36 Burst results for "8 Years"

A highlight from New Real Estate Agent 15 Step 90 Day Success Plan

Real Estate Coaching Radio

08:51 min | Last week

A highlight from New Real Estate Agent 15 Step 90 Day Success Plan

"Welcome to Real Estate Coaching Radio, starring award -winning real estate coaches and number one international bestselling authors, Tim and Julie Harris. This is the number one daily radio show for realtors looking for a no BS, authentic, real time coaching experience. What's really working in today's market, how to generate more leads, make more money and have more time for what you love in your life. And now your hosts, Tim and Julie Harris. Three, two, one, and we're back. And this is the new real estate agent, 15 step, 90 day success plan. And of course you can use this plan whether you are a new real estate agent or not. Before we get to point number one, Julie and I were just talking about something that she read online. That's the first sign that basically, yeah, exactly. Now we're going to just address this head on and we're not going to sugar coat it. So get ready. I'm just going to shoot you guys between the eyes and Julie's going to back it up with facts as we always do on this podcast. There is not going to be a real estate crash. There's not going to be a precipitous drop in home values. There's not going to be anything that's going to resemble anything that even remotely resembles what happened back in 2007, 2008. Stop listening to anybody that tells you that there's going to be any kind of crash or correction. 99 % of the time they didn't sell real estate back then. They don't know the facts and or most likely they're trying to sell you something in preparation for this zombie apocalypse housing crash that's never going to happen. So I want you guys to be very clear that this time of year is really any time of year but really, you know, I have not seen so much misinformation or straight up, I'm going to just use the word that came to my mind, lying that's happened in our industry since probably it's been at least 10 years. Because of the fact that so many agents don't know what to do in this real estate market, weren't selling real estate back then and they're so, they're such easily manipulated into believing there's going to be a housing crash because, you know, after all, all these other people are saying there's going to be a housing crash. How can the masses be wrong? Well they are. So here's some facts straight from Julie Harris. Yes, that's right. So you might think that foreclosures are going up. Why do you guys think that sometimes? Well because in the previous thing that you've heard about, probably not lived through, prices went up, prices went up, it seemed like a big boom and then there was a big bust and that is the beginning and end of the thought process. Just because prices have been going up for a long time does not equal a housing crash. That is not a fact based on anything. Just because it happened back then does not mean it's happening back now. Why? And we've done very long form podcasts with many, many points but the underlying facts are not even close to the same. Well matter of fact, there's the fewest number of industrial estate actual homes that there's been how many long? 20 years? No, not 20, but like 15. Since they've recorded it. Okay. And not only that, as a percent. As a percent of total mortgages, right? It's less than 3%, right? Yes. Okay, so here's a couple of facts since we're facting them off the top here. Only about 50 % of people who own a home even have a mortgage. And I believe the number and Julie and I didn't prepare for this, like I said, this was just a conversation we're kind of looping you guys in on. I believe the number was a little bit less than 50%, like 43%, but it's something like that. Now when we say that on this podcast, somebody always puts in the comments, I have a hard time believing that that few people have mortgages. How? Why is it that you have a hard time believing that? A lot of people basically by the time they're like 45 or 50 have their home paid off. And it's also tracked. Yeah, exactly. Google it. Altos Research has fantastic facts. You can join them for your own local zip code and get your personal facts. That's the nice thing about, you know, we call it GTS, Google that shit. So if you come across, if you're wanting to know something, you know, GTS that and you're going to discover what the truth is. And what we just told you, again, I'm not sure if our numbers are right, but the essence of the point we're trying to make between 40 and 50 % there you go now that that means the other 50 % of the people that have, um, uh, you know, mortgages, they have mortgages that are 3%, 3 .2 % or less. So a vast majority of the people with mortgages have essentially mortgages where their money's free. Now, what do I mean by that? Because the homes, and this is the last point and this is the big one and I'll leave it up to Julie to make this point, the amount of appreciation rate or inflation. But with the inflation rate on real estate being somewhere between six, seven or 8 % year over year, and that's going to continue, that trend is going to continue for a long period of time for all kinds of reasons, but it really comes down to demand, right? But what we're looking at is you're looking at homes that are going to increase in value at a greater, uh, at a greater amount and actual real dollars than the cost of owning that home. So if someone bought a $400 ,000 house and they put down, I don't know, 50 grand and they have a $350 ,000 mortgage and the mortgage is based on a 3 % finance rate there, I can't even do the math in my head. It's like 13 or 1400 bucks depending on property taxes per month. Well that same home is going to appreciate this year. So you're looking at probably they're all in expense being less than 20 grand. If that home inflated or appreciated by 6 % in the last 12 months, that same $400 ,000 home now six times for guys get it. So someone's actually make living in their house for free because the house is actually inflating faster than what they're spending on that. That is not normal unless you're in a house a super duper, duper long time, like decades. Then that kind of thing will play out because of the inflation. But with interest rates and so many people locked into lower interest rates, a lot of people have won the real estate lottery. Now that's not to mean that they're going to stay in those homes forever because a lot of those people are going to have to put those homes for sale for natural, normal reasons that sellers have always historically put their homes for sale. Too big, too small, can't afford it, moving, relocating and here's the real bugaboo. Here's the thing that nobody, all these real estate doomsdayers don't want you to really take into consideration. We talked about the amount of equity, we talked about the average mortgage interest rate, but the amount of inflation or appreciation in homes in the last 24 to 36 months has been? Up to 40 % in some markets like Boise, but on average right about 28 % since 2020. So if you bought a house back in 2020, you can just add 28 % and you have at least that much equity. The average equity for people who still owe something on their homes, people with mortgages is over $100 ,000. That's the average. Now, are there cases where perhaps maybe you bought in the last half of last year and you were in a bidding war and you had to go over list price and you didn't have a really big down payment and maybe you got relocated and you have not very much equity? Yes, that's true, but it's still highly unlikely that you would get to the point where you're actually upside down. What you're saying is if you bought when the interest rates were higher and you haven't stayed in the house long enough and you put money down, if you had to be forced to sell the property now, you might actually have to lose some of the equity. But here's the solution for that. Stay in the house another year or 18 months or rent the house for another year or 18 months. And then the inflation rate is going to basically make you more than right on your mortgage and more than right on your equity situation. Well, so are there random sort, I call them one off foreclosures and short sales very, very occasionally like one to two percent. I don't know why anybody would go after one to two percent of the market. What you're seeing randomly and I mean very randomly. And this example that I was reading online was in Las Vegas. But even the distressed real estate is still selling for retail, basically. It is still selling for retail. So that that is and I'm glad you brought that up, because that is a huge difference between this time versus last time, because last time it was the phrase catch a falling knife. Prices were falling virtually by the hour and it was disappearing. And Julie and I were buying houses that we were buying houses. I remember going on auction dot com and putting in bids on properties that we ended up buying a lot of them in Las Vegas and still own them. And I remember the auction gal called back and was like, what the hell? You want to buy real estate? I mean, do you remember that? Yeah. It's like, are you sure? Are you sure? Like, do you know this is the process? And I'm like, yeah, OK. And then when you're buying through like auction dot com, you have to pay their commission, basically. And she goes, well, you know, this is going to cost you an additional whatever. And I'm like, OK, that's fine. Let's do it. It's fine. And those properties now are worth three x what we paid for them. That's right. Totally different scenario. Prices will continue to go up now. They go up, you know, 20 percent a year. That was extremely unusual. I know some of you think that that was normal because for you that has been normal, but it's not actually normal. On average, it's five or six percent over the past probably 10 to 15 years. And beyond that, it gets down to about three to five percent, depending on where you live and how far back in time you're going. But it's still increasing. OK, so here's the thing. And we'll get off this topic in a second and onto our 15 step 90 day success plan.

Julie Five TIM 3 .2 % $350 ,000 $400 ,000 13 2007 Julie Harris 6 % Las Vegas 99 % 20 Years 28 % 3% 45 Three Six Times 43% 3 %
Fresh update on "8 years" discussed on Bloomberg Daybreak Asia

Bloomberg Daybreak Asia

00:00 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "8 years" discussed on Bloomberg Daybreak Asia

"Does begin to take effect. Here is James Zellter speaking with Lisa Abramowitz and Jonathan Ferrer at the Bloomberg Global Credit Forum in London. The mechanism, the transition mechanism, which the Fed would like to see in slowing down the economy, which we all expected, it's taken a lot longer. In the U .S., you have a mortgage market with 30 -year mortgages at a 3 % interest rate. You have the high yield market with a 6 % coupon and an 8 -year duration. So, the real impact of higher costs around the globe in the U .S. and Western Europe, it's not been felt yet. So, when people say we're going to have a ending, I'm skeptical. I see a world where financial conditions have gotten tighter and it's just question of how long that transition mechanism, which will probably be longer than it's taken in the past. There are a couple of different ways for us to get to something other than a soft landing. There's the crash and then rates going back down, and then there's something where it's just sort of a stagflation light or a stagflation proper, where rates remain high for a very long time and the growth just slows substantially. It seems like the market is leaning into the latter. How much does that change your perception of what's going to happen in the credit space? Well, this conversation is going into one where we need to get Torsten here because he's the economist at Apollo, not me, but certainly what you're talking about is an environment where growth is more challenged and with how do companies is access capital with a new price of marketplace. Certainly you have challenge whether it's in Germany or in the UK with a slowing economic growth, but there's a variety of that we would see. Unemployment, while still very low, it's going in probably a more challenging direction. Delinquencies are going up. Defaults are going up a little bit in the average loan market and the high loan market. Recoveries are lower. So there's a lot of points that would say to you that there's going to be a more challenging tightening financial conditions. But certainly for us, the US has been quite strong. The UK, there's still a lot of areas to lend. There is on Western Europe as well. So I guess the theme that I would take away from this is that we're going from a decade of a real imbalance where the equity was a big beneficiary, debt paid a crazy price. That balance has been completely changed 180 degrees. And now, how do companies navigate? How does the financial services, how do banks, how do alternative asset managers, how do we all balance and navigate this marketplace ahead of us? Is this the return of the bond vigilantes then? Well, I do think think when people talk about when the central banks are going to actually lower rates? I think it it will happen well before they actually get around to it, just like it happened on the upside in terms of rates. no There's doubt that one of the challenges of the last 15 years of the regulatory environment is you've had so much capital withdrawn from these marketplaces in terms of trading desk capital. So the amount of capital to trade a hundred or a billion dollars of ten -year treasuries right now that has a greater impact. So there's no doubt that any kind of activity in the markets secondary will have a pronounced impact. And that's just the way of the regulatory impact post GFC. But for us, if you're in my seat at Apollo, there's been four trends since I got in the business. There's been massive technology improvement, there's been massive globalization, there's been massive deregulation, and the fourth there's been a decline of interest rates. Other than technology, you're probably having those tailwinds be massive headwinds as an investor now. As James Zelltor, the co -president at Apollo Global Management. A look at the top business stories coming up next. This is Bloomberg. Broadcasting live from the Bloomberg Interactive Brokers Studio in New York. Bloomberg 1130 to Washington DC. Bloomberg 99 .1 to Boston. Bloomberg 1061 to San Francisco. Bloomberg 960 to the country. Sirius XM Channel 119 and around From the Globe, the Bloomberg Business App and BloombergRadio .com. This It is 6 30 p .m. on the Atlantic seaboard of the United States. 6 30 in the morning right here in Hong Kong. I'm Chad Solomon. And I'm Brian Curtis. Trading will get underway in 90 minutes in some key markets like Tokyo and Seoul. We've got three hours to go before the China markets get up and running. Hong Kong and Shanghai and Shenzhen and Russia. Sea of red numbers

A highlight from DC26-Bernard-pt1

Audio

29:53 min | Last month

A highlight from DC26-Bernard-pt1

"Discerninghearts .com presents The Doctors of the Church, the Carerism of Wisdom with Dr. Matthew Bunsen. For over 20 years, Dr. Bunsen has been active in the area of Catholic social communications and education, including writing, editing, and teaching on a variety of topics related to church history, the papacy, the saints, and Catholic culture. He is the faculty chair at the Catholic Distance University, a senior fellow of the St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology, and the author or co -author of over 50 books, including the Encyclopedia of Catholic History and the best -selling biographies of St. Damien of Malachi and St. Kateri Tekakawisa. He also serves as a senior editor for the National Catholic Register and is a senior contributor to EWTN News. The Doctors of the Church, the Carerism of Wisdom with Dr. Matthew Bunsen. I'm your host, Chris McGregor. Welcome, Dr. Bunsen. Great to be with you, Chris. I'm really looking forward to talking about our next doctor, St. Bernard of Clairvaux. Tell us why he's really quite special in the rankings of the doctors. Well, he's known as the Doctor Malifluous. He's known as the Ophthalmaturgist. In other words, he's a healer and a miracle worker. He was also kind of one of those doctors that was all -encompassing for his era, but who also imparted then important lessons for us today. He was a reformer who helped build the Cistercian Order, who helped reform much of monastic life. He was also a brilliant theologian who defended the teachings of the Church. He had a particular devotion to the Blessed Mother. But there's also one other thing that we're going to talk about, and that, of course, was his impact on the society of his time. And it came, as we're going to see, especially where the Second Crusade was concerned, at great price to him personally. And that's one of the other hallmarks of the Doctors of the Church. We always think of them as brilliant, as magnificent writers and theologians, but they were also saints. They were also people who put themselves totally at the service of Christ and his Church. And there, I think, was one of the areas where St. Bernard of Clairvaux really shined forth across the medieval sky, but it's a brightness that we can still see today. Help us to understand a term like mellifluous. What we mean by mellifluous is somebody who is perfectly capable of speaking, who's gifted as an orator, who is a brilliant speaker. Somebody who, we always say that the words just seem to roll off their tongue. Well, that certainly was St. Bernard. But there's also implied in the use of the term mellifluous, a smoothness, an elegance. Now, it's something of an apparent contradiction to think of somebody who lived a life of such severe austerity as St. Bernard of Clairvaux as being elegant. And yet, his theology, his mind, his love for the Church were indeed very elegant. He had a beautiful turn of phrase. He had a way of expressing himself that was indeed intellectually elegant. So mellifluous, I think, really works quite well when we're discussing a Doctor of the Church like this. What do we know of his upbringing? Well, we know that he was born into a noble family. And he, in France, he was born probably around 1090 to a very prominent family. His father, in fact, was a nobleman, a lord of what was known as Fontaine. His name was Tesselyn and his mother was named Alith of Mont Barde. They were part of Burgundy. So when we think of France, we think of the Burgundy region as creating these beautiful wines, the Burgundy wine. Burgundy, during this time, was emerging onto the French scene and then the European scene as one of the most prominent of the great duchies in medieval Europe. It was positioned sort of between France and Germany, but then the Burgundians would also influence the great and terrible Hundred Years' War in a couple of centuries. So the family itself enjoyed quite a bit of prominence, which meant that Bernard, as one of seven children, was given the opportunity for a great education. He was then sent to a very prominent school of chatillon that was run by a group of canons. And he quickly showed himself very capable of great learning. He enjoyed poetry. He had a skill, an aptitude for literature. And he demonstrated that ability to speak well, to be mellifluous. And he had two interesting devotions. The first was a great love of the Bible, and then the other was a particular devotion to the Blessed Mother that was going to carry him forward for the rest of his life. What led him into the Benedictine Order? Yeah. Well, Bernard himself always had a rather low opinion of himself. He was tempted by the great opportunities of life, by the temptations of the flesh, but also of the mind. He was somebody who probably would have excelled, and boy we have seen this with so many of the Doctors of the Church, he could have excelled at anything he chose to do. He could have become a very, very powerful and prominent leader in the secular world, in the world of the nobility of the time. He understood that about himself though, and I think his mother had a great deal to do with that. His mother helped ingrain in him an abiding love of the faith. And when she died, when he was 19 years old, he understood that he was being called to something else. And as we have seen with other Doctors of the Church, he felt called by Christ to escape the world, to live a life of prayer, of solitude, of contemplation. And so, in order to control himself, he used the phrase that he was aware that his body needed strong medicine. And what he meant by that was that he needed strong spiritual medicine. He turned himself over to the Benedictine order. Now, as it happens, when Bernard was only 8 years old, a very famous saint at the time, named Robert of Mollem, had founded, near the great French city of Dijon, what was known as the Abbey of Citeaux. This was the foundation of the Cistercians. Their objective was very simple, to restore the rule of Saint Benedict. Now, there's no implication that the great house, for example, of Cluny, that was the dominant institution of the time from monasticism, was corrupt. Rather, it simply did not have the same devotion to the rigor of the rule of Saint Benedict that there were some who felt it needed to have. Robert of Mollem was one of them. So, the Cistercian monastery really looked to recapture the vigor of the original rule of Saint Benedict. And it began attracting many people, many young men, who also sought what Bernard was seeking. And, as it happened, in 1113, another saint, by the name of Stephen Harding, became abbot of Citeaux. And Bernard arrived, along with a group of other young noblemen, who followed him from Burgundy and the surrounding regions, with a desire to enter the Cistercians. And Bernard proved himself, really from the very beginning, a most apt postulant. And he found his true life in Citeaux, in the Cistercians. And it was clear, in short order, that the Cistercians saw in him somebody with almost unlimited potential. You mentioned his great love for scripture. He's known for some of the most beautiful teachings, from one book in particular of the Bible, that being the Song of Songs. Yes, yes. What's interesting about his love of scripture is that he was able to reflect on scripture, but how did he do it? He did it through a series of sermons, in particular, as you note, on the Song of Songs. Now, the Song of Songs is one of the most controversial, so to speak, of the texts of scripture, of the books of the Bible, because so many people interpret it in almost exclusively sensual terms. And yet, here we have Bernard preaching on this beautiful book of the Old Testament. And for him, it was not just simply a rhetorical device to use sermons, but it was a way of imparting to every possible audience some of his most important teachings. And so we have, aside from his sermons on the Song of Songs, we also have in excess of a hundred sermons that he delivered throughout the year, throughout the liturgical year. And then he gave sermons as well on a variety of other subjects, and then of course we also have his letters. We'll be talking more, I know, about his writings in a little bit. What are some of those marks of those early years in his involvement with the Cistercians, or his living out that Cistercian call? We know, as I said, that Bernard was acutely aware of his own failings, of his own temptations, and the need, as he said, for strong medicine. The environment, Cistercian with its stress on prayer, on contemplatio, on contemplative prayer, on discipline of the monastic life, on the full embrace of not just the rigor, but also the deep humanity of the Benedictine rule, of the rule of St. Benedict, I think had a really profound influence on him. He was able to control himself, to focus his mind as he needed to have it focused. And within a short amount of time, I mean, consider that he entered around 1113, what happened within three years. He was chosen by the Cistercians to set out and do something that was almost impossible to imagine at the time. This young man was sent out to establish a new house, and it became the great founding of Clairvaux. Now, where he was sent was in the Diocese of Langres in France, in what was called the Valley of Desolation. It gives us a little visual of what we're actually talking about. This was a virtual swamp where they chose to establish this new community. And this is around 1115. And it soon became a place of almost ceaseless toil. But imagine trying to convert a swamp into a new community of religious life, and yet this is exactly what Bernard was able to accomplish. But he did it with austerity, with prayer, with almost ceaseless toil, and that took its toll on him. And always of a somewhat frail disposition, he consistently embraced austerity to the point that he wrecked much of his health, but he saw it as a worthy gift in order to get this institution of Clairvaux up and running. Now what you've just described sounds so unappealing. We're really honest with ourselves, and yet it attracted so many to the extent that it would thrive. Yes, that's the thing precisely. The harder the life was at Clairvaux, the more people seemed to be attracted to it. Now, it's not a sense of, oh, I want to embrace suffering. What it is, rather, is I want to conform my life to what the Cistercians, what Clairvaux had to offer. Think about the Sons of Nobility, who a century from now would be joining the mendicant orders of the Dominicans and especially the Franciscans. We're seeing a similar impulse toward a lifestyle of the rejection of the self, of giving up everything we have, picking up their cross and following Christ. This was the appeal of Clairvaux. This was the appeal of the Cistercians. And it was accomplished. Why? Because Bernard was able to create an environment that, yes, it was difficult, there was work and toil for everyone. But two things. One, that prayer life, but also the joy. The valley, which had once been called a place of desolation, a valley of desolation, soon acquired the title of the Valley of Light. Why? Because it was a place of prayer. It was a place of joy. And young men in growing numbers came to Clairvaux to embrace that life, but also to place themselves under the spiritual direction of Bernard. Among them were Bernard's brothers. His father, after the death of his mother, of course, embraced this life. And even his sister, Humboldtine, remained out in the world and yet she eventually, with the permission of her husband, became a Benedictine nun. This is the influence of Bernard. Bernard's brother Gerard became the master of the cellars of the Cistercians. And, of course, what soon happened, this small community of Clairvaux was bursting at the seams. They simply had no more room for the young men. So, they themselves then went out and found, established new houses, new Cistercian communities based on the model that Bernard had established at Clairvaux. And by the time of his death, more than 160 new establishments were flourishing across, not just France, but increasingly across the whole of Christendom. And if we want a testament as to what the Church thought of all of this, one of the Popes came for a visit one night and he was asked, Bernard was asked, to make it possible for the Pope to dine at Clairvaux. And he certainly gave what was a very warm welcome to the Pope and the whole papal court. Well, what was the meal? It was a humble meal of bread and a few fish. The analogy, of course, being very obvious to the Pope. Wine was not really served, but rather he received water that was filled with herbs to give it some taste. So, in other words, the Pope came to this monastery and he was not served a feast. He was given loaves in the fishes and a cup of bitter herbs. And yet, the Pope was grateful and found the entire experience to be so powerfully edifying that it confirmed once again Bernard's value to the Church, but also his value to the Popes. And that was something that many Popes availed themselves of. We'll return in just a moment to The Doctors of the Church, the terrorism of wisdom with Dr. Matthew Monson. Did you know that Discerning Hearts has a free app where you can find all your favorite Discerning Hearts programming? Father Timothy Gallagher, Dr. Anthony Lillis, Monsignor John S. of Deacon James Keating, Father Donald Haggerty, Mike Aquilina, Dr. Matthew Monson and so many more. They're all available on the free Discerning Hearts app. Over 3 ,000 spiritual formation programs and prayers, all available to you with no hidden fees or subscriptions. Did you also know that you can listen to Discerning Hearts programming wherever you download your favorite podcasts, like Apple Podcasts, Google Play, iHeartRadio, Spotify, even on Audible, as well as numerous other worldwide podcast streaming platforms? And did you know that Discerning Hearts also has a YouTube channel? Be sure to check out all these different places where you can find Discerning Hearts Catholic podcasts, dedicated to those on the spiritual journey. A prayer of St. Ignatius of Loyola Take, Lord, and receive all my liberty, my memory, my understanding, and my entire will, all that I have and call my own. You have given all to me. To you, Lord, I return it. Everything is Yours. Do with it what You will. Give me only Your love and Your grace. That is enough for me. Amen. Show your support for Discerning Hearts by liking and leaving positive reviews on your favorite streaming platforms, such as Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Spotify, and more. With a collection of insightful podcasts led by renowned Catholic spiritual guides such as Father Timothy Gallagher, Monsignor John S .F., Dr. Anthony Lillis, and more, Discerning Hearts is your gateway to a deeper understanding of discerning life's mysteries and growing deeper in your relationship with Christ. Your likes and reviews not only affirm the value these podcasts bring to your spiritual journey, but also help others discover the guidance and inspiration they seek. Share your thoughts, spread the word, and be part of a community that's committed to elevating hearts and minds through meaningful conversations. Your feedback fuels our mission to help others climb higher and go deeper in their spiritual growth. Like, review, and let your voice be a beacon of light for fellow seekers on this spiritual journey. We now return to The Doctors of the Church, The Charism of Wisdom, with Dr. Matthew Bunsen. Is it possible for us to underestimate the power of the foundational element in all of this, of the Holy Rule of St. Benedict? And in particular, that very first paragraph, that very first exhortation by Good St. Benedict to listen with the ear of the heart. As you're describing this, that's exactly what Bernard was doing. Yeah, and in that sense we see in Bernard not something extraordinarily new, but something wonderfully old. In the sense that here was a reformer, here was in the great tradition of the church, a reformer who wanted to go back to recapture the original zeal, the fire of St. Benedict. But what was it that was always so remarkably successful about Benedict's rule? To pray, to work. All of these rules of St. Benedict are aimed at bringing the soul to Christ through work, through prayer. But there is this underlying practicality to Benedict's rule. Benedict knew people. He knew humanity. So that the rule itself was able to take a person, form them in Christ, and help them not to become less than they were with rules and other things, but rather through the rule to form them into more fully created humans, living as Christ really wants us to. Authentic freedom in giving up of ourselves for Christ. But in a way that still accommodates human frailty and human weakness, not by catering to it, but by understanding it and forming it. To use that word again, forming an authentic human person. And I think Bernard, while incredibly tough on himself, helped create an environment that was truly faithful to what Benedict had in mind. He's visited by the pope and the papal court. From this point forward, he becomes quite a, can we say, influential person within the life of the church. Very much so. In Bernard, we have one of those great voices within Christendom. And what did he use his voice for? He always placed it at the service of the popes. He defended the church against secular interference. He worked to diffuse potentially violent situations. Despite the fact that he wanted to stay at Clairvaux, he wanted to give his life exclusively to his monks, to his life of prayer. He was constantly being called out of the monastery to travel, to go forth on behalf of the popes. In 1128, for example, he took part in the Council of Troia that had been convoked by Pope Honorius II. Its was purpose to settle controversies that had developed among some of the bishops in France, as well as to try to make some sense of the ecclesiastical life of the Church of France. The church at the time in France was growing, but it was also being beset by the demands of secular rulers, of the need for internal reform. And what was Bernard given the task of doing? Well, he served as secretary of the council. He was asked to write the statutes of the synod. And as a result of it, one bishop was deposed and a real effort at reform was implemented. It's notable that coming out of this particular synod, though, there were those who did not like him. There were those who found him excessive in his call for reform. There were others in the church who felt that as a monk he had no business interfering in the life of diocese. And in one particular instance, a letter was sent to Bernard describing him as sounding like little more than a noisy and vexatious frog sitting in his marshes. Which of course was a phrase sort of going back to the very origins of Clairvaux. So here was this noisy and difficult frog croaking in the marshes and annoying as this one cardinal wrote the Holy See in the cardinals of the church. Well, of course, Bernard, using his sharp mind, made a reply to this cardinal by the name of Harmeric. And he said that he was the one who was asked by the pope to do this. And so he said, if you wish, forbid the noises of this vexatious frog. Don't allow him to leave his hole, to leave the marshes. And if that's the case, then your friends of the Holy See in the cardinals will not be forced to endure the accusations of pride and presumption that this frog is croaking in their direction. What it did was to diffuse the entire situation. And Bernard actually rose in the estimation of people because it implied two things. It showed that he had a sense of humor, which he did. He was able to do a fraternal correction of a cardinal, but in a way that everyone could appreciate. But it also pointed to his humility. It pointed to the fact that he'd been given these tasks against his will. There were other things that he would rather be doing. And yet he took up that task and he did it exceedingly well. And so in the next years, two years later, what happened? With the death of Pope Honorius, you had a new schism in the church. You had two popes who were rivals and, of course, Bernard entered the fray and helped to settle many of these issues. And then, of course, in the next years, he was so profoundly trusted that he was summoned to the second laddering council in which the schism was decisively put down. In which the rights of the real pope were validated. And then, in the coming years, he was asked by the pope to bring about the second crusade. And this, of course, became one of the great crosses that he was forced to bear. With some of the doctors that we've explored, their lives are so full and their teachings so rich that it takes us sometimes two, maybe even three episodes. And I think this is what we're encountering with St. Bernard of Clairvaux. So in conclusion of this particular conversation on his life, what's a final thought? The final thought is that we can trace in the life of St. Bernard from his earliest days a love of the faith, a desire to serve the faith. But as we have seen consistently with doctors of the church, serving in the way that God wills, not what he would rather do. And he was called, felt deeply the love of the contemplative life, but God had other plans for him. The wider service of the church. And he spent those years, his early years at Clairvaux, serving the church. And he was asked to serve on a wider plane. And he was going to give the rest of his life to that, regardless of the cost. And there, I think, is the lesson for all of us. I look forward to our future conversations, particularly about St. Bernard. So do I. Looking forward to it, Chris. God bless. Thank you.

Chris Stephen Harding Chris Mcgregor Gerard Mike Aquilina France Alith 1113 TWO Tesselyn 1128 Humboldtine Christ Matthew Monson St. Paul Center For Biblical T Robert Of Mollem Bible Bunsen Anthony Lillis Dijon
"8 years" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

The Charlie Kirk Show

04:44 min | 3 months ago

"8 years" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

"So Tucker is in a interesting spot right now. I just want to say I was a little skeptical publicly and privately, like, is this Twitter video thing really going to work? It's been a great idea for him. He has he's moving the Overton window, his audience feels connected to him, and Fox is in a tough place right now. Fox's ratings are down. And they sent Tucker Carlson Fox News did a cease and desist letter. Saying, hey, stop doing this Twitter show thing, and Tucker keeps on doing his Twitter show. In fact, the latest video that Tucker made was basically a pulsating middle finger to Fox News. It was as graphic as one can get to. Hey, buddy, sue me, that's effectively what Tucker did. You say, why? Well, if you watch the video, he said, quote, Well, the women who run Fox News got really upset. It was all about this chyron of wannabe dictator Biden, which, by the way, the person who made the chyron has since resigned. Good for the guy who did it because it's exactly right. And Tucker in only a way that Tucker can. He's so talented. He's just an infinitely better writer than I will ever be when he writes these scripts. And he says he's so true. It's just why people get so fired up that the chyron said wannabe dictator. It's because not because it was false. It's because it was true. Same thing with Trump ties together. Right. So but there is this ongoing drama, obviously, between Tucker and Fox News. And the most important question of which we do not know the answer is, will Fox News sue Tucker Carlson? That is the question. Will Fox News sue Tucker Carlson and seek an injunction to muzzle him? That's why my public advice and private advice is Tucker Carlson should run for mayor of Bryant Pond, Maine, or something. And therefore, it's politically protected speech under the First Amendment regardless. Now, maybe to run for something else, but. I'll leave you guys for speculation on that, but the point is that if he wants liberated speech to go in front of a judge and say, I'm a political candidate, a private corporation can't, that's something that's a complaint he can win. But will Fox News do that? Will Fox News give the green light to their legal division to say that Tucker Carlson is in breach of contract, he's causing material harm to the company, and we require we require an injunction or it's even beyond a cease and desist, an injunction would be a court order to. Stop doing these Twitter videos, a judge, a judge, you could appeal that. Now, this is really important. Tucker Carlson is still drawing a salary from Fox News. He's not getting paid from Twitter, which is an important piece of information, so he's not monetizing it. There's no deal, there's no advertising. And in his deal, it says you're allowed to use your social media. So there is some flex in these joints that could be. Litigated. But does Fox News really want to get into active litigation with Tucker Carlson, even if they get an injunction which would silence Tucker Carlson, 30 to 60 days later, Tucker Carlson will respond with a countersuit likely and a salvo of discovery requests. I want to see the emails. I want to see the conversation. I want to know why my show was taken off air. And then that stuff would then be made public. So what he has done. Is he has really tried to force the hand of Fox News. And it's unclear how Fox News will respond so far. Fox News has responded with more force, more force, more force at every corner, every turn. Fox News is going to the next level of force. Take the show off air, try to stifle you with cease and desist. And now we are at a play at a moment where if Fox decides to play the ultimate hardball and sues Tucker Carlson, I don't think that will go well for them. Ratings are down, discovery would not go well for them. So do they just kind of let Tucker continue to post on Twitter at the same time of his old show and disenfranchise their own network? Tucker has forced the hand and it looks like Tucker is willing to sacrifice his salary and any sort of legal comfort he has, because a pretty vicious lawsuit could be coming his way. But one that I think he would ultimately win in the most important, which is the court of public opinion..

"8 years" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

The Charlie Kirk Show

05:10 min | 3 months ago

"8 years" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

"So check it out. Go to strongsell .com forward slash Charlie and read the personal testimonies for yourself. Then use promo code Charlie to get a special 20 % discount on your order. Again, that's strongsell .com forward slash Charlie, 20 % discount strongsell .com promo code Charlie. I remember where I was eight years ago. We were actually hosting our Young Women's Leadership Summit. That's right. Our first ever Young Women's Leadership Summit. Eight years ago, we had 41 attendees, and it was received kind of as a joke. Who is this guy? What does he think he's doing? You see, what Donald Trump also did is he changed the body politic of the GOP. East Palestine, Ohio, all of a sudden became a Republican stronghold. The muscular class had a voice. Most Democrats used to own that muscular class because he spoke in a way that they could resonate and understand, especially on the issues that there was more bipartisanship than ever before, that there was agreement that eroding the middle class was a good thing as it was vanishing. Remember, Ross Perot tried this. It's nothing new to have. Pat Buchanan tried this, but Donald Trump was unique. He was built for a perfect time, obviously with ubiquitous name ID, an ability to command attention, and he took everybody by surprise, everybody, because the more they platformed him, they used to cover MAGA rallies, they used to have him in interviews, his support grew and grew and grew, and they did not eventually end up attacking him because he's a liar. All politicians lie. No, they attacked him because he was a truth teller, and he told the truth in a way that was not pre -approved. He didn't go through the proper committee process of the Republican Party to say, oh, hell, I have five things I'd like to say. What do you guys think? That's what Jeb Bush would do. Water this down a little bit and use an abstraction here and do that. Oh, yes. Yes, sir. Donald Trump was like, yeah, I'm big enough. I don't need to run it by anybody. And they underestimated him and they underestimated him. And so much what you're seeing now, that document case with Donald Trump is revenge driven. Truth is a threat to tyrants. And yes, of course, Donald Trump did it in his showmanship way with a little bit of bloviation in and, you know, just let's say the unique Trump spirit. But what got down to the essence of it is when he went on media show after media show. And he said things you were not allowed to say, not as a Republican candidate. Play cut 100. Ladies and gentlemen, I am officially running for president of the United States, and we are going to make our country great again. National revival, making it great again. Has a not so subtle subtext, it means it was not as great as it could be at the moment, you were not allowed to say that. You see, you're only allowed to run for the presidency. Everything is wonderful. Everything is fine. Just ask don't why eight out of the 10 wealthiest counties in America around Washington, D .C., don't ask that. Don't ask the fact that the middle class is just vanishing and people are taking on consumer debt at record levels. Can't ask that. You can't ask the question of why is it a good thing that we're allowing hundreds of thousands of Chinese nationals to go into our schools? Can't ask that. And he changed conservative media. He changed everything. And you might hate Donald Trump in this audience. You might bitterly. Some of you do. I'm getting your emails. You have to be honest, though, eight years ago to this day, the whole ballgame was altered permanently before 2015, the cable news media actually sometimes struggled to come up with news stories to cover. Remember the Natalie Holloway case? Cable news would stretch these stories out for ever, every day on CNN for six years just became a Donald Trump obsession commercial. Trump broke MSNBC. You started getting crayons like, quote, Trump melts down an angry response to reports he ignored virus warnings or, quote, Trump uses task force briefing to try and rewrite history or, quote, angry Trump uses propaganda video. They still can't shut up about him, even if he's under indictment and he's no longer president. It changed right wing media to eight years ago. We might. I think that Fox News's influence was probably at its peak as an institution eight years ago..

"8 years" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:40 min | 3 months ago

"8 years" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

"And he went right after them, and he said, that is a lie. One of the criticisms that people level against Donald Trump is how he has divided America, how he's this divisive guy. Donald Trump did not divide America. He simply observed the hidden fault lines that were already there. He did not divide America. He simply exposed the divide. And then he mentioned it. He ripped the veil off and said, your plutocrats are getting rich while you get poor. We're invading countries while we're getting invaded, and this is dumb. And that was his great crime, and he's paying the price for it even today. But it started eight years ago. a It's been decline in your middle -aged body for a year or so..

"8 years" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

The Charlie Kirk Show

07:55 min | 3 months ago

"8 years" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

"Here's Donald Trump all of a sudden going after the three third rails of politics. That's right, the three third rails. And he did them all at once. Our trade deals are awful, our wars are stupid, and our borders are wide open. Whoa, one, two, three. You see, when you run for president, you're supposed to do platitudes. I believe America's best days are ahead. As Ronald Reagan would say, freedom is no more than one generation away from extinction. And our country has been through a lot, but I believe if we yearn to our better angels, we can overcome these divides. And I disagree with President Obama and what he's doing to the economy. And I think that behind our campaign, we can ignite a new American future. He didn't do any of that stuff. There are no consultants. There is no poll testing stuff. Trump with his instincts says, yeah, this country is not being run well. I'm a politician. Let's lean in and let's fix it. Play cut 101. We somebody need that literally will take this country and make it great again. We can do that. And I will tell you, I love my life. I have a wonderful family. They're saying, Dad, you're going to do something that's going to be so tough. You know, all of my life, I've heard that a truly successful person, a really, really successful person and even modestly successful, cannot run for public office. Just can't happen. And yet that's the kind of mindset that you need to make this country great again. Eight years ago, he looked around like, this is not going well. He is right. Eight years ago, Donald Trump was not under federal indictment. Donald Trump was not an impeached president. Donald Trump had all the contracts with corporate America. Donald Trump was the darling of the show. Donald Trump was well accepted by Oprah before he went down that escalator. He had a good life, an easy life, a simple life. Eight years later, Donald Trump's comfort is gone. He's under multiple indictments in the town, one in the town that he built, one by the federal government. He's been a twice impeached president, spied on by the federal Bureau of Investigation. Eight years ago, he decided to do something for you. The forgotten man and woman of this country, the ordinary person. He's paid a big price for it, but I think we're barely just touching on the significance of how everything changed eight years ago when Donald Trump went down that golden escalator. I want to talk about ReliefFactor .com. I want you guys to check out ReliefFactor .com. 100 % drug -free, knee pain, back pain, joint pain, elbow pain. Check out ReliefFactor Energy. Help makes your body make nutrients readily available. ReliefFactor Sleep. I know a lot of you are probably having trouble sleeping. ReliefFactor Sleep could be the best solution for you. Everybody goes to bed, not everybody sleeps. We're all about helping people live lives that are filled with connection, exploration, passion, and emotion. That is what his life is all about. Make sure you guys are sleeping well. It's a major part of life. Check it out right now. ReliefFactor .com. ReliefFactor .com. The most amazing thing is there is no plan. There is no committee, no poll testing. The discussion was all about Ted Cruz, Rubio, Rand Paul, Scott Walker. This guy just comes down the escalator and blows it all up. He challenged and eventually changed the entire Republican Party. I could say that when I first got involved in conservative politics, you were not allowed to challenge free trade orthodoxy. You could not question it. It's a good thing that we have endless piles of plastic crap coming from China. It's actually getting us richer. We're actually getting richer. You don't know it, but we're actually getting really rich. And oh, okay, go read some Austrian economics textbooks, of which I did. It's a capital account surplus. But then you drive through Ohio and you're like, well, why are these towns really poor and everyone's on opioids? No, no, shut up. Plastic is good for us. Why is it a good thing that our homes are twice as big, filled with twice as much crap, but we have half as many people living there and we have less kids? No, it's a good thing because, you see, McKinsey has told us that we get richer the more textiles that we have coming from China. We don't want those jobs anyway. And those people should just go to learn to code. We don't need a muscular class. We don't need carpenters, welders. We don't need any of that. Just let the experts and the intellectuals. And here's Trump, who's part of that elite class and challenged the entire orthodoxy, how rotten the Republican Party was on these issues, selling out the country to China, selling out our country with bad trade deals, letting whoever wants to come across the southern border. The border was not a top issue for any Republican until Donald Trump ran for the presidency. And they immediately called him racist, even though then he did much better in votes than Mitt Romney. And of course, he was able to brand it better. We're going to build a wall and Mexico's going to pay for it. And the wall just got 10 feet taller. The thought crime that he really paid a price for, according to Tucker Carlson, and I agree completely, is he questioned the war in Iraq. He said there were no weapons of mass destruction. We never should have invaded this country. And people said, finally, somebody in the Republican Party is willing to say that George W. Bush and his entire cabal messed up. He even said that Bush didn't keep America safe, and he blamed him for having loose immigration policies that led to 9 -11. So this is the additional point, though, as we remember what started eight years ago with him coming down the golden escalator. As he launched an unexpected Tomahawk missile at neoliberalism, he declared war on the Uniparty. They then declared war on him. And it didn't happen immediately, because he wasn't taken seriously immediately. Why was it not taken seriously? Because the smart people in the shadow government thought they'd seen this act before. They're like, oh yeah, we saw this with Ross Perot, who's talking about that sucking noise with the trade and jobs, and we're used to this. He'll end up running third party or something, we're fine, we're in control. They never thought he would take over the Republican Party. They had no idea how weak the Republican Party actually was. There were no super delegates in the Republican Party, unlike the Democrats at the time, so there was no kind of elite philosopher king ruling class to be able to pick a candidate. And Donald Trump was smart. He spoke at a lot of Tea Party rallies. He saw this kind of grassroots fury that was building up, and the Tea Party movement by 2015, when he announced, had kind of largely gone away. So he said, ooh, I'm going to get right back into that energy, and he smashed the golden calves of our time. The straw men that we just kept on repeating, that we held up as orthodoxy. Plastic makes us wealthier. It's a good thing that people are on opioids..

"8 years" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

The Charlie Kirk Show

07:33 min | 3 months ago

"8 years" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

"Hey everybody, it's Hannah, Charlie Kirk Show. Eight years ago today, everything changed. Donald Trump went down the escalator, and our lives were never the same. Email us freedom at charleykirk .com, tpaction .com is where you can get your tickets to the Turning Point Action Conference. Tucker Carlson, Dan Bongino, Steve Bannon, Donald Trump, Josh Hawley, and more. Megyn Kelly will be there as well, tpaction .com. That is tpaction .com. Buckle up everybody, here we go. I'd say most people didn't take it seriously. It was considered a joke that quickly turned into an internet meme. There's no way this guy is serious talking like this. This is just for him to sell more apartment buildings, and this is a branding exercise. Where were you? Where were you when you first heard the news? Not 9 -11, not even for some of you, Pearl Harbor, not the Kennedy assassination. Where were you when Donald Trump went down the golden escalator? I think it's without a doubt one of the most top 30, top 40, top 50 significant moments in American political history, easily. Where were you? Were you sitting at home, kind of minding your own business, maybe listening to Rush? And all of a sudden you saw this, you said, this is interesting. Were you in the car? Were you at work? It started as a joke. Circles I was running at the time certainly didn't take it very seriously. Remember, it was supposed to be Jeb Bush who's going to be the nominee. Donald Trump also announced right next to Jeb Bush intentionally. Or Marco Rubio, or maybe Ted Cruz, Scott Walker, who is this Trump guy? Who does he think he is running for president? This is just a branding thing. He's just there to try to boost his name ID, egomaniac, whatever, let's not take him seriously. He went down the golden escalator, and that was eight years ago to the day today. And everything changed. Everything changed. Eight years ago Donald Trump went down that escalator and gave a 43 minute speech that was noticeably different at the time than almost any other political speech that we heard. Of course it was Trump who had built up name ID, rap songs, apprentice, best -selling author, art of the deal, branded buildings, the darling of New York. If you went to somebody in Missouri or Montana and said, hey, name me an American billionaire, they would almost certainly say Donald Trump. You thought of rich, American, successful, a little braggadocia, a little bit shoot from the hip, American spirit. Donald Trump. Oprah loved him. And he was the darling of the media for American entrepreneurial capitalism, building big buildings and golf courses and casinos and football teams and airlines and Trump steaks and all this. He just was relentless. He was that life force of energy, and he knew how to use the media, did it for years. But then all of a sudden Donald Trump goes down the escalator and he didn't run this by people. He didn't call Chuck U. Schumer or Nancy Pelosi. He didn't call McConnell and say, hey, just so you know, I'm thinking of doing this. He didn't call a bunch of donors and say, hey, you know, I need to have this launch and I'd like to have you there and you guys can support me. He didn't get permission. He just woke up one day and said, hey, that atrium in Trump Tower, just go put a little thing there that says Trump make America great again. And I'm going to go make an announcement. Yes, sir, Mr. Trump. Yes, sir. Puts his family together. Hey, guys, by the way, I'm running for president, and they said, oh, really? He just winged it. Every other politician, they have consulting fees, perfectly tailored and manicured visuals, inviting every single friend, babysitter, client and cousin to their announcement address. Donald Trump was just like, yeah, I've basically done everything else. Traveled the world, best selling author, number one TV show, country's going to hell. Let's see what we got. And eight years ago, Donald Trump went down that escalator. And he committed the greatest of all crimes. It didn't sink in immediately when he did it. The American flags flanked the brightest red candy red tie you could imagine, the alpha male mannerisms, not talking like a politician, engaging with the audience. His beautiful family flanked around him, like right out of central casting. But he committed a serious crime. No, he didn't take a bunch of money from China or Burisma. He didn't smash a bunch of cell phones or lie to the FBI. No, he committed a crime that Washington, D .C. does not think is very funny. And he did it again, and then he did it again, and then he made a whole campaign around it. His crime was noticing. Donald Trump said out loud, repeatedly, and sometimes rudely, that the country was going to hell. He said out loud that the rich were getting infinitely richer and screwing the American middle class. He said out loud that these foreign wars are pointless, aimless, stupid. He said out loud that we have millions of people waltzing into our country. He asked the question, why are we in NATO again? Is this a good deal for us? He noticed that China was taking over the world and our leaders were complicit. His crime was noticing the outright fraud, the plunder, that the cartel of Washington, D .C. was engaged in. You see that picture there of Donald Trump at the presidency. People said, there's no way this is going to resonate. There is no way. That's what all the experts said. Quite honestly, at the time, being young and naive, I said, this is not going to go anywhere. I was only three years into this thing. I thought that we were still in a policy debate. Oh yeah, high taxes, low taxes, balance the budget, reform Social Security..

The latest in sports

AP News Radio

00:59 min | 4 months ago

The latest in sports

"EP sports, I'm Josh rowntree, a busy night on the diamond and we start in Canada where the Blue Jays dropped the brewer 7 two. Alejandro Kirk and Vladimir Guerrero junior each had three hits and Kevin biggio had a pair and drove in a run. In Seattle, the Yankees beat the Mariners tend to Aaron judge homered for a third straight game in Houston, the Astros topple the twins 5 one as Alex Bregman, hit his 7th home run of the year. The Orioles dropped the guardians 8 5 Anthony Santander with three hits and three RBIs got our Henderson also drove in three runs. The Padres topped the Marlins 9 four, the rangers out slugged the tigers ten 6 Cincinnati edge Boston 9 8 things to Jose barrero Grand Slam. The mets blank the Phillies to nothing, St. Louis got by the royals two one, while the cubs beat the rays by the same score. The Dodgers beat Washington 9 three and a big change to one of the NBA's marquee franchises, bob Myers departing as president and GM of the Golden State Warriors after winning four titles in an 8 year span. I'm Josh Brown tree, AP sports.

5 6 7TH 8 8 Year Ap Sports Aaron Alejandro Kirk Alex Bregman Anthony Santander Astros Boston Canada Cincinnati Dodgers Henderson Houston Josh Brown Josh Rowntree Kevin Biggio Mariners Marlins NBA Orioles Padres Phillies Seattle Slam St. Louis Vladimir Guerrero Washington Yankees A Busy Night Bob Myers Four ONE The Blue Jays The Golden State Warriors The Year Third Three TWO Two One
Bob Myers departing as Warriors president, GM after 4 NBA titles, 11 seasons

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 4 months ago

Bob Myers departing as Warriors president, GM after 4 NBA titles, 11 seasons

"Bob Myers is departing as president and general manager of the Golden State Warriors after building a championship team that captured four titles in an 8 year span and reached 5 straight NBA Finals from 2015 to 2019. One of the most successful GMs over the past decade in any sport, Myers contract was set to expire in late June. The 48 year old Myers became an agent before emerging as a top NBA executive with a personable nature who regularly attended practices to chat with players, coach Steve Kerr, and his assistants. I'm get cool ball.

2015 2019 48 Year Old 5 8 Year Bob Myers Myers NBA Nba Finals ONE Steve Kerr Four Late June The Golden State Warriors The Past Decade
Biden attends memorial Mass to mark 8 years since son Beau's death from brain cancer

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 4 months ago

Biden attends memorial Mass to mark 8 years since son Beau's death from brain cancer

"President Biden has marked the 8th anniversary of his eldest son's death. A day after publicly grieving Beau Biden's death and a Memorial Day address. The pain of loss is with us every day, but particularly sharp, a Memorial Day. The president and other family members mourned privately. A memorial mass in Delaware followed by a visit to his son's gravesite, Beau Biden died of brain cancer at 46, which the president has linked to his son's exposure to toxin burn pits in Iraq. He's often said Bo is the Biden who should have been president, not him. Over the weekend, the president attended the high school graduation of Beau Biden's daughter Natalie, Sagar, Meghani, Washington.

46 8TH A Day Beau Biden Beau Biden 'S Biden BO Delaware Iraq Meghani Memorial Day Natalie Sagar Washington A Memorial Day Every Day THE The Weekend
Grillo birdies 2nd playoff hole at Colonial after blowing lead

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 4 months ago

Grillo birdies 2nd playoff hole at Colonial after blowing lead

"Emiliano grillo had to wait almost 8 years before claiming his second PGA Tour win, but he finally did it in a sudden death playoff at the Charles swab challenge at the same colonial country club in Fort Worth, Texas, the 30 year old Argentinian survived the final hole double bogey that dropped him back into a tie at 8 under with Adam schank. Grillo secured the win with a birdie two on the second extra hole. It was a heartbreaking loss for shank, who was three behind with three to play, but couldn't close out his first tour win. Scottie scheffler, AC 8th hole on his way into a tie for third place. I'm Graham agar

30 Year Old 8 8TH Adam Schank Argentinian Charles Emiliano Grillo Fort Worth Graham Aga Grillo Pga Tour Texas Almost 8 Years First Second Shank Third Three TWO
2 more Oath Keepers sentenced to prison terms for Jan. 6 Capitol attack

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 4 months ago

2 more Oath Keepers sentenced to prison terms for Jan. 6 Capitol attack

"Two more members of the oath keepers were sentenced for their roles in the capitol riot. Army veteran Jessica Watkins was sentenced to 8 years in prison. Another army veteran, Kenneth harrelson, received a four year sentence. They were acquitted of the most serious charge seditious conspiracy, harrelson was the group's ground team lead on the day of the riot. Watkins formed a separate Ohio based militia group, recruiting people to join. Watkins cheerfully apologized and described herself as just another idiot running around the capitol on January 6th, harrelson broke down in tears as well, saying he has totally demolished his life a day earlier, the leader of the proud boy, Stuart Rhodes, was sentenced to 18 years in prison for seditious conspiracy. The longest sentence yet in a capitol riot case. Ed Donahue Washington

18 Years 8 Years Ed Donahue January 6Th Jessica Watkins Kenneth Harrelson Ohio Stuart Rhodes TWO Washingto Watkins A Day Earlier Four Year Harrelson The Day
Oath Keeper who stormed Capitol gets more than 8 years in prison in latest Jan. 6 sentencing

AP News Radio

00:59 sec | 4 months ago

Oath Keeper who stormed Capitol gets more than 8 years in prison in latest Jan. 6 sentencing

"Another oath keeper who stormed the capitol has been sentenced. Jessica Watkins, of Woodstock, Ohio, received an 8 and a half year sentence on a conviction of obstruction and conspiracy to impede Congress, the transgender army veteran was one of the oath keepers who stormed the U.S. capitol in a military style stacked formation on January 6th, communicating with other helmet clad members over a channel called stop the steel J 6 on the walkie talkie app zello. Watkins tearfully apologized for her actions and condemned the violence by rioters, calling herself just another idiot running around the capitol, the sentence comes a day after oath keepers founder Stewart Rhodes received an 18 year sentence in Florida chapter leader Kelly mag was sentenced to 12 years for seditious conspiracy. U.S. district judge Amit Mehta said that while Watkins was not a top leader, she was more than just a foot soldier, telling her that your role that day was more aggressive, and at least three others charged in the riot wouldn't have been there if she hadn't recruited them. Just over 500 January 6th defendants have been sentenced with more than half receiving prison time. Jennifer King, Washington

12 Years 18 Year 8 And A Half Year Amit Mehta Congress Florida January 6Th Jennifer King Jessica Watkins Just Over 500 Kelly Mag Ohio Stewart Rhodes U.S. Washingto Watkins Woodstock A Day At Least Three More Than Half ONE That Day
Ron DeSantis: Creating a System to Re-Constitutionalize Our Government

Mark Levin

01:55 min | 4 months ago

Ron DeSantis: Creating a System to Re-Constitutionalize Our Government

"So Mark we have all these things that you and I believe your listeners our shared principles and values and we have a sense of what that would look like in public policy And the idea is to get that if you're in office and get that through a constitutional system so that it can stick and become the policies that govern our state or our country And so what I do is as governor I studied all the authorities that I possess constitutionally statutorily customary policies I knew what I needed the legislature for what I didn't local government Vis-à-vis me and the same thing would apply to the presidency You understand article two powers You understand where your leverage points are You understand your statutory authority You also have to be willing to assert the true scope of article two powers And I think a lot of our presidents have not been willing to do that For example Vis-à-vis the administrative state The founding fathers would have never accepted the idea that you could get elected president and yet the executive agencies could do whatever the hell they wanted to do That is not the way this works And so I view kind of the task at hand for us is the reconstitution of our government I think we need to return the government to its rightful owners which is we the people The only way you'll get that done though is if you go in with a clear plan on day one you spit nails right out of the gate And I think you really need two terms to be able to do it 8 years because every time you make a movement you fire someone it's going to be contested by the left There's going to be lawsuits There's going to be this And you've just got to be disciplined You've got to be determined But I don't see any other way around it Mark because if we keep going in this direction then you can elect people to Congress You can elect a president and all the important issues get decided by unelected bureaucrats If you don't govern ourselves if that's the case

8 Years Congress Mark Article Two Day One TWO
Trump Sides With Putin Over Ukraine

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:01 min | 4 months ago

Trump Sides With Putin Over Ukraine

"Said about Ukraine that it was not prudent to call Putin a war criminal. Do you agree with him? No. No, I think he's a coward, and I think he's a puppet of Putin. I really do. I think I don't know why. I say the truth. I can't figure it out. But there's no conclusion to come to. He wouldn't say last night that you've created win the war. I mean, I was stunned, it was to me it was the most stunning moment of the debate. If you won't say that you think Ukraine should win the war, I don't know where you stand with Putin. And the city that he could settle it in 24 hours is the same kind of bravado that we heard 8 years ago when he said that he would build the wall across the entire border of Mexico and the United States and Mexico would pay for it. And we have a wall that's about a 5th of what we need after his presidency and Mexico has paid their first peso to us yet.

24 Hours 5TH 8 Years Ago Mexico Putin Ukraine First Peso Last Night The United States
Lincoln Project's Reed Galen Cries Following CNN Trump Town Hall

The Dan Bongino Show

01:49 min | 4 months ago

Lincoln Project's Reed Galen Cries Following CNN Trump Town Hall

"Here it is Here's another member of the Lenin project sometimes known as The Lincoln Project Reed Galen career long grift there has never had a real job lives off his dad's name his dad's Richard some kind of political mucky muck or whatever Dude's never had a job Hates Trump now He lost it last night too on Twitter after the CNN thing Rick Wilson was probably in the next room I hope he was showering Here take a listen to this Is anyone surprised by what we saw tonight If you are you weren't watching the last 8 years Thanks again to CNN who helped get us into this in 2016 and is now helping us get deeper into this in 2023 We knew what he would do You knew what he would do Caitlin Collins I think probably tried the best she could given the circumstances You put her out there to do something that was an impossibility You filled the crowd with his sycophants You filled the crowd with people who clapped when he said he would pardon the January 6th rioters and insurrectionists Chris licht you will not sleep tonight and I do not feel bad for you Everything that we have been telling you not to do you continue to do So you and mister zaslav I want you to ask yourselves a question tomorrow Do you want to live in a free country or don't you Because maybe you can be the friendly media if and when Trump wins again But you know what I wouldn't count on it This is about all of us gang Let's get to work and make sure that this man never ever gets anywhere near the Oval Office again That's Reed Galen from the Lenin project Sometimes known as The Lincoln Project It's interesting about this guy because this guy used to try to get involved with my campaign all the time I've got just a library of emails from the city We kept turning him down He kept trying to shake us down for money trying to sell us his dad's email list and everything

2016 2023 CNN Caitlin Collins Chris January 6Th Reed Galen Richard Rick Wilson The Lincoln Project Donald Trump Last Night The Lenin Project The Oval Office The Last 8 Years Tomorrow Tonight
Is Poland Reviving the Death Penalty? Jack Posobiec Weighs In

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:33 min | 4 months ago

Is Poland Reviving the Death Penalty? Jack Posobiec Weighs In

"Jack, I want to talk. You know, actually, give us the lay of the land. I mean, you are Polish, you're an American, but you are a Polish descent. My family's poorest, yeah. Yeah, your family's Polish. So I saw this news story. I wasn't going to so sorry to put you on the spot here, but I know you can handle it. I saw that there's the prime minister in my right of Poland is now calling for the death penalty to be brought back into law in Poland. Is that right? Yes. Exactly. So you got to understand that the backstory is that in the EU, the death penalty does not exist. In fact, there's only one country in all of Europe that still has the death penalty, and that's Belarus, which is in Eastern Europe, not in EU member. And in fact, Russia doesn't even have the death penalty. So I know, right, Russia. And so for any EU member to even discuss bringing this back, I mean, it would be like, I mean, it would be like us talking about bringing back firing squads or something, which I do know that I think Idaho was actually talking about this recently. So the backstory here is that unfortunately there was a horrific case of child abuse in Poland, this total psychopath where murder in general is very, very low in Poland. It's one of the lowest countries in all of the OCD. The developed countries list. And it was an 8 year old child who was unfortunately brutalized and killed. And the prime minister of Poland came out straight up and said, we should reinstate the death penalty when it comes for a child abuse. And Andrew, I got to say, if there's any crime that deserves it, it's that.

Andrew Jack Europe 8 Year Old Eastern Europe ONE One Country Poland Belarus American Idaho Prime Minister Russia Polish EU
Rep. Byron Donalds: Why Doesn't the Media Dig Into Biden's Shady Deals

The Dan Bongino Show

01:40 min | 4 months ago

Rep. Byron Donalds: Why Doesn't the Media Dig Into Biden's Shady Deals

"Here's Byron Donald's fantastic member of Congress I think he gave the best presentation at the briefing Here he is to the media people like what else do you idiots need to hear This is Pulitzer Prize winning stuff you've done since here Check this out Having read those documents one thing became pretty crystal clear that there were many people who had serious questions about the transactions and about the velocity of these transactions And they either get very very deep into concealment hiding money shifting money And for the purpose we don't know because one thing everybody in this room and the American people definitely know is that the Biden family doesn't really have a business There is no business structure around this family Except politics And since Joe Biden has spent decades in the Senate served 8 years as vice president and is now president of the United States and the families getting money from various countries and foreign businesses through various shell companies and this web of LLCs I mean guys you and the press This is easy pickings I'm giving you Pulitzer stuff here I like that he said that because Donald's is a very very smart guy I really hope he runs for governor and here in Florida He's extremely talented politician I can't say enough good things about And a real conservative I ran and that district he runs now over in the House of Representatives in Florida District 19 He is absolutely correct What else do you guys want He knows He knows they don't want anything They are in the business of politics the Biden family

Joe Biden Donald Trump Florida 8 Years Biden House Of Representatives Congress Senate Byron Donald Decades Pulitzer Prize Pulitzer Many People One Thing Florida District 19 United States American President Trump
Bin Laden SEAL Member Outraged Over Drag Queen Ambassador

Dennis Prager Podcasts

00:50 sec | 4 months ago

Bin Laden SEAL Member Outraged Over Drag Queen Ambassador

"Bin Laden seal member outraged over drag queen ambassadorship. A navy seal who took part in the mission to kill Osama bin Laden says he was outraged daily mail. Over the U.S. Navy using a drag queen for a discarded recruitment program. Robert J O'Neill a decorated combat veteran who served for 8 years as a member of SEAL Team 6. Said on Twitter, he can't believe he fought for this bull. And you fill in the four letter word at the end of bull. All right, the U.S. Navy is now using an enlisted sailor drag queen as a recruiter. I'm done. China is going to destroy us. Which is fine with the left.

Robert J O'neill Osama Bin Laden 8 Years Bin Laden U.S. Navy Seal Team 6 China Four Letter Word Twitter
Ex-officers get house arrest in girl's gunfire death at game

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | 4 months ago

Ex-officers get house arrest in girl's gunfire death at game

"Three former police officers charged in the shooting death of a girl outside a football game in Pennsylvania have been sentenced, following an emotional hearing in Delaware county court, former Sharon hill, Pennsylvania officers Brian devaney, Devin Smith, and Sean Dolan will serve 5 years of probation the first 11 months on house arrest. They pled guilty to ten misdemeanor counts of reckless endangerment in the death of 8 year old phantom ability, the victim's family accepted the defendant's apologies, staying behind in court for a few moments afterwards to hug the three men and wish them well, when shots rang out after a football game at academy park high school in August of 2021, deveining then a school resource officer says it was a split second decision to open fire, emptying 25 rounds at a car they mistakenly thought was involved. The DA initially charged the two black teens who had exchanged gunfire nearby with a child's death, but a grand jury investigation found the officers were at fault, although investigators could not determine which of the three fired the fatal round. I am Jennifer King

Sean Dolan Jennifer King Devin Smith Brian Devaney Pennsylvania August Of 2021 25 Rounds Three Men Sharon Hill 5 Years Ten Misdemeanor Counts 8 Year Old Three Delaware First 11 Months Second Decision Three Former Police Officers DA Two Black Teens Probation
Dissident pulled off plane by Belarus gets 8 years in prison

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 5 months ago

Dissident pulled off plane by Belarus gets 8 years in prison

"A court in Belarus has convicted a dissident journalist who was arrested, sentencing him to 8 years in prison. Raman protest savitch is dramatic arrest in May 2021, was met with outrage by western leaders, some saying a plane's diversion was tantamount to state sponsored hijacking. Belizean flight controllers had ordered the Ryanair jetliner traveling from Greece to Lithuania to land at minx, telling the crew there was a bomb threat against the flight no explosives were found on board, but pre to save it, who was living in exile at the time was detained. The journalists ran next to a telegram messaging app channel used by participants in mass protests against the disputed 2020 election that gave Alexander Lukashenko a 6th term in office. I'm Charles De Ledesma

Alexander Lukashenko Greece May 2021 Lithuania Charles De Ledesma Belarus Ryanair 8 Years 6Th Term Belizean 2020 Election Minx Raman Protest Savitch
Kayleigh McEnany Previews Her New Book 'Serenity in the Storm'

Mark Levin

01:56 min | 5 months ago

Kayleigh McEnany Previews Her New Book 'Serenity in the Storm'

"Kayleigh McEnany you've written a fantastic book As usual serenity in the storm How are you by the way Hey I'm doing great Mark It's so good to talk with you And I've got to say you are one of my favorite people as you know me and my husband John we love you listen to you forever And it's just it's great to join you always an honor And he's a great guy too And you have two kids now right Two one who kept me up all last night The 5 bucks It happened That's right my left foot kept me up all night I haven't neuropathy but that's a whole nother story Anyway tell us about this book generally and then we'll get into the specifics You know look Mark I felt very deeply about this because for my whole life I've loved politics ever since a young age I was this 8 year old hearing for Bob Dole on the playground I mean I've just been animated by the political process And you know while I don't have many many decades I certainly have observed something that has changed You know from my time in college and law school where I watched the Obama battles play out Through the bush years I've noticed something transformative happening And it is so much bigger than a political party And look I'm a committed conservative That's what I am But it's bigger than left or right I just feel that we as a people of faith Jewish Christian believers in God we look to something bigger than ourselves It's been left behind total forsaking of God complete abolition of patriotism on the part of the left Family unit being destroyed and the fabric that really makes our country up face freedom and God really the patriotism it's just common It's fallen by the wayside and I feel very deeply that we've got to return to that or we're going to lose our country It's bigger than 2024 2024 is important But something deeper is happening

Kayleigh Mcenany John Mark Bob Dole Two Kids TWO Jewish 5 Bucks 2024 GOD ONE 8 Year Old Barack Obama Last Night In The Storm Christian
Texas mass shooting suspect could be anywhere, sheriff says

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 5 months ago

Texas mass shooting suspect could be anywhere, sheriff says

"Police continue to search for the man accused of killing 5 of his Texas neighbors, the youngest 8 years old. San jacinto county sheriff Greg capers says the shooting happened Friday night after neighbors asked Francisco or apaza to stop firing in his yard. The victims, they came over to the fence, said, hey, do you mind not shooting out in the yard? We have a young baby that's trying to go to sleep. And he had been drinking, and he says, I'll do what I want to in my front yard. Police said FBI searching for the 38 year old, finding his clothes and bone, but tracking dogs losing the scent, agent James Smith. We consider him armed and dangerous. And we're not going to stop until we actually arrest him and bring him into custody. But he is out there and he's a threat to the community. Audio courtesy, KTRK. I'm Julie Walker.

Julie Walker James Smith Friday Night 5 Greg Capers FBI Texas Francisco San Jacinto 8 Years Old 38 Year Old Sheriff Apaza Ktrk
"8 years" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

08:09 min | 5 months ago

"8 years" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"8 years ago at a concert in Zürich, Ed Sheeran sang that mash up of his Grammy winning song, thinking out loud, and Marvin Gaye's classic, let's get it on. Now Sheeran is in a Manhattan federal courtroom, fighting claims that he stole elements from gay's song, and the pop star defended himself with his guitar, playing and singing for the jury to prove that thinking out loud was his own. My guest is intellectual property litigator Terrence Ross, a partner at cat and mutch and rosenman. Terry, what do the plaintiffs, the heirs of gays co writer Ed Townsend, have to prove? The plaintiff has to show that there was substantial similarity between Ed Sheeran's song thinking out loud and the sheet music for the Marvin Gaye Ed Townsend written song. Let's get it on. Now, this is a very important distinction. Let's get it on is from 1973. The copyright act of 1976 obviously had not yet been enacted. And so let's get it on is under the old copyright regime. And under the 1909 act, there was no copyright in recorded music or recorded sound in general. And so what a songwriter had to do in those days is prepare sheet music. Everybody hopefully remember that from taking piano and elementary school, but they had to prepare sheet music and submit that to the copyright office. And so the copyright that was issued was strictly limited to the sheet music. And the sheet music is just a series of notes. It does not have the full impact of recorded sound with beats and rhythms and the jury has to decide whether that relatively sparse sheet music was infringed, meaning whether or not Ed Sheeran's song thinking out loud was substantially similar to that sheet music and that again is a big ass. What typically happens in these cases involving songs with older copyrights is someone comes in with a little keyboard and they play strictly those notes that are on the sheet music and take my word for it. Somebody who's been in the courtroom when this has happened. The effect of hearing a handful of notes played on a keyboard is so different from hearing the recorded music that it becomes very hard for a jury to then jump to the conclusion that that's the same as the recorded music. Here's what Sheeran said last year after winning an infringement trial in Britain over another one of his hits, shape of you. There's only so many nights and very few chords used in pop music. Coincidence is bound to happen if 60,000 songs are being released every day on Spotify. It's 22 million songs a year and there's only 12 notes that are available. Sharon's defense seemed to be arguing something like that. In this case, what do they have to prove? The argument that the defendant it shares attorneys have to make is that those chord progressions are very limited. And we all know there's only 8 notes in the octave scale, right? But even when you combine those notes into chords, for different genres of music, there are limits on the number of chord progressions available to actually make it sound like what you want it sound like. So in the pop music industry, there's actually very few chord progressions that are available. It's a little bit different from blues music where you have a slightly larger range of chord progressions available. But again, it's finite. And the argument that has been made over the years is that where you have this finite group of notes and finite group of chord progressions, you can't allow any song or group of songs to an effect monopolize them by having gotten there first. What their selection and notes and chord progressions. That's not what the copyright act is supposed to be about. It's supposed to protect unique expression and not merely the use of as people often say, the building blocks of a pop song. And so I hope that explains it, that is the fundamental battle that has been going on, not only in this courtroom, but in numerous courtrooms for the last 15 to 20 years. On Thursday, Sheeran took the stand in his defense case, and from all accounts, did very well. He talked through the process by which he created thinking out loud, the song issue. And talked about it in incredible detail. And this is what was important to me. See, remembered exactly what he was doing at the time. His collaborator Amy wag was in his apartment. He was going to take a shower to a shower, came out. She was messing with some popcorns and putting them in different range. And he goes, hey, I think you got something there. And they started tinkering with it. And he remembers the process so distinctly that it lends credibility to his assertion that he didn't borrow this from any other artist. Second thing that was really interesting about his testimony was he's comment that he works with Amy Wyatt all the time. They're just really good at pulling up music quickly. He said that since they were both in New York City for this trial over the last four days, did written ten songs back in the hotel room. I mean, which is just phenomenal, but the point that the defense was trying to make is this guy's just really talented and creative. He's a prolific singer songwriter. Who doesn't need to steal from anybody else? And I thought that was very impactful. So when did Sharon whip out his guitar and start singing? His own lawyer started asking him about the testimony during the plaintiff's case with their expert who made the argument that both songs have a four chord progression that ascends that, although there is one difference in the fourth quarter sending progression, specifically in the second quarter that it's a variant chord that it's easily substituted and is not there for meaningful adherence and lawyer asked him about this. And he said, essentially, God is now what are you talking about? And he whipped out his guitar, which had been pre positioned behind the witness stand. Before anybody had come into the courtroom, nobody would know it was there. And once somebody like Ed Sheeran has a guitar in his hand, the plans attorney can get up and object as much as he wants. But that jury is going to resent it if he's not allowed to play. And so he started playing this on. And he played it two different ways. He played it with the chord progression of the actual song and then the chord progression from the Marvin Gaye song. It's in the very opening of the entire song. And the university of Vermont professor for the point of admit that the rest of the song is different. So they're only now fighting over the four quarter ascending progression. And he says, you see how that doesn't work? It doesn't substitute in the way the university of Vermont professor was insisting he does. Do you hear how that works differently? And a number of the jurors started nodding their head. As if an agreement. And that is a very telling. And if there had been a settlement off our unstable for the defense, I would immediately apply this overnight except at that. But it just tells you we've talked about this before June, how challenging it is to bring a case against these mega celebrities like Katy Perry, Led Zeppelin, Taylor Swift. We're here Ed Sheeran, because they come in the courtroom, and even if a jury didn't really know, and wasn't familiar with, they see the hoopla that's going on at the courthouse. They know he's a big celebrity because of all the hoopla that they see going on. And then he plays guitar and sings to them. I mean, can you imagine going back in the jury room that in voting against this guy who got sort of really cute love the look to start with? Our lawyers watching this case not only because of Ed Sheeran, but because of what law may be made. So copyright lawyers, music lawyers, academics, are following this case very closely. There has been over the last decade or so a trend in copyright infringement of songs that really started with the blurred lines case. In that case, some interesting decisions by the district court and a curious jury decision ended up in a finding that rob thick and Farrell had infringed Marvin Gaye's song and the appell court really came up with a disjointed opinion that at the end of the day. Affirmed the jury award, which set off a feeding frenzy amongst plaintiffs lawyers bringing lawsuits such as this one against Ed Sheeran. A couple of years later, there was

"8 years" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

07:42 min | 5 months ago

"8 years" Discussed on WCPT 820

"Stop still got a lot of fire left in me. 20 million good paying jobs were created during the 8 years of the Clinton presidency and he eliminated the deficit. In fact, he created a budget surplus. President Barack Obama inherited the Great Recession. Fiscal irresponsibility and 14 million good paying private sector jobs were created during the presidency of Barack Obama and he reduced the deficit by a $1 trillion. Took it from 1.5. Trillion to 500 billion I came Jack bitch slapping them with the facts. Oh, yeah. Holy shit. As is Leslie Jones, by the way, we're gonna talk to a French law about Bill Maher's thoughts on black crime in Chicago or whatever the right wing talking point is. Leslie Jones says the, they're not even in the top 20 of deadliest cities, Chicago. There are many, many red state cities that have much higher crime rates. If only there was a fine American that was out there fact checking every day. Bowler ting as we call it. Eric poehler in memory of our beloved. Angela Carson, CEO of media matters, seeing your handsome mug all over the TV these days. Good morning. Thanks for having me. Thanks for coming on. Well, it's just been a stunning week, even for you, right? Tucker Carlson, et cetera. Tell us, you know, just what your initial reaction was. Were you? 'cause you had tweeted that you've been saying for years. They've been losing money on Tucker Carlson. No. Yeah, I mean, I think that a lot of times and I understand it, but I think a lot of times it's people when there's some moment of needed accountability. Especially with the right wing. And the person doesn't get immediately fired or they immediately change their behavior. The assumption is, well, there was a teller. And they lost. And when you go after someone's advertisers, first of all, that's a really big thing to do. I think it should only happen in really extreme circumstances. But when you do it, the idea is that, oh, well, then they'll change, right? They'll say, we're losing money and we have to adapt. And what Fox did after Tucker lost the overwhelming majority of his advertisers a couple of years ago, is the same thing they don't let every time, which is to say, oh, we're not losing any money, don't worry about it. And they were. They were losing Colorado money on Tucker's show. But you know, he had F of the paid ads on his program that he had for the first few years. I mean, they literally cut the number of paid commercials that he was running on his program by more than half. And they kept it that way for two years. I don't think that's the only reason they fired him. But my point in all of that was, for something like this, it's like a cost like anything the cost benefit analysis. And with Tucker, that was one factor. They're losing money on the factors that he's uncontrollable. And other factors that there's more stuff that's going to come out about him, right? So when you keep piling on all of those little individual things, it starts to make people in charge wonder, is it worth it? Explain Angela the people that aren't in the business, though, that a lot of times people say it's the carriage fees that allow them to make their money. This is why they can be so offensive and lose all their advertisers and boycotts and may not work the way you would think they would with Fox. Can you explain that? That is true. Yeah. So one of the things that Fox did about 12 years ago is they basically artificially inflated Fox News's carriage. This is a roger ailes for the idea. And the way it basically works is if you're a cable, if you're any TV channel that is on cable, the cable companies pay them a nominal fee. Usually 30 cents, 40 cents, maybe a dollar. So that they could then have all these channels available to their customers, and then they bundle them into the packages, all those little bundle of those tears of cable package everybody gets. And it is a nominal fee. That's why I was like HBO, for example, are and ons for $5 or $8 a month. You have to add that on. They're usually too expensive to bundle in. Well, Fox News basically did is the same way they turn their audience against people. They turn their audience gets cable companies based a lot online, threats that they were going to sense of them, and their net result is that Fox News doesn't need a single commercial to be profitable. In fact, they could have $0 in ad revenue. They would still have a 40% profit margin. And that's because they get the overwhelming amount of their money from carriage fees. And one of the things that was happening while the dominion trial was supposed to be unfolding is Fox News was renegotiating three of their really large cable contracts. And the increase just the increase that they were trying to get a loan was worth about a $1 billion a year from just those three companies. Wow. Wow. So the smartmatic is bigger is bigger is a bigger dollar amount. Is that what's that going to do to them? Is that not going to you think hurt them either? It can very well could. You know, and they just, they just had a victory this week. It obviously kind of overshadowed by so many other so much other Fox related news, but they went to court to basically ask for a bunch of documents related to Rupert Murdoch that dominion wasn't able to get, but it had started to discover that the Murdoch had held back during the discovery process and their trial. The smartmatic one at the hearing. And Fox agreed that they would go through the process of essentially over turning over these documents. And that is important because the money is really a significant matter. But one of the things that helps lead to this cascade of consequences into the insight, you know, if you start to peel back the veil, it begins to snowball because the entire thing is rotten to the core. It's not like they just did one bad thing one time. You know, it is their business model. So yeah, lying is their business model. You're exactly right. Yeah, I was saying like fraud was Trump's business model. His whole life. So Angela, in terms of all the coverage of Tucker and all these stories that we've had come out. So you just think it's the full glass. Do you think there was one factor more than other more than others? Because I keep saying it wasn't what already came out, but like you sort of implied what is still yet to come out, right? Yes, that's right. And here's the one thing I know for sure. The official reason that box sort of started leaking to the times and has been reported in the last couple of days is clearly not true. And so what Fox News is claiming is that the day of the trial, they discover that Tucker Carlson is a racist. And that is so ridiculous. They say, well, we found this one text message that was part of the materials we collected to respond to dominion and when our leadership team found out about this horrible thing that Tucker Carlson said that was racist. We were both shocked and we knew we had to take action right away. And so not only is that is clearly ridiculous, but they're also blaming Tucker. They're saying that because they found this explosive piece of information, they also realize that they had to settle really quickly in order to make sure that it didn't turn into a larger issue for the company. Again, kind of ridiculous to blame Tucker for the extra settlement. It was obviously the entire network. It had not, it wasn't just about Tucker, but it sort of kicking him on the way out. I think personally, and I think the time sort of alluded to this is that you have all this appy gross work tapes. You have another lawsuit that's very likely to come out from ray eps, who's somebody that tunnel for really smeared. You can each of those is a piece of discovery. Each of those is insight. There's also other tapes apparently, right? Because if you look at the times, one of the things that the reporting acknowledged was

"8 years" Discussed on The Bible Recap

The Bible Recap

01:52 min | 6 months ago

"8 years" Discussed on The Bible Recap

"Fill in the blank. But God's doing something. Sometimes what God does in our hearts through obedience is beyond our capacity to understand. Sometimes he's teaching us to trust him for the outcome instead of trying to achieve it on our own. He is at work, even on the so called nothing days when obedient schools like we're just walking in circles. You've probably already seen evidence that your obedience to him is him at work in your life. Drawing you nearer to him. It's the best place to be, even when we don't fully understand. Because he's where the joy is. We are so grateful to all of you who've picked up a copy of the Bible recap book. Maybe you've got a copy of big blue, that's what we affectionately call the original hardback version, or maybe you've got the vegan leather deluxe edition. Either way, it's a great option for you visual learners out there. People who like to take notes while you read, or people who just want to unplug from a digital world a bit, or maybe who don't like the sound of my voice. The basic contents of the book are similar to what you're hearing on the daily podcast, but instead of listening to the recap for 8 minutes a day, you read the recap for two pages a day, and high 5 to those of you who do both simultaneously. But if you haven't picked up a copy yet, or you want to get one for a friend, you can find the Bible recap book wherever books are sold, including online, in brick and mortar stores, and even in airports, grocery stores, you can also find it in our store. Just click the link in the show notes or visit the Bible recap dot com slash books. Today's podcast is brought to you by AFM. They understand life can feel overwhelming and lonely sometimes, so to help you feel known, loved and prayed for, they've created a space where you can receive prayer and pray for others. They call it the prayer wall. Check it out at AFM dot com slash prey or click the link in the show notes.

"8 years" Discussed on The Bible Recap

The Bible Recap

07:36 min | 6 months ago

"8 years" Discussed on The Bible Recap

"The Israelites have just set foot in the promised land as a nation for the first time. This is the partial fulfillment of something God promised them approximately 750 years earlier when he first called Abraham and genesis 12. More fulfillment will come when they take the land, but at this point, their enemies de canaanites still live there. The first city they plan to take is Jericho, a town near the eastern border of the promised land. But before they do that, God wants them to be fully prepared. In God's economy, preparing for battle has very little to do with sharpening your weapons. It has everything to do with preparing your heart. He wants to make sure their hearts are surrendered to him and aligned with his own heart before they go face the enemy. The first thing they have to do is circumcise all the israelite males, then allow them time to recover. After every male is circumcised, they celebrate Passover. The timing of this is beautiful. It's kind of a second exodus exactly 40 years after the first one. Their hearts need to celebrate Passover, because it will reinforce their faith. It serves as a reminder to them that God has protected and provided for them through the years. Then in 5 12, we get a little sentence that speaks volumes. It says, the man is ceased on the day after they ate the produce of the land. What? This is incredible. This is God's precise provision on display. He gave them miracle food 6 days a week for 40 years and the mana even follows them into the promised land, but then it stops on the day after they have access to the local food. There are no gaps in God's provision. Next, Joshua has a strange encounter with a man holding a sword. Obviously this could be super scary given the fact that they're in enemy territory. So Joshua wants to know if this man is in israelite, that he just doesn't happen to recognize, or if he's a canaanite. And the man basically says, guess again, I'm God. How do we know he's God? First of all, he receives Joshua's worship. God's elect angels don't allow people to worship them. They reject it because they know they don't deserve it. Second, the angel of yahweh also tells Joshua to take off his shoes. Just like God had told Moses to do when he appeared in the burning bush. Because he was standing on holy ground. The presence of angels doesn't make things holy. Only God can do that. In this conversation, many people suggest that God is refusing to take sides in the battle since God doesn't give Joshua a straight answer. But we know from the surrounding text that God has aligned himself with the Israelites. So what's going on here? God's reply to Joshua suggests more that Israel is on his side than that he is on Israel's side. Meanwhile, Jericho is shook. They probably know what's coming. This terrifying army is camped outside their city, so they hole up in their houses. God tells Joshua that Jericho is theirs for the taking, because he's giving it to them. But he has some super weird instructions on how to accomplish this. Don't march around it, carrying the ark once a day for 6 days, while 7 priests blow trumpets. Then on the 7th day, the march around 7 times, and on that 7th trip, all the people will shout. And then the walls will fall, and they'll have an opening to go inside and devote everything to destruction. Everything except for rahab and her family. Joshua tells the two spies who met her that their in charge of saving her. And it all happens just like God commanded. They defeated Jericho with exactly zero military strategy, just by trusting and obeying God's weird commands. Joshua pronounced a curse on anyone who rebuilds Jericho, so heads up, it's been rebuilt. We'll get to that later, but just remember this curse. Another thing Joshua emphasized before they took the land was that the israelite soldiers aren't allowed to take any plunder for themselves. Any plunder they take was supposed to be set apart and devoted to God, kind of like a first fruits offering from their first conquest in the promised land. So bad news, a guy named Aiken secretly took some stuff for himself. Some commentators estimate the value of this stuff to be approximately the amount a worker would earn in his entire life. Meanwhile, Joshua makes a classic leadership mistake. He's probably overconfident from their defeat of Jericho for getting that they won because they walked in obedience to God's commands, so he sends his people to go take over another city, but without consulting God first. So the Israelites go to take over the city of I and not only did the Israelites lose, but about 36 men died in the process. Joshua is overcome with grief and he begins to doubt God thinking God had betrayed them. He appeals to God in much the same way Moses used to when they were in trouble. But God points the finger back at the Israelites, all of them. Since God views the Israelites as a unit, one man sin has impacted the whole. Aiken is personally responsible for his spiritual adultery, but the whole community is affected. God is angry at them all, and he tells Joshua how to deal with the guilty party. And since akin sin represents spiritual adultery against God, not just theft, it requires the death penalty. The next morning, God's supernaturally identifies Aiken from the tribe of Judah as the man who is committed the sin. Even though Aiken is from the most esteemed tribe, he's rejected from the people of Israel because his heart isn't devoted to God. This is important. We're already seeing through the rescue of rehab the canaanite and the rejection of ache in the israelite that being a part of God's people, the Israelites, has nothing to do with race or genes and everything to do with your heart. Those whose hearts are devoted to yahweh are welcomed into his family, even if they're strangers and foreigners. And those whose hearts reject yahweh, even if their Israelites by birth are not counted among his people. God's family is made up of people with new hearts, not similar DNA. Aiken and his family are stoned for his adultery. And because deuteronomy 24 16 tells us that children aren't to be put to death for their father's sins, it seems to indicate that his family may have played a role in his sin or in concealing it. God takes this stuff seriously. After all this happens, God commands them to try again at defeating eye, because this time they'll win. And this time, he says they can take the plunder. How ironic is that for Aiken, if only he had waited, using a clever military strategy, they defeat the city, keep its livestock and plunder for themselves, then set it on fire. And again, it's important for us to remember that when they destroy these cities it's serving the purpose of God's judgment on its inhabitants for their wickedness, as well as providing the promised land for the Israelites. After the battle, Joshua builds an altar to God and follows the instructions guide gave them back in deuteronomy 11. Speaking the curses from mount evil and the blessings from mount gerizim. Then Joshua renews the covenant with the people by reading it to them aloud. We covered a lot of ground today, so where did you see your God shot? Mine was as they were taking their first 6 trips around the city of Jericho. They'd get up, make their circle a few of them would blow some trumpets, then they'd go back to their camp and do it all over again the next day. All this walking around seems like such a waste of time. If I were in that army, I would probably be like, what is the point of this where accomplishing nothing? Maybe if we're honest, we feel like that some days in our reading plan or in prayer or in Sabbath or

"8 years" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:33 min | 6 months ago

"8 years" Discussed on WTOP

"Casey who covers real estate for The New York Times. Time? 5 18, traffic and weather on the 8 years bob himler. Well, inner loop beltway from one 23 heavy and slow to the American legion bridge heaviest after that from river road to T 70 own loop still slows headed south from two 70 across the legion bridge. And beltway does slow on the outer loop from old Georgetown road, in fact, getting to the G 70 spirit to merge with a spur. In a loop through Bethesda Silver Spring getting a bit better, outer loop slows western 95 over to New Hampshire avenue and inner loop through college park and green belt and outer loop from Android is often on a green bell still some volume there in the district. Northbound, D.C. two 95 heavy and slow from Pennsylvania avenue did have an incident in the roadway reported near eastern avenue, southbound, it's just heavy and so from burrows to east capital street and I two 95 just briefed delays now. But three 95 south out of the tunnel just volume delays out to the 14th street bridge in Virginia. Southbound from The Pentagon, very slow to a point before glee road, not sure if there's an incident in the roadway or just volume. After that though, you're slow from lording over the aqua Quan and northbound traffic is very slow out of Fredericksburg one stopped in the roadway before X and one 36 centerport Parkway. That is still blocking the right lane. And 66 is going all right for the most part. Bob and the WTO traffic. My extent of it, it's a nice afternoon for the most part, at least temperature wise, but we're still watching the cherry blossoms here later this weekend. Yeah, I believe there's going to be a

"8 years" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

04:05 min | 6 months ago

"8 years" Discussed on WTOP

"That's where they're going to play Kansas in March Madness in just a couple of days. It is the first time since 1992 that Howard will be in the NCAA tournament. The message from the crowd here was goodbye, good luck, and we're proud of you. As Howard University's team got on a bus and drove away. Steve settle is a small forward on the team. I expected to be a little bit nervous, but you know, once they took the ball up, it's basketball at that point. I've been playing basketball my whole life, so I was the whole team, so, you know, we just gonna keep trusting ourselves. The team's head coach, Kenny blakeney. That's just a special moment for those guys, and I know that they really appreciate this. And they're wild and play for the DMV for Howard University. We have a long legacy of greatness. And I know our players will represent that greatness. At Howard University Nikon LAW TLP news. 8 46, some rock legends are getting sued. They're accused of ripping off another artist. The Rolling Stones Mick Jagger and Keith Richards are headed to court for copyright infringement. Singer songwriter Sergio Fernández, who goes by angel slang, claims the rockers stole elements from his songs. Here's angel slang. And here's the stone song living in a ghost town. Living in a boat town The Rolling Stones released the tract during COVID lockdowns in 2020. It was their first piece of original music in 8 years. The band hasn't responded to the lawsuit. Monica ricks, CBS News. Now the top stories were working on a WTO, a highly anticipated report on sexual abuse by Maryland priests in the Baltimore archdiocese may be released soon there will be redactions. The latest close call between passenger airplanes happened at one of our three major airports, the FAA says it's investigating. Keep it here for full details on these stories in the minutes ahead on WTO. Hey there, it's Luke Garrett with WTO's DMV download podcast. Have you heard of trank? Or what about zombie drug? It's medical name is xylazine, and it's showing up in Maryland's illicit opiate drug supply. This drug was made to put animals to sleep. But when combined with an opiate, it can cause flesh, decaying wounds, tune in to the latest episode of the DMV download podcast to hear how the state of Maryland is combating this emerging drug. We'll see you there. 8 48. Traffic and weather on the H and when it breaks on WTO be going to bob imler in the traffic center. And Virginia on king street westbound west of three 95 and just before you get to beauregard near Hampton road, there is a Hampton driver. I should say, listener says a tree is down blocking the westbound lanes of route 7. Nobody's getting by headed toward Walter Reed and beauregard on westbound route 7. He's found traffic is getting by, but you may have a lane blocked on the left side there. Three 95 and 95, each running without delay, we're in pretty good shape on 66 in both directions. And in Maryland, things are pretty quiet up and down both 95 of the Baltimore Washington Parkway. I think they've got the workshop set up now though on the Baltimore Washington Parkway northbound at one 95 and getting my single file to the right. On 95 lanes are open. We're a good shape on two 70 and at last report on Castro mill road, that is still closed both ways north of Avery road, and that because a wire's down from an earlier crash, traffic there, having to turn around. Be ready for any weather with crop Metcalfe's $99 heating and cooling check. One 800 go crop or crop Metcalf dot com. Crop Metcalf, home of the 5 star technician, bob in the WTO traffic. Storm team four, four day forecast. Let's go to Amelia Draper. Clear and cold tonight with Lowe's in the 20s to low 30s and strong gusty winds, a wind advisory is in effect through the evening and early overnight hours expiring at 2 a.m.. Blustery winds tomorrow with plenty of sunshine, but we are warmer than today, highs in the low to mid 50s. We continue to warm on Thursday, highs in the low to mid 60s and with lighter winds and plenty of sun, Thursdays looking like the best day out of the workweek with rain arriving later in the day on Friday. I'm stumped in four meteorologist stimuli Draper. Right now, Tyson's 36

"8 years" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

06:02 min | 7 months ago

"8 years" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"In the same way that the Ukrainians are we might. And so there really is that in itself is no deterrent to making these small and tiny and very costly in terms of human life gains. Let's move on to the story which is dominating a lot of the papers here in the United Kingdom and is making headlines around the world as well. Nicholas sturgeon, a perpetual thorn in the side of Westminster. Leader of the Scottish national party, champion of independence or hoping for an independent Scotland, has effectively yesterday thrown in the towel. Yes, and there's no doubt about it. Whatever way you look at her politics, she is an absolute Titan of British and Scottish politics. I mean, she has dominated Scotland. She has made the S&P are the most popular party in Scotland for so long. And came quite close to leading it to independence, but not close enough, and really that's at the very heart of this. And she announces her resignation quite surprisingly, but not after there has been a lot of pressure on sturgeon to go. There's been a lot of infighting, a lot of leaking against her. So we knew this was coming to a head. That it would come to a head yesterday morning at the time she announced her departure. No, nobody was necessarily expecting that yesterday. And she herself was very emotional. She announces her retirement. And I have to say, full credit to her, she has left with the self awareness that she says she is no longer the person that can lead Scotland to independence. And acknowledges that she herself had become a very polarizing figure. Now, I brought to picked out the telegraph's copy today on this story because they have gone for the most politically charged lead here, which is that they believe she's being brought down over quote her radical approach to transgender rights end quote. And this refers to the law that since been vetoed by Westminster. But that would have allowed 16 year olds to self identify on their gender without consulting a doctor. Now, that, of course, has caused there's a huge furious route about this, obviously, in the public. And now party sources in the S&P have told the telegraph, they expect this to be dropped like a hot potato. Get it off the front pages and move on. So we'll see whether that is actually the reason, but I do feel like that might be the straw rather than the load on the camel's back. The load had been coming for some time. Absolutely. And this is what she said. I mean, the description of how political life in the last ten years has become brutal. Born out, you go for the telegraph, the bit that I've spotted up with CNN highlighted. The fact that one of the most, the Nicholas sturgeon was involved in one of the world's most entertaining political feuds, namely between her and Donald Trump. She said goodbye and then Donald Trump said, good riddance to a leader who's a failed woke extremist and a crazed leftist ridiculing her over a controversy of a transgendered rights law that you just spoken about. She had called, but he'd made Trump cheerio with a vernacular equivalent of good riddance, don't hasty back when he was when he left office. And it was all to do with a row over a golf course, wasn't it? Do you think it's something to do with him being redheads? I have no idea. Very fiery gingers. That was it. But I think this is the fact that he was trying to block the construction of a wind farm that was supposed to be near the coast of his golfing of his golfing resort. It's one of those arguments that she, it's a departure of a very, very strong leader that's for sure. Oh, and it could be really the end of an era. And who knows what this means for the S&P? I mean, the S&P for so many people has been Nicola Sturgeon. It also suggests that this has been written as well in the last 24 hours that Nicola Sturgeon in her in her singular adherence to issues such as end of Scottish independence. She belongs arguably to a part of political history in Britain which is perhaps becoming just that history in so far as the polemicist, the firebrands, the single issue, the Boris johnsons of this world who would thump a tub at any cost. And there's been a suggestion that perhaps and many would say, welcome, British politics might be cooling down a little. Moderation is back in fashion. Possibly. I am in dare I say it. And for someone who covers it quite closely, what would you say? Look, I do think I do think we're seeing more moderates come back into power. You're seeing that obviously in the United States, where Biden has calmed things. You're seeing that in Australia as well, where labels selected and it's running a much more centrist government. I think it's definitely seeing that in Rishi sunak who is embraced boredom. And it's no bad thing. Really, it's no bad thing. I think we as a public and certainly we in the media have become very, very used and perhaps addicted to the chaos of the last decade. And that is a destructive thing, I think, and we've got to be, I mean, sometimes I pine for those days of the 90s where I grew up thinking gosh the world's a bit boring and I'm going to be a journalist. Roll on 20 years later and here we are. Latika brook ready to have a good night's sleep. I hope rather a few years of turmoil. Thank you so much for joining us. You are the globalist. UBS has over 900 investment analysts from over 100 different countries. Over 900 of the sharpest minds and freshest thinkers in the world of finance today. To find out how we can help you. Contact us at UBS dot com. Let's talk business now with Helen Morrissey, senior

Nicholas sturgeon Scotland Westminster S Scottish national party Donald Trump Trump cheerio Nicola Sturgeon United Kingdom Boris johnsons CNN Rishi sunak golf Britain Biden Latika brook Australia United States UBS Helen Morrissey
"8 years" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"8 years" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"That the three pulled over in the car to eat some food when shots were fired that penetrated their vehicle Kemper said a 20 year old woman in the driver's seat was taken to the hospital and is expected to recover An 8 year old girl in the backseat was unhurt New York City mayor Eric Adams also at the news conference stressed the importance of getting guns off the streets The question I continue to ask what about the innocent people What about people that send in their cars in this shot to kill We are so much about those who are fighting but when are we going to start fighting for the innocent people of this city Mayor Adams says we need everyone to help us end this senseless violence New Jersey governor Phil Murphy has tested positive for COVID-19 and will isolate for 5 days a spokesperson says Murphy is asymptomatic and feeling well but will cancel all events for now Most New Yorkers who worked from home during the pandemic plan to cut their time in the office by nearly half and spend less money in the city annually According to Stanford economics professor Nicholas bloom the average New York City office worker would slash annual spending in the city by more than $6700 down from an estimated 12,500 before the pandemic at the conference of the Federal Reserve bank of New York bloom said the remote work push could cost New York between 5 and 10% of its city center population Global news 24 hours a day on air and on Bloomberg quicktake powered by more than 2700 journalists and analysts and more than a 120 countries Michael Barr this is Bloomberg naked All right Michael thank.

Eric Adams Mayor Adams Phil Murphy COVID Kemper New York City Nicholas bloom New Jersey Murphy Stanford Federal Reserve bank of New Yo bloom Bloomberg New York Michael Barr Michael
"8 years" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

Book Club with Julia and Victoria

03:28 min | 2 years ago

"8 years" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

"We're gonna come back to it. 'cause was barely scratched What is bringing joy. Okay so if you follow us on instagram you might have learned. I accidentally ordered a five pound bags carries. It's bigger than you think Huge like you know you're like okay. They're not baby carrots. The normal yet. Just the ground carrots usually when you buy those you buy like probably a pound half pound you get like a nice cute little bag with like six of them above five pounds games. Because i ordered my groceries and didn't pay attention to the weight anyways. So thank you to all of our instagram france. You've sent me recipes and ideas of how to use them. We are slowly whittling down. Our supply particularly excited about the carrot cake muffins cupcakes question-mark from chelsea shared harass. Be literally Written on a note card which is adorable. I don't know where she founded. Originally i would cite it but thank you chelsea delicious and i also appreciate. I did not contribute to the making of these head. I have eaten them and their great. Yes my other. We've got a new board game in the house. Yes called wingspan Game it's about birds. It's so great falls very delightful bird-watching collecting birds in eggs. And you've to feed them. It's so the board is like a little like ford thought worthy naga fers notebook journal scraped. Okay i have learned to play the ukulele. That is just this week. I subscribed to kiko over the winter and built the ukulele and then it was extremely out of tune for a very long time. And i had to wait for the strings to like stretch out a little bit to. It's just been sitting on various chairs throughout the house. Out of waiting for me to pick it up and this week i finally did and i learned some chords and i learned a song. And i've been practicing. And i'm getting my little calluses which i haven't had since middle school when i played the cello and i'm very excited and then also when i was finding my notes for this book because i read this way back early pandemic i was looking through all my journals. For last summer and it was bleak friends it was extremely bleak and remember twenty twenty. It was quietly. It was so dark. And i had the sense of lake. Pride and gratitude for myself for like working through that day at a time and taking care of myself and like relying on my resources you know getting to where i am now mentally and emotionally and health wise like so much has changed and it kind of boggles my mind and i just wanted to leave a little encouraging vibes for everyone that like you come really long way and you've lived through lake one of the hardest years in human history and you're still here.

five pound last summer six instagram a pound chelsea this week france wingspan Game one five pounds half pound twenty twenty naga fers the hardest years kiko Huge
"8 years" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

Book Club with Julia and Victoria

03:10 min | 2 years ago

"8 years" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

"It's like easily half the third would would just the last three essays. Yeah more than half the bugs lawsuit essays in this blog in additional. Yeah woo okay. We're gonna talk a lot more in depth about the case for operations we will not give it. Its due with what it deserves in this podcast that we are recording right. Now this episode. This episode i read on so many quotes the thing. That's really jarring. I think is how high up it goes like when it comes to housing or la bank loans or policing or anything like how. It's all the way in the very top in the federal government that by people are systemically excluded. It's not just chicago. He uses chicago as a starting point. you learn a lot about chicago in this book which i really appreciated since we live here. But that's sort of a case study in may maybe the most one of the most extreme examples but like he has this line the fha so it's a federal housing administration administration adopted a racial policy. That could well have been cold from the nuremberg laws. That is a direct quote that chilled me to my bombs and the fact that there is a an escaped slave clause in the constitution in the constitution in the cops. Like they're everywhere. You know what i mean like. If you want to train dig it out of our political system you gotta dig all the way to the foundation in one thing. I think up in the civil war essay as well as in this one like how. How long time is which is such a weird phrase to say but when we think about oh it's been one hundred fifty hundred sixty years since the civil war really. That's not very long at all. No and to think that the first slaves from africa were brought to the continent like to fifty years before that before the war end to think. We're only sixty years from the civil rights movement. Like all these timeframes where we like we the way we were taught history. The way we digest issues where we talk about our own narrative as americans. It seems like those are so far away it is so distant does not have you know things are different now. It's not that way anymore and changes have happened but to say that everything's all right in good. Oh enough time has passed like bridge like no. It hasn't been that long and to see it wasn't just like oh these things are freed in then we refine the now. We still had some problems that we dealt with later it was like a hundred years of continued oppression in so many ways in being told like no..

africa sixty years chicago first one thing half one civil rights movement one hundred hundred sixty years more than half the bugs hundred years civil war fifty years three essays third fifty americans
"8 years" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

Book Club with Julia and Victoria

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"8 years" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

"Am i doing my job. You know and he has this kind of crisis like is it. Is it working or am. I failing like i tell you know wrestling with that. Like pride of like wow. I'm being recognized for rain. Work is finally paying off but also what does that mean. what am i saying it right. He also has issues because he's considered a public intellectual now so he's like cold upon all the time to comment on anything to do with race. You have to ask tana us. He goes his opinion. And he's like. I'm just you can do your own research you know. This was just a project for me and all of a sudden everyone's listening and there's this fear of like are we reading the same thing. Are we seeing the same information. And if we are than white person sees that information what story are they telling themselves And because there is their narrative is the one that's ultimately going to be the one that gets used in public policy in government in daily life not daily life but like dominant culture so anyway yes fear of a block. President is in somebody like a feature piece on obama Specifically what his presidency looks like after the murder of trayvon martin and how he kind of with the first line the irony of president. Barack obama is best captured in his comments. On the death of trayvon martin in the ensuing fray. He writes how the world i responded to trayvon martin's death and then as soon as frock obama said something about it then it became like something. Totally different million seems whatsoever. He uses uncontroversial at first. And then when obama says. Like if if i had a son he looked like trayvon at. It's almost in a way as white americans realized the president was black Yeah it is kind of an exploration of what could have black president be an until we had one there was like not even really compensation like he talks. How is a joke. In a lot of ways it was seen as would maybe never happened in the did and he also kind of ways the nuance of having a black president. But then it's like again this. He has to be twice as good narrative around everything. Obama does where an especially in light after the fact was trump when there's so many things that trump doesn't like why was he there for as long as he was elected. We questioned those things. But it's like well we know why because he's white and he can do those things but this is the answer he first starts will not i but dives more deeply into exploring what having a black president. What kind of american style. Themselves with a black president whether they're white americans or Americans like how they perceive the president of the united states. yeah and like just by him. Existing is a black man in the white house every single decision he made. Every he took was racialized In a way that if white managed said it would have been considered objective. Words just the right thing to do but suddenly it's about race. I the sentence that kind of summed it up for me was m thus the myth of twice as good that makes barack obama possible also smothers him and then we get into the meat and potatoes of this book..

trump Obama trayvon martin Barack obama obama twice frock first line american white trayvon every single decision many things one million Americans barack obama first black united
"8 years" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

Book Club with Julia and Victoria

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"8 years" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

"What does the store you till matter if the world is set upon hearing a different one and this made me think a lot because we talk a lot of this podcast on the stories we tell ourselves and how important is that. We kind of allies. What we're taking in and then also kind of almost like the therapeutic way that we can tell ourselves narratives about ourself our world our history But then there's this layer of privilege to those conversations. Because whether i don't know it one is because we're small and mostly anonymous to the world. You know like the stories we tell ourselves there isn't like an onslaught of people telling something differently next to us as individuals but then also this white privilege that we can continue to taller selves. The stories that we want to and the majority of the world is going to say okay cool. The majority doesn't look at us and throw other stories on us. Or lets you save the story. But then like disregarded completely. I i love. That's about that. Yeah you start to see the tragedy as he gets bigger he starts to kind of question like what am i actually doing now. My accomplishing anything. And the most important thing for him is clearly. Like i have to do this for myself. And but once people start paying attention you see this in notes from the sixth year where he asks himself like. Why do white people like what i write. He has some guys on the subway. Two white men on the subway like tell him that they really liked his essay on case for rations and on one level. He's just like i am a writer. You're not supposed to address me. A public is invisible. I live in my words. So i don't look at my face but he also has his level of like the goal of rating is to completely unravel everything you ever thought you knew about who you are as a white person and your country and you like it..

sixth year one level Two white men subway