Cruz California South Africa Southern California India Delhi Republican Party Michaleen Duke Anderson 2000 Brazil Scripts Research Institute Shoko University
"89.3 fm" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:38 min | 11 months ago

"89.3 fm" Discussed on KQED Radio

"FM in San Francisco and 89.3 FM in Sacramento. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm no well King. Good morning. Five months ago, Alexey Navalny, a prominent critic of Russia's President, Vladimir Putin, went to Germany. He was very sick, he'd been poisoned. Authorities in Russia warned Navalny. If you come back will arrest you. And then yesterday he went back. Yes. Last local Only July supported me a strawberry cool man. You still there after his plane landed in Moscow, Navalny said. The criminal cases against him are fabricated, he said. The truth is on his side, He said he has no reason to be afraid. Then he said goodbye to his wife and the police arrested him. NPR's Lucy in came is following this from Moscow. Hi, Lucy. Morning. Why did in Navalny go back if he knew he was going to be arrested? Well. Alexei Navalny has never shied away from publishing an investigation into government corruption or attending a protest rally because he was afraid of arrest. He spent literally hundreds of days in jail in the past and has faced criminal cases that he says are trumped up. As you mentioned. He was in Germany for the past several months, recovering from a poisoning with a nerve agent, But he vowed to return to Russia yesterday. The flight he was on was diverted to another airport at the last minute, and maybe that's because crowds of his supporters have gathered at the airport, where he was scheduled to land. I've only had time to make the statement we just heard And then he was arrested by police. All of this makes him a fascinating, almost cinematic character. What does he represent? And how did he get to this point? Well, No, Bonnie is a lawyer by training. He's been an online gadflies I for years, uncovering shad, shady government deals and attacking President Putin's rigid political system. He's also developed a real offline presence by opening campaign offices across Russia when he ran for president in 2018, even though he was barred from the election. And then last summer, he was poisoned on a domestic flight and on Lee after the German government intervened, was he allowed to be flown out for medical treatment? Navalny blames Putin for ordering the poisoning. Kremlin, of course, denies any involvement. And Putin has even suggested that Navalny is too insignificant to be killed. Well, he is a very significant member of the opposition clearly. So what is his arrest mean for them? Well, I think it's more important to understand that there is no organized opposition in Russia, besides a handful of political parties that cooperate closely with the Kremlin, and I think that's what makes Navalny's such an outstanding figure because he mastered social media long before the government figured out what it was. He kept soldering on, even when he was relatively unknown. Calling people to protest and running that presidential campaign that was really doomed from the start, so his return is hugely important to people who oppose Putin. Many Russians and I personally know quite a few have left Russia because of the repressive political climate here. Navalny could easily have stayed in exile. But now he's giving a signal that his place is in Russia, and he sees himself as a future leader of the country. And much of the world is watching this. So is Vladimir Putin risking anything by arresting him? Yeah, well, the authorities had hoped that by threatening navalny with arrest, they could keep him away because it's returned, Presented them with a real catch 22. You could either jail him and face international outrage or just tea or just let him continue his political activities. Right now we do see that political that outrage internationally, the Trump Administration and the incoming Biden administration. Have condemned the arrest. The Kremlin doesn't have high hopes for relations getting better under Biden. But the arrest of Navalny woman will mean things get off to a very rocky start, and we'll make Putin even more isolated internationally. NPR's Lucy in Kim in Moscow. Thanks, Lucy. Thank you. Many countries around the world are betting on a vaccine from China to help them stop the coronavirus. On Sunday, for example, Brazil gave emergency use authorization to this vaccine made by the Chinese pharmaceutical companies. Sign of AC Countries are embracing the Chinese vaccine, despite conflicting reports about how well it works. NPR health correspondent Maria Godoy reports nearly two weeks ago, researchers running a late stage trial for sign of X vaccine in Brazil announced it was 78% effective against Cove. It Which sounds pretty good. But then, last week, they revised his numbers, saying the vaccine prevented disease on Lee about 50% of the time. So what's the truth? Natalie Dina, by a statistician at the University of Florida, says it all depends on how you define efficacy. So when we talk about vaccine efficacy, often we think about a single number. But actually there are a lot of different types of efficacy. And you could think about it as a spectrum. Dean says vaccines typically work best to preventing severe disease. That's what the Brazil trial found 78% of the time to sign of act vaccine protected people against moderate or severe disease or even mild disease that needed some medical assistance. But when the researchers including what they called very mild symptoms that needed no medical attention, the vaccine's effectiveness dropped to 50% as we tend to include milder and milder cases. It's natural to see a bit of a drop in vaccine efficacy sign of AC is conducting trials in various countries, and they haven't released much of the data. John more vaccine researcher with Weill Cornell Medicine says that's made it hard for outside scientists to know exactly what's going on. It's science by press release, the Chinese are being well, characteristically less left and transparent. Even so, from the data that is available, more says it's clear that the sign of that vaccine is less effective than those from Adana, Advisor. Those vaccines on the whole protect against disease around 95% of the time. More says That's not surprising because previous data had showed that the vaccines from Adana and Fizer, both of which used a new technology, called Marin, a triggered a stronger immune response. Then the sign of back vaccine most people in the field believes that the antibody responses to correlate to protection on that You know the strength of the antibody responses matters, Natalie Dean says the less effective the vaccine is a preventing disease, the harder it is to pinpoint its efficacy when the vaccine is closer to 50 60%. That range of uncertainty can be a lot bigger. That may help explain another head scratcher. Different clinical trials in different countries have reported starkly different efficacy rates for the sign of a vaccine from 50% of Brazil to 65% in Indonesia to a stunning 91% in a smaller study in Turkey need a lot more data to distinguish between different levels of advocacy, so it might also just be kind of statistical noise. To a degree. But even if the sign of that vaccine is only around 50% protective, that's still substantial. It's better than the flu vaccine some years and it does meet the minimum threshold for emergency use authorization set by the World Health Organization. That's not nothing. It's much better than last, saying Dr Denise Skerritt is an epidemiologist with the Save in Vaccine Institute in Washington, D C. She says the data show the sign of X vaccine protects against severe cases of Covic. And that could have a big impact in places like her native Brazil. The healthcare in Brazil is about to collapse in many city. The situation's very critical and having a vaccine that will prevent people from being hospitalized. That will be I'll.

President Putin Alexey Navalny Russia Navalny Lucy flu vaccine NPR Brazil Vaccine Institute Moscow NPR News Germany President Natalie Dean Steve Inskeep Lee San Francisco Sacramento
"89.3 fm" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:39 min | 11 months ago

"89.3 fm" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Some wind out of all of that could begin with, perhaps moving forward with impeachment as soon as possible. And again. We're talking about the efforts to impeach President Trump and we will continue. We'll take your calls when we return. And with that, Eugene Scott, Molly ball, this is for him. Michael Krasny. Support for KQED comes from a generous gift from Yon Schramm and Maria Manetti Schramm, founders of the Manetti Schramm Museum of Art at UC Davis, who believe that all people deserve access to education and culture to enrich a lifetime of exploration and learning. Reverend Raphael Warnock goes from pastor to senator elect as he becomes the first black senator from the state of Georgia, which will bring to Washington from his time as a preacher at the historic church, where Martin Luther King was once a pastor and the role of faith in this next chapter of American politics. That's next time on the takeaway from W N Y C N p R X Join us for that and other stories today. The takeaway returns on this Monday Monday afternoon at one PM later today on KQED Public Radio 88.5 FM in San Francisco and 89.3 FM in Sacramento. Listening to form and we're talking about the effort to impeach President Trump for the second time with Molly Ball, national political correspondent with time and author of Pelosi and Eugene Scott, political reporter for The Washington Post and host of the podcast. The next four years. Let me read some emails that air coming in When I have your voices heard here, Kelly writes, President Trump's words and actions are without question. Treasonable offenses. Traitorous actions by a sitting president warrant immediate report removal This is beyond the impeachment and 25th amendment removal process is he should be immediately removed by the appropriate law enforcement agency. Likely by the military. And Jean writes, I don't agree with the Republicans claim that impeachment would divide the country. The entire country's already extremely divided more than it ever has been in my lifetime. They're way too long to impeach him. I fear the Republicans will soften up and vote No and Jenny writes. Some consequence needs to happen. Whether it's removal, impeachment or prosecution, facing no consequences would be horrible and would pave the way for another rampage. Let me bring your calls on. Let's start with you, Mike. Thank you for waiting. You're on. Good morning. Um I have a question regarding impeachment. Um, regardless of the house's vote to impeach the chances of 18 Republican senators voting to convict the president are slim to none. They remain terrified of him. So just like last year's impeachment was mostly toothless, want this vote result in nothing more than a stain on Trump's neck type? We go to you on this volleyball? That comment and the others that you read before it all point to this question of what is the purpose of this impeachment because I think there are a bunch of different things that air trying to be done here. Right First. There is simply the expression of disapproval, saying we We don't think the president should is allowed to do this. And this is the mechanism for that. Given that you know, we way have a standing opinion on the part of the Justice Department that the president can't be prosecuted. The on Li Wei. The only means of holding any sitting president accountable is this political process of impeachment by the Congress or the 25th amendment. But that's beauty somewhat farfetched, Just given that it has never been deployed in that way and raises a lot of other questions logistically about how that process will work. So isn't just to lay down a marker say this isn't something you're allowed to do in the United States isn't an attempt to actually remove him from office is the color suggests it's unlikely that that would succeed. Although again this is a fast moving process. We did just have 92 members of the Senate, including all but eight Republicans vote to certify the election, So at the very least, the majority of Republican senators are in reality on unlike their colleagues in the house on that question, eyes it to prevent Trump from running again. That is one of the things you can do with impeachment is prevent somebody from ever Again holding federal office. Or is it to sort of, you know, prevent Trump for doing it from doing anything crazy in the little more than a week remaining in his term to sort of signal? Hey, buddy, you're hanging by a thread here on. We may not be able to do this with the votes we have at this moment, but this is moving very fast. And anything else you do could push more Republicans calculation in that direction. I think that is also unimportant aspect of what's going on here. So The impeachment. You know, A some have noted impeachment is not just an act. It's a process and I think part of the point of initiating this process is to have it in place s O that any further events can can then be taken into account. All right, I want to read a comment from a listener named Henry says impeachment is not only divisive but politically disadvantageous for Democrats, Republicans were feeling Shamed and rejecting their party. But impeachment will lead many to coalesce around President Trump. I'm gonna get a caller on who's also talking about the Republicans in this vein, Tim, Go ahead. You're on. Yes, I'm a Democrat. But I think we need to party two strong parties in this country. And I feel the Republicans air, uh, heading for permanent minority. So I guess my question is, I don't understand why Democrats are trying to get Oh, Incentivize er Republican colleagues. They could get on the bandwagon with achievement. Impeachment because they need to remove this sting and stink from Republican Party and they're just trying to stall it out. Which seems to be the same thing they did when come Said he lost you election was stolen from them, and they just want to just let it play out like him. Thank you for that call. Let me hear what you have to say on this. Eugene Scott, go to you. But I think there has been some anxiety from some on the left, who fear that Democrats could be overstepping and creating a situation that makes it even more difficult and the future to reach some type of bipartisan solutions to many of the issues plaguing our society. Right now, there's often you hear a response. That's that's something like You know,.

President Trump president Eugene Scott Manetti Schramm Museum of Art Molly ball KQED Republican Party Yon Schramm Michael Krasny Maria Manetti Schramm senator United States Li Wei Martin Luther King UC Davis Raphael Warnock Justice Department Sacramento San Francisco Washington
"89.3 fm" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:29 min | 11 months ago

"89.3 fm" Discussed on KQED Radio

"FM and San Francisco and 89.3 FM in Sacramento. Now, 7 46. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I know well, King. Good morning. A new year means new music and the NPR music team is sharing some of the albums. They are most excited about high. Many mystery, Um Mohammed I'm a producer with NPR music, and I'm really excited about an album called El Arte de Bolero. That's coming out this Friday by Alto saxophonist Miguel's Unknown and pianist Louise Parador, MMA. He campaigned on letting Sin honest from Puerto Rico and is a founding member of the SS Jazz collective and Luis Perdomo is originally from Venezuela, and he moved to New York City in the early nineties. Back in September, The two recorded a concert at the Jazz Gallery in New York City, and it was live streamed in November. After they listened back to the set. They realized that the recording was something really special, and that it had to be shared. This music was recorded all in one take and you can really hear the synergy between these two jazz greats. They know each other so well and you can hear that They've been collaborators for 20 years. Song We're hearing right now is called getting, And it's a classic tune written by the legendary Bobby Capone. This whole album includes some great Latin American standards. Both artists have heard the songs on this album. Hundreds of times songs that they heard growing up with their parents and grandparents. And now they love these songs, too. Can. Another record. I'm really excited about is.

NPR music New York City NPR News NPR Steve Inskeep El Arte de Bolero Miguel Louise Parador San Francisco Sin Jazz Gallery Bobby Capone Luis Perdomo Sacramento Puerto Rico founding member Venezuela producer
"89.3 fm" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"89.3 fm" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

"You were listening to the Pacifica Radio archives. Voices that change the world National Broadcast Fund Drive heard on all five Pacifica stations are flagship station K P. 94.1 FM. Berkeley P F B 89.3, Berkeley. K. 248 b r 97.5 FM SANTA CRUZ KPFK 90.7 FM Los Angeles K P F T 90.1 FM Houston, Texas W B A 99.5 FM New York City and w P F W 89.3 FM Washington D C police call 1 873 50 to 30 to pledge your support for this endangered American treasure. Or go online at support dot or your donation today helps us more than ever to do our work, preserving, digitizing and caring for this historic election since 1949.

"89.3 fm" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"89.3 fm" Discussed on KQED Radio

"FM in San Francisco and 89.3 FM in Sacramento. This is morning edition from NPR News. I'm David Greene and I'm Steve Inskeep for a generation. Democrats and presidential campaigns have been losing Arizona. They've been winning other states in the South West Nevada, New Mexico, but not their 2016 was only the latest year the Democrats hoped, but Republican Donald Trump prevailed. What about this year? NPR's Kirk Siegler reports. It used to be conventional wisdom that if you win Phoenix and surrounding Maricopa County, and you probably win Arizona once reliably Red Maricopa, home to Sheriff Joe Arpaio and conservative snowbirds. But in 2016 Trump won here by less than three points and polls now show Biden comfortably ahead as more Latinos come of voting age and new growth from out of state is tilting Phoenix Bleu. What That means is that if you're looking for a win in Arizona The rural vote may be the deciding factor. Scott Smith is the former mayor of Mesa, who ran for governor is a Republican in 2014, he says. If the election is close, Trump could win Arizona by holding down his losses and cities and getting a big rural turn out. I don't want the room numbers work out that way, but We've seen some interesting results in statewide elections over the last 2 to 3 election cycles that would say that that's not a on absurd strategy. 100 Miles to the north of the nation's fifth largest city. In the Biden Harris signs lining Busy Phoenix streets give way to the pastures and long driveways. We're blue Maga flags are.

Donald Trump Arizona Biden Harris NPR News Phoenix Bleu NPR Maricopa County Phoenix Joe Arpaio Steve Inskeep Kirk Siegler Sacramento blue Maga San Francisco Scott Smith David Greene Nevada New Mexico Mesa
"89.3 fm" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"89.3 fm" Discussed on KQED Radio

"FM in San Francisco 89.3 FM Sacramento Good morning. This is California report. I've solved Gonzalez in Los Angeles. One of the most closely watched political races in California is happening in the 50th congressional district, covering much of eastern San Diego County. And part of Riverside County. The race pits of veteran Republican politician who was in Congress for years before losing in another district and a young Democrat who ran for the same seat two years ago and lost. San Diego KPBS reporter Matt Hoffman has more after recent polls showed Republican Darrell Issa and Democrat Amar companies are neck and neck. A new poll of voters in the 50th has with a double digit lead. A survey use a poll shows 51% of likely voters supporting Isis with just 40% supporting campaign ajar and 9% still undecided. The pole has about a 6% margin of error meeting. Isis lead could be slim. U C. San Diego political science professor Thad Cowser says some $17 million has already been spent on this race back that both candidates are still spending so much money in this race, I think shows that their internal polling shows it that Mark Open ajar may still have a chance in a statement campaign Are said the only poll that matters is Election Day, and that Isa is trying to buy his way into Congress. While Isis says his previous congressional experience in the 49th is clearly resonating with voters for the California report, Mat Hoffman in San Diego This week. We've brought you stories about how the ban on affirmative action passed by California voters in 1996 through prop. Two of nine has affected college students and what they think about the current measure on the ballot props 16 to bring affirmative action back And there's a thread that runs through the reporting by student journalists how to create a sense of belonging on campus this morning, Sacramento State junior Kaylene Carter tells us about how students are finding and creating community on campus. And how props 16 might help..

San Diego California San Diego County Isis Matt Hoffman Congress San Francisco Riverside County Kaylene Carter Darrell Issa Los Angeles Sacramento Thad Cowser Gonzalez reporter Isa professor
"89.3 fm" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:33 min | 1 year ago

"89.3 fm" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And Asia. Cooley advises entrepreneurs, investors, financial institutions and established companies around the world. Where innovation meets the law. And by the listeners and members of the public Radio, 88.5 FM in San Francisco and 89.3 FM in Sacramento. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Noelle King and I'm Steve Inskeep. It matters what you call street violence during a protest. Is it a riot isn't rebellion. Is it an uprising or just plain looting Protesters in Chicago after a police shooting were unusually upfront and labeling some of their own actions Sunday night. Looting and in response last night, Chicago authorities razed the bridges into downtown and stopped many trains. W be Zeze Chip Mitchell has been covering the story chip. Good morning. Morning. How did all this start Chip? After midnight late Sunday. I'm heading into Monday and Emma's many is a few 1000 people started arriving along the main shopping corridor downtown, upscale stores. They were smashing in windows and taking things by the armful or even filling up cars. On and they also surrounded the police station, and we're pretty frank. About what? What their goal was here. What they believed in is a tactic. Yeah, So then this is a this is ah, the next evening. Last night, 150 protesters led by black lives matter Chicago, they came to support the alleged looters. About 100 of them had been arrested tonight before Andre were getting released slowly from police custody. The protesters have this big banner. It was handpainted and it said Our futures have been looted from us glued back. So here's Arial Atkins. She organized the protest and took questions from reporters about the looting. My people are struggling. People in this city are struggling through a pandemic. So I don't care if somebody decides the loo Taguchi or a Macy's or 90 because that makes sure that that person eats that make sure that that person has closed that makes sure that that person can make some kind of money because this city obviously doesn't care about them. Not only that that's reparations. So she's talking about reparations for the injustices, black people of face and slavery. Steve let's back up a little bit here. What led to the looting, and then the second night of protests that police tamped down somewhat? Yeah, the city's new police superintendent. His name's David Brown, he said the looting stem from a shooting by Chicago officer Sunday afternoon on the South side. It was in the poorest neighbourhood of the city, one of the poorest neighborhoods. They shot and injured. A 20 year old man. Brown says that man had fired at the cops first. So as the police were processing the scene, they got into a confrontation with a crowd of people, Brown said. That crowd kept growing that misinformation about the shooting spread and hey, said social media posts then led to what he called a caravan of cars that went downtown Tio loot, Mayor Lightfoot said There's a big difference between pro testing against police brutality and that looting This had nothing to do with legitimate protected First Amendment expression. We're not poor people engage in petty theft to feed themselves and their families. This was straight up felony criminal conduct what a residents have to say about all this chip. Well, they're struggling to make sense of it. So yesterday in this one neighborhood just north of downtown, a bunch of swanky department stores have been looted. Several residents told me they get why people are protesting police brutality, but none agreed with an analysis We often hear on the city's south and West sides that the economy is so rigged that looting like this is to be expected. Some residents of this neighborhood also said they'd like to see the national Guard deployed against looters is something some Republican lawmakers called for two, but Mayor Life had said the National Guard is not needed. Chip Mitchell of W B Z chip, thanks My pleasure As a maker of cameras. Kodak was iconic, but in the digital age it was failing. And then last month, the Trump Administration announced it was giving.

Zeze Chip Mitchell Chicago David Brown NPR News Arial Atkins Steve Inskeep Asia Cooley Noelle King national Guard San Francisco Macy Kodak Sacramento Emma Steve let Trump Administration Andre Mayor Life
"89.3 fm" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"89.3 fm" Discussed on KQED Radio

"FM in San Francisco and 89.3 FM in Sacramento. This is morning edition from NPR News. I'm David Greene and I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning. The honors for the late John Lewis suggest how far he came in his life, and also how far his country came. Lewis was once a civil rights protester beaten by Alabama police for demanding the right to vote in later years. He not only voted but won election to Congress. He will lie in state of the U. S. Capitol beginning today. On Sunday, he was honored in his native state of Alabama at the scene of violence on a different Sunday 55 years ago, NPR's Debbie Elliot reports. A celebration of John Lewis's life started in the town of Troy, where the one time all White University that denied him entrance as a teen hosted his memorial service. Then it was Selma's turn toe honor the man who came back every year to reenact the historic 1965 voting rights march, where he and others were brutally beaten by state troopers and sheriff's deputies on the Edmund Pettus Bridge. I want to thank the family for allowing Selma To say goodbye to John. That's Congresswoman Terri Sewell of Selma, the first African American woman elected to Congress from Alabama. She spoke at a service held in historic Brown Chapel Ame Church, a place of strategy and mass meetings during the civil rights movement. The ceremony featured Lewis's fellow foot soldiers, including Betty Mae Fikes. This is my last song. My last time. Remember? Been in outside the church to men in their early twenties, Noah Calhoun and Tony Jackson watched in awe paying my respect, You know.

John Lewis Alabama Selma NPR News Congress Brown Chapel Ame Church Edmund Pettus Bridge San Francisco NPR Sacramento Steve Inskeep Betty Mae Fikes David Greene Terri Sewell Debbie Elliot Noah Calhoun Troy Tony Jackson
"89.3 fm" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:29 min | 1 year ago

"89.3 fm" Discussed on KQED Radio

"FM in San Francisco and 89.3 FM in Sacramento. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm no well King. Good morning. China is banning a handful of American lawmakers from entering the country. China's retaliating because thie US put sanctions on some top Chinese leaders last week. The U. S sanctions are punishment for China's detention and imprisonment of hundreds of thousands of Chinese Uighurs. And there's Emily Thing is in Beijing with more hamli. Hey, Noelle, which U S lawmakers can't go to China? So it's a mixture of organizations and individuals. Sanctions cover American Ambassador at large for Religious Freedom Sam Brownback U. S. Senators Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz. Representative Chris Smith and the U. S Congressional Executive Commission on China, which is a bipartisan group that monitors human rights abuses and the rule of law in China. The's sanctions would ban these people from entering China, and they also would freeze any assets these individuals or entities have in China, which is very unlikely, unlikely that they have assets and makes me wonder where any of them actually planning to visit like, does this actually Does this mean anything? Or is it just more symbolic? It is very symbolic. It might not actually hinder the work of thes individuals, but it definitely means something. It's the latest round of sanctions between the US and China and it's about a region called Xinjiang, which China finds very sensitive. In the region of Xinjiang. China has long struggled to mend ethnic tensions with Uighurs, which is a tricky, tricky ethnic minority, and it is detained hundreds of thousands of leaguers as well as several other ethnic minorities. We do not have the exact number of how many of the detained because China keeps its detention and forced labor programs their secret, but Based on reporting that I've done in the research of other analysts, it could be over a 1,000,000 individuals over the course of the last three years. So last week the U. S sanction several top Chinese leaders who it says are responsible for coordinating this detention campaign in Xinjiang. Among those was Xinjiang's top Communist party that Ganga, who is part of this super elite Communist Party body, called the Polit bureau. And this is why China is hitting back thes American individuals and entities have sponsored or supported legislation sanctioning China over Shinjuku. All right. So as you've pointed out, and as we know, from the past couple of months or even years, relations between the US and China have been really, really not great. What does this latest move mean? For the relationship? Is it just more of a deterioration? Yes, And it's probably the first of many retaliations we will see between the US and China Last In just the last few weeks, the US has sanctioned other top Chinese officials who it says blocks outside access to Tibet, which is another region. China controls very tightly. The U. S. Has also put sanctions on any bank that transact with Chinese officials who are behind Beijing's crackdown on Hong Kong's civil liberties. China has said multiple times that it will retaliate in kind against Americans and American entities. So Today we saw the first of those retaliations, but there will be more to come. NPR's Emily Fang in Beijing. Thanks, Emily. Thanks No well, hospitals.

China US Xinjiang Beijing NPR News Steve Inskeep Sam Brownback U. S. Senators M Chris Smith San Francisco Emily Fang Sacramento NPR Communist Party U. S Congressional Executive C Noelle Ted Cruz Shinjuku Representative U. S
"89.3 fm" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:45 min | 1 year ago

"89.3 fm" Discussed on KQED Radio

"FM in San Francisco and 89.3 FM in Sacramento. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm no. Well, King. Four months ago, a young black woman named Brianna Taylor was killed by Louisville police in her apartment. Since then, protestors across the country have demanded accountability, but no one has yet been arrested. Or charged. Omino Lahey of member station W F P L in Louisville is with me now. Good morning. I'm gonna Good morning. So there is an investigation into Briana Taylor's killing. Where does it stand? Well, the investigation is ongoing and we really don't know when it's it's going to be wrapped up. As you know. Brandon Taylor was killed during the middle of the night raid on her apartment on March 13th which was linked to a broader narcotics investigation that focused on her ex boyfriend. She was at home and asleep at the time when her when the police arrived after midnight, and her then boyfriend, Kenneth Walker heard loud banging on the door being broken down. Taylor and Walker were approaching the door. When the officers were in plainclothes entered their home and Walker, her boyfriend fired a warning shot thinking the police for intruders. That shot struck a sergeant in the leg, after which he and two other officers fired back. Taylor was hit by multiple invest multiple bullets and died soon after in her hallway, and she wasn't a target of that narcotics investigation. Nothing legal was found in her apartment. In fact, the men the police were looking for had already been taken into custody that same night across town. But the investigations by the FBI and the attorney general of Kentucky, who's reviewing the police is internal investigations are ongoing. So the police say they were there because of drug activity. But there has been a really interesting development here, which is that Taylor's family says it was something else. It was not about. Drug activity was about something else. Very specific to Louisville, whatever they alleging, exactly. A lawyer for Taylor's family alleged in a court filing last week that her killing was a result of aggressive police actions. And they claimed that that was driven by a plant gentrified, the majority black neighborhood where her ex boyfriend who was the focus of the drug investigation that led to the raids that night where he lived. And here in Louisville lawmakers have been planning to investigate Mint Mayor Greg Fisher's actions and decisions and these allegations have on Lee turned up the heat on the mayor who denies them. On Friday, he attended a ribbon cutting for a new apartment complex Some blocks away, which protesters quickly. Shut down. Take a Listen when you think about What we're trying to do here in the city. When we're trying to do to the country, there's really nothing more fundamental stable..

Brianna Taylor Louisville Steve Inskeep Kenneth Walker NPR News Omino Lahey San Francisco Sacramento FBI Kentucky Greg Fisher attorney Lee
"89.3 fm" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"89.3 fm" Discussed on KQED Radio

"PM If you missed any marketplace you can tune in for the rebroadcast of the program this evening at 6 30 NPR's All things considered is coming up after Look at traffic, starting with the wreck in San Jose, he was Julie Dept. It's a bad one South down to 80. This is before race street. Three vehicles of all there in the two middle lanes, about a 30 minute delay back to Saratoga Avenue and sub Mill Peter's eastbound to 37 connector ramp to south and 80 wreck their partially blocks that ramp eastbound 80 The Shore Freeway slow this afternoon. For the maze to the car. Keenness Bridge. 29 minute trip. Julie Deputies work Acuity. Support for a D comes from Schoenberg Family Law Group, a boutique family law firm specializing in high asset. Complex divorce and custody. Litigation throughout the Bay Area. Learn more at S f l g dot com My name is Michelle Hen again. You're listening to member supported D 88.5 FM, San Francisco and the I 89.3 FM, north Highland Sacramento and live online at dot org's. It's 4 30 It's all things considered from NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelly. And I'm Elsa Chang coming up a founder of the say her name campaign on why the Black lives matter Movement should be more inclusive of.

Julie Dept Julie Deputies NPR Michelle Hen Mary Louise Kelly Schoenberg Family Law Group Elsa Chang San Jose San Francisco Bay Area matter Movement founder Sacramento
"89.3 fm" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:48 min | 1 year ago

"89.3 fm" Discussed on KQED Radio

"FM in San Francisco and 89.3 FM in Sacramento. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Noelle King and I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning after the police killing of George Floyd, many people are having conversations about race and one of those conversations in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, went viral online. Ernest Skelton owns an appliance repair business. He went to Caroline Brock's house to fix her washer and dryer on a day when she was watching news of the nationwide protests. She asked Skelton about his experiences with racism and was surprised to hear what was happening in their community. He described random stops by local police difficulty finding jobs, discrimination from customers. Caroline was shocked and moved by what he told her and with his permission, she shared their conversation on Facebook. Since then they become friends. David Green, reached out to them a few days ago to hear more and earnest skeleton began by talking about his life in Myrtle Beach is a black man getting stopped by police. I was getting pulled over for no reason. There was this all over here. Murder, Beech or accounting. It just it got to the point that you know. Cause I get home around eight or nine o'clock. Maybe 10 o'clock. Depends on Miss Cager. I get proto one know I'm staying out too late. It's just got to the point man. I was just didn't want to do it anymore. I was just tired of the harassment. Yeah. I mean, the other thing that that really stuck with me was was reading about how you know you. You own your business. You're so much experience, but you have customers who actually I question your credentials? Yes, Before even come into the door. They asked me from court if I certified, do I have? Ah, you know Licensed to do work on the appliance and they wanted background history and you know, and I told him I said, Well, if you don't want me to come, I can call to want too confident and tell them that you read it has someone else. Didn't you tell me where come on in. So when I do come in, they be over your shoulders and just thin air A move that you do, because I guess there wasn't comfortable. Having me in the house where I'm not sure what that was. But, yes, I was question before I even got am So tell me how you met Caroline. Actually, she was one of the cousins. You see another customer, and she just asked a question. And then you know when I say that she was sincere, you can tell when a person is to see here. And concern about our community. So I was able to vent with Caroline because I was one thing around with a lot of anger because having two degrees, you know Gin pullover can get a job. You know that there's a ideas. So when I spoke to Cannes on it, I was able to relieve that pressure that was holding name and anger that I was having. You know, after talking to Carol, and it's just, you know. It was a relief. Do you mind if I know Caroline's right there? Do you mind passing the phone and I can ask her a couple questions Share share his years. Awesome. Thanks, Ernest. No, no. Hey, Caroline. So can you Can you take me to that moment? I mean you Where was your Thinking that day And why did you decide to open this? This kind of conversation? Well, I think you know. Saturday morning don and most people were watching the tension Ratchet up in Minneapolis and And so that's why when he came, and I just thought to myself, how would it be? To be a black man coming into a white people's homes on a day like this. That just lead me to ask the question on when he started opening up. I can still remember where I was on the stairs when he mentioned how often he gets pulled over at night, and I stopped in my tracks because a lot of the things he was saying it was really matter of fact, he wasn't You know, projecting anger me. He wasn't railing against his reality. He was just stating how he operates in the world and what he experiences and and that type of matter of fact, conversation was really illuminating to me and really surprising. And Caroline, can I ask you? I mean, if people hear your story of the two of you, and they feel like This is almost too perfect. It's almost like two storybook. I mean, it's like, you know, a white woman who had not been exposed to these kinds of stories, you know, meets a black man who tells her about his experiences and And you know everything is you know happy? What would you say to them? T Tell them this is this is more than that. It's a good question. I do think that one of the reasons why the story got the attention that it did is because people want a happy ending. And people want it to be solved and and It's not going to be solved easily. You know, I think I think part of the puzzle is that we need to start talking to each other in talking in ways that are uncomfortable. This problem. This this systemic racism is has a lot of different components in it, and I feel like it needs to be led by A change of heart and I know that sounds cliche, but I really feel like it's foundational and fundamental to the changing of our hearts in our country because I know you can change laws and make sure that the most vulnerable are protected. And that's you know, been done steadily since the end of slavery, But I mean, to be perfectly honest, have white people in the south ever really Apologised ever really had their hearts changed. Thank you. Could I talkto earnest one more time? Sure. Sure, of course..

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