35 Burst results for "80%"

Yvette Mimieux, '60s starlet of 'Time Machine,' dies at 80

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 3 hrs ago

Yvette Mimieux, '60s starlet of 'Time Machine,' dies at 80

"A a a a top top top top movie movie movie movie star star star star of of of of the the the the nineteen nineteen nineteen nineteen sixties sixties sixties sixties has has has has died died died died the the the vet vet vet meaning meaning meaning you you you starting starting starting key key key movies movies movies of of of her her her day day day like like like where where where the the the boys boys boys are are are the the the time time time machine machine machine and and and light light light in in in the the the piazza piazza piazza she she she has has has died died died a a a family family family spokesman spokesman spokesman says says says she she she died died died in in in her her her sleep sleep sleep of of of natural natural natural causes causes causes Monday Monday Monday at at at her her her home home home in in in Los Los Los Angeles Angeles Angeles she she she was was was eighty eighty eighty years years years old old old in in in the the the time time time machine machine machine she she she played played played opposite opposite opposite rod rod rod Taylor Taylor Taylor as as as we we we know know know in in in the the the movie movie movie which which which was was was set set set in in in the the the year year year eight eight eight hundred hundred hundred thousand thousand thousand that that that led led led to to to her her her being being being cast cast cast in in in the the the teen teen teen movie movie movie where where where the the the boys boys boys are are are an an an even even even more more more stardom stardom stardom she she she ended ended ended up up up being being being featured featured featured on on on the the the cover cover cover of of of life life life magazine magazine magazine and and and it it it done done done eight eight eight films films films before before before turning turning turning twenty twenty twenty one one one I'm I'm I'm Oscar Oscar Oscar wells wells wells Gabriel Gabriel Gabriel

Piazza Piazza Los Los Los Angeles Angeles Angeles Rod Rod Rod Taylor Taylor Taylor Oscar Oscar Oscar Gabriel Gabriel Gabriel
NBA marks 75th year: A look at the 80's

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 1 d ago

NBA marks 75th year: A look at the 80's

"Julius Julius Dr Dr J. J. Erving Erving and and NBA NBA hall hall of of Famer Famer and and in in NBA NBA and and ABA ABA champion champion says says players players in in the the eighties eighties the the league league success success to to the the previous previous generation generation shoulders shoulders we we wish wish all all cool cool you you know know who who was was right right many many many many years years yeah yeah Robert Robert S. S. and and Riley Riley of of three three time time NBA NBA coach coach of of the the year year says says the the league's league's popularity popularity exploded exploded because because of of the the rivalry rivalry between between the the Celtics Celtics Larry Larry Bird Bird and and the the Lakers Lakers Magic Magic Johnson Johnson so so to to run run this this is is the the media media also also played played up up the the rivalry rivalry and and help help make make the the NBA NBA as as popular popular as as it it has has become become a a norm norm hall hall

NBA Julius Julius Dr Dr J. J. Ervi Famer Famer ABA Robert Robert S. S. Riley Riley Larry Larry Bird Celtics Lakers Johnson Johnson Norm Norm Hall Hall
Senator Rand Paul on Fauci's Abuse of Power

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:53 min | 2 d ago

Senator Rand Paul on Fauci's Abuse of Power

"And with us right now, is someone who I think has been so courageous more so than any other member of Congress and definitely in the Senate, someone who is actually a medical doctor and has been exposing the independent regulatory agencies of the deep medical state, doctor Rand Paul or senator ram Paul senator, welcome back to the Charlie Kirk show. Hey, Charlie. Thanks for having me. So senator walk us through kind of your latest kind of bout with Fauci, if you will. You went back and forth in the committee or one of the only ones willing to do so. Seems as if he's getting a little bit uneasy that you might be on his case. You know, I think it's in a appalling abuse of power. He makes over $420,000 a year, but he then uses his salary and his office and his minions to take down an enemy's list. So his enemies list includes other doctors and other scientists and three of them are imminent epidemiologists that work for Stanford Oxford and Harvard, but he and doctor Collins conspired by email that we know of because we have a record of this. And they said in the email, let's do a published takedown of these people. And immediately Fauci responded to Collins and said, I'm on it and sent him two or three things that got up in the lay press at the nation a left wing progressive outlet and then also at spike. So the thing is they're putting these nodes at wired. So they're putting these things out. But I think it's an abuse of office to go after other scientists and use your government position to try to take down people who disagree with you. And what these scientists were putting forward was the great Barrington declaration that simply acknowledged that we learned very early on that COVID affects different age groups wildly differently to 80 year old has a thousand times greater chance of dying than a ten year old. And if we don't account for that, I think it's basically

Senator Ram Paul Charlie Kirk Fauci Stanford Oxford Rand Paul Collins Senate Congress Charlie Harvard Barrington
Ryan Bangert of Alliance Defending Freedom on the Latest Supreme Court Rulings

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:30 min | 2 d ago

Ryan Bangert of Alliance Defending Freedom on the Latest Supreme Court Rulings

"So our friend Ryan bengard from the alliance defending freedom joins us now, Ryan, welcome to the program. Eric, thank you for having us on. Well, listen, people need to know that the alliance defending freedom ADF. You guys are heroes, unfortunately, you're very important at this time in American history. We need folks like you. Fighting in the courts for the constitution. So we're great to we're grateful for what you all do and we're grateful for you in particular today for coming online because many people want to know what happened in the Supreme Court in the Supreme Court recently with the two rulings. So for people who really haven't followed the ruling specifically the one about the one that was struck down, I guess it was 6 to three. And then the one that was not struck down, tell us a little bit about those rulings. Sure. So back in September, President Biden announced that he was going to require the federal agencies to mandate vaccination. And his chief of staff even called this a workaround knowing that federal authority wasn't there to implement these requirements. And so the agencies, the federal agencies, began going one by one and requiring vaccination in areas that they could control. And the occupational safety and health administration, which is part of the Department of Labor, issued a requirement back in November that all private employers with 100 or more employees require those employees to be vaccinated or if they chose not to get vaccinated. They had to be tested every single week and they had a mask up if they were unvaccinated. So they sweeping mandate covering over 80 million American employees. Simultaneously, the center for Medicaid and Medicare services CMS issued a mandate requiring healthcare workers at 15 different types of facilities that receive either Medicare or Medicaid funds to be vaccinated with only very narrow exemptions. So that covered over 10 million workers. So right there, you have almost a 100 million Americans covered by federal mandates. And those were the two mandates that the Supreme Court took up at Earl argument on January 7th and issued decisions last week. The osha mandate, the one that covered the private employees, the 80 plus million private employees was struck down like you said 6 to three. And the Medicare and Medicaid mandate that covered healthcare workers was upheld by a 5 to four

Ryan Bengard Alliance Defending Freedom Joi Alliance Defending Freedom Adf President Biden Supreme Court Ryan Eric Center For Medicaid And Medica Occupational Safety And Health Department Of Labor CMS Medicare Earl Medicaid
Journalist John Solomon on Voter Rights and Suppression

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:24 min | 2 d ago

Journalist John Solomon on Voter Rights and Suppression

"And I'm proud to present to you on Sebastian gorka's show John Solomon John welcome to the program. Great to have you with us brother. It is good to be with you. Happy Monday. Happy Monday. Here we go and happy Martin Luther King day. John. You're our go to guy if I may. And so would you explain to me the pressing is voting rights situation? You know, John, I didn't know there was suppressing votes in America. I didn't know I always felt as a person who just showed up and voted my fault was being suppressed. My vote wasn't counted because I wasn't one illegal. Number two, I wasn't dead yet. Despite what you might hear right here. Explain, explain to me, what is going on with this voting rights like they double that and they go to Georgia where they might very well have been shenanigans down there and I'm being kind in the 2020 election, but they doubled down. Could you break down what they want to vote for? And what they will end up with down in D.C., please. Yeah. Well, first off, the bill is in some dire trouble because there are at least four Democrats that are holding the line on it. Joe Manchin, Kirsten sinema, Mark Kelly and I'm thinking that the fourth one now just gave my mind. But they've got a little bit of opposition in their own party, particularly in these Democrats that are in the swing states. And so the bill may not happen. It may go the road of the BBB and some of the other Biden democratic plans. But the big thing that Joe Biden talks about being Jim Crow two is the idea that it is inherently racist. It is voter disenfranchising to ask someone to show their ID before they vote or descend in an absentee ballot. And this is an interesting thing because every poll that I've seen in the last year, including one, we did it just to know news says 70 80% of Americans support this. But there's a fascinating new poll out in Michigan. It surveyed Michigan voters who voted in the last election. And here is the ticker. African American voters, the very voters that Joe Biden says are disenfranchised by a voter ID. They support voter ID by Uranus, 79%. In fact, black voters were more strongly supporting of voter ID than all other voters

Sebastian Gorka John Solomon John Kirsten Sinema John Martin Luther King Mark Kelly Joe Manchin Georgia America D.C. Joe Biden Jim Crow Biden Michigan
Michael Anton: Blue Politicians and Editorialists Don't Have a Positive Message

The Dan Bongino Show

01:52 min | Last week

Michael Anton: Blue Politicians and Editorialists Don't Have a Positive Message

"I get what he was going with radical federalism but candidly it's really nothing radical about the idea when you think about it I mean the original purpose of the republic and the constitution Michael was to reserve federal powers for areas of mass consensus right A military a court system taxes duties in post excises I mean there's nothing controversial like that's what the document said And it reserved other powers to the states And what I find weird about this whole thing and I think what you're getting at in correct me if I'm wrong and your messaging problem thing is I don't really care what you do in New York I grew up there I live for ten years in Maryland You want to tax the snot out of your people I think it's dumb It's counterproductive but you do you You want to engage in this radical regulatory nonsense and mask wearing And you vote for that I'm all about freedom I don't have a problem with that The problem I have Michael is that they then want to attack us down here in Florida for saying hey that's not for us We're just going to kind of live our lives like leave us alone Yeah yeah and that's the heart of the messaging problems The title of the piece is the blue politicians and editorialists And they're basically the same There's no real clear line anymore between the democratic politician a TV pundit and a New York Times columnist or reporter They are all on the same side working the same issues in the same direction They don't have a positive message right Think about think back to something like the 1992 election which Bill Clinton unseated an incumbent president who had been at 80% popularity barely a year before because of the first Gulf War And he was able to knock the guy out and win the election Why Because he had a positive message for the middle of the country for the middle class for what is derisively referred to as flyover country the heartland whatever that tends to trend Republican but he had a positive message

Michael Maryland New York Florida New York Times Bill Clinton
Rep. Kat Cammack Describes the Problem With 'Reality Show' Politicians

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:52 min | Last week

Rep. Kat Cammack Describes the Problem With 'Reality Show' Politicians

"Reagan used to say, look, if I can get 80% of what I want, I'll come back later and get the other 20%. Do you sense? And you've brought it up, so I'm gonna bring it out. Do you sense there's more members of Congress who are coming in now that maybe don't understand that concept as well that our politics today may be more polarizing than the getting that part done and your wife what you said being the bull and trying to stop the being strategic about it. Is it now more is it becoming more of let's break every play and then figure out what to do instead of deciding what place needed to be broken. Yeah. I think that there's a definitely the environment today is drastically different than it was heck even 5 years ago. Today I see so many of my colleagues come in with the mindset of well this place is so fundamentally broken from the outside that this is their perspective. They've seen it from the outside. It's so fundamentally broken. We have to break it all completely down and then start anew. Then they get in there and they're like, well, I never thought about that. I never knew that. There's such a learning curve in getting to Washington that so many have an experience. And I do see there's a new generation of politicians coming in that seem to be more about the reality show and creating a reality show to drive the likes and the shares and the clicks and the headlines. And that's really I think detrimental because you take a note of the United States Constitution, you're there to do work on behalf of your constituents and to get things done and to move us towards the vision that our founding fathers put forward. And put everything on the line for. And instead, you see people who are like, well, I'm just going to raise a ton of money and I'm going to say the craziest thing in order to raise that money. And that hurts. It hurts conservatives. It hurts the country. It hurts everybody.

Reagan Congress Washington United States
2021 in Review: Critical Race Theory and the Great Parent Revolt

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:28 min | Last week

2021 in Review: Critical Race Theory and the Great Parent Revolt

"Here and we had our first gathering back in May of last year, which coincided with what I believe was one of the great stories of 2021, which was moms and dad starred in the rise up and go to school board meetings across the country, including all throughout Arizona. And what was so special about this was that this was this was the only place where many of you felt that you could actually make a meaningful and measurable difference with the chaos, the calamity and the catastrophe that was happening around you. And in some ways, the school boards had many years, if not decades of complaints piling up that seems like I'm not going to go to school board meeting. But in 2020, I was like, you know what? I'm so angry. Things are more expensive, supply chain crisis. They're teaching CRT to my kids. I'm going to show up to school board meeting. And it kind of became this kind of almost pressure release valve for so many of us that were like, you know what? I'm angry at a lot of different things, understandably, but I'm really upset with the fact that these school boards are putting masks on our children and mandating vaccines all the while that we know that the virus is not going to be a substantial risk to young people in a way shape or form. And so what happened in last year was and it's really kind of interesting because you didn't feel the effects of what was actually happening in real time till months afterwards. And as you started to see citizenship start to become renewed last calendar year in August, September and October, especially when you saw the Department of Justice issue their memo against moms and dads calling parents that show up to school board meetings domestic terrorists, all of a sudden the game changed in a very serious way. And this could best be explained. Historians will look back at this honest historians as the unexpected and the great inversion. So you look at what an inversion means in the dictionary, it means almost like a one 80 turn. When things go in a way that they aren't expected to be. So you look back at this last year, it started as one where the people that were in charge, the rulers, they thought that they were going to be able to make you super peace. Basically surrender. You're going to stop showing up at events like this. You're going to stop caring what the education of your kids. And the exact opposite happened. It was the ultimate kind of slow motion picture of Newtonian physics, which was for every action there is an equal and opposite

Arizona Department Of Justice
Justice Neil Gorsuch: Biden Admin Has Been Going 'Agency to Agency' to Enact Vaccine Mandate

Mark Levin

01:54 min | Last week

Justice Neil Gorsuch: Biden Admin Has Been Going 'Agency to Agency' to Enact Vaccine Mandate

"Noel Gorsuch justice Gorsuch at the oral argument cut 9 go Now you are you we should not consider the major questions doctrine unless and until we find a statutory ambiguity I understand that But let's say the court does find such an ambiguity I know you'll contest the premise but let's just work on it If there is an ambiguity why isn't this a major question that therefore belongs to the people's representatives of the states and in the halls of Congress Given that the statute at issue here is as the chief justice pointed out 50 years old doesn't address this question the rule effects I believe we're told 80 million people and the government reserves the right to extend it to every private business in the country Traditionally states have had the responsibility for overseeing vaccination mandates I rejected a challenge to one just the other day from New Mexico Congress has had a year to act on the question of vaccine mandates already As the chief justice points out it appears that the federal government is going agency by agency as a workaround to its inability to get Congress to act The risks imposed here are not unilateral There are risks to those who choose not to be vaccinated that they're trying to avoid sometimes as you discuss with justice Alito and conceded to him Traditionally osha has had rules that affect workplace hazards their unique to the workplace and don't involve hazards that affect individuals 24 hours a day No so what So what To policy decision don't you see It's a policy decision

Noel Gorsuch Gorsuch Congress New Mexico Federal Government Alito Osha
Joe Biden Does Not Get to Define Who Republicans Are

Mark Levin

01:39 min | Last week

Joe Biden Does Not Get to Define Who Republicans Are

"Benny lecturers ask about what the Republican Party is or is not Cut 16 go Well some courageous men and women in the Republican Party are standing against it Trying to really courageous With the media at their back with the Democrat party at their back go ahead Well that party Too many others are transforming that party into something else They see how completely politicized this is Completely Now I had want to be the party The party of Lincoln Eisenhower Reagan the bushes All right let's stop The Democrats hated Lincoln Fact they assassinated him The Democrats hated Reagan Hated his guts They wanted to impeach him over Iran if they could have The bushes they blew off the old man as a joke and his son they said he was an illegitimate president So Biden throws out these Republican names Biden doesn't get to decide what the Republican Party will be and he doesn't get to decide who the Republican nominee will be As a matter of common sense and I'll say it whether people like it or not with arm under attack or not Everybody scratches their head frankly even in the media even in the Democrat party how the hell did this guy get 80 million votes From his basement

Republican Party Lincoln Eisenhower Reagan Democrat Party Benny Biden Reagan Lincoln Iran
One Year Later: What's Happened to the January 6 Defendants?

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:24 min | Last week

One Year Later: What's Happened to the January 6 Defendants?

"And we back one on one with American greatnesses, Julie Kelly. Julie, you you've written the book on January 6th. I want everybody to read it. When you tell us what has happened since January the 6th, the numbers of arrests, how people were treated in prison access to these individuals. The charges are putative insurrection. What were these people actually charged with and how were they treated? So more than 700 Americans have now been arrested, most of them face misdemeanor, charges, trespassing, parading in the capitol, which is my personal favorite. We now have those, at least 80 men being held under pretrial detention orders, more than half of them are riding in a D.C. jail that has been set aside just for January 6th defendants. So yes, we have a political prison in this country in this nation's capital. They have not been convicted of any crime, but they have been deemed a danger to society by Joe Biden's line prosecutors and by federal judges, judges, by the way, all appointees, Donald Trump's judges, Barack Obama's judges, Ronald Reagan's judges, all have deemed these people a danger to society. They must be held behind bars awaiting trials that the government and the federal judges continue to delay into the middle or even late next year.

Julie Kelly Julie D.C. Joe Biden Donald Trump Ronald Reagan Barack Obama
NYT Writer Becomes Increasingly More Sensible About COVID

The Larry Elder Show

00:25 sec | 2 weeks ago

NYT Writer Becomes Increasingly More Sensible About COVID

"New York Times to become increasingly more sensible. Regarding COVID, one of their principal healthcare writers is a guy named David Lee and hart, who I read so you don't have to. And I'm going to tell you something. More and more he sang things like we never should have shut down to schools. You shouldn't be telling people who are not vaccinated. They can't work. I mean, this is a one 80 from the kind of crap he was saying about a year ago.

David Lee New York Times Hart
Facebook Reverses Course After 'Permanently' Locking Account of Conservative Children's Book Publisher

The Larry Elder Show

00:29 sec | 2 weeks ago

Facebook Reverses Course After 'Permanently' Locking Account of Conservative Children's Book Publisher

"Is doing a one 80 after permanently there were not mine locking the account of a publisher of conservative children's books. They published a book about Amy Coney Barrett. A book about Ronald Reagan, a book about Thomas sole and they permanently locked their account and then they heard the wrath of conservatives and they've now done a one 80. Some promising news for the new year.

Amy Coney Barrett Ronald Reagan Thomas
How Many Kids Die From the Flu in the USA Each Year?

Mark Levin

01:50 min | 3 weeks ago

How Many Kids Die From the Flu in the USA Each Year?

"I'm going to do this live on the earth How many kids die from the flu In the USA Each year let's just see what it says You throw that in there Flu and young children CDC Flu is dangerous for children the CDC says on their website Flu season vary in severity However every year children are at risk CDC estimates that from 2010 to 2011 season to the 2019 2020 season flu related hospitalizations among children younger than 5 years old have ranged from 7000 to 26,000 United States of America While relatively rare some children die from the flu each year From 2004 and 2005 season to the 2019 2020 season flu related deaths death and children reported to the CDC during regular flu season have ranged from 37 to a 199 During the O 9 N one H one N one pandemic 358 pediatric flu related deaths were reported to the CDC From April of O 9 to September 2010 it is noteworthy that among reported pediatric deaths about 80% of those children were not fully vaccinated Also of note even though individual flu deaths in children must be reported the CDC it is likely that not all deaths are captured and that the number of actual deaths is actually higher All right so if we have a year where a 199 people die from COVID do we do we mandate vaccines those kids excuse me from the flu Did we mandate kids wear masks and schools The answer is

FLU CDC United States Of America
Bart Herbison Tells Us About the Nashville Songwriters Association

The Doug Collins Podcast

02:15 min | 3 weeks ago

Bart Herbison Tells Us About the Nashville Songwriters Association

"When I talk about the Nashville songwriter association, they asked, well, what is that? So let's start off here, but just won't tell a little bit about how you got into this and also about the national songwriters as well. Well, me first a little hoity toity. My father was a painter in Paris. A house painter in Paris Tennessee. And look, we grew up in a rural area, somewhat poor, and music was the thing. Music, my grandma played piano in our little Methodist Church, and everybody was musical in my family. Three brothers played Trump at I blew mine, the other two played theirs. And I guess it's 16 years old. I got a job as a dish jockey at the local radio station, which was an NBC affiliate, and ended up doing some work on a national show they had. But a guy that grew up with me became a very famous songwriter named Jimmy Stewart, he wrote brotherly love, the last number one for Keith. Whitley, a little less talk for Toby, and I just was always drawn to that. I always drawn to they just make this up out of thin air and I said as a child some day somehow I'll work with American songwriters, and I did. For us, the origin story, I don't sing, but remember please release me let me go. The waste our lives would be a sin, release me and let me love again. That was written by Eddie Miller. Yeah, singing was not part of that too at bar. It takes a while to pass the bill. And he was a real southern gentleman, and he thought we can orgas the songwriters. There were only 80 songwriters total 80 in the entire town of Nashville in 1967. And he reached out to all of them and a lot didn't want to risk their career because even our friends within the music industry didn't necessarily want to see the songwriters quote unquote organize. But Eddie got married John wilkin Chris Christopherson fully and boulevard Bryant Liz and Casey Anderson, a bunch of really important songwriters and 42 risk their careers to become an advocate advocacy group for American

Nashville Songwriter Associati Paris Local Radio Station Methodist Church Jimmy Stewart Eddie Miller Donald Trump Tennessee Whitley NBC Toby Keith John Wilkin Chris Christopherson Nashville Bryant Liz Casey Anderson Eddie
Supreme Court to Hear Oral Arguments Over Vaccine Mandates on January 7

Mike Gallagher Podcast

00:59 sec | 3 weeks ago

Supreme Court to Hear Oral Arguments Over Vaccine Mandates on January 7

"Supreme Court yesterday agreed to take up disputes over the Biden administration's nationwide vaccine or testing COVID-19 mandate. This were large businesses, 100 or more, and a separate vaccine requirement for healthcare workers. The brief court order said that the court will hear oral arguments on January the 7th in two different cases. The court delayed action on an emergency request of both of these the plaintiffs were asking for an emergency ruling, the court denied that. And appeals court on Friday allowed the workplace mandate which covers about 80 million American workers to go into a fact prompting businesses and states and other business groups to ask the Supreme Court to block it. And the other case concerns whether the administration could require healthcare workers at facilities that treat federally funded Medicare and Medicaid patients to receive shots while litigation continues. So I guess we'll wait until after Christmas January 7th to see a resolution on this.

Biden Administration Supreme Court Medicare
Doctors Have Known for Decades That Viruses Get Weaker as They Mutate, So Why Isn't This Being Talked About?

The Larry Elder Show

01:32 min | Last month

Doctors Have Known for Decades That Viruses Get Weaker as They Mutate, So Why Isn't This Being Talked About?

"John, you're in the Larry elder show. Thank you so much for calling. Yeah, hi, Larry elder. I hope that healthcare worker is still listening. Doctor Kelly victory, she's a prom room surgeon and a mess has been special. She's on your old radio station last summer over and over and over again. She was saying that epidemiologists know doctors know scientists know that viruses mutate, why they're calling it variants. I don't understand that. But it's their mutations. And she said, and when the viruses mutate, they become more infectious and they get weaker. She said they have known this for decades for 80 a hundred years. And for healthcare workers and these people pundits to not know this, they either know it and align or they need to be educated on the science. And she's a brilliant woman, doctor Charlie. He's on your radio station. I used to listen to you. When you started out in the radio. No way. And it just amazes me that that isn't talked about more, but it doesn't immediately in a way because like you said, they want to use this for power. They want to use this for control. And John, this omicron variant is they're calling it. The doctor from South Africa says that people are simply not getting sick, which suggests that the path that you're just now talking about is what's going on. These variants are getting weaker and weaker and weaker and this is the evolution of a virus.

Larry Elder Doctor Kelly John Charlie South Africa
Hispanic Voters Now Evenly Split Between Parties, WSJ Poll Finds

Mark Levin

01:04 min | Last month

Hispanic Voters Now Evenly Split Between Parties, WSJ Poll Finds

"Now what I want to talk about is this article that I saw And I think I may have mentioned it a little bit last time but I wanted to bring it up again because I was just talking about it with Chris salsa a big shout out to him from wba P and newsmax About this Wall Street Journal poll a report about a poll where Hispanics are evenly split 37% and 37% saying that they both would support Trump or Biden And this is revolutionary if you will because for decades my entire lifetime that's always been part of the guaranteed vote for the Democrat party In the 60 to 70 percentile African Americans into the 80 and close to 90% So what gives now that there's this big split well obviously Latinos are leaving the left because they've seen the economic growth that occurred during the Trump administration It doesn't matter what color you are or what country you're born in People come to America for the American Dream That's exactly why they're

Chris Salsa Wall Street Journal Biden Donald Trump Democrat Party Trump Administration America
"80%" Discussed on Off The Meatrack Chainz New York Podcast

Off The Meatrack Chainz New York Podcast

07:42 min | 2 months ago

"80%" Discussed on Off The Meatrack Chainz New York Podcast

"In host city for the final match of twenty twenty six fee for mass soccer world cup in north america. The world cup football in north america has three hosts the usa canada mexico. They're united twenty twenty. Six bid has been awarded at the sixty fee for congress in moscow on june thirteenth. Twenty eighteen beaten out morocco. One hundred eighty four to sixty five votes. The twenty twenty six world cup final is therefore expected to take place at the metlife stadium in east rutherford. Just outside new york city to the united twenty twenty six did twenty twenty six world cup. Final stadium is home of the near giants and new york jets. Both plane in the national football league new jersey has hosted matches at the nineteen ninety four cuff football as well being played in the former giant stadium Twenty twenty six world cup final stadium. The new current metlife stadium has been constructed in twenty ten and is situated at the meadowlands complex a sports complex including on ultra modern facilities and amenities among which hundreds of hotels. This base situated in east rutherford. New jersey is also known as the metlife sports complex including the Stadium the metlife stadium has a eighty two thousand five hundred capacity and is a thirty minute. Drive from manhattan So the twenty twenty six world cup. Final win the exact date of win. The final will be held is still unknown. More information about the world cup final most probably in host city new york will be available s here as soon as it is confirmed world cup. Soccer more stadium location info The world cup final location is metlife stadium in new york slash new jersey as mentioned besides the world cup soccer final. The us will also host all games at this twenty twenty six fi first tournament starting from quarterfinals. Excuse me out of eighty games at the schedule of the fine around mexico. Canada will have ten games. Each sixty games will be played at. Us ground except from the court the four quarterfinals to semi finals the third-place battle end the final also. Thirty four matches in the group stage. Twelve in the round of thirty two and six in the round of sixteen will have the usa as their host in bit into bid it has been proposed that seven group matches round to round of thirty two and one round of sixteen will take place in both canada and mexico more info about the locations. See on twenty twenty. Six world us canada and mexico So this is a way and see folks so there you have it with that one. That's pretty much good news right dead. Oh man okay hey K before even go to The next topic Our light to remind people the new the new comers especially the new listeners especially the the youtube watchers that just came in Welcome to the show For those of you who may may not know we are basically live on stream yard. Youtube it also Seventeen love now flows you who may not know what that is is basically a phone app which i actually explained in ever so seventy eight that it went through a rebranding change is normal delivered anymore. Seventeen live now so you could follow me at gene money. Stacks queens new york ordinaire rate so day. Have it right there. effort Watson me on seventeen live Semi coins are Snacks knake's Or as they say snack rone's shit you know how that sagoes man So so now. That i got out the way. Let me see how much time i got here. A while Okay so cameron is flexing his acting chops these days. Killa cam made his queen's debut on tuesday night. October twenty six in abc show second episode. Camp plays the role of a rapper. Whose who who guest on the girl group made up of eve brandy anatoly. Houghton's hit single He's also a what that is. Wait a minute here. this is crazy man. why can even Hold on a minute here. Yeah hip hop the x. It go here. we go For this to load up Course yes here. We go so cameron flexing his acting chops these days. Killa camp made his queen's debut on tuesday night. The twenty six in the abc shows Episode camp plays the role of a rapper. Who guests on the girl. Group made up of eve brandy in tori on hit singles. he's also a former fling of brandies and comes back into her life decades later during the episode cam in girl. Gang hit the states to to perform their heart of queens single wishaw diplomats. Co-founder channel is vintage. Self and bring out the pink Athlete would timberland amp timberland boots einstein. You love it. but i'm just financing. Chinchilla makes dragon like day. Our wedding dresses far. Rockaway queens No i'm down. He wraps while.

metlife stadium united twenty east rutherford football mexico Soccer meadowlands complex metlife sports complex north america canada us new jersey new york jets new york morocco moscow giants new york city congress Snacks knake
"80%" Discussed on Off The Meatrack Chainz New York Podcast

Off The Meatrack Chainz New York Podcast

01:39 min | 2 months ago

"80%" Discussed on Off The Meatrack Chainz New York Podcast

"House..

"80%" Discussed on Dateable Podcast

Dateable Podcast

01:50 min | 3 months ago

"80%" Discussed on Dateable Podcast

"Okay we're going to wrap this up in dateable fashion. Sit all the dateable. Podcast is part of the frolic podcast network. Find more. Podcast you'll love at frolic dot media slash podcasts..

"80%" Discussed on Dateable Podcast

Dateable Podcast

05:38 min | 3 months ago

"80%" Discussed on Dateable Podcast

"I take that you guys believe that couples come back from you know this mentality of score keeping an all that what some advice that you would have maybe for two groups of people maybe if you will in relationships that are kinda going through this. Current day is tit for tat mentality in the navy. The group also. That fear is going to this. Yeah well i think we are an example that this is possible because we were really stuck. I mean we were right on the verge of divorce. It's kind of like a miracle that we didn't get divorced but we were able to dig our way out of that and it was really about changing the underlying habits and behaviors of how we related to each other in all these things so when it comes to the group of people in relationships and what they can do. I think a good starting point is to really look at two habits. Which we've talked about one is one radically generous active contribution each day. Which again doesn't have to be huge. Could just be a very small thing. It could just be you make dinner for your partner or you make them a cup of coffee in the morning or you know you. You pick up their jacket that they left on the floor or whatever it is but just doing that one thing can have a really profound effect and then the other is that appreciation mindset shift. Where if you can appreciate your partner once a day and flip around those glasses that you wear when you're watching your partner from everything. They did wrong to everything they did. Right that's another thing that's really powerful and for us we do. This actually is a kind of ritual before we go to bed. We each appreciate each other for one thing. It takes like sixty seconds maybe ninety seconds but it totally changes the energy of the day and it brings us into connection right before we go to sleep so that would be for the establish relationship folks and then for the who are like. I don't know if i want to do this. I would say is we've talked a lot about structure and mindset and finances and power and all these kind of more boring all say structural pieces but one of the things we haven't talked about is the reward on the other side of that right. Which is that when you are deeply connected with somebody when you feel like you are absolutely on the same team..

navy
"80%" Discussed on Dateable Podcast

Dateable Podcast

05:57 min | 3 months ago

"80%" Discussed on Dateable Podcast

"Going to go beyond dating. I would say what do you think about since. We're talking about early stage dating. How do we set the tone for revealing and basically setting boundaries in some ways and talking about your needs without stripping the romance out of a relationship. Or how do you infuse of romance back once you start having these conversations. I think it's finding the other side of revealing because what nate's describing is essential being able to name with your partner the teeny tiny things that if they go unspoken could actually drive you apart but the other side of revealing is knowing each other more deeply and there's something really intimate and really attractive about getting to know someone at that next level and so this could be anything from. What's something that you dream about that you were. You may never get to experience. In in that conversation you got fears and vulnerability and dreams altogether and that closeness is really powerful and so using revealing as a space where it's actually quite intimate that i think starts to make sure that it doesn't become now. I'm going to nitpick you but rather here's who i really am. And who are you. So it's a combination of. Hey i really do not like dirty socks on the floor to my dream vacation. Let's start working towards that. So you've gotta balance the domestic with the sexy dreams. I think there's also a way of revealing that will lead to a helpful response by your partner and a way of revealing. That will lead to an unhelpful response and really has to do with your motivation or the sort of underlying energy of the reveal so it comes purely from resentment anger and and a place of criticism. Your partner is going to mirror that back to you whereas if you can do this kind of jedi mind trick and you can reveal your complaints from a place of radical generosity. Which i know sounds crazy but it's possible. I do it all the time win. You're able to do that all of a sudden you get a very different response because it's coming from a place of. Hey i love you. I want this to work and when you leave your socks in front of my drawers is just. It's really hard for me. I feel really frustrated. Yeah the example. That just happened. That i thought was so powerful is with a couple and they had really different preferences about what happened with the phone at dinner and partner. One said that they were like w with your phone. Surprisingly the partners like f you with your phone and instead i was like all right. Let's try this conversation again. Why does this matter to you and the person said anytime. Your phone comes out. It feels like. I'm not important to you because so little time where it's just the two of us. I want you to be the most important person in my world in that moment. And i want to be the most important person in your world in that moment. Totally different conversation with totally different results. Yeah i love that like thinking that your partner has your best interests than they are. They are because they love you and they want to be there. I think that's a good way to lead. I guess where. I struggle a little especially with early stage. I'm going to go back. Here is sometimes at that stage. You don't know where you stand with someone. So how can you lead with generosity and want to assume the best resources you know. Set yourself up for a bad situation. How do you balance the two. It's a great question. And i think early stage in some ways. What you're noticing is how does your partner meet you and how does your partner reciprocate that. You take a little risk in a little risk in a little risk and as your partner takes.

nate
"80%" Discussed on Dateable Podcast

Dateable Podcast

05:48 min | 3 months ago

"80%" Discussed on Dateable Podcast

"Of the evolution marriage and you hit on it. This eighty twenty. Which was the more traditional gender roles what our parents generation was you in a in a marriage. I definitely see this. My parents like my mom. Does the more domestic tasks owns the household then. My dad is the primary breadwinner like from a work perspective. But obviously because of shifted with women's equality in the fifty fifty worlds was more like separating it so where do you see the future with. Add with roles and responsibilities. Gonna you just mentioned a little about doing what works for you. But how do you see that playing out. I think that belief is if you are able to look at all of the things that you're up to as a couple and then so lax year rolls based on what you're good at and what you care about and then make some choices where. I don't know that anybody's like you know what. I'm so good at taking out the trash but being willing to say hey. It really bothers me when the trash cans to get to the top. I'm gonna own because it bothers me so much more than it bothers you and being willing to have the conversation from that perspective what it allows choice it allows intentionally also around things that you might say. We want to outsource that. Then it's not important to either of us. Can we make some decisions to either. Not do it at all or to outsource it. And just having the conversation as i look into the future when i imagine is complementarity rather than fighting over. What needs to be done. I am so on board with this. But i'm also very curious to because julie's aware that at the beginning of the pandemic when my boyfriend i accidentally moved in together like lots of couples. Did we had a lot of conflicts in the beginning. Because i think there's a there's this notion were assumption that when you live together you contribute to the same tasks so for him..

julie
"80%" Discussed on Dateable Podcast

Dateable Podcast

03:59 min | 3 months ago

"80%" Discussed on Dateable Podcast

"They're doing wrong and all the ways in which they didn't quite measure up you're looking for the things they did right and when you see that appreciating them and then there's one other piece which is really about. Can you reveal your full truth in the relationship and revealing is about revealing. Hey what's really going on with me at work in life emotionally but it's also about like all those little microscopic ruptures in connection that happen when i feel pissed off that kaley nagged me about not unloading the dishwasher or whatever that might be. It's it's just revealing that so that instead of pulling us further apart it brings us closer together and it gives you permission for each other to give that extra thirty percent in a relationship and to share that extra thirty percent. But i know we have some very quantitative based listeners. We're thinking how do you know you've been giving eighty percent versus sixty five percent or seventy percent. How do you know when you hit the eighty percent. You don't which is in days if the point that the whole thier is. Can you stop scorekeeping nineties. You could do it where it actually becomes the exact same problem i just gave eighty percent. You were only at seventy two is exactly this ryan argument as fighting for fifty fifty. So the whole idea is can i over shoot. Can i do more. I would add a bit of a caveat here which i think is really neat early in relationships which is around what matters to you to receive. Because if you're going to go above and beyond might as well have it land in the other person's world as something fantastic that they've really cherish. Where as a for instance early on nate. We got me flowers and it was amazing. Allegedly except i am so good at killing living things..

kaley ryan nate
"80%" Discussed on Dateable Podcast

Dateable Podcast

05:45 min | 3 months ago

"80%" Discussed on Dateable Podcast

"Ab l. e. Okay let's get into the eighty. Eighty marriage with nate in keighley. How do you have a successful relationship or marriage. Nobody knows these days because the model for a successful relationship keeps changing with our society and we no longer can look to our parents to say this is what makes a marriage work because fifty percent of our parents are also divorced so this is very interesting. That we have. Nate clamp and kaley clamp on the phone with us. Today who wrote a book called the eighty eighty marriage a new model for happier stronger relationships. They live in boulder. They've been there for nine years. I'm from collins of were fellow. Colorado ends here. They're both forty two years old. They're married to each other right. Just want to confirm and what is it. Eighty eighty model relationships while in particular exploring how to use a mindset shift to radical generosity and the structural shift to shared success as you transition from dating to the early stages of intimate relationship. We are so excited to have you at. The book was also definitely excited to dig in deeper on this episode with you all awesome so so excited to be here. You're ut this up so beautifully that eighty eighty is really about letting go of the old model said. Our parents had about what relationships might look like and instead saying as we're going into relationships now we know that we are equals with each other and we want to create a relationship where it feels like we're equals and in love and previously the very best that we could do was the technology of fairness. Let's make sure that we're equals by making things super fair fifty fifty exactly the same and the problem was that created so much for us to fight about. I was when he picked up dinner last time. It's your turn. I was in hugh planned are cool date last time. Now it's your turn keeping tabs exactly and so this keeping score with such an issue and so eighty eighty is all about dropping keeping score shifting your mindset to that of radical generosity where you're contributing appreciating and revealing to each other and from that place you're able to create a structure of shared success which really just means you know your values which means you can identify your priorities set clear boundaries. Identify your roles imbalanced power which interestingly leads to really great sex well fake. That's really interesting. Because i feel like we keep hearing in modern culture that we want to strive for equality and i know you just touched on this a bit but why do you think this is flawed. Like this motion of equality. Yeah well. I actually think there's a really important distinction here between equality and fairness and so as kayla was mentioned earlier we are all about equality in marriage and i think like we're living in the generation that's all about equality in marriage in contrast to our grandparents who had very different structures. Even our parents may have had very different structures. So i think the key question couples are asking now is how can we be equals and in love without killing each other. Essentially and the reason we're killing each is because of this berry. Clunky technology of fairness that kayla was talking about a minute ago..

Nate clamp kaley clamp keighley nate boulder collins Colorado hugh kayla
"80%" Discussed on Dateable Podcast

Dateable Podcast

03:04 min | 3 months ago

"80%" Discussed on Dateable Podcast

"There are so many reasons. I think we're so afraid to have those conversations because we're afraid we're going to get the answer. We don't want a lot of times. But i think there's only upside because i mean you know. Worst case scenario is someone says. I'm not that into you. But when she rather than ever now than months and months down the road and best cases they are aware of what. You'd like hard a cigarette. I think i've definitely learned that. I used to hardest so much. That is new or the worst. It's a very lonely place because you're only talking to yourself and it's so unfair to your partner to super unfair to that when you think about it yes. This is very much related to our question for this episode. Someone wrote in and said i just started seeing someone. It's been about a few dates in. And i feel like i'm constantly planning dave. How do i get her to plan more of the dates back. Well this is what we've been talking about communicating what you want out of the relationship even in early stages of dating. You cannot expect the person you're dating to read your mind or to act the way you do. My mom always says to me. You can't expect other people to be you 'cause you only you know what you want. They don't know so. I think it's very important to communicate. That what i really appreciate about a partner is someone who plans things takes initiative in planning things. I think it's also helpful to sit back and think have. I even allowed this person to plan things. I know some friends who are very adamant about going to certain restaurants doing certain things getting tickets for certain events and then their partner or date is just along for the ride. Otherwise is not a good date so relinquishing that control is another way of thinking Have i even allowed this person to take initiative. I think it's how do you make it more collaborative my partner and i. We have a running list of things. We wanna do on cuco keep. It's just a list of activities or restaurants or beaches hikes. Whatever it is and that's just there we just add to it as we come up with things even if we're talking to each other will add things and then we can refer to it and it doesn't feel like one person's planning it that way it just feels like it's more of a collaborative nature and i'm also not keeping track like am i putting eighty percent of the things on here is he putting eighty percent of Taking about that way it's more of here is our list of running things we wanna do and you know we have this at our disposal while we're looking for something to do i so i think that's been really great but i think also another way. Is you kind of alluded to earlier. How do you ask them what they watch like even saying. Hey i know you're into music. I would love to join you on a concert that you really like. That would be really fun to me. I think one it shows that you're invested in the relationship that you want to partake in their activities and then also it invites them to plan something they know you want to come to it Yes i've also heard this..

dave
"80%" Discussed on Dateable Podcast

Dateable Podcast

03:48 min | 3 months ago

"80%" Discussed on Dateable Podcast

"This show such a good one one of the questions that we talk about is how do you like discern from someone not stepping up in doing the work of lincoln being interested in being a healthy relationship versus you know just the dynamics that play out in relationships at i think even from early stages of dating the stuff comes into play like we're always hearing people say i'm doing all the work or i'm planning everything like what's the line you know of. This isn't a good situation versus know people bring different things to the table kind of thing. You've been there right julie. Oh totally totally of like that. I've been the one planning everything absolutely. And i think some of it is. I took it on myself. But then i don't know. In retrospect looking back on it too. I'm like why. I trying to force something that wasn't there. You know i think about this all the time because with my previous relationship we got into many fights that i felt like he should've planned more every trip we go on. It was my ten harari. And i would resent him while we're on the trip not enjoying our vacation because i kept thinking. This is what i wanna do. How about you just pick lunch for once. But in hindsight. I kind of think about one i never communicated this till after the fact which ruined our vacation already a little little late and the second thing i was thinking about was he had other interests that i just never cared about and i wish i would have taken more time and asked him on this trip. What are the things you would be interested in seeing. And then if he said x. y. z. that it gives me the Allows me to say how about you. Plan those things right well. I think it's hard because it's your birgit to people that have very different ways of living. And you know it's one of those things that you think about it. Let's say you do meet in your thirties or forties. This person has had thirty years plus of life experience before you. They've had this whole life. Yeah you're not part of it. It's actually kind of kind of better. What do you think about dick as you're like. You were a functioning person before be. I don't need to do all the staff yet. I think when. I've stepped into the planner role. There's a few things like wine. I have trouble relinquishing control. That i learned about myself but then the other side is i took it very personally like this person donna. You know make a reservation. Because i'm not important enough to them. And i've learned over the years that it doesn't always mean that like that's like reading a lot into it people show love and different ways it just because that's something that i do doesn't mean that that's how someone why needs to be loved also that also what they're gonna reciprocate but then you know that's the line though. Is we hear all these people all the time that are in these relationships or situation ships where they're doing all the work and that's that's not a good rule to be an either. I just always think about this image of a couple. And let's say one person is doing all the trip planning and resenting their partner and their partner is like scrubbing the kitchen resenting their partner for not helping cleave with both people feel like they're right you know thinking what they're doing is so important. Why is my partner contributing. That is what a true relationship is it. All comes down to communication. I mean we say it's so cliche we say it all the time. I think when we start to bottle the stuff up even if you're in an early stage relationship a feels like you're the one text all time. Maybe it's that they're not that into epa. Maybe it's just that you're doing it all so they don't feel like you want them to do it or they need to do it..

harari lincoln julie dick donna epa
"80%" Discussed on Tape Notes

Tape Notes

02:25 min | 3 months ago

"80%" Discussed on Tape Notes

"From loving in stereo and I'm very pleased to say that I am sat in jungle headquarters in shepherd's Bush with one half of jungle Josh. How you doing? Nice to see you again. Great to see you. Thanks for working on us into your world. Thanks to the humble abode. It is. It's nice to be in here. So is this where the record was recorded there? This is where the record was finished. Yeah, we kind of came into this space to finish it. We moved from a place in East London and this record was made all over. We did sort of over two years, bits and pieces, getting little ideas everywhere and kind of a lot of it was made in East London just off brick lane. We had this house and we had this sort of back garden room that was sort of really nice and it wasn't soundproof at all, wasn't a studio really it was basically shed. We've made most of it and then kind of got to the end of it and had to move here and we moved back home and set up this space and finished it. It was nice to get into a lack of this as like a quite a solid sounding room and it's a bit more of a let's go. What are we doing? Let's finish this thing. Yeah, so West London drew you back, you couldn't get away from West London, because your routes are here. Here we grew up in shepherd bush yourself on the goat road opposite townhouse studios, the team act will always say it's famously where blur smashed the bottle on the pavement for the park. I don't know if that is true. Well, that's a good story though, and you lived opposite. Do you think that had an effect? Do you think that inspired you and you thought that's a recording studio? We want to be there. I think it must have done in some way. Tease parents always kind of amazing because they let us have this basement room in the house and we kind of always had drums and stuff set up and we'd always jam in there. So there was always so much to go after school and make music and play music and it's actually kind of funny because our first band, which was called L shaped room. I think you played one of the tracks. I think we entered this competition this thing called Emma genser Emma. It was the story. It was like a battle of the bands. I mean, we must have been 14, I think you played the first track from that bans and the funny thing is, come over it's cool because I was either called twice before and she said or something like that where these like indie rock songs and that was the first thing we were on John Kennedy exposure. Wow. That is amazing. I didn't know that. That's 16 years ago. Wow, God. I mean, that was three years ago. Wow, L shaped room inspired by the novel. Yeah, that was a good friend of mine longtime friend colotis..

East London West London Josh Bush Emma genser bush Emma John Kennedy colotis
"80%" Discussed on How The Heck Are We Gonna Get Along

How The Heck Are We Gonna Get Along

04:28 min | 4 months ago

"80%" Discussed on How The Heck Are We Gonna Get Along

"So you know how a figuring out how to be honest in your words be direct or frank but do it in thirty seconds. I don't know how you do that. And i wish you luck at it. While i appreciate the advice i loved the podcast format because it does allow conversations debris the but more so. I'm a big fan of this kind of conversation and the second thing is how are you going to spend the next year. I don't know how can spend a whole year. Not being themselves you know and then people wonder like why are there so many fake people running for office right now. I see why that is because there's a lot of pressures and you point to a number to be honest to not be authentic and i told my team at the beginning of this running this race. We're going to do it. The right way. And i'm be myself and i think number politicians who have done well are people who've been themselves and i think you like me were unusual personalities in many ways and we're just going to put that out there and have fun with it. Well i mean. I asked the question about how you're going to spend the next year. Differentiating yourself. what you're going to do for the next year. I was going to say differentiating yourself. Because i do know that the the horrible thing about primaries and i've always said over and over i'd run the general election every day of the year. Ten times over. I'd be happy to do it. Did you tell me that the wisconsin primary is a year away. Do your primaries happen in late summer early fall. August okay i will never can move to voice kansin for sure because there is nothing worse than a primary i. I was in good spirits during my general election campaign. I was fine with what needed to raise money. I was in a very very red district. And so there's all of that but there's nothing worse and there was nothing more heart-wrenching than a primary campaign. because you do typically agree with most of the people who you're running against a primary on policy issues there's not much daylight oftentimes in my particular campaign. We had a very big generational difference. My opponent was very very experienced and very very establishment and much. Older and i was clearly not establishment. Clearly have didn't have the same type of experience. Much younger was able to bring attention. I was able to differentiate myself in so many ways and for so long. I was beating him by forty points until stephen. Those nasty ad started coming out and he closed a forty point gap with that dirty ad in a matter of two weeks. And i'm not mad at him for it at all because he was doing what it took to win but the problem is primaries are always personal. They always our personal. Because you don't have that many policy differences so given that you now have a year in front of you of having to god. I feel so badly for you. Ours was in march back. You have a year in front of you of having to race run a race against a lot of people who you say you're friends with and who you probably do agree with and who. I assume you would vote for if you didn't win. The primary that's what politics has become. It has to be fighting disagreeing telling you why i'm better than that person telling you. That person is worse than me and you should vote for me instead of them. So that is the whole system if the system is set up that way. And you're gonna live in it for the next year steven. How the heck are we going to get along. Well i'll just you will start with. We'll end with where we started. You mentioned russ find golden campaign finance reform. The story of russ feingold in nine hundred ninety two which was the last competitive democratic primary for the us senate. People laughed at him when he jumped in. There is a much more prominent multi term member of congress and a self-funding billionaire type person and those two just trashed each other leading into the primary and russ feingold focused on his message..

frank wisconsin stephen russ feingold steven russ us senate congress
"80%" Discussed on How The Heck Are We Gonna Get Along

How The Heck Are We Gonna Get Along

01:51 min | 4 months ago

"80%" Discussed on How The Heck Are We Gonna Get Along

"And so are the reason to vote for us is to have a. What do you mean us to vote. Why vote for you. Instead of alex classroom. So the reason to vote for me and when you're voting for me you're really supporting a movement of people on the ground is to fundamentally change the culture of our politics and i'm the first one to say i can't do it by myself. I'm our campaign is merely a vessel vehicle to channel the desires of a lot of people who feel disenfranchised. There's a report that more in common put out called political tribes and they describe voter demographic called the exhaustive. Majority you know. Most people are exhausted by politics right now. You know and this is an existential moment. You know i've done human rights work abroad. Political violence is something you might see. In other countries i've worked with people from sudan and yemen and places like that now political violence is now real in this country It's in front of us and so if we don't ask ourselves the hard questions of how are we going to do. Things differently than our democracy will not succeed over the long term. My views that there is reasons to be helpful but we do need to make those tough decisions right now and elect people who are going to be more bridge builders as opposed to just a twitter social commentator all of these things. I'm not being a hypocrite here because all of these things are music to my ears and people who listen to this show. No that i agree with all that all that stuff. But.

yemen sudan twitter
"80%" Discussed on How The Heck Are We Gonna Get Along

How The Heck Are We Gonna Get Along

05:48 min | 4 months ago

"80%" Discussed on How The Heck Are We Gonna Get Along

"Delivering real impact for people who need help right now so to your point about the the reconciliation. Bill absolutely support it. That's going to deliver relief. And i think delivering relief is much better than not delivering relief. Okay talk about climate change and how it affects wisconsin specifically because y'all are pretty damn cold up there so tell me how it affects wisconsin. Yes i think needs to be done about it. Yeah absolutely so. First of all climb is is the issue that got me into politics in the first place. I think it's a proxy for whether or not a democracy is successful over the long term ken. Our democracy create long-term solutions that affects voters. That haven't been born yet right now. That's a big question because our democracy is set up really for the short term election cycle. And there's a lot of incentive to keep kicking the can down the road so for me. This is a moral challenge in a calling and here in wisconsin First of all there are huge huge challenges that our farmers were facing as the climate continues to get weirder for them. It's increasingly hard for them to plan. their crops. And so you're seeing right now in wisconsin. We've the highest level of small family farm bankruptcies in the country and so they're in the bankruptcies are now leading to alarmingly alarmingly high suicide rates as well so our farmers are challenged by that and the huge opportunity. I see is for clean energy technologies if you go up to the fox valley which is Come north of milwaukee south of green bay. You'll see lots of wind turbines there. That's a huge opportunity. Biomass is a huge opportunity. My role in the us senate will say. Let's empower our clean energy entrepreneurs to come up with new solutions and the government shouldn't necessarily say which are the best solution but the government needs to be on the side of the problem solvers The people who are trying to cut carbon emission. And i think this is going to be a political winner here in wisconsin a majority of wisconsin nights Believe we need to take on climate change and who said. Where's that poll from. Because i want to look it up right now. Where a majority of wisconsin. I think that you need to take take climate change or majority of the people who are voting in your primary and then your polls thinkin you take on climate change you bill. Look it up. And you'll see all so i can't remember the name of the pollster but a lot of the best polling does come out of marquette law school so if you look up the marquette law school poll they'll probably back sometime in the last couple of years They did a poll on the issues. And you'll see climate change on there but one of the most interesting things. There is to see the generational breakdown as well. In other words the younger you go the more support you're gonna see for taking on climate action including this is now national poll. That shows a majority of millennial. Republicans believed that when you take on climate change. So we're in a midterm election cycle now and the question is going to be who can be an authentic candidate who can build a student movement and my experience for the last ten years has been organizing young people We will have to practice a different form of politics that people can actually believe in to attract young people and then there needs to be a an agenda that speaking to young people as well and i think the issues that i have a successful track record working on whether it is climate or gun violence or criminal justice reform are going to be issues that speak directly to young people and then finally i'm actually going out to the college campuses and we're gonna have strong organization. No one else is doing that Not yet to my knowledge. I mean you're not. You're not that you are the youngest in the race but you're not the only young person in the race right. I mean to be kind to you because understand to your communications director. Whoever that is. I won't name the person again but there is certainly someone else in the race already. Who is a statewide elected official. Whose only what two three years older than you. Thirty four years old and has won a statewide race. Ferenci it yourself there. The way we're differentiating ourselves is is having a positive message. First of all ever announces running largely race. That says i'm not ron johnson. And my first of all. We don't even know ron johnson's running for reelection. But my view is just the easiest thing in politics. Just just say what you're against and just demonize people in my view. The more important approach is to say what are you for. What are you actually going to do in this position. And how are you going to deliver for. People were really the only campaign speaking to that right now. Yeah but nobody's but here's the bottom line. Negative ads are disgusting. Everyone hates them. They get sick and tired of seeing them but they are the only thing that works so what why. Not vote for mandela. Barnes not vote for sarah. I don't even know her last name loose ski see. I'm sorry i told you. I'm looking these things up because i didn't want to do this before i talk to you. Why not vote for state treasurer or the guy who runs the milwaukee bucks. Why not vote for them. But instead vote for stephen well first of all. I'm friends with all three of them. And so are the reason to vote for us is to have a. What do you mean us to vote. Why vote for you. Instead of.

wisconsin marquette law school fox valley green bay ken milwaukee Bill ron johnson senate Ferenci us mandela Barnes sarah milwaukee bucks stephen
"80%" Discussed on How The Heck Are We Gonna Get Along

How The Heck Are We Gonna Get Along

03:23 min | 4 months ago

"80%" Discussed on How The Heck Are We Gonna Get Along

"I'm assuming on your millennial action group and so the fact that you've got a base of support already there but i mean how do you. How do you appeal to older. Wisconsin nights. I think older voters want to know who they can trust. Who's honest and who can deliver a better future for their children and grandchildren. And that's my job to be able to articulate that not only From the issues that were talking about in this race Which i would love to talk about but also there needs to be a sense that i can connect with this person. And that's where hopefully my life experience Growing up in a largely republican part of the state and first generation american but also other areas of fun and commonality in this case of music That can help to create the connection and opened the door to a larger conversation and the last thing that is for two years. I hosted a dialogue series across. Wisconsin called red and blue dialogues that attracted people across generations. And we're able to draw on that Well of support to host these conversations. Because the people who i've worked with over the years are able to validate and kind of as we go into different communities. Okay so you wanna talk about issues in the campaign. I'm not from wisconsin. I'm from a purple state so we have some similarities. But we're a long way away. Tell instead of me asking you specific questions about issues. I'll do that in a minute. But what are in your opinion the issues that are most important in this ranch right now. Yeah i think number literally a year out more than a year. Sorry it is. Yeah yeah yeah. We're about a year out from the primary race Primary election so for me. The number one issue in this race is changing the business model of politics. I mean people are wondering why is politics so broken. Why is it that we can't pass climate change legislation wise. It that proposals that have majority support are not passing and there are systemic reasons why our politics has become so toxic right now and i think the root of that is money so i promise at my number one piece of legislation in the us senate. We'll be getting big money out of politics and that will help in a number of ways first of all it will help you to ensure that legislators spend their day job. Legislating as opposed to becoming telemarketers means that there will be less of an incentive to communicate in the most negative demonizing even dehumanizing ways to raise money and on top of that it means that more working class people are going to be able to run for office. You know right now if you want to run for the us senate. You need to know a lot of millionaires and billionaires on top of that You need to be able to go if this is your fulltime job. You need to go for about a year plus without making an income so we need to make some systemic changes to make more normal people are represented in politics and they can be the agenda setters people who've promised things and they can actually deliver so there are wondering what is going to change about her politics. I mean we defeated donald trump last fall but our politics then. We had a capital insurrection..

Wisconsin wisconsin senate us donald trump
"80%" Discussed on How The Heck Are We Gonna Get Along

How The Heck Are We Gonna Get Along

04:26 min | 4 months ago

"80%" Discussed on How The Heck Are We Gonna Get Along

"This is a study. That recently came out. Eighty percent of wisconsin nights democrats republicans and independents all believe the federal government is fundamentally broken having a traditional campaign. It's not gonna work. We're going to do things a little bit differently. The second criteria for me was knowing that my core group of supporters who i've been working with the state Over the last decade would continue supporting my campaign going into this race and as a result of them saying yes i knew that was good and then the third thing was i as a musician strongly believe in the value of listening and listening with a lot of humility and so over the summer we did a series of listening events and just seeing the incredible amount of momentum and energy on the ground four message for emission. Those three things lead to launch a couple of weeks ago. So what makes you different. I mean you you. You've got all got great answers. But what makes you different. You talk about a different kind of campaign. You talk about diversity. You mentioned the word diversity in an earlier partier answer. What what do you have that. No other candidate. Who's running has. I've passed bipartisan legislation through congress. And that's been my experience for the last ten years. I think the real job of a us senate which what's what exactly what exactly what legislation that. You're talking about. Because i told you i didn't research so run i'm most proud of just forever and who's tuning in right now for the last ten years i've just recently stepped down as founder and ceo. Iran a group called the millennial action project and it was all about training generation of young leaders to enter public service build coalitions and get legislation over the finish line that will impact communities that are in need of help right now traditionally underrepresented and so the way that would work is we built the first ever bipartisan caucus of young members of congress called the future caucus we also chapters in thirty state legislature. So we're passing state legislative reforms as well and one of the reforms was most proud of is after the tragic shooting that we saw in parkland and those students came to washington. Dc to call on the conscience of our nation. There is a sense that we need to do something about gun violence but there is also a narrative saying it's too polarizing and divisive of an issue. There's no way you can get anything done and our mentality is. Everything is on the table. Nothing is too hard to work on. And we've been building relationships in congress to work on that very issue and so i was really proud. We helped to build the first coalition saying that the centers for disease control should be authorized and funded to study gun violence as a public health issue the first democrat and republican to sign onto that. We've actually got more people from our caucus to sign on. And because of that coalition the bill passed and today. The cdc is authorized and funded to do that work. We did similar things on clean energy funding criminal justice reform just as an example. The good news is that that bill led to a lot of nationwide momentum. So you see a lot of state reforms and local forms to help get more background checks for example to make sure that there are red flag laws across the country and to students parkland students have told me personally that bill helped to galvanize the larger movement but i also would point to saving clean energy innovation program. That's crucial to combating climate change. That was on the chopping block and we were able to save it because of the members we had on board or even more recent example last year our state just like many other states but our state of wisconsin was very much in the national spotlight for for trying to conduct an election during the pandemic and there is a sense of. We don't have the systems in place to run this effectively and voting just like gun violence seen as a very divisive issue. I'm really proud that we built the first and only coalition of sitting legislators democrats and republicans to strengthen the absentee voting system Not only to put out. Psa education but actually to make sure that a registered voters in wisconsin are mailed..

congress wisconsin federal government centers for disease control senate parkland Iran legislature washington us bill
"80%" Discussed on The Cycling Podcast

The Cycling Podcast

04:16 min | 8 months ago

"80%" Discussed on The Cycling Podcast

"Definitely. I mean, just I mean, especially when you look at the the field of writers who who were there and attendant, you know, when you think about, you know, Mateo Jorgensen just coming off the, the gyro & Quinn, Simmons and Kia walk in. And then, you know, then there's the whole host of gravel contenders, you know, tend a.m. and Stanton on Strickland, you know, I just didn't. Yeah, didn't really anticipate them, you know, you know, being in a final Sprint against Lawrence. Tend em in a gravel race in Kansas, but yeah, I guess it's a lot of things. Kind of fell fell my Direction with, you know, not having Mechanicals and no real, no real issues. And just kind of, you know, fueling and preparing, right? And all just seem to kind of go. Right. Which very seldom happens in a bike rack. Yeah, definitely not. You don't win. Well, I spent a lot of my life, not when I try to follow it as best I could. Without being able to watch, you know, pictures. I was sort of following a social media felt it fell off. It was kind of exciting following it like that because you were just getting Snippets of information and you know it was like reports from the front line sort of thing and and and you know, mainly with most of the ports are thousands of how think bad things have happened to people and they've been eliminated or drops or, you know, whatever and slowly that from group is just is just reduced and reduced and reduced and wage. And I guess I mean, someone that so many posters say would be the first time we've ever had an accurate race report on the cycling podcast, but I mean, maybe without without, you know, going into too much detail, but the 10 and 1/2 hours that you're out there. You know, was that pretty much what happened was that a race that was that you're able to kind of ride from the front as it were and and and, and off and gradually and find yourself there in the end because others were were eliminated or dropped. Yeah, I mean, a very much as a race of of elimination, you know, I wouldn't say that I necessarily erased from the front early on just because, you know, was my first time back in, in a big Peloton like that and especially on on surfaces that are off, you know, far more unknown than, than pavement. So, I hung back quite a bit. Especially once we enter the first couple like unmaintained Road sections, you know, prior to that run kind of bigger more or less than a gravel roads..

Mateo Jorgensen Kansas 10 Simmons Stanton 1/2 hours first couple Lawrence Kia Peloton first time a.m. gyro first Quinn thousands Sprint Strickland